DOVER KENT ARCHIVES
PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Barry Smith and Paul Skelton

Earliest 1839

Apollonian Hotel

Latest 1929

50-52 Snargate Street/Northampton Street

Apollonian Hall 1920

Above photo circa 1920s taken from the John Gilham collection.

The Apollonian Hall

The picture above, is of the old East Kent Brewery's Apollonian Hall and pub house which was an extremely popular feature of Snargate Street before the widening of the late 1920s and early 1930s.

Apollonian Hall

Above photo kindly sent to me from Glenn Hatfield.

 

"The Apollonian Hall and Tavern" built in 1839, was on the corner of Snargate Street at number 51, on the same side as the "Royal Hippodrome" and stood opposite Charles Clout. The hall itself, was a public hall, established about 1846 by Mr Henry Stone. It measured only 54 by 36 feet. It included a gallery but seated only eighty people. The Apollonian Hall and the Wellington Hall, further up the street, were the regular places for holding political meetings, concerts and lectures until the Connaught Hall at town hall was built at the Maison Dieu in 1883.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, Saturday 22 February, 1840. Price 5d.

DOVER CATCH CLUB

The meeting on Thursday evening, at the "Apollonian Hall," was attended by nearly 200 members and visitors. The performances in the orchestra, both vocal and instrumental, went off with great eclat, and Mr. J. Southbridge was most deservedly encored in the song of "the Standard of England." Mr. J. Knight sang some of his popular comic songs which elicited unbounded applause. The chair was, as usual, admirably filled by Mr. J. Birmingham, supported by Messrs. Rich and Dickson.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, Saturday 4 January, 1845. Price 5d.

NEW YEAR'S BALL

The annual ball took place at Stone's Apollonian Hall on Tuesday evening, which was attended by nearly 250 fashionables, including several of our county families. Mount's celebration band was in attendance; to whose enlivening strains the fashionable Polka was danced several times during the evening. Among those present were - the Officers of the garrison at Dover; Lord William Paulet and the Officers of the 68th, from Deal; Major Pipon and the Officers of the 1st Dragoon Guards, from Canterbury; Mr. and Mrs. Edward Royd Rice and family, Dane Court; Mr. and Mrs. Hammond, St. Alban's Court; Rev. C. H. Hallet and family, Higham; Rev. K and Mrs. Bayley, Acrise; the Misses Croft, Saltwood; Rev. Cholmondley Dering and Miss Dering; Mr. and Mrs. Brydges, Wootton Court; Hon. Mr. Law; Major Edwards and family; Sir T. and Lady Montresor and family; Mr. and Mrs. Lee Warner, Mrs. Adml. Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, Misses Bandwin, Mr. and Mrs. Minet, Mr. Jarvis, Capt. Parker, R.N., Sir T. Drake, Mr. and Miss. Hamilton, Miss Smith, Miss Matthews, Mrs. Dillon Hearn, Lady and Miss Knatchbull, &c. &c. The refreshments were provided by Mr. Stone most liberally, and in a manner which gave universal satisfaction.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, Saturday 8 March, 1845. Price 5d.

GENERAL TOM THUMB

This extraordinary little gentleman, who has excited so much interest in the metropolis, and every part of the kingdom, is about to hold his levees for two days only, at the "Apollonian Hall," Dover, as will be seen by our advertising columns, and the admission being only one shilling, will doubtless attract crowded audiences at each exhibition. At the conclusion of the levee on Wednesday evening, the General will appear at the Theatre, where he will go through his extraordinary stage performance.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, Saturday 15 March, 1845. Price 5d.

GENERAL TOM THUMB

The Dover public, who had only known by report of the extraordinary little fellow, have at last been gratified with a sight of the Prince of Lillyputians, who has honoured us with a visit during the week, and was exhibited at the "Apollonian" on Tuesday and Wednesday, attracting on each occasion immense throngs of spectators, all eager to glance at what seemed "passing strange," and who retired both delighted and astonished. Subsequently to his exhibition on the Wednesday the General paid a visit to the Theatre, and between the pieces figured on the boards in a variety of stage performances, much to the pleasure of an overflowing house. Particulars might be detailed relative to this "man in miniature," but the little gentleman's fame has so ling extended through our sea girt isles, that the effort could only be received as a tale oft told.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, Saturday 28 August, 1848.

