DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, September, 2022.

Page Updated:- Wednesday, 14 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1870

Brewery Tap

Latest 2004+

53 Tontine Street

Folkestone

Brewery Tap

Above photo, date unknown, kindly sent by Linda Cox.

Brewery Tap 1976

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1976.

Brewery Tap

Above photo kindly sent by Chris Excell, date unknown.

Brewery Tap, Folkestone 2009 Brewery Tap, Folkestone 2009 Brewery Tap Sign, Folkestone 2009

Above photos by Paul Skelton, 27 June 2009.

Brewery Tap card

The above sign, wasn't actually designed and released by Whitbread, but has been designed by Robert Greenham in the same style as the card sets they distributed as a representation of what the sign looked like. Robert says:- This was based on the image which appeared on Whitbread's metal map for East Kent which was painted by D. W. Burley in 1950, on commission from Whitbread.

Whitbread metal map 1950

The above metal map, kindly sent by Robert Greenham was released, in 1950 and painted by D. W. Burley, and was titled Inn-Signia of Whitbread Houses in East Kent, Whitbread & Co Ltd. The Inn Signs designed by:- M. C. Balston, Vena Chalker, Kathleen M Claxton, K. M. Doyle, Ralph Ellis, Marjorie Hutton, Harvey James, Prudence Rae-Martin, Violet Rutter, L. Toynbee and Kit Watson.

Brewery Tap 2012

Photo taken 7 May 2012 from http://www.flickr.com by deltrems.

 

I believe that although the frontage still (2012) looks like a public house, it is in fact being used as an art gallery.

Any further information or indeed photographs would be appreciated. Please email me at the address below.

 

Folkestone Observer 17 February 1870.

Tuesday, February 15th: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

James Wilson was charged with stealing two fowls, the property of C. and A. Dickenson, brewers, on the 14th instant.

John Hobday, in the employ of Messrs. Dickenson, brewers, said: I know the prisoner by sight. I saw him on the prosecutor's premises yesterday about six o'clock in the evening, at the back of the cart house in the brewery yard. Prisoner had no business there. I was in the stable at the time, and heard the fowls making a noise. The fowls were kept at the back of the cart house, near the stable. When I rushed out, prisoner was at the back of the lodge, holding a brown hen in his hands, which he dropped on seeing me. I asked him what he was doing there, and he said “The old hen has bit my thumb”. I said “Oh, all right”, and I let him go. Prisoner then went into the tap. After he was gone, I, in company with Mr. Poole's man, went to the fowl house and found the bird produced lying dead, with it's neck broken. The hen bird was lying down on the floor of the cart lodge. I gave information of the robbery to my master, and the prisoner was taken into custody. The value of the fowl was 4s.

P.C. Ovenden said: I apprehended the prisoner in front of the Brewery Tap about half past 10 o'clock last night. I cautioned him. He said he went to the cart house to relieve nature, and that the cock flew at him and bit his thumb. On searching him at the police station I found no marks on either thumb. Prisoner, at the police station, said he was innocent.

Prisoner, in defence, said he had been during the day filling the ice house at the Pavilion Hotel, and afterwards went into the Brewery Tap to have something to drink. He went to the cart lodge of necessity and the cock flew at him, but he did not have the fowl in his house. It was daylight at the time, and he was not absent from the tap more than three minutes. He had worked for Mr. Peden for seven or eight years, and he had also worked at the Gas Works for five years.

The Mayor sentenced the prisoner to a month's hard labour, and told him that had he been convicted before he would have been sent to jail for three months. He had known the prisoner all his lifetime, and had he been in difficulties, he (the Mayor) would have relieved him. (Applause)

 

Folkestone Chronicle 19 February 1870.

Tuesday February 15th: Before the Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

James Wilson, of Foord, was brought up in custody, charged with entering the premises of Messrs. Dickenson, brewers, of Tontine Street, and stealing therein two fowls, value 4s.

John Hobday deposed: I am in the employ of Messrs. Dickenson. I know the prisoner by sight. Last evening about six o'clock I saw him on the prosecutor's premises at the back of the cart lodge in the brewery yard. He had no business there. I was in the stable without a light. Fowls are kept at the back of the cart lodge, and hearing a noise I went to see, and found [prisoner wit a brown hen in his hand. He dropped it and turned round saying”The old hen flew at me and has bit my thumb”. I said “Oh, all right”. I then went into the brewery, and the prisoner went into the Tap. Afterwards I found the cock produced lying dead with his neck broken., just where the prisoner had been standing. The hen was also on the ground, instead of being on the roost about ten feet high. I gave information of the robbery to my masters, and prisoner was given into custody at the Tap about ten o'clock. The value of the birds is about 4s.

Cross-examined: You had no business in the cart house.

Re-examined: The last time I saw the cock alive was about one o'clock, before I went to the Camp.

P.C. Ovenden deposed that from information received he apprehended prisoner in front of the Brewery Tap about a quarter past ten yesterday evening, cautioned him and charged him with attempting to steal two fowls belonging to Messrs. C. and A. Dickenson. He said he went into the cart house, a hen flew at him, and bit his thumb. I brought him to the station, and there he said he was innocent of the charge. I searched him and found no marks on either thumb. A small brown and white feather dropped from the knee of his trousers.

Prisoner elected to be tried by the Bench, and pleaded Not Guilty. He said he was at work at the Pavilion ice house till four o'clock. He then went into the Brewery Tap for some beer, and before dark he went out into the cart house, as he had often done before, and while there the hen flew towards him. He put up his hand to fend her off, and it bit his thumb. The cock he knew nothing about. The place was open, and if anyone had wished to steal the fowls, he must have been foolish to attempt it then, for he would have been sure to have been found out. He had always lived in Folkestone, and borne a good character.

The Bench decided to send the prisoner to Dover for one month's hard labour, the Mayor remarking that had it not been the first time he had appeared before them, he would have had three months.

 

Folkestone Express 19 February 1870.

Tuesday, February 15th: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

James Wilson was charged with stealing two fowls the previous day.

John Hobday, in the employ of Messrs. Dickenson, said: I knew the prisoner by sight. About six o'clock I saw him on the prosecutor's premises. He was at the back of the cart house in the brewery yard. He had no business there. I was in the stable. I had no candle. I heard our fowls making a noise; they roost at the back of this house. I rushed to the back of the lodge, and the prisoner was there with a brown hen in his hand. He dropped it, and said “The old hen flew at me and has bit my thumb”. I said “Oh, all right” and let him go. He then went into the Tap, and Mr. Poole's man went with a candle and found the bird produced, lying dead; the hen was lying alongside. We have only one brown hen. I gave information to Messrs. Dickenson, and they gave him into custody. The fowls are valued at about 4s. I saw the cock bird alive at one o'clock.

By prisoner: No-one has any right there except those working at the brewery.

P.C. Ovenden said: I apprehended the prisoner in front of the Brewery Tap about quarter past ten last night. I cautioned and charged him. He said he went there for a natural purpose; a hen flew at him and bit his thumb. At the station he said he was innocent of the charge. There was nothing the matter with either of his thumbs. A small feather dropped from his knees.

Prisoner elected for the Magistrates to decide the charge. He pleaded Not Guilty, and said he had been at work in the ice house at the Pavilion. He went to this place for a certain purpose, when the hen flew against him and he struck at it.

The Bench came to the decision to give him a month's hard labour at Dover gaol.

 

Folkestone Express 20 December 1873.

Wednesday, December 17th: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer and J. Kelcey Esqs.

Mr. William Summers, who was formerly manager of the Naval Club in London, and who came to Folkestone to manage the County Club, applied for a temporary license to the Raglan Hotel, Dover Road, which was granted, excellent testimonials as to character being produced. Mr. Summers has also taken the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street.

Note: Date for Summers taking the Brewery Tap is at variance with information in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 1 May 1875.

Saturday, April 24th: Before J. Tolputt Esq., and Col. De Crespigny.

A temporary authority was granted to James Watson, mate of the ship Onyx, to sell intoxicating liquor at Dickenson's Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, under the license granted to Edward Summers.

 

Folkestone Express 19 June 1875.

Wednesday, June 16th: Before R.W. Boarer, Col. De Crespigny and J. Tolputt Esq.

The license of the Burton Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, was transferred from Frederick Wallis to William James Watson.

Note: Neither Wallis, nor this transfer appear in More Bastions at the Brewery Tap.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 2 September 1876.

Notice.

To THOMAS PREBBLE, one of the Overseers of the Poor of the Borough of Folkestone in the County of Kent, and to the Superintendent of Police for the same Borough.

