DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Whitstable, July, 2021.

Page Updated:- Monday, 26 July, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1864-

Jolly Sailor

Latest 1864+

(Name to)

High Street

Whitstable

 

I have only found the one instance of this pub at present from a report in the Kentish Chronicle of 1864.

There is another "Jolly Sailor" situated at nearby Seasalter, but I believe this to not be that pub as the licensee is a different person for this year. Less he was just lodging there.

I believe this pub changed name around 1864 to the "Prince of Wales" to honour his wedding in 1863. Although further dates of licensees doesn't seem to make this assumption correct.

More research required for this one.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle, 25 April, 1863.

A NARROW ESCAPE FROM FIRE.

On Sunday morning last, about one o'clock, the police perceived a strong smell of fire at the “Jolly Sailor” beer-house, Whitstable. They immediately aroused the inmates, when it was ascertained that a fire had broken out in one of the bed-rooms occupied by some navvies. It appeared that one of the men went to bed later than the others, and had inadvertently placed the candle between two beds, and left it alight when he fell asleep, and it is supposed that his clothes caught fire. Had it not been for the timely arrival of the police, it is very probable there would have been an extensive fire, as the house is closely connected with premised occupied by Mr, J. Gann, containing oils, turpentine, powder. &c.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle, 13 February, 1864.

OFFENCE AGAINST THE BEERHOUSE ACT.

Saturday last Edward Jackson, landlord of the “Jolly Sailor” beer-house, Whitstable, was summoned to answer a charge of having kept his house open for the sale of liquors during prohibited hours on the Sabbath. The defendant did not appear.

P.C. Bates stated that he entered the defendant's house at twelve o'clock the morning of Sunday, and found several persons drinking therein. He had previously had occasion to caution the defendant on the same matter.

Fined 10s. costs 9s.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle, 12 March, 1864.

ST. AUGUSTINE’S PETTY SESSIONS. BEERHOUSE OFFENCE.

A man named Knowler was charged with refusing to admit Police Instructor Bates into the “Jolly Sailor” beer-house, at Whitstable, at 25 minutes past 4 o'clock p.m. on Sunday, the 21st. ultimo. A man named Edward Jackson is licensed to keep the beer-house, but about three weeks ago he was fined for having people drinking in his house on a Sunday morning. He absconded, and his sister, who advanced him the money to open the house, afterwards put the defendant Knowler in to carry on the business.

Bates, the constable, said that on the day in question he went to the beer-house and knocked at the door, which was closed. He heard people talking in the house, and directly the defendant looked out of the window from behind the blind. He then heard people being let out of the house by the back door, and after being kept waiting fully four minutes he was admitted. When he got into the house there were four men there, one of whom swore at him and said he would “pull his nose out of his face if he reported the case.” The men had nothing to drink when he saw them. The magistrates fined the defendant 1 and 10s. costs.

 

LICENSEE LIST

JACKSON Edward to Feb/1864+ Kentish Gazette

KNOWLER Mr Feb/1864+

 

Kentish GazetteKentish Gazette

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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