Susannah Goodchild appeared on a charge of creating a disturbance at the "Apollonian Hall" at an early hour this morning. - Case dismissed.

 

 

The East Kent Brewery officiated but sometime after 1917. Jude Hanbury are evident.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports Advertiser, 6 January, 1849.

The New Year's ball at the "Apollonian Hall on Monday evening was numerously attended by the elite of the fashionables at present residing amongst us. Among those present may be mentioned - Sir George and Lady Gould, General and Mrs. Power, the Hon. Mrs. Fleming, Col. and Mrs. Barrington, Col. and Mrs. Cole, Lady Neale and Miss Rennoul, Mr. Green Wilkinson, Mr. and Mrs. Bendyshe, Mr. and Misses Bradger, Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey, Mr. and Mrs. Ingram, Mr. and Miss Godfrey Fitter, Mrs. Reynott, the Misses Dickens, Miss Cavendish, the Officer of the Garrison, &c. &c. Dancing was protracted to a late hour, and satisfaction was gratefully expressed at the arrangements made for the comfort of visitors.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports Advertiser, 28 August, 1849.

Susannah Goodchild appeared on a charge of creating a disturbance at the Apollonian Hall at an early hour this morning. - Case dismissed.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 5 December, 1863.

MR. AND MrS. GERMAN REED AND Mr. JOHN PARRY

These very clever and highly popular entertainers announce their appearance at the "Apollonian Hall" on Tuesday evening next. Their entertainment has long been par excellence the best of its class; and we believe "the Charming Cottage," and "Mrs. Roseleaf's Little Evening Party," - the first given by Mr. and Mrs. German Reed, and the other by Mr. Perry, - fully maintain this enviable yet well earned distinction.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 11 October, 1867.

THE BROUSIL FAMILY

This talented family of violinists gave their entertainment at the "Apollonian Hall" last evening, to a large and highly appreciative audience.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 6 September, 1867.

THE REGATTA PRIZES

William Spicer, a mariner, was charged with assaulting William Clark, another man of the same calling, on Wednesday evening.

The assault was rather a serious one, three other men being concerned with the defendant molesting the complainant. The matter arose out of the regatta proceedings. The complainant, it appeared, was the owner of the winning boat in the sailing match, and he had been to draw the money, when he was met by the defendant on coming out of the "Apollonian Hall." The defendant throttled him, and shouted, "What are you going to do with the money now, you _____." He returned to the "Apollonian Hall," and Mr. Stone permitted him to leave by the back part of the house; but on getting outside he was met upon by three other men of the same party and seriously assaulted.

In reply to the Magistrates the complainant said that out of the eight boats entered for the sailing match, the owners of seven agreed to share the whole of the money, irrespective of the winning boats. Witness had not entered into the compact; indeed he had never been spoken to on the subject till after the regatta; and he then declined to share his winnings with the rest. In consequence of this he was threatened by a number of the boatmen, the defendant among them, and this was the reason of his ill-treatment.

In cross-examination by Mr. Lewis the complainant declared that he was not a party to the agreement he had referred to.

Edward Thomas Artlett, corroborated the complainant's testimony.

John Castle was also examined as a witness on the complainant's behalf.

Mr. Lewis for the defendant, said that the defence was that the complainant had agreed to share with the rest of the men before the race, and that he afterwards wanted to get off his agreement when he found that his boat had carried off the first place. The practise of sharing prizes was a very common one with the boatmen, as it secured to all of them a good day's pay, while the spectators on shore were equally well amused.

Mr. Lewis called Joseph Potter, who swore that the owners of all the eight boats, including the complainant, agreed to share. He heard the complainant say that he should go "concerus" twice, and the last time he said if this was not agreed to she should not let his boat sail. On the afternoon of the regatta, on seeing the complainant after the race, witness said to him, "I s'pose things are all right, Bill," when the complainant turned his back and said he had not got time to talk. He was at the "Apollonian Hall" when the prizes were distributed and saw Spicer close to Clark, but no blows were struck. Witness entered Clark's boat.

William Ladd, another mariner, gave precisely the same evidence. The agreement is to go "concerus" was quite clear and distinct. All the owners of the other boats could swear it, and their testimony could be borne out by 200 witnesses. It was not till after the Regatta that Clark declined to go shares. Witness saw Spicer jump at Clark, when Clark came out  of the "Apollonian Hall," but no blows were struck. Witness considered that the complainant went out at the back of the "Apollonian Hall" because he was afraid to face the men he had enraged.