I, ARTHUR LANGTON, now residing at Manor Road, in the Parish of Folkestone, in the County of Kent, do hereby give you notice, that it is my intention to apply at the adjournment of the General Annual Licensing Meeting for the Borough of Folkestone aforesaid, to be holden at the Town Hall in the said Borough, on the Twenty-seventh day of September next ensuing, for an order sanctioning the removal of a License now in force, and held by JAMES WATSON, for the sale of beer at certain Premises, situate at Tontine Street, in the Borough aforesaid, and known by the sign of Dickenson's Brewery Tap, from the said premises to newly erected premises, adjoining and situate in the said Street, of which license, when removed, I desire to be the holder.

Given under my hand this 25th day of August, one thousand, eight hundred and seventy six.

ARTHUR LANGTON.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 30 September 1876.

Wednesday, September 27th: Before Ald. Caister, Col. De Crespigny, J. Tolputt and J. Clark Esqs.

This was the annual Licensing Day, and a spirit license on the application of Mr. Mowll was refused to a new house in Tontine Street being built by Mr. Langton, but the Bench stated they had no objection to transfer the beer license of the house now being demolished to the one erected in it's stead.

 

Folkestone Express 30 September 1876.

Wednesday, September 27th: Before Aldermen Caister and Tolputt, Col. De Crespigny, and Mr. Clark.

On account of the peculiarities of the cases it was necessary that there should be four to constitute the Bench, and the fourth gentleman could not be obtained until after about three quarters of an hour kept in suspense Mr. Clark put in an appearance, when the following cas was recapitulated:

An application was made in respect to a new house in the locality of Tontine Street.

Mr. Mowll made the application on behalf of Mr. Langton, who has been in possession for the past nine months. The old beerhouse was used as a brewery tap, and the Bench may be aware that many brewers are in the habit of suggesting to customers who wish to taste their liquors to visit what they term the “brewery tap”, it's being particularly under the brewers' control. Mr. Langton is, in addition to a brewer, a spirit agent, and therefore feels the want of a spirit license attached to the beer license which has been held for many years.

Mr. Alderman Caister said that previous applications have been made and refused.

Mr. Mowll pointed out that there are some 16 or 17 new houses, and that the shops in Tontine Street which had been closed are now to be sold. These changes rendered that this additional license should be granted.

The Bench having consulted in private for some time said they had considered the case, but they could not grant the spirit license. They had, however, not objected to transferring the beer license of the house now being demolished to the new house erected in it's stead.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 28 July 1877.

Notice.

To THOMAS PREBBLE, one of the Overseers of the Poor of the Borough of Folkestone, in the County of Kent, and to the Superintendent of Police for the same Borough.

I, ARTHUR LANGTON, Brewer, now residing at No. 32, Manor Road, in the Parish of Folkestone, in the Borough of Folkestone, do hereby give you notice that it is my intention to apply at the General Annual Licensing Meeting for the Borough of Folkestone aforesaid, to be holden at the Town Hall in the said Borough, on the twenty-second day of August next ensuing, for a license for the sale of spirits, wine, beer, porter, cider, perry, and other intoxicating liquors, to be drunk or consumed in a certain house, and in the premises thereunto belonging, situate at Tontine Street, in the Borough aforesaid, known by the sign of the IMPERIAL BREWERY TAP, and which I intend to keep as an Inn, Alehouse, or Victualling House.

Given under my hand this twenty-sixth day of July, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy-Seven.

ARTHUR LANGTON.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 25 August 1877.

Annual Licensing Day.

On Wednesday the annual licensing sessions were held at the Town Hall, the Magistrates on the Bench being J. Clark Esq. (Chairman), Col. De Crespigny, Ald. Caister, and Capt. Crowe. A wine and spirit license was granted to Mr. Arthur Langton for a house in Tontine Street.

 

Folkestone Express 25 August 1877.

Wednesday, August 22nd: Before Col. De Crespigny, Capt. Crowe, J. Clarke Esq., and Alderman Caister.

General Licensing Day.

Applications for Spirit Licenses.

Mr. Mowll applied on behalf of Mr. Arthur Langton for a spirit license in respect of a public house adkoining his brewery in Tontine Street. A similar application was made last year, but the Committee would not grant it because the house was not then completed. The house was now completed, and houses in the neighbourhood which last year were unoccupied were now occupied, and houses which were then in the course of erection had now been completed. The accommodation which the house would provide was greatly needed.

He called Alderman Banks, who deposed that the house was worth a rental of 30 per annum, and there was no house, with the exception of the Clarendon Hotel, nearer than the Dover Road.

Mr. Langton having proved that ample accommodation was provided in the construction of the house, the Bench granted the application.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 15 October 1887.

Saturday, October 8th: Before The Mayor, Surgeon General Gilbourne, Captain Crowe, J. Brooke and H.W. Poole Esqs.

Elizabeth Wellesley, a respectably dressed woman, was summoned for being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street on the 1st inst.

Sergeant Butcher said he was in Tontine Street at half past ten on Saturday evening when he saw the defendant near the Brewery Tap. She was drunk and there were about 200 people around her. Police constable Knowles advised her to go away, and witness also endeavoured to get her away, but she would not go. Witness told her that he would be obliged to lock her up if she did not go, and she answered “I don't care a ----“. Witness then gave her into Knowles' custody and had her taken to the police station. There was another woman with her, but she went away when she was told to.

The defendant, who was very excited, declared that she was not drunk, and, as her excitement increased, the Mayor told her that if she did not keep quiet the case would be heard in her absence.

P.C. Knowles then stated that he was on duty in Tontine Street on the evening in question. He saw defendant standing outside the Brewery Tap with another woman. The defendant was very drunk. Witness advised them to go away, but the defendant would not. The other woman went away at once. There was a crowd of two or three hundred people around her. The strange woman was accusing the defendant of doing six months' for trying to pass counterfeit coins. As the defendant would not move on, witness, under the instructions of Sergeant Butcher, took her into custody.

Jane Rogers, living at 42, Sidney Street, said the defendant came to her house about nine o'clock on Saturday. She stayed there about twenty minutes and then left. She did not appear to be drunk in the least. Had known her several years, but did not know anything against her character.

Supt. Taylor said he released her from the police station about twenty minutes past eleven on Saturday night, as he thought she was capable of self-protection.

The Mayor said the charged had been proved against her, and he hoped it would be a warning to her. She would be fined 5s. and 11s. costs, or seven days' imprisonment with hard labour.

Defendant asked for time to pay the money in, and this was granted.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 22 February 1890.

Thursday, February 20th: Before J. Clarke Esq., and Alderman Pledge.

Harry Austin and John Sullivan were charged with stealing one pair of stockings, one cotton shirt, and one sheet, valued at 5s., the property of Mrs. Kennard, on the 19th instant.

Mary Ann Kennard, living at 60, Dover Street, said she hung some clothes out to dry at the back of her house on the 19th instant. Amongst the articles there were a pair of stockings, a cotton shirt and a sheet. She last saw the articles safe at four o'clock and missed them about seven. She went to the police station about nine o'clock, and she was then shown the sheet. It was her property. She identified it by it's general appearance. The articles were worth 5s.

Harry Spillett, landlord of the Star Inn, said the prisoner went to his house at seven o'clock on Wednesday evening. Austin showed him a sheet and asked him to buy it, but he refused. Sullivan asked witness to buy a shirt and a pair of stockings, but he refused. He offered them to some people in the taproom, but no-one would buy them.

Ann Warwick, a servant employed at the Marquis Of Lorne, said the prisoner had lodged at the Marquis Of Lorne for a week. She met them at the Radnor Street arches on Wednesday night. Sullivan pulled out a shirt from his coat and asked her if she could sell it. She said she did not know where to sell such a thing.

P.C. Knowles said he saw Austin on Wednesday evening outside of the Marquis Of Lorne with a bundle. He followed him through the house and asked him his name. He said “Johnson”. Austin said “That's my parcel”. On the way to the station he said “It's no use; my name is not Johnson, it's Austin”.

P.S. Butcher said he saw the prisoner Sullivan outside of the Brewery Tap on Wednesday evening, and charged him with being concerned in the theft. He replied “All right, sergeant”

Sentenced to one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 21 June 1893.

Inquest.

Disraeli, in his splendid epigrammatic way, once said in reply to an attack made upon him “There is a lying spirit abroad, and one can hear the flutter of his wings”. We don't go quite so far as that, but we are bound to confess that Dame Rumour in Folkestone is not too particular as to the truth. On Friday, all sorts of tales were afloat as to the death of a man named John Jones, of Park Street, who had died somewhat suddenly that morning. The investigation, however, which was held before the Coroner, Mr. Minter, in the evening, showed that while the circumstances of the death were sad, there was nothing attached to them to warrant the idle gossip which had been set about.

