DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Chatham, August, 2019.

Page Updated:- Friday, 09 August, 2019.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1793-

White Hart

Latest ????

262 High Street / Rhode Street

Chatham

White Hart 1930s

Above photo circa 1930, kindly supplied by Tony Smith.

White Hart 2015

Above photo 2015 by Darkstar.

 

The pub was situated at the corner of Rhode Street. In the 1874 directory and before the address was 237, but in 1881 it was addresses as number 3.

I also have reference to a "New White Hart" also in the High Street, and also an "Old White Hart" at 31 Brook Street, but as yet don't know the connection between them.

 

From the Maidstone Telegraph, Rochester and Chatham Gazette, Saturday 10 March, 1860. Price 1d.

KENT QUARTER SESSIONS

Henry Baker, a lad, for stealing at Bromley, on the 5th Jan., a coat, 10 handkerchiefs, 7 scarves, 2 shirts, several neck ties, and other articles, value 40s., the property of Samuel Porter.

Mr. Russell for the prosecution. Mr. Biron for the defence.

Joseph Jessup, shop-boy to Mr. Porter, said his master had some woollen scarves in stock shortly before Christmas. The prisoner had been in the habit of coming to the shop. He used to come about half-past eight in the morning. Sometimes he used to sit on a box, near the window and near the goods. He used to stay and chat about a quarter of an hour. Witness sometimes had occasion to leave the shop. On Wednesday, after Christmas, witness asked prisoner whether he had got the servant's handkerchief. He gave witness her handkerchief to take down to her, and told witness to ask if she had his handkerchief. He then requested him to go down again; he did so. Witness was away from shop the first time about ten minutes, and only a few minutes the second. The scarves were missing just before Christmas. None of them had been sold to the prisoner. Shortly before Christmas his master had some great coats in stock also. No coats had been sold to the prisoner. Witness was generally in the shop, but not always.

By Mr. Byron:- The prisoner was a friend of his and used occasionally to come into the shop to chat with witness. He (witness) was only shop-boy. When he first went to the shop the prisoner used to purchase articles, but had not purchased any to his knowledge during the last twelve months.

Re-examined:- There were two doors to the shop, which he used to fasten when he left.

Francis Brooker, the wife of James Brooker, of the “White Hart Inn,” Bromley, said the prisoner had been lodging at her grandmother's, and also slept in her house on the sofa occasionally. He had a small box at her house and a larger one at her grandmother's. About a fortnight before Christmas the prisoner brought to her 3 scarves, and 4 silk pocket handkerchiefs, and asked her to sell them for him, saying he was out of a situation, and wanted to get to London. She sold the scarves, there were 7 in all, and gave the money to the prisoner. There were two in a piece that had not been cut. She sold 3 to Mrs. Ellis, at 1s. each, and 2 more to Mrs. Boorman, and left with that person 2 other scarf's, and 2 silk handkerchiefs, for her to sell. The articles were sold and the prisoner received the money. A short time after this Mr. Porter came to her, and in consequence of what he told her she looked in the prisoner's box and found 6 neckerchiefs there.

Jane Boorman, deposed to purchasing 2 scarf's from Mrs. Brooker, and said, that person gave her 2 silk handkerchiefs to sell, she sold them to Mrs. Brister for 2s. each, and sent the money to the prisoner.

Alfred Boorman, a little boy, stated that Mrs. Brooker gave him some handkerchiefs and scarf's to sell. He sold 2 scarf's to Mr. Mitchell foe 1s. 6d., and 2 to Mr. Batchelor for 2s., and took the money to Henry Baker (the prisoner).

Thomas King, a police sergeant at Bromley, said he apprehended the prisoner at his mothers house, and on searching his box he found it in a great coat and two cotton shirts, (produced). When at the police station, he took from the prisoner a new vest and scarf, which he was wearing. The remainder of the articles witness obtained from the above named parties. Most of the articles were identified by the prosecutor as his property, and the prisoner was found guilty and sentenced to 6 months' hard labour.

 

Maidstone Telegraph, Rochester and Chatham Gazette, Saturday 4th August 1860.

Robbery from the person at Chatham.

George Matthew Milton, 22, and George Walter Bartlett, 20, soldiers, were charged with having stolen certain money from John Oriel, with violence, at Chatham, on 16th April.

Mr. Lily was for the prosecution, and Mr. Ripton appeared for the prisoner Milton.

The prosecutor said that in April last he was a corporal in the 23rd Regiment at Chatham. On the evening of the 16th of that month he was in a cottage at the back of the "White Hart" public house. While there, three soldiers came into the room; one of them he recognised as the prisoner Milton. Two of them immediately rushed upon him, when Milton put his hand over his mouth, and rifled his pockets. He had a struggle with Milton for his purse, which contains three sovereigns and a small Indian coin. Milton ultimately got possession of it, and all of the men then ran away; Milton, before leaving, striking prosecutor a blow in his face. He, however, ran after the men, and followed them into the "White Swan," and through the house into the back of the premises where he lost sight of them.

Three soldiers were called, who was sitting in the tap-room of the "White Swan" when the three men ran through, two of whom spoke to Milton as being one of them, and one to the prisoner Bartlett.

Two witnesses, also soldiers, who called on behalf of Milton, who distinctly swore that they were drinking with him at another house at the time the prosecutor stated of the robbery to have been committed, and one witness gave similar evidence for the prisoner Bartlett.

The jury acquitted the prisoners.

 

LICENSEE LIST

HINKLEY Thomas 1793+ Trade Directory 1793

CLIFFE James 1828+ Pigot's Directory 1828-29

MUNNS J 1828+ Pigot's Directory 1828-29

LEADBITTER James 1832-38+ Pigot's Directory 1832-34Wright's Topography 1838

BENNETT James 1858+

BROOKER James 1860+ Maidstone Telegraph

BENNETT J W 1862+

BENSTER Thomas 1871-74+ (age 50 in 1871Census)

BENNETT James 1879+

SHARP Christopher 1881+ (widower age 45 in 1881Census)

BARRICOTT William J 1891+ (age 44 in 1891Census)

WENMAN Richard William Henry 1882+

BARNICOTT William J 1891+ (age 44 in 1891Census)

CLOAK Alfred 1901-03+ (age 48 in 1901Census)

BAKER Caleb 1913+

BELCHER Charles A 1922+

DENYER Herbert F 1930-38+

BRETT M E 1953

http://pubshistory.com/WhiteHart.shtml

http://www.closedpubs.co.uk/whitehart.html

 

Trade Directory 1793Universal British Directory of Trade 1793

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-29

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

Wright's Topography 1838Wright's Topography 1838

Maidstone TelegraphMaidstone Telegraph

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

TOP Valid CSS Valid XTHML