The magistrates dismissed the summons.

John Potter, William Spice, and Henry Irvine, the three men who were alleged to have assaulted the complainant in the last case also, were charged with assaulting Edward Thomas Artlett, a witness in the last case, who was concerned with Clark in sailing his boat.

Mr. Lewis appeared for the defendants.

The assault arose out of the circumstances already detailed. Several witnesses were examined on both sides, the evidence being of a very conflicting nature.

It appears that police-constable Baker was upon the spot, and he was therefore called by the Magistrates to speak to the facts. He heard one of the defendants ask complainant as he was going down the street if he meant to stick to his bargain, and the complainant said "No." He afterwards saw a mob in front of the "Apollonian Hall" and there was a scuffle, but he saw no blows struck.

Mr. Lewis addressed the Magistrates for the defendants, and the witnesses on defendants behalf having been examined.

The Bench considered the assault proved. Irvine would be fined 10s. and costs, and Potter and Spice 5s. 6d. and costs. In default, Irvine fourteen days' imprisonment, and Potter and Spicer seven days' each.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 5 March, 1869.

TO-NIGHT (FRIDAY), & To-morrow SATURDAY, MARCH 5th & 6th, 1869.

MR. H. BOX BROWN, from Richmond, U.S. America, the King of all Mesmerists, and Professor of Magic, will give his ENTERTAINMENTS at the above Rooms on Magic, Animal Magnetism, Mesmerism, Electro-Biology, and Phrenology, assisted by Madame Brown. Crowded Houses!! Crowded Houses everywhere.

Concluding with the Great AMERICAN TEA PARTY and the NJew York barber's shop. Mr. B will also introduce the American Electric Drum and Bell, with many other Feats in Magic, changing his Entertainments each night. Great present nights! Presents of every description! Magnificent sets of Electro-Silver Plate, Electro-Silver Drinking Cups, Tea Spoons, Splendid Sets of Papier Machè Tea Trays, Beautiful Writing Desks and Ladies' Work Boxes, Brooches, Rings, Scarf Pins, Sets of China, Albert-Chaics, and a variety of other articles too numerous to insert. Appropriate music will be in attendance. Stalls, 1s. 6d.; Unreserved Seats, 1s.; Body of the hall, 6d.; Gallery 3d. Doors open at Half Past 7, commence at 8 o'clock. carriages may be ordered for a quarter-past Ten o'clock.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 15 October, 1869. Price 1d.

DISORDERLY CONDUCT

Ellen Brown, a respectably dressed young woman, who said she was married, was charged with causing an obstruction of the footway in Snargate Street on the previous evening.

It appeared that there had been a ball at the "Apollonian Hall" on Friday night. the defendant with several other women congregated around the entrance to the hall, and caused an annoyance to those entering the place, and as the defendant refused to go away, Police-constable Bowles took her into custody.

The Magistrates dismissed her with a caution, on her paying 2s. for the hearing.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 26 August, 1870.

INTERRUPTING A PERFORMANCE

Leonard George, a young man of good address, who bowed politely to the Magistrates on being placed in the dock, was charged with being drunk and disorderly at the “Apollonian Hall” and interrupting the performance of the Christy Minstrels, on the previous evening.

It appeared that the defendant was a member of the troupe, who was not only unable to appear before the public in consequence of his intoxication; but who, by his proceedings, interrupted his confreres to such an extent as to stop the performance and render it necessary to give him into custody.

A member of the troupe was in attendance; but he informed the Magistrates that there was no desire to press the charge. The defendant had put them all to much inconvenience. The performance was delayed for the better part of an hour, during which several persons left the hall and demanded that their money should be returned, and when they did commence without him the noise he made prevented them from continuing.

The Magistrates asked the defendant what he had to say.

The defendant said he was very sorry to find himself in this position; but the fact was that he had been insulted on the previous day by one of the proprietors of the troupe, and having taken a little to drink he became excited and refused to sing. He remained at his own lodgings and should not have gone near the hall; but he was fetched and placed in the hall to prepare for the stage; but he still declined tossing, and after a time he lost consciousness, and did not remember what he did.

The Magistrate: I suppose you had engaged to sing?

The defendant: Yes, sir, but I was not compelled to sing, unless I chose.