According to the evidence of Mrs. Amos, the deceased was a navvy, and had been working of late at the Waterworks. He was a widower, and had four children. About seven on Thursday evening his little boy informed her that his father was “in one of his fits”, and acting upon his statement she went to the back premises of Mr. Knott, in Mill Bay, and there found the poor man lying on the floor. She said, what no-one else seems to have had the sense to perceive, that the poor fellow was dying, and advised them to send for a doctor. After some trouble, the medical gentlemen being out, the services of Dr. Yunge Bateman were secured, and Jones was then removed to his home, and afterwards from there to the Hospital.

A rather singular story which, perhaps, accounts for a good deal of the sensationalism attached to the case was told by a woman named Annie Rowe, living at the Marine Terrace. She stated that about a quarter past four in the afternoon she heard a man run past her kitchen window, which overlooks the Lower Sandgate Road, and he was immediately afterwards followed by two other men, who were also running. She rushed up her steps and saw the deceased lying in the road. There was no-one else near, but the two men to whom she had referred, came up almost instantly and rendered help. He was bleeding from the side of the head and his nose. Her impression was that he was drunk and had been fighting.

Mr. Knott, the landlord of the Brewery Tap, carried on the narrative by stating that on the afternoon in question a boy came and told him there was a man drunk in his yard. He went out and found Jones on the broad of his back. Thinking him drunk, he let him lie for some time and then he raised him up and gave him a glass of water. His stomach seemed quite empty, suffering from the “rattling bronchitis”. He put him up against the wall and sent for a policeman, who, eventually, took him off in a cab. The constable was P.C. Gardner, who, however, was not called upon to give evidence.

The most important testimony was, of course, that given by the medical witness, Dr. Yunge Bateman, who saw him at his residence, 16. Park Street. He was then lying in bed in an unconscious condition. On examining him he found a wound on the left side of the head. He was also bleeding from the right ear and nostril. He had him taken to the Hospital, and he there died under an operation to find if there was depression of bones under the scalp; there was not. There was a puncture at the back of the head, but the instrument, which must have been a sharp one, did not penetrate the skull. The injuries might have been caused by a fall; a small meat skewer would have done it. The wound was very puffy and swollen.

The Coroner told the witness he hardly understood what he meant. Did it appear to him the blow had been caused by an instrument or by a fall?

The doctor replied falling on the pavement, a sharp flint would have done it. His opinion was that death had resulted from effusion of blood on the brain from fracture of the skull, received, from the evidence, from an accidental fall.

And the jury returned a verdict accordingly.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 24 June 1893.

Wednesday, June 21st: Before Colonel De Crespigny and Mr. W. Wightwick.

Richard Knott, landlord of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, was summoned for using an unstamped pint glass for the sale of beer on the 16th June.

Evidence in support of the case was given by Mr. Major, Inspector of Weights and Measures, and by his assistant, a young man named De Vere.

The defendant said he had used similar glasses for 20 years and he was not aware they had to be stamped.

The Inspector said he had served notices on all the publicans in the town both personally and by post.

The defendant said he did not have one.

Mr. Wightwick: You are not supposed to have a notice. You are supposed to know the law.

The Bench stated that as this was the first offence since the passing of the Act in 1872 they should only inflict a nominal penalty of 6d., and the defendant would also have to pay the costs, 10s.

 

Folkestone Express 24 June 1893.

Inquest.

An inquest was held on Friday evening at the Town Hall by J. Minter Esq., Coroner, on the body of John Jones, a labourer.

Mrs. Amos, wife of John Amos, identified the body. She said deceased had suffered from fainting fits for a long time, and also from pains in the back, and she had frequently known him to drop down quite insensible, and the remedy usually given was a little whisky. About seven o'clock on Thursday evening, one of deceased's little boys went to her and told her his father was in a fit. She went to Mill Bay and saw deceased lying on the floor in Mr. Knott's. She thought he was dying, and requested that a doctor should be sent for. Dr. Bateman attended and had him removed first to his house and then to the hospital.

Mrs. Annie Rolfe, wife of John Rolfe, of 1, Marine Terrace, said on Thursday afternoon she heard men running, and on going up the steps of her house she saw deceased lying in the road. There was no-one near him and she went to him and thought he was in a fit. His nose and ear were bleeding. She got some water and the man recovered, and went with two men towards South Street.

John Jones, a fruit seller, and no relation to the deceased, said the deceased went into his stable and sat down in a chair. He was reeling, and witness, thinking he was drunk, said “You must not stop here”. He went out and laid down on some straw for about ten minutes, and then went into Mrs. Stubbs's shop. He returned, and after laying down again for a little while, went away. His ear was bleeding, and witness thought he had been fighting.

Richard Knott, of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, said the deceased went into his yard at 5.30 on Thursday. A boy told him there was a man there drunk. He found deceased lying on his back and thought he was drunk and let him be for some time, and afterwards gave him a glass of water, which he drank. His inside was rattling as though he had bronchitis. A policeman went in, and afterwards deceased's son went and said his father was in a fit. The policeman sent for a cab and had him taken home.

Mr. Marcus George Yunge Bateman, surgeon, said he saw the deceased at his house, 16, Park Street, lying on a bed unconscious. He found he had a wound on the right side of his head just above his ear, and was bleeding from the ear and nostrils. As he appeared to be in a serious condition he was removed to the hospital, where an operation was performed, and it was thought there was some depression caused by a bone, but there was none. Deceased did not regain consciousness, and died at six o'clock in the morning. There was a bruised wound, and a puncture into which a probe was introduced about three quarters of an inch between the skin and the bone. It might have been caused by falling upon something sharp, like an iron railing. From the symptoms and the evidence of the witnesses he believed there was a fracture of the skull, but he had not made a post mortem examination.

Superintendent Taylor said he understood deceased had suffered from fits for some years.

The jury found that the deceased died from effusion of blood on the brain, caused by a fractured skull, arising from an accidental fall while in a fit.

The Coroner in summing up said it appeared all the witnesses thought the poor fellow was drunk. It was very fortunate they were all civilians. Had they been policemen, who were supposed to know everything, there would have been a lot said about it.

Wednesday, June 21st: Before Colonel De Crespigny and W. Wightwick Esqs.

Richard Knott was charged with selling beer in a glass not marked. He said he was guilty of selling a pint of beer in a pint glass.

Thomas Major said he sent his assistant to the defendant's premises, the Brewery Tap, on the 16th June, with certain instructions. Shortly after he entered the premises himself, and saw that his assistant, Albert De Vere, had a glass containing beer. It was apparently a pint glass. He asked defendant if he was aware he was breaking the law by serving beer in an unstamped glass. He said he had had no notice. He produced the glass. He had sent notices by post to every publican in the town.

Albert De Vere proved purchasing a pint of beer in the glass produced.

Colonel De Crespigny (sotto voce): It looks like an honest pint.

The Clerk: You are not charged with selling short measure, but with selling in an unstamped glass.

Defendant: I have used these glasses for 20 years. They are used all over England, and hold an Imperial pint.

Mr. Wightwick: The sooner you stop it the better. You are liable to a penalty of 10 every time.

Colonel De Crespigny: You are supposed to know the law.

Defendant: That may be, but a working man knows a pint of beer as well as he knows what he has on his back. What about the brewers sending their beer in barrels not stamped?

The Clerk: They have no need to be stamped. The section only affects sale by retail.

Colonel De Crespigny: You have exceeded the law, and you will have to pay for it. We shall let you off easy. You will have to pay the costs, and we fine you 6d. The costs are 10s.

Mr. Wightwick: As this is the first offence since the Act was passed in 1872 we let you off lightly. In future the penalty will be heavier.

Defendant: Twenty years ago – and now just come to the front.

Mr. Wightwick: The Inspector has not done his duty.

The Clerk: We have had no Inspector.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 June 1893.

Police Court Notes.

On Wednesday morning the sitting Justices, Col. De Crespigny and Mr. Wightwick, were engaged in the Borough Court in adjudicating upon a number of charges instituted by Inspector T.C. Major under the Weights and Measures Act.

The first charge was preferred against Richard Knott, licensed victualler, of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, for serving a pint of beer in a glass which was unstamped, and not in accordance with the requirements of the 29th Sec. of the Weights and Measures Act, at Folkestone on 16th June.

Mr. Major said on the day in question he sent his assistant (Alfred De Vere) into the defendant's licensed premises, and shortly afterwards he himself went in. His assistant had a glass containing beer; it was supposed to be a pint glass. He asked the defendant if he was aware he was breaking the law by serving a pint of beer in an undenominated and unstamped measure. Defendant replied that he understood notices had been sent out to all publicans in the town, but he had not had one. He produced the glass in which the beer was served, and it had no mark upon it indicating it's capacity.

Defendant said he had not had notice from the Inspector.

Mr. Major said he not only delivered notices by hand, but to make sure everyone had a notice he made out a list of every publican in the town and sent oto each one a notice by post.

Mr. Wightwick said the Inspector was not bound to have sent a notice. The defendant was supposed to know the law.

