DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Page Updated:- Saturday, 23 October, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1832-

New Flying Horse

Open 2020+

Upper Bridge Street

Wye

01233 812297

https://www.newflyinghorsewye.co.uk/

https://whatpub.com/new-flying-horse

New Flying Horse 1920

Above photo, circa 1920, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

New Flying Horse

Above photo, date unknown, from Tel Terry.

OS map 1896

Above map form the O.S 1896.

New Flying Horse 1974

Above photo, circa 1974, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

New Flying Horse inside 1974

Above photo, circa 1974, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

New Flying Horse restaurant 1974

Above photo, circa 1974, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

New Flying Horse garden 1974

Above photo, circa 1974, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

New Flying Horse 2011

Above photo 2011 by Oast House Archive Creative Commons Licence.

New Flying Horse sign 2013New Flying Horse sign 2020

Above sign left, 2013. Sign right, 2020, kindly taken and sent by Roger Pester.

Above photo showing cottage The Chelsea Pensioner" in the grounds, August 2017.

New Flying Horse sign 2017

Above sign "The Chelsea Pensioner", 2017.

New Flying Horse 2018

Above photo March 2018 kindly taken and sent by Rory Kehoe.

 

Kentish Gazette, 3 June 1851.

DEATH.

Tucker:— May 28, at Wye, Susan, the wife of Mr. Richard Tucker, of the "Flying Horse Inn," aged 59 years.

 

Maidstone Telegraph, Rochester and Chatham Gazette, Saturday 21st July 1860.

From the Kentish Chronicle, 28 July, 1860.

WYE SUICIDE OF A CHILD.

On Friday T. T. Delasaux, Esq., coroner, held an inquest at the "New Flying Horse Inn," in this parish, touching the death of a little girl named Ellen Jordan, ten years of age, the daughter of a labouring man and woman, who committed suicide by taking poison on the previous evening.

Sarah Jordan, the mother of the deceased, deposed, that at seven o’clock in the morning of Thursday, she left home for the purpose of going to work. At twelve o’clock the returned, and at one o'clock she again left for the same purpose, leaving the deceased and two other children at home. She desired the former to get the kettle to boil, and to be prepared to feed the baby, but which she neglected to do. Witness returned home at seven in the evening, and when she saw the deceased, she struck her twice across the shoulder because she had not obeyed her orders. The deceased then went upstairs and fetched a loaf, and when she came down she drank some cold water. She then complained of being ill and lay down saying. "Oh, mother, I am dying—I have taken some poison." Witness asked the deceased where she got the poison from, and she replied from off her father’s bed. When the deceased came down stairs, she added, "I shall soon be out of any one's way. Deceased was perfectly well when witness returned home.

Mr. Henry Stubbs, assistant surgeon, deposed that he attended on the deceased the previous evening, and found her in a very dangerous stale, consequent taking poison similar to that produced, called "Vermin destroyer." He gave an emetic, but which had no effect, and she died between eight and nine the same evening, from the effects of poison.

Verdict, "temporary insanity."

 

Kentish Gazette, Tuesday 7 February 1865.

Wilful Damage and Assault on a Policeman.

William Punyer and Henry Hayward, two notoriously unruly characters, belonging to Wye, were charged with wilfully burning a set of pins called "jenny pins" value 4s. 6d. It appeared that the prisoners came into the "New Flying Horse Inn," Wye, on the previous day, and because there was not quite enough fire to suit them they put the pins on the fire, and afterwards kicked up a tremendous row, and the landlord sent for a policeman.

Punyer was then charged with assaulting P.C. William Hickmott. It appeared that after the prisoner was apprehended he ran away, and scrambled over a high quick set hedge. When the constable caught him the prisoner knocked him down and then kicked him, and a severe struggle took place between them in a field for nearly half an hour, until assistance came to the constable.

The prisoner alleged that Hickmott struck him with his staff because he would not have the handcuffs on, and pointed to his face, which was terribly knocked about, and he said his person was all over kicks as well.

The constable also had the marks of ill-treatment; but he alleged the prisoner's face was damaged in his scramble over the hedge.

Both the prisoners received very bad characters, especially Punyer, who, it was stated, had been sent to prison five times for poaching and felony, combined with violence.

For the wilful damage both prisoners were sent to prison for one month, with hard labour; and Punyer was farther committed for two months with hard labour, at the expiration of the former sentence, in default of paying a fine of 5, for the assault on the constable.

 

From the Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald, Saturday 13 September 1879.

WYE. SAD ACCIDENT FROM A DRAYMAN.

A fatal accident occurred on the Downs, on Tuesday week, to Allen Hepden a drayman, of Ashford, in the employ of Messrs. Shepherd and Neame, brewers. No one actually saw the sad occurrence, but a short time before, about five o’clock, the Tuesday passed Mr. White of Elmsted, riding on a two wheel dray at the top of the hill, along the road leading from Hastingleigh to Wye. The horse was going very fast, Mr. White said, and the deceased appeared to be trying to hold it in. Those who had seen the dray previous to this say it was proceeding at an ordinary rate. It seems that, after passing the brow of the hill. Hepden drew into the side of the road to check the speed of the vehicle, when one of the wheels struck against a large stone in the bank, violently pitching him out head first and all the barrels after him. Death must have been instantaneous. The horse with the empty dray then proceeded at such a rate down the long descent into Wye that Mr. Edward Hills, of Elmsted, who was driving up, narrowly escaped collusion with it. Mr. Hills found Hepden lying on his face at the side of the road, with two empty barrels on him. The police were communicated with and the body removed to the "New Flying Horse Inn," at Wye. An inquest was held on Wednesday by Mr. Coroner Delasaux, with Mr. R Mills as foreman, when evidence to the above effect was given. Mr. Manning, surgeon, stated that the external injuries to deceased were a wound above and another below the right eye, and an injury to the nose, and that death had resulted from concussion of the brain. A verdict of accidental death was returned. The poor fellow, who was 42 years of age, leaves a widow and three children, two of whom are grown up.

 

From the 1886 death register.

PACKMAN William, 30 July 1886.

Administration of the personal Estate of William Packman, late of Wye in the County of Kent, Licensed Victualler, who died 26 May 1886, at Wye, was granted at Canterbury, to Jane Ann Packman of Wye, Widow the Relict. Personal Estate 135.

I am informed by his Great Grandson, Brian O'Connor, that his death was caused after he was bitten by a horse and he contracted tetanus, it is also said that the family were plunged into poverty and had to scatter.

 

During the Covid 19 lockdown of 2020 this pub was offering a takeaway service at their in-house Burger Kitchen.

 

LICENSEE LIST

COOK Thomas 1832+ Pigot's Directory 1832-34

TUCKER Richard 1851+ (age 58 in 1851Census)

DRYLAND J 1855+

KENNETT James 1858+

KENNETT James & John 1861-62+ (James age 42 in 1861Census)

LAW John 1871-82+ (age 67 in 1881Census)

THORPE Thomas 1891

DRYLAND John 1891-13+ (age 66 in 1911Census) Kelly's 1903

HOWLAND George T 1918-30+

WOOD Victor J 1933-47 Next pub licensee had

https://pubwiki.co.uk/NewFlyingHorse.shtml

 

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

CensusCensus

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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