The Magistrates: I think you were bound to sing, if your refusal had the effect of putting the rest of your company to loss or inconvenience; but that is not the question before me. You were given into custody for drunkenness, and I suppose you have been locked up all night. The charge is not pressed against you, and you will be dismissed; but let me advise you to keep sober and fulfil your engagement for the future.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 28 April, 1871. Price 1d.

THE GOVERNMENT LICENSING BILL

A numerous meeting of licensed victuallers and others interested in the public trade was held at the “Apollonian Hall” last evening for the purpose of opposing Mr. Bruce's licensing bill and to induce the members for the borough and the county to give their opposition to the measure. Mr. B. Browning, the chairman of the Dover Licensed Victuallers' Association, took the chair, and was supported by Mr. P. Court, Mr. S. Court, Mr. E. R. Mowll, Mr. A. Leney, Mr. T. Fox, Mr. G. Adamson, Mr. T. Robinson, and other gentlemen. The Chairman, after briefly introducing the subject, called on Mr. Fox, who gave an explanation of the point of the Bill deemed most objectionable by the promoters of the meeting, after which resolutions (which will be found in our advertising column) were adopted condemning the measure as one of injustice and confiscation, pledging the meeting to exert itself to the utmost for its defeat, with which view a petition to Parliament was signed and a deputation of the Chairman (Mr. B. Browning), Mr. Leney, Mr. G. Adamson, Mr. P. S. Court, Mr. E. R. Mowll, Mr. Tomlin, Mr. Todd, and Mr. Birch, was appointed to wait upon the members for the borough and the country, and urge them to oppose the second reading of the Bill.

A circular, issued by the Brewers' Union, appealing for support to the petition, was signed by the Mayor (Mr. E. Knocker, Esq.), “as objecting to unjust confiscation,” Mr. F. S. Peirce, deputy mayor, Alderman P. B. Claris, Councillor Stiff, Alderman Norwood, Councillor T. Robinson, Alderman Birmingham, Councillor E. P. Robinson, and W. Knocker, the Town Clerk.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 7 February, 1873.

APPLICATION

Mr. Nutt, the landlord of the “Apollonian Hall” applied for two special licenses, one for the night of the 10th, on which a private party was to be given, and the second, for the night of the 11th, a gentleman's soiree having been fixed to take place on that evening.

The Magistrates granted the application.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 14 March, 1873.

SPECIAL LICENSE

Mr. Nutt, of the “Apollonian,” applied for a special license for a private dance to be held on the night of the 11th, and the Bench granted the application.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 16 May, 1873. Price 1d.

EXTENSION OF TIME

On the application of Mr. Hards, the tenant of the "Apollonian Hall," the Magistrates granted an extension of time for Monday next, on the occasion of a ball.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 14 November, 1873.

LICENSING BUSINESS

Mr. Hards, of the “Apollonian Hall,” applied for an extension of hours on Tuesday night, at which time a soirée was to take place.

The Bench granted the application.

Mr. Hards also applied that his Hall might be used as a theatre on Wednesday and the three following nights, when the stage play the Happy Land was to be enacted.

Mr. Stillwell said it was necessary to give seven days' notice before making an application similar to the present one. The Bench, therefore, could not grant the application.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 21 January, 1876. Price 1d.

EXTENSION

Mr. Hards applied for and obtained an extension of time for the ball at the “Apollonian Hall.”

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 21 April, 1876. Price 1d.

APOLLONIAN HALL, DOVER

Alfred Hards, begs most respectfully to thank the Nobility, Clergy, and Inhabitants of Dover, and the Country for the kind Patrons they have so liberally bestowed on him, and to intimate that he has disposed of his business to Mr. William Brown, whom he trusts will receive an equal amount of Patronage from the Public.

21st April, 1876.

William Brown, begs most respectfully to acquaint the Inhabitants of Dover and the surrounding Country that he has taken the “Apollonian Hall,” and hopes that by attention to business to merit a share of the Patronage so liberally bestowed on his predecessors I this well-known Hall.

W. B. would further state that he is known to many of the Inhabitants, and that his conduct has been before the Public during the thirteen years he has been connected with the “Lord Warden Hotel.”

 

From the Dover Standard, 13 January, 1877.

(Miss) Annie CLAYTON (soprano) one of the artists at the 3rd concert of the Dover Catch Club at the Apollonian Hall, “Thursday last”

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 19 January, 1877. Price 1d.