Alfred De Vere deposed to calling for a pint of beer, and defendant served it in the glass produced.

Defendant said he had used this sort of glass for twenty years, and it was used all over the kingdom.

The Deputy Clerk said the Act was quite clear. It said they should sell all intoxicating liquors not in cask or bottle, when sold in any quantity above half a pint in a measure marked according to the Imperial Standards.

Defendant repeated these glasses were used all over the world, in every country.

Mr. Wightwick said the sooner the defendant stopped using them the better. Mr. Major was not liable to give him notice.

Col. De Crespigny: You ought to know the law.

Defendant: We are not lawyers. We have enough to do to attend to our own business.

The Chairman said the defendant had offended against the law, and would have to suffer for it, but they would let him off easy this time. He would have to pay the costs and a fine of 6d.

The Clerk said the costs were 10s.

Mr. Wightwick said the Bench had no desire to punish the publicans, but unless they obeyed the law they must be punished.

The defendant said this was the first case in 21 years. He paid the fine.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 28 June 1893.

Police Court Notes.

“You are supposed to know the law” said the Magistrates to a defendant at the court on Wednesday, but he would be a wise one who could carry in his head one thousandth part of all the crotchety rules and regulations known by the comprehensive term of law as laid down in our statute books.

The defendant was Richard Knott, landlord of the Brewery Tap, in Tontine Street, and the Magistrates were Col. De Crespigny and Mr. W. Wightwick. The former had to appear before the latter for using an unstamped pint glass.

Defendant said he had used them for the last twenty years, and he was not aware they were bound to be stamped.

This drew forth from the Bench the dictum with which this par started. As this was the first offence since the passing of the Act in 1872, defendant was let off with a fine of 6d. and 10s. costs.

Geo. Burchett, landlord of the Two Bells, Canterbury Road, had a similar experience.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 29 June 1893.

Hall Of Justice.

Wednesday, June 21st: Before Justices De Crespigny and W. Wightwick.

Two licensed victuallers were charged with selling pints of beer in glasses which were not marked by the inspector. This is the first prosecution of the kind which has taken place in Folkestone for 21 years.

The defendants pleaded ignorance of the technicalities of the law, and were informed by Mr. Justice Wightwick that it was their duty to read every Act of Parliament. One of the accused replied that were he to do so he would be unable to carry on his ordinary business.

In justice to the accused we are pleased to state that there no question but that the glasses held their full measure.

Mr. Justice Col. De Crespigny informed the accused that they would be let off lightly, viz., 6d. and costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 31 July 1897.

Police Court Reports.

On Monday – the Mayor presiding – John Connor was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street on the 24th July.

P.C. Lawrence gave evidence to the effect that at a quarter past ten on the previous Saturday night he saw the prisoner very drunk, with his coat in his hand, flourishing it round his head, surrounded by a crowd. Witness requested him to go away, but he went into the Brewery Tavern (sic), and was pitched out by the landlord. Witness again spoke to him, and he used bad language. When taken into custody he was very violent, and tried to throw witness. With the assistance of P.C. Prebble he was taken to the police station. A penny was found upon him.

Defendant said that he had a glass or two of beer, and completely lost his senses. He was to have worked at the Tunnel, and been there at six o'clock that morning.

Superintendent Taylor informed the Bench that the defendant was cursing and swearing about, and said he would tell the Magistrates about the police assaulting him. His clothes did not look as if he had been working.

Defendant said he had been fruitering.

The Bench sentenced him to 7 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 27 January 1900.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before Alderman Spurgen, Col. Westropp, and Col. Hamilton.

Mr. Thomas (sic), late of the Castle, Sandgate, applied for confirmation of the licence of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, which was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 27 January 1900.

Wednesday, January 24th: Before Alderman Spurgen and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

William Thomason, late of the Castle Inn, Sandgate, applied for a transfer of the licence for the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, Folkestone.

The Bench granted the application, Supt. Reeve raising no objection to it.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 January 1900.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday Mr. William Thomas Thomason was granted a temporary authority to sell at the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street.

 

Folkestone Express 10 March 1900.

Wednesday, February 7th: Before J. Fitness, C.J. Pursey, W. Wightwick, and J. Pledge Esqs.

William T. Tomlinson (sic) applied for a licence for the Brewery Tap in Tontine Street. The Bench granted it.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 March 1900.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday, the following transfer was granted: Imperial Brewery, Tontine Street, to Mr. W.T. Thomason.

 

Folkestone Express 28 June 1902.

Monday, June 23rd: Before W. Wightwick, G. Swoffer, and W.G. Herbert Esqs., and Lieut. Colonel Hamilton.

Thomas Isherwood, a private in the North Lancashire Regiment, was charged with stealing a glass, valued at fourpence, from the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street.

Detective Sergeant Burniston said he was outside the Queen's Hotel on Saturday night about eleven o'clock, when he saw prisoner, with several other soldiers, go past. His suspicions were aroused by the bulky appearance of prisoner's pocket. On lifting up the tunic, he found the glass produced. Witness asked prisoner where he got it from, and he replied “Someone must have put it in my pocket”. On taking prisoner to the police station, he said “I took it from a house a few yards from here”. Witness made enquiries, and the landlord of the Brewery Tap, Mr. Thomason, and the barman, accompanied him to the police station. On charging the prisoner with stealing the glass, he replied “I did not steal it from the Brewery Tap. I took it from the Lord Nelson”.

Prisoner said he did not use those words, but said “I have been to the Lord Nelson”.

Mr. W.T. Thomason identified prisoner as a man who came into his house about 10.45 p.m. on Saturday. He also identified the glass produced as his property, and valued it at 4d.

Prisoner, who has been in the service seven months, said he did not know how the glass came into his possession.

The Bench dealt with the case under the First Offenders Act, and fined prisoner one shilling and no costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 June 1902.

Monday, June 23rd: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Councillor Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Alderman Herbert, and Mr. G.I. Swoffer.

Thomas Isherwood, a private in the North Lancashire Militia, was charged with stealing an ale glass, the property of Mr. Thomason, of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street.

Detective Burniston stated that at 11 p.m. on Saturday night he saw prisoner with some other soldiers by the Queen's Hotel. He noticed that he had something concealed under his coat. Witness stopped him, lifted up his coat, and found the glass (produced). He took prisoner to the station.

Mr. Thomason, landlord of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, said the prisoner was in his house on Saturday night. He identified the glass (produced) as belonging to him. He valued it at 4d.

A barman in the employ of Mr. Thomason also gave evidence.

Prisoner was fined 1s.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 5 July 1902.

Wednesday, July 2nd: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and C.J. Pursey.

George Ealy was fined 2s. 6d. with 10s. costs for being drunk in the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, on the 19th of June.

 

Folkestone Express 5 July 1902.

Wednesday, July 2nd: Before W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

George Ealy was summoned for being drunk on the licensed premises known as the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street.

Inspector Lilley said on the 19th of last month, at a few minutes to eleven, he saw defendant and another man come out of the Clarendon Hotel. The manager came out, and the men appeared to be having a quarrel. They went along Tontine Street and entered the Brewery Tap. Witness followed them, accompanied by P.C. Nash, with the intention of cautioning the landlord. When he looked inside defendant had a glass of ginger wine, but he was so drunk he could not hold the glass to his mouth, but kept spilling the contents over the counter.

P.C. Nash corroborated.

Defendant said he did not know he was drunk. The other man had more sense than he had. He proved he was not drunk. (Laughter) He had been for two years at the front with the Royal Engineers, and had not had anything to drink for that time. He got home all right if he was drunk.

A fine of 2s. 6d. and 10s. costs was imposed.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 July 1902.

Tuesday, July 1st: Before Mr. Wightwick, and Aldermen Herbert and Salter.

George Ealy was summoned or being drunk on the premises of the Brewery Tap.

Inspector Lilley said that he saw defendant and another man come out of the Clarendon Hotel. They then went into the Brewery Tap. Witness, accompanied by P.C. Nash, went into the house with the intention of cautioning the landlord. He said the defendant had a glass of ginger wine and was so drunk that he spilt it over the counter.

P.C. Nash corroborated.

Defendant said he did not know he was drunk. He had been with the Royal Engineers at the front, and had not had anything to drink for two years.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 10s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 8 November 1902.

Saturday, November 1st: Before Aldermen Penfold and Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Westropp, and J. Stainer Esq.

Chas. Henry Dennett was charged with being drunk and disorderly.

P.C. Watson said about 9.35 the previous night he was in Tontine Street and saw prisoner outside the Brewery Tap. As he was using obscene language and refused to go away, witness took him into custody. He then became very violent, and had to be handcuffed and strapped on to an ambulance wagon before he could be brought to the police station.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs; in default seven days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 March 1903.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The Adjourned Licensing Sessions for the Borough of Folkestone were held in the Town hall on Wednesday. In view of the opposition by the police to a number of the existing licences extraordinary interest was evinced in the meeting, and when the proceedings commenced at eleven o'clock in the morning there was a very large attendance, the “trade” being numerously represented. Representatives of the Folkestone Temperance Council and religious bodies in the town were also present, prominent amongst them being Mr. J. Lynn, Mrs. Stuart, and the Rev. J.C. Carlile. Prior to the commencement of business the Licensing Justices held a private meeting amongst themselves. When the doors were thrown open to the public there was a tremendous rush for seats. The Justices present were the following:- Mr. W. Wightwick, Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Mr. J. Pledge, Lieut. Col. Westropp, and Mr. C.J. Pursey.

Before proceeding with the business, the Chairman announced that at the Annual Licensing Meeting the Justices adjourned the renewal of 23 full licences and five on beer licences, and directed the Chief Constable to give notice of objection to the owners of the licences of the following nine houses:- Providence (Arthur F. East); Marquis Of Lorne (William R. Heritage); Granville (Charles Partridge); Victoria (Alfred Skinner); Tramway (Frederick Skinner); Hope (Stephen J. Smith); Star (Ernest Tearall); Bricklayers Arms (Joseph A. Whiting); and Blue Anchor (Walter Whiting). Since the former sessions the Justices had inspected all the houses objected to, and considered the course which they ought to pursue with respect to the same, with the result that they had directed the Chief Constable to withdraw the notices of objection served by him with respect of the Victoria, Hope, and Blue Anchor, and to persist in the opposition to the following:- Providence, Marquis Of Lorne, Granville, Tramway, Star, and Bricklayers Arms. As regarded the remaining 15 full licences and five beer licences they would renew the same this year, and deal with them next year according to the circumstances.

With respect to the Packet Boat, the Brewery Tap, and the Castle they ordered the back entrances of the licensed premises to be closed within 14 days from this date.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 18 April 1903.

Monday, April 13th: Before The Mayor, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, and Messrs. S. Penfold, E.T. Ward, G. Peden, J. Stainer, G. Spurgen, T.J. Vaughan, and W.C. Carpenter.

Walter John Prior, who had been in custody since Saturday afternoon, was charged with being drunk and disorderly, and further with assaulting P.C. Watson.

P.C. Watson said about 3.05 on Saturday afternoon he went to the Harvey Hotel, where he found the prisoner, who was drunk. The landlord had refused to serve him and requested him to leave the premises. Prisoner would not go away, and at the landlord's request witness ejected him. About 3.20 witness again saw accused at the Brewery Tap. The landlord told the man he would not get any beer there, and at the landlord's request witness ejected him from that house. Accused then became violent and bit witness on the finger of his left hand. The man continued to be violent, and with the assistance of P.C.s Rue and Kettle he was placed on a truck and conveyed to the police station.

Prisoner said that he had served in South Africa for 16 months with the Yeomanry and met some old friends and had a drink. A very little had upset him. He had had only two pints. He did not remember the assault. He must have been mad.

The Bench told prisoner that this ought to be a warning to him. The Bench were going to be very lenient; he would be fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs in each case, or in default seven days'.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 February 1904.

Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Alderman Herbert, Lieut. Cols. Fynmore, Westropp, and Hamilton, Messrs. C.J. Pursey and E.T. Ward.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) read his annual report, which contained interesting figures with regard to drunkenness, etc. No person in Folkestone had yet been convicted a sufficient number of times to be placed on the “black list”. The Chief Constable objected to the renewal of the licence of the Swan Inn, Dover Road, and asked that the consideration of this licence might be deferred until the adjourned sessions.

The Chairman then read the Justices' Report, which stated that the number of licensed houses in Folkestone, and especially around the harbour, was out of all proportion to the population. The number of licences had not been reduced, owing to the fact that a Bill amending the Licensing Laws was shortly to be introduced in Parliament. Certain public houses – the Imperial Brewery Tap, the Hope, the East Cliff Tavern, the Victoria, the Lifeboat Inn, the Duke Of Edinburgh, and the Channel Inn had been inspected by the Justices, and recommendations with regard to their sanitary improvement and closing of back entries were made.

Mr. John Minter said that water had been laid on at the Channel Inn since the report on the bad state of the sanitary arrangements. Mr. Minter also suggested with regard to the Imperial Brewery Tap that a public bar should be made with an entrance from Mill Bay.

The Bench decided, however, that the orders made in the report should be adhered to.

Licences were then granted to the lessees of public houses and licensed premises.

 

Folkestone Express 13 February 1904.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before W. Wightwick Esq., Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, and W.G. Herbert, E.T. Ward, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The following was the report of Supt. Reeve: Chief Constable's Office, Folkestone, 10th February, 1904. To the Chairman and Members of the Licensing Committee of the Borough of Folkestone. Gentlemen, I have the honour to report for your information that there are at present within your jurisdiction 139 premises licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquors, namely: Full licences 87; Beer on 11; Beer off 6; Beer and Spirits (dealers) 16; Grocers 12; Confectioners 3; Chemists 4; Total 139 – an average of one licence to every 220 persons, or one “on” licence to every 313. This is a decrease of one full licence as compared with last year's return, the licence of the Marquis Of Lorne having been refused at the adjourned meeting in March. Twenty of the licences have been transferred during the year, namely, 14 full licences, two beer on, two beer off, and two grocers. One beer off licence was transferred twice during the year. One licence holder has been convicted since the last annual meeting of committing drunkenness on his licensed premises. He has since transferred his licence and left the house. The alterations which the Justices at the adjourned meeting last year directed to be made to the Packet Boat, Castle, Tramway, Bricklayers' Arms, Granville, and Star Inns have all been carried out in a satisfactory manner, and none of the licensed houses are now used as common lodging houses. Ten occasional licences, and extensions of hours on 21 occasions, have been granted to licence holders during the year. There are 14 places licensed for music and dancing, and two for public billiard playing. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquors are sold are registered in accordance with the Licensing Act of 1902. For the year ending 31st December last year, 154 persons (131 males and 23 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness. 131 were convicted and 23 discharged. This is an increase of 65 persons proceeded against, and 51 convicted, as compared with 1902. The increase is chiefly due to the additional powers given to the police under the Licensing Act, 1902. Up to the present time no person within the Borough has been convicted the necessary number of times within the 12 months to be placed on the “black list” as provided by Section 6 of the Act of 1902. With very few exceptions the whole of the licensed houses have been conducted in a satisfactory manner. The only objection I have to make to the renewal of any of the present licences is that of the Swan Inn, Dover Road, and I would ask that the renewal of this licence be deferred until the adjourned meeting. I have the honour to be, gentlemen, your obedient servant, H. Reeve (Chief Constable).

The Chairman: I think, gentlemen, you will agree that the report of the Superintendent is a satisfactory one – in fact, I may say very satisfactory – for the whole year. With your permission I well read the report we now make to you. At the adjournment of the last general licensing meeting we stated that in our opinion the number of licences for the sale of intoxicating liquor then existing in the borough of Folkestone, especially in the part of the immediate neighbourhood of the Harbour, was out of all proportion to the population, and that we proposed between then and the general annual licensing meeting of this year to obtain information on various matters, to enable us to determine what reduction would be made in the number of licences. We invited the owners of licensed houses in the meantime to meet and agree among themselves for the voluntary surrender at this general meeting of a substantial number of licences in the borough, and to submit the result of their united action to the Licensing Justices for acceptance. Failing any satisfactory proposal for reduction by the owners, the Licensing Justices last year intimated that in the exercise of their discretionary powers they would at this year's meeting decide in a fair and equitable spirit what reduction should be made. But at the opening of Parliament last week it was announced in the King's speech that the Government intended to introduce in the House of Commons during the present session a Bill to amend the Licensing Laws. In view of this legislation we are of opinion we ought not, pending the passage of this Bill through Parliament, exercise the discretionary powers vested in us, and take measures for effecting a further reduction in the number of licences within the borough on the ground that certain licensed premises are not required for the public accommodation. We have recently inspected certain houses known as the Imperial Brewery Tap, the Hope, East Cliff Tavern, Victoria, Lifeboat, Duke Of Edinburgh, Railway Tavern, and Channel Inn.

As regards the Brewery Tap, we recall the fact that at the general annual licensing meeting for 1903, we ordered the back entrance leading from the licensed premises into Mill Bay to be closed within fourteen days. Although this order has not been drawn up or served on the owners and occupier, they gave notice of appeal on the grounds, inter alia, that such order was illegal, and that we had no power to make the same. Since then the King's Bench Division has decided the case of “Bushell v Hammond”, that Justices have jurisdiction under the Licensing Act of 1902, to order the closing of a gate leading into the back yard of licensed premises, though no intoxicating liquors were consumed at such gates, or in the passage leading thereto. We therefore now direct that the holder of the licence of the Imperial Brewery Tap shall, within 14 days from this date, build up the back entrance from the passage in the rear of the licensed premises to Mill Bay. The existence of this doorway renders it difficult for the police to exercise adequate supervision over the licensed premises.