EXTENSION OF TIME

Mr. Brown proprietor of the "Apollonian Hall," made an application for extension of time for the Volunteer Ball on Tuesday and for a soirée on Friday.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 9 March, 1877.

Mr. Stone made an application on behalf of Mr. Brown, proprietor of the “Apollonian Hall,” for extension of time for a ball on Tuesday next.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 13 April, 1877. Price 1d.

EXTENSION OF TIME

An application was made by the proprietor of the "Apollonian Hall," Mr. Brown, for extension of time for a ball on Thursday evening.

The application was granted.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 7 September, 1877. Price 1d.

EXTENSION OF TIME

Mr. Brown, proprietor of the "Apollonian Hall," applied for an extension of time for a ball on Monday next.

The application was granted.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 5 October, 1877. Price 1d.

EXTENSION OF TIME

Mr. Brown, the proprietor of the "Apollonian Hall," applied for an extension of time two nights next week, Monday and Friday, on the occasion of a ball each of those evenings, which was granted.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 26 October, 1877. Price 1d.

APPLICATION

Mr. Brown, proprietor of the “Apollonian Hall,” applied for an extension of time on the occasion of a ball on Friday.

The application was granted.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 22 December, 1877. Price 1d.

PRIVATE BALL

Extension of time was granted to Mr. Brown, proprietor of the "Apollonian Hall" for a private ball to be given by Mr. Fortescue, on Friday next.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 18 January, 1878

CHARGE OF THEFT

Thomas Cook, private of the 61st Regiment, was charged with stealing from the shop counter at 2, Five Post Lane, one print skirt, value 1s. 6d., the property of Mr. Lichtenberg.

Pauline Lichtenberg said: My husband is a dealer in second-hand clothing, carrying on business in Five Post Lane. The prisoner came into the shop last evening and asked me the price of a little print frock, of which that produced is a part. I asked him if he was a married man and if he had any children. He said “yes” and that the child he wanted the print frock for was three years old. I asked him 3s. for it, and then he took up the piece produced and ran out of the shop. He was stopped by the Superintendent of the Police.

Mr. Superintendent Saunders said: About a quarter to nine last night I was in Snargate Street and saw the prisoner come out of an umbrella shop opposite the “Apollonian Hall.” In consequence of what the proprietor said I followed him with the intention of handing him over to the picquet. He went from Snargate Street to the Commercial Quay, up Northampton Street, and then went up Five Post Lane. I then lost sight of him but again saw him standing in the shop of the prosecutor's. Seeing him take something from the counter and make a rush for the shop door, I stopped him and took him to the station. At the station he said he would rather do six months' in prison than soldiering.

An officer in attendance said the prisoner was a young soldier and bore an indifferent character.

The Bench sent prisoner to gaol for one month with hard labour.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 25 January, 1878

EXTENSION OF TIME

An extension of time was granted to Mr. Brown of the “Apollonian Hall” for the Artillery Volunteers Ball on Tuesday evening next; also for a private Ball on Wednesday evening.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 26 April, 1878

EXTENSION OF TIME FOR BALLS

An extension of time for two balls, one on the 26th, and another on the 29th, were granted to Mr. Brown, of the “Apollonian Hall.”

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 26 July, 1878

EXTENSION OF TIME

An extension of time was granted to Mr. J. Brown, proprietor of the “Apollonian Hall,” for a farewell ball to be given to the officers of the 10th Regiment on Tuesday night.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 19 January, 1883. Price 1d.

EXTENSION OF TIME

Mr. Brown, proprietor of the "Apollonian Hall," applied for extension of time for two balls, for Wednesday the 17th, and Tuesday the 23rd inst.

The application was granted.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 29 May, 1885. Price 1d.

DRUNK

Mr. Brown, proprietor of the “Apollonian Hotel,” applied for extension of time on Friday night on the occasion of a subscription ball.

The application was granted.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 28 January, 1887. Price 1d.

ANNOYING A TRADESMAN

Alfred Crick, butcher, and William Jones were mentioned by Mr. W. Brown, of the “Apollonian Hall,” for being drunk on the 19th ult. On the premises and refusing to quit when requested.

Mr. Martin Mowll appeared for the defendant Crick.

Defendants pleaded “Guilty” to the charges.