Mr. Minter asked if he might mention, with regard to the closing of the door of the Imperial Brewery Tap in Tontine Street, that he agreed that the Justices could order the back entrance to be closed, but he asked if they would allow the building to be extended right out to Mill Bay.

Mr. Ward said the objection was that there was insufficient police supervision.

Mr. Minter said it was a public street at the rear, although a narrow one. That was the normal condition of Folkestone streets. The house would be carried back to Mill Bay.

Mr. Wightwick: You mean with another bar? We should not grant that. We shall keep to the order.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 February 1904.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonels Hamilton, Fynmore, and Westropp, Messrs. J. Ward and C.J. Pursey.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The Chief Constable first presented his annual report (for which, see Folkestone Express 13 February 4).

The Chairman then addressed his colleagues (for which, see Folkestone Express 13 February 4).

As regards the Imperial Brewery Tap, and the closing of its back entrance, he could bring evidence then to show that that might be converted into a proper state by bringing the house back into the Mill Bay, so that the back part would become a complete part of the house itself.

The Bench decided to keep to the order they had made.

 

Folkestone Express 26 March 1904.

Saturday, March 19th: Before E.T. Ward, J. Stainer, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs., and Lieut. Colonels Westropp and Fynmore.

Robert Hugh Ellender was charged with assaulting Mr. A Thomason, a publican, and also with using obscene language. The charges were taken separately.

Mr. Thomason said at 7.30 on Sunday evening the defendant was using the lavatory for an improper purpose, and when remonstrated with he used abusive language, and struck witness. Defendant had since called upon him and apologised, and therefore he did not wish to press the charge.

Defendant was dismissed on paying 9s. costs.

The charge of using obscene language in Tontine Street was then proceeded with. Defendant pleaded Guilty. It appeared that a constable was accosted by the complainant in the former case, who said that the defendant had assaulted him. Defendant then used filthy language.

Fined 5s., and 9s. costs, or seven days'.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 March 1904.

Saturday, March 19th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. J. Stainer, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and Lieut. Colonel Westropp.

Robert Hugh Ellender was summoned by William Thomas Thomason, landlord of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, for assault.

Complainant said that at 9.30 on the evening of the 13th inst. he saw defendant at the rear of his premises. When he spoke to him Ellender used obscene language. As defendant refused to give him his name and address, witness went into the street and waited until a constable came along. Defendant then attempted to strike witness, but the constable caught hold o his arm. Since the affair happened, Ellender had called on him and expressed sorrow for what he had done, so he (witness) did not wish to press the case.

Defendant was let off on paying 9s. costs.

The Chief Constable said there was a second summons brought against defendant by the police, for using obscene language.

For this Ellender was fined 5s., with 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 19 November 1904.

Saturday, November 12th: Before The Mayor, Ald. Spurgen, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, W.G. Herbert and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

Dangerfield Pitcher was summoned for being drunk on the licensed premises of the Brewery tap on November 7th. Defendant pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Sales said about 10.30 a.m. on November 7th he had to eject defendant from the Tramway Tavern. At 1 p.m. he saw defendant go into the Brewery Tap in company with another man. He was drunk, and witness drew the landlady's attention to him. She refused to serve the defendant and asked him to go out. He refused, so witness had to eject him.

Defendant said he “owned” being drunk, but he never caused any disturbance.

Fined 5s. and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 November 1904.

Saturday, November 12th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Spurgen, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, and Mr. J. Stainer.

Dangerfield Pitcher was summoned for being drunk on licensed premises.

P.C. Sales stated that on the 7th inst. he was called to the Tramway public house by the landlord to eject the prisoner, who was drunk. Subsequently witness saw him go into another public house in Tontine Street. Witness requested the landlord not to serve him, as he was drunk. The prisoner was ejected, and when he got outside he became very abusive, and refused to go away, whereupon witness took him into custody.

Defendant, who had nothing to say, was fined 5s., and 9s. costs; in default 14 days'.

 

Folkestone Daily News 18 March 1905.

Saturday, March 18th: Before Messrs. Ward, Carpenter, Spurgen, Vaughan, Fynmore, and Peden.

John William Minter was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street yesterday.

P.C. Sales said he saw the prisoner go into a public house, from which he was ejected. He then went into the Brewery Tap, the landlord of which refused to serve him. As prisoner refused to go away witness took him into custody.

Fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 22 July 1905.

County Court.

Tuesday, July 18th: Before Judge Shortt.

A case which had attracted considerable interest was withdrawn from the record at the last moment. In this case Mr. H. Crumby sued Mr. Thomason, of the Brewery Tap, for 42, money alleged to have been paid out by plaintiff as a commission agent upon the defendant's instructions. It was understood that defendant intended to plead the Gaming Act, but we were informed at the rising of the Court that defendant had agreed to judgement being entered against him, with costs. It was also unofficially stated that the 42 had risen with costs to 63.

 

Folkestone Daily News 14 July 1906.

Saturday, July 14th: Before Messrs. Fynmore and Linton.

A transfer of the licence of the Brewery Tap, in Tontine Street, was granted from Mr. Thomason to Albert Taylor, who takes possession on Monday next.

 

Folkestone Express 21 July 1906.

Saturday, July 14th: Before Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and R.J. Linton Esq.

Mr. Albert Taylor was granted temporary authority to sell at the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, in the place of Mr. Thomason.

 

Folkestone Daily News 25 August 1906.

Saturday, August 25th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Herbert, Hamilton, Banks, Swoffer, Linton, Pursey, and Ames.

Maggie Taylor was charged with being drunk whilst in charge of a child under 7 years of age, and also with assaulting the police.

P.C. Watson deposed that he saw the accused in Tontine Street, very drunk with a baby, on Friday night at 10.30. He took her into custody and brought her to the police station. While she was being searched she became very violent and he had to hold her. She also bit his thumb.

Sergeant Dunster corroborated.

Accused created a scene in the dock, and it took two policemen to hold her. She afterwards became cool, and said she felt thoroughly ashamed of herself. She had a fit in the Brewery Tap, and the landlord sent for a constable and gave her in charge.

She was fined 24s., including costs.

 

Folkestone Daily News 29 August 1906.

Wednesday, August 29th: Before Messrs. Vaughan, Linton, Carpenter, Ames, Herbert, Hamilton, and Fynmore.

The licences of the Belle Vue Tavern and the Brewery Tap were transferred to the new tenants.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 September 1906.

Wednesday, August 29th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Mr. R.J. Linton, and Mr. T. Ames.

The licence of the Imperial Brewery Tap f was temporarily transferred from William James Thomason to Albert Taylor.

 

Folkestone Daily News 2 October 1906.

Tuesday, October 2nd: Before Messrs. Spurgen, Fynmore, and Vaughan.

Thomas Comboy was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street at 3.30 on the afternoon of the 1st October.

P.C. Wellard stated that he was called to the Imperial Brewery Tap by the landlord, Mr. A. Taylor, to eject Comboy, whom he understood was drunk and disorderly. He proceeded there with the landlord and found Comboy in the bar with a woman whom prisoner alleged to be his wife, and another woman. They were drunk and creating a disturbance. He ejected the accused and went back to find the woman, but could not do so. She had been passed through the landlord's private kitchen, through the passage, and out of one of the doors of the jug department, and had gone to Mr. Waite's, the sweet shop. Not being able to find her, he came out and found prisoner waiting for him. He was very violent, and attempted to assault Wellard, who arrested him, brought him to the police station, and charged him with being drunk and disorderly.

In reply to the Chief Constable, Wellard said he did not know how long the prisoner had been in the house, neither did he know how long the women had been there. He had made no enquiries.

Prisoner (to the constable): When you came into the house, you seized me at once? – Yes. I put you out because you were drunk.

Did I wait ten minutes outside till you came out? – You waited till I came out.

Did I not ask for my wife who was in the bar? – You did ask for her, and I told you I could not find her.

Do you swear I was drunk? – Yes, you were very drunk.

Sergt. Dawson stated that he was on station duty when prisoner was brought in by Wellard and charged with being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street. Prisoner was very drunk.

The prisoner stated that he had had a glass or two, but was not absolutely drunk; in fact, he had no money to get drunk with. It was the 1st of October, and he had been invited into the Imperial Brewery Tap by some pensioners to have some drink. It was the first time he had ever been in such a place, and if they would look over it he promised that it should not occur again.

The Justices consulted for a little while, and then decided to send for the landlord of the Brewery Tap.