Mr. Brown said: On Wednesday night, about twelve o'clock, during the time a ball was being held on my premises, my attention was called to the two defendants in the ladies' private room. I entered the room and saw the waiter Pain had hold of the defendant Crick's coat collar trying to remove him from the room. Defendants were both semi-intoxicated. I requested them to leave at once, but as they did not seem inclined to do so I pushed them out of the door into the passage. I again requested them to leave the premises altogether, and they declined. I then opened the door and removed them outside. The defendant Crick afterwards got up and commenced kicking the door. The defendant Jones was going to break a glass window with his fist. A Policeman was sent for, but the defendants had gone before he came. This is the third time that I have had to caution Crick for a similar offence.

By Mr. Mowll: the defendant insisted on going to the ladies' room. I am quite certain that it was the defendant Crick who kicked the door. It was Jones who attempted to strike me.

Mr. Mowll, on behalf of his client, said that Crick was very sorry for that had happened. He had pleaded guilty to the charge, and there was no doubt that he was intoxicated at the time he committed this offence. Crick and the defendant Jones were old friends, and having met together at Folkestone that day they had had a little to drink. They came home by the night train, and went into the “Apollonian Hall” as they were on their way home. Crick had met with a certain amount of warm treatment directly he got on to the premises and was afterwards thrown into the gutter. He ought not to have gone there at all and expresses his sorrow for it now. He (Mr. Mowll) would ask the Bench, taking into consideration these circumstances and that his client had a large family, that they would only impose a small fine.

The Chairman said that they had taken a lenient view of the matter as both the defendants had expressed their sorrow for what had taken place. They were liable to a fine of £5 each, but the Bench had decided to fine them 20s. each and costs, amounting in all to £1 8s. 6d., or in default of payment fourteen days' hard labour.

A week was allowed for payment.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 5 October, 1888. Price 1d.

APPLICATION

Mr. Brown, applied for an extension of time on Friday night, on the occasion of a ball being held at the “Apollonian Hall,” under the auspices of General Bruce.

The application was granted.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 12 October, 1888. Price 1d.

EXTENSION OF TIME

Mr. Brown of the "Apollonian Hall," applied for an extension of time on the occasion of a ball being held, under the auspices of the Polo Club.

The application was granted.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 26 October, 1888. Price 1d.

THEATRICAL LICENSES

Mr. Brown applied for the renewal of the theatrical license for public performances and stage plays for the “Apollonian Hall.”

The Surveyor's report was read as to the condition of the premises.

The Bench granted the application.

The sureties were Mr. S. R. Elms and Mr. E. W. Spain.

Mr. Knocker said it would be the last occasion on which the bench would grant the licenses. He would have to go to the County Council in the future.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 28 December, 1888. Price 1d.

EXTENSION OF TIME

Mr. Brown applied for an extension of time, on the 1st of January, on the occasion of a fancy dress ball being held at the “Apollonian Hall.”

The application was granted.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 23 January, 1890. Price 1d.

APPLICATION

Mr. Fairlie of the “Apollonian Hall” was granted an extension of time on Tuesday night till 2 o'clock the next morning, on the occasion of a ball.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 7 February, 1890.

BALL

On Monday Mr. Brown applied for extension of time, that day week on the occasion of a Tradesman's ball to be held at the “Apollonian Hall.” The application was granted.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 20 February, 1890. Price 1d.

APPLICATION

Mr. Fairlie, of the “Apollonian Hall,” was granted an extension of time on Wednesday, till 2 o'clock the next morning, on the occasion of a Swimming Club Dance.

Mrs. Austin, of the “Royal Mail,” was also granted an extension of time this evening, till one o'clock tomorrow morning, on the occasion of the L.C.D.R. Employees Annual Supper.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 25 July, 1890. Price 1d.

THE APOLLONIAN HALL

This well-known House, with Assembly Rooms attached, which has for several years been in the hands of our respected townsmen, Mr. Brown, has been taken by Mr. C. A. Fairlie, who has for several years been the proprietor of the “Royal Hotel.” Mr. Fairlie is a man of enterprise, and is the caterer at the dining rooms and buffet at Folkestone Promenade Pier. He will let the “Apollonian Hall” as usual for all kinds of high class entertainments, making balls and soirées a special feature.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 27 November, 1891. Price 1d.