He stated that his name was Albert Taylor, and he was the landlord of the Imperial Brewery Tap, in Tontine Street. He swore that the prisoner and his wife came in in the afternoon and had half a pint of beer each. After some time they went out and returned. His wife was in the bar with him, and a lot of pensioners were having a drink. He could not say whether the prisoner and his wife were served again or not, neither could he say who served them.

The Justices: You were in the bar?

Taylor: Yes, but I was looking after the customers.

The Justices' Clerk: You sent for the police? – Yes, the prisoner's wife and another woman were quarrelling. It would not do for me to go in front of the bar, so I sent for the police.

Was the prisoner drunk? – I shouldn't think so. It was not him that I complained about, it was the women who were fighting. Prisoner and his wife had only been in the bar about ten minutes the second time.

Did you send for the constable to eject the prisoner? – No, it was to quell the disturbance, especially the two women.

Cross-examined by Chief Constable Reeve: Do you absolutely swear that you didn't send for the constable to eject prisoner for being drunk? – Yes, I do. It was the women that I wanted turned out.

Did you see the constable turn the prisoner out? – Yes. He was handling the constable roughly. I thought he deserved it.

Did you tell the constable that you didn't want him turned out? – No.

Did you go to the constable's assistance when you saw the prisoner handling him roughly? – No, I went on serving my customers.

Then you left the constable to do your dirty work? (No answer)

Do you think it is the duty of the constable to come and do your dirty work, and eject your customers after they have got drunk and quarrelling? – I understood that it was the duty of constables to do that.

Let me tell you emphatically it is not their duty. Do you swear now that the prisoner and the women were not drunk? – Well, they were not very drunk, and they showed it in getting away.

Now, when the constable had ejected the man, did he come back for the woman? – I suppose so.

Were you in the bar? – Yes.

Did you tell him where the woman was? – No.

Did you know where she was? – Yes, she had gone through my kitchen, then through my passage, and out of another door of the house.

You didn't tell the constable that, did you? – No, I went on serving my customers.

Did you hear a disturbance outside? – No, I never troubled about it when they got outside. I went on with my business.

Did you know there was a disturbance? – Yes, but that did not trouble me so long as it was outside.

Did you know that the prisoner had been locked up for being drunk and disorderly? – Yes, and I said it served him right for interfering with the police.

And yet you say he wasn't drunk? – Well, not very drunk.

The Bench, after further consultation, considered the case proved, and that Comboy was drunk and disorderly. He was fined 9s. 6d. including costs, or seven days' hard labour.

He told the Bench he couldn't see how they could convict him after hearing the evidence of the landlord.

Editorial.

We commend the Bench for doing the right thing this morning in sending for the landlord of the Imperial Brewery Tap, and endeavouring to further investigate the charge of drunkenness against the man, especially as the constable stated that he was sent for by the landlord to eject the man and quell the disturbance.

Mr. Taylor, the landlord of the Brewery Tap, who is a novice in the licensing trade, learnt this morning that it is not the duty of the police to come and quell disturbances that arise in the bars, and are caused by the people quarrelling and drinking. We could have told Mr. Taylor this before. A licensed victualler has no more right to the services of the police than any other trader, and it is his duty to call the police if he likes to see that there is no unnecessary violence, and then to eject anyone creating the disturbance, and if necessary the police can aid him.

 

Folkestone Express 6 October 1906.

Tuesday, October 2nd: Before Alderman Spurgen, Alderman Vaughan, and Lieut. Colonel Fynmore.

Thomas Comboy was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street the previous afternoon. He denied the offence.

P.C. Weller said on Monday afternoon about 3.15 he was on duty in Tontine Street, when he was called by the landlord of the Brewery Tap to eject the prisoner. After struggle he got him outside, and prisoner continued the disturbance in the street. He tried to strike him (witness), and as he refused to go away when requested, witness took him into custody.

In answer to the Chief Constable, witness said he had no idea how long the prisoner had been in the house. There was a woman in the house with whom the prisoner was struggling. She was drunk, and she got out of the house by going through the landlord's private room and into the street. He had no idea how long she had been there.

Alderman Vaughan: It is a pity we do not know.

Prisoner said he was a long way off being drunk.

P.S. Dawson said when the prisoner was brought in to the police station, about half past three, he was drunk.

Prisoner said he would own he had had a little drink, but he was far from being drunk. He could promise them he would never have any more beer. For the sake of his wife, he hoped they would look over that. He had not got a farthing in his pocket with which to get drink.

The landlord of the public house, Albert Taylor, was sent for. In answer to the Clerk, he said he was in the bar when the prisoner came into his house, between two and three o'clock, accompanied by a woman, whom he took to be his wife. He drew them half a pint of beer each. They went out shortly after, and returned about ten minutes before the disturbance occurred. He drew no more beer for them, neither was any drawn for them to his knowledge. A pensioner, however, was there, and he had plenty of drink, but he did not know whether he gave any to them or not. He went for the constable to eject two women. He did not fetch the constable to eject the prisoner, whose wife, however, was one of the women he wanted turned out, because they were fighting. He saw the prisoner handle the constable very roughly, which he thought was the wrong thing to do.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, he said he swore on oath that he did not call the constable to eject the man and his wife. He would not say the man or the woman was drunk. He did not raise any protest about the constable ejecting the prisoner, because he thought he had done very wrong in handling the constable roughly. He went behind the bar to serve when the constable entered the house.

The Chief Constable: You left the policeman to do your dirty work. Do you think it is your duty to call in the police to do your dirty work?

Witness: I thought it was my duty to call in the police to eject anyone.

The Chief Constable: I may tell you it is your duty to look after your own licensed premises. Did you render any assistance to the constable at all?

Witness: I did not.

The Chairman said the Magistrates had come to the conclusion that the prisoner was the worse for drink and that he was disorderly. He would be fined 2s. 6d. and 6s. 6d. costs, or in default seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 October 1906.

Tuesday, October 2nd: Before Alderman G. Spurgen, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, and Councillor R.J. Fynmore.

Thomas Comboy was charged with being drunk and disorderly.

P.C. Wellard stated that at 3.30 the previous afternoon he was on duty in Tontine Street, when he was called by the landlord of the Brewery Tap to take prisoner off his premises, as he was drunk. He did so, and then returned to the bar to fetch the woman out. He could not find her, and when he went outside prisoner was waiting there, threatening to fight him. He took him into custody.

Sergt. Dawson stated that when brought to the station prisoner was drunk.

Prisoner stated that he was only in the bar about five minutes, and hoped the Bench would overlook his case. He also said he was not drunk, as he had no money to get drunk with. He was waiting outside for his wife.

Mr. Taylor, landlord of the Brewery Tap, who was sent for by the Bench, said he was in the bar when prisoner came in with a woman, and called for a drink. He asked for half a pint of beer each. They remained at the house about ten minutes. He could not say if prisoner had any more to drink, as there were some pensioners there. He went for the police to stop two women who were fighting. He had no objection to the man. It was prisoner's wife he wanted shifted, not the prisoner. He was in the bar when the constable arrived, and he saw the accused handle the policeman very roughly, which he thought was not the right thing to do. The constable put prisoner outside the house. The wife of prisoner went through the kitchen and out of the front door, and he did not hear any more noise after they went out of the house. The constable came back to look for the woman, and left defendant outside. Although he knew where the woman had gone he did not give the information to the police constable. She had gone through the kitchen, then through the passage, and out the front door.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, witness said that he did not help the constable eject prisoner. He did not know it was his duty to clear the bar, and thought he could call for the assistance of the police.

The Chief Constable: You left the policeman to do your own dirty work.

Prisoner was fined 2s. 6d. and 6s. 6d. costs, or in default seven days'. As he could not pay he was taken below.

 

Folkestone Daily News 5 December 1906.

Wednesday, December 5th: Before Messrs. W.J. Herbert, Fymore, Hamilton, Linton, Leggett, Ames, Stainer, and Pursey.

The Brewery Tap.

Mr. Taylor, the landlord of the Brewery Tap, attended with some plans showing proposed alterations which the Bench are to be asked to sanction. However the notices had not been served in time, and a further application is to be made.

 

Folkestone Express 26 January 1907.

Wednesday, January 23rd: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Cols. Fynmore and Hamilton, Major Leggett, and W.C. Carpenter, W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, and T. Ames Esqs.

The landlord of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, applied for permission to take down a partition, and so throw two private bars into one.

Application adjourned for a week, in order that some of the justices could inspect the place.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 January 1907.

Wednesday, January 23rd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, Colonel Hamilton, and Messrs. T. Ames, R.J. Linton, and R.J. Fynmore.

The landlord of the Brewery Tap applied for permission to make certain alterations to his premises, by which two bars would be thrown into one.

The Bench decided to adjourn the matter till the annual licensing session, and in the meantime to visit the premises.