EXTENSION OF TIME

Mr. Farlie, of the “Apollonian Hall,” was granted an extension of time on Monday next till midnight, on the occasion of the Dover and East Kent Scottish Society's annual dinner.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 1 February, 1895.

BALLS

Extension of time was granted to Mr. Fairlie, of the “Apollonian Hall,” on the 29th inst., on the occasion of an officer's dance, and on Wednesday February 6th, when the Cycling Club will be held.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 15 May, 1903. Price 1d.

DEATH OF FISH SALESMAN

On Saturday afternoon, the Borough Coroner, Sydenham Payn, Esq., held two inquests in the Board-room of the Dover Union Workhouse, the one on the body of Harriet Smith, who was found hanging in an outhouse at Primrose Road, on Friday, and the other on the body of John Doughty, who was found in an apparently dying state at Russell Place early on Saturday morning.

In the case of John Doughty the evidence was as follows:

Mary Jordan, wife of James Jordan, a bell diver, living at Union Row, said: I identify the body as that of my brother John. He was a fish hawker, aged 52 years. He lived at 12, Dolphin Place, alone. I saw him about a fortnight ago. I know nothing about the case except that I heard he was found and brought to the Union.

Henry Betts, greengrocer, Golden Cross cottages, Russell Place, said: As I was coming up from the Market this morning about 4.15, to get my barrow, I heard the groaning of a man at the back of my barrow, which was tipped up. I knew Doughty. I asked him to get up, and took hold of his left arm. He replied, “I want my girl.” I sat him up against the wall, and I saw blood on the asphalt alongside of him. I could not get him up. He had a bucket of fish beside him which he had been selling. I saw Police-constable Dane, and he went to Doughty, and I went on down to the Market. It was 150 yards from his house where I found him.

Police-constable Charles E. Dane said: At about 4.30 this morning I went round to the back of Russell Street Chapel, Russell Place, and saw the deceased sitting back under his fish barrow. I asked him what was the matter. He made no reply. He smelt very strongly of drink. I asked him to get away, and if he could not, I should take him to the Station. He said, “Let me go; I will get home.” When we got to the end of Russell Place, he could not tell me where he lived, not go any further. I put him on his barrow and took him to the Police Station. He was suffering from the influence of drink. I have seen him look like that before. I saw some blood which seemed to have come from a slight cut on his nose.

Police-sergeant James Lockwood said: I was in charge of the station when the deceased was brought in at 4.45 this morning. He was charged with being drunk and incapable. He seemed to have been drinking very much. He gave his name and age. He was searched and put in a cell. There was 5/7½ in money, part of which was found in his pockets and part in Russell place where he was lying. Soon after he was put in the cell I heard a peculiar noise, and found him with his head on the bed and his feet on the floor. I had previously rolled him up in two blankets. I called Dr. Ormsby, who came and ordered him to be removed to the Workhouse Infirmary, which was done without delay.

Henry Tarling, landlord of the “Apollonian Hall,” said: Last night at 9.45 the deceased called at my private door with a few plaice, and asked if I wanted fish. I said “No”, and he touched his hat and went out. A few minutes after my wife said, “That poor man has gone down.” I went to the door and found he had fallen on the pavement. There was a man who was picking him up. He held on by his barrow. He crossed the road and sat on his barrow. He then went up to the Watt's, the herbalist, and went in there with his fish. That was the last I saw of him. It is not true that he had been chucked out of my bar. He had not been in there.

Dr. Ormsby said: I was called to see the deceased at the Police Station. He was lying partly on the bed and partly on the floor with rugs round him. He was very much under the influence of drink and in a dying state. He was nearly pulseless, in a deplorable condition, covered with vermin and filth, and very scantily clothed. I could hardly tell that his heart was beating. I thought the only choice was to send him to the Infirmary and put him in a warm bed. It had been a cold night. He died from heart failure from alcoholic poisoning. He lived alone, and had no one to look after him. He was not insensible when I spoke to him, but he was in a great collapse, which I attribute to the effects of drink and exposure. I do not think he had received any other injury except a very slight scratch on the nose.

Esther Tracy, nurse at the Infirmary at Dover Union, said the deceased was admitted at 6.30 that morning. He was alive, but very bad. Beef tea and brandy were at once administered, and he received a little. His body was in a terrible state, and he was cold and wet. He was put to bed and fed again. At ten minutes past eight witness found he could not swallow, and he died a minute or two afterwards. All was done for him that could be done. He tried to speak before he died.

While the Jury were waiting for the above witness to arrive, Chief Constable Knott asked the Coroner for instructions concerning the handing over of the key of deceased's house to relatives. He understood that there was an insurance policy there on the man's life.

Deceased's brother-in-law said it was to the amount of £12 6s.

The Coroner said a Constable had better go to the house and look over it, and then the key should be handed to the Master of the Union for the Guardians to settle what was to be done with the money, as deceased would be buried by the parish, and three of his children have been in the Workhouse for some years.

A verdict of death from drink and exposure was returned.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 9 May, 1914. Price 1d.

OCCASIONAL LICENSE

The licensee of the "Apollonion Hall," Dover, was granted an occasional licence from May 11th to May 16th, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., to sell refreshments in a tent at the Royal St. George's Golf Links on the occasion of a golf tournament.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 10 February, 1922.

LICENSING BUSINESS

Mr. Bushell, of the "Apollonian Hall" was granted an extension for a dance on Saturday next.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 17 July, 1925. Price 1½d.

A DRINK TOO MANY

At the Dover Police Court on Monday, before Messrs W. B. Brett, C. E. Beaufoy and W. Hollis.

Edward Crossley, a labourer, was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Snargate Street.

P.C. Moore said that at 7.40 p.m. on Saturday he was on duty in Snargate Street, when he saw the prisoner, who was drunk and had just been ejected from the “Apollonian” public house. He was standing in the roadway, shouting and behaving in a disorderly manner and begging. Witness advised him to go away and he immediately entered the “Avenue” public house. Witness told the landlord not to serve him and he complied with the request. Witness then advised the prisoner to go away but as he did not witness arrested him. He was of no fixed abode.

Prisoner said he was sorry but he had a drink too much. He came from Folkestone and had been locked up all the weekend. He would promise it would not occur again if he was allowed to leave the town.

Dismissed on condition that he left the town.

 

 

Demolition proved necessary in October 1929 when dockyard facilities were improved. Its beer store at 3 Commercial Quay may have survived at that time but would have met the same fate eventually.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 9 August, 1929.

Apollonian Hall demolition

Taking down the Apollonian corner for the dock developments. The "Apollonian Hall" was for many years one of the chief amusement halls of Dover. (Photo taken from microfilm.)

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 11 October, 1929.

THE END OF THE APOLLONIAN HALL

Apollonian hall demolition

The walls of the Hall so well known in "Victorian" Dover, were demolished during the weekend. (Photo taken from microfilm.)

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

STONE Henry 1839-66 end (age 56 in 1861Census) Bagshaw's Directory 1847Post Office Directory 1855Melville's 1858

STONE Henry Thomas 1866 and Jul/1871 Dover Express

NUTT 1872-73 Dover Express

HARDS Edward May/1873-21/Apr/76 Dover ExpressPost Office Directory 1874

BROWN William 21/Apr/1876-June/90 ( age 55 in 1801Census) Dover ExpressPost Office Directory 1882Pikes 1889

FAIRLIE Charles Archibald June/1890-Jan/1900 Post Office Directory 1891Pikes 1895Dover Express

JOYCE John Burnett Jan/1900+ Dover Express (Secretary to the East Kent Brewery Company)

TARLING Harold Maides 1901-1903+ Post Office Directory 1903

PORT Richard 1906-15 dec'd (age 54 in 1911Census) Post Office Directory 1913Kelly's 1913

JOYCE James B 1910 dec'd ?

LINELL John 1910-20 end (Royal Apollonian Hall)

Last pub licensee had BEANE Francis James 1915-18 Next pub licensee had Post Office Directory 1918

BUSHELL John 1920-22+ Post Office Directory 1922

THURSFIELD Arthur B M 1923-28 end Pikes 1923Pikes 1924

MILES George 1928-Feb/29 Dover Express

Last pub licensee had CASTLE or CASWELL Edward Feb/1929+ Dover Express

 

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Post Office Directory 1855From the Post Office Directory 1855

Melville's 1858From Melville's Directory 1858

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Pikes 1889From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1889

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Pikes 1895From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1895

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Kelly's 1913From the Kelly's Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1918From the Post Office Directory 1918

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Pikes 1923From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1923

Pikes 1924From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1924

Dover ExpressFrom the Dover Express

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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LINK to www.DeadPubs.co.uk