 

Folkestone Daily News 2 April 1907.

Tuesday, April 2nd: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Stainer, Boyd, and Hawksley.

James Patrick Riley was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street yesterday.

A constable said he was called to the Brewery Tap to eject the prisoner, who was creating a disturbance. Witness did so, but prisoner became so violent that he had to take him into custody.

Fined 10s., 9s. costs, or 14 days'.

 

Folkestone Daily News 1 June 1907.

Saturday, June 1st: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Stainer, Herbert, Swoffer, Boyd, Leggett, and Ames.

John White and James Skerratt were charged with being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street on Friday. Both prisoners pleaded Guilty.

William Tiddy, photographer, of Tontine Street, said he saw the prisoners in Tontine Street at 5.30 in the afternoon. They evidently wanted to get into the Brewery Tap, but the landlord tried to get rid of them. They were using most disgusting language, and were both drunk. After a time they went as far as the Congregational Church, where they commenced quarrelling again.

They were fined 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or 14 days' hard labour.

Henry Ratcliffe was charged with being drunk and disorderly yesterday.

P.C. Nash said he saw the prisoner being thrown out of the Wonder public house. Witness advised him to go home, but he became so violent he had to get assistance to get him to the police station.

Prisoner made a long, rambling statement about his wife and little children.

He was sentenced to one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 8 February 1908.

Monday, February 3rd: Before Alderman Banks, J. Stainer, W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, G.I. Swoffer, and G. Boyd Esqs.

Alfred James Huggett pleaded Guilty to being drunk and disorderly on Saturday night.

P.C. Sales said about 7.45 on the night of the 1st of February he was in Tontine Street, where he saw the prisoner, who was very drunk. He went into the Brewery Tap, and witness warned the barmaid not to serve him. Prisoner left the house, and then began to abuse witness. He refused to go away when requested, and witness took him into custody.

The Chief Constable said there were five convictions against Huggett, at Folkestone and Chatham, the last being in 1906.

The Magistrates inflicted a fine of 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or fourteen days' hard labour.

Huggett was taken below, addressing an insolent remark to the Bench as he left the Court.

 

Folkestone Daily News 21 September 1908.

Monday, September 21st: Before The Mayor and Col. Fynmore.

Dinah Matilda Page was charged with being drunk and incapable.

P.C. Chaney deposed that at 8.10 p.m. on Saturday the accused tried to enter the Brewery Tap in Tontine Street and fell down, so he brought her to the station.

She was fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 26 September 1908.

Monday. September 21st: Before The Mayor and Lieut. Colonel Fynmore.

Dinah Martha Page, of Dover, was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street the previous night. Prisoner said she was not drunk but had overwalked.

P.C. Chaney said at 8.15 the previous evening he saw the prisoner in Tontine Street. She was drunk and kept falling against the shop window. When she got to the Brewery Tap she opened the door and fell inside. As she was drunk and incapable he took her into custody.

Mrs. Chidwick, the female searcher, said she was called to the police station to attend to the prisoner the previous evening, and she was then very drunk.

Prisoner said she had walked from Dover and had only had a stout to drink. She had been a teetotaller for nine months.

The Chief Constable said it was the first time the lady had honoured them with a visit, but she was a regular customer at Dover.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 5s. 6d. costs, or seven days' in default.

 

Folkestone Express 6 February 1909.

Friday, January 29th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggett, and Messrs. J. Stainer and G.I. Swoffer.

James Freeman, a driver in the A.S.C, stationed at Shorncliffe, was summoned for a breach of the Borough Bye-laws for throwing and breaking a bottle in Dover Road on the previous Sunday night.

P.C. L. Johnson said on January 24th he was opposite the Wesleyan Church, when he saw defendant drinking from a beer bottle. Upon finishing the beer he threw the bottle into the road, breaking it to pieces.

Defendant said just before ten o'clock he ordered three bottles of beer in the Brewery Tap, but his friend and himself could only drink two of them before ten, so he took one outside. When in Dover Road he thought it did not look nice for a soldier to carry a beer bottle, so he put it in the gutter and it broke.

An officer from the Camp gave the defendant a good character.

The Chairman, in fining the defendant 1s. and 9s. costs, said he ought to have been content with the beer in the house and should not have brought any away with him.

 

Folkestone Express 22 May 1909.

Wednesday, May 19th: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Major Leggett, and Messrs. J. Stainer and G.I. Swoffer.

Mr. Taylor, of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, was granted an occasional licence to sell at the Albany Assembly Rooms on Whit Monday, on the occasion of the annual dinner and smoking concert of the Postmen's Federation.

 

Folkestone Daily News 16 August 1909.

Monday, August 16th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Stainer, and Swoffer.

James Patrick Eugene Reilly pleaded Guilty to being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street on Saturday night.

Sergt. Lawrence said he saw the prisoner ejected from the Brewery Tap public house, where the landlord had refused to serve him. The barman received a blow in the face from the prisoner, and witness, finding the accused was drunk and creating a disturbance took him into custody. Witness also stated that Reilly had been acting as an out-porter at the Central Station during the past three weeks, but owing to his drunken habits he was a complete pest.

A fine of 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or 14 days' hard labour, was imposed.

Prisoner asked for time, but the Chief Constable objected, and Reilly was conducted below.

The Chairman then called the barman forward and commended him for his conduct in refusing to serve Reilly while under the influence of drink.

 

Folkestone Express 21 August 1909.

Monday, August 16th: Before Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, and G.I. Swoffer.

James Patrick Eugene Reilly was charged with being drunk and disorderly. He admitted the offence.

Inspt. Lawrence said at ten minutes to ten on Saturday night he saw Reilly being ejected from the Brewery Tap by the barman. He commenced to shout, and witness advised him to desist. The prisoner, however, went up to the barman and struck him in the face. With the assistance of P.C. Weller, witness took him to the police station. Reilly had been hanging about the Central Station, more or less drunk, for some time, and had been a general nuisance and a bother to the police.

The Chief Constable said the prisoner went into the Brewery Tap, and owing to his condition they refused to serve him, and the barman ejected him. There were three previous convictions against Reilly for drunkenness.

The Magistrates inflicted a fine of 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or in default 14 days' hard labour. Pat's request for time in which to pay was refused, so he went to prison.

The Chairman called the barman forward, and told him that the Bench considered he had behaved extremely well in ejecting the man. If such things were more often done they thought there would be less trouble with such men.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 August 1909.

Monday, August 16th: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Col. Fynmore, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

James Patrick Eugene Reilly was charged with being drunk and disorderly. He pleaded Guilty.

Sergt. Lawrence said that he saw the prisoner being ejected from the Brewery Tap public house on Saturday night by the barman. He at once commenced shouting, and witness told him to go away. Prisoner eventually struck the barman in the face. Witness took him into custody.

Prisoner, who had been three times previously convicted, was fined 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or 14 days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Daily News 5 January 1910.

Wednesday, January 5th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Leggett, Stainer, Swoffer, and Linton.

Arthur Taylor, landlord of the Brewery Tap, was charged with permitting drunkenness on his premises on Christmas Eve. Mr. G.W. Haines defended.

Lance Corporal Edmunds, of the Military Police, deposed to being called by the landlord to eject an artilleryman who was making a disturbance, and had broken a picture. The landlord only wanted him to go out of the house, and did nor want to charge him with any offence. Witness swore that the Artilleryman was very drunk, and had to be handcuffed, while it took five of them to get him to the station. A great disturbance was caused in the street at the time. After being conveyed to the police station he was handed over to the military authorities to be dealt with.

Corporals Pollard and Kirk, and Private Rose, of the Oxfordshire Regiment, deposed to being in the Brewery Tap from 8.15 to 9.45 and seeing an Artilleryman named West there. He was very excitable and wanted to fight, Corporal Kirk alleging that he went out of the Tap, leaving West there, to avoid a quarrel. They swore that he was drunk.

Inspector Lawrence and Constable Taylor deposed to seeing the man West ejected and conveying him to the station, where he was afterwards handed over to the military authorities. It was elicited in evidence that he had pleaded Guilty to being drunk, and was sentenced to 10 days' cells for that offence.

Albert Taylor, the landlord, was sworn, and deposed that with his wife he was attending the bar the whole of the evening. He instructed his barman to take particular notice that if anyone came in the worse for drink not to serve them. His only object in getting this man ejected was that he was quarrelsome. He did not believe he was drunk.

He was corroborated by Privates Nash and Parker, of the Artillery, and his barman named Brooks.

The man West was called, and swore that he was not drunk, although he had pleaded Guilty to the offence in order to avoid being court martialled on a charge of assaulting his superior officer.

Mr. Haines then addressed the Bench for the defence, submitting that if the man was drunk the landlord had taken all reasonable precaution to avoid the offence.

The Bench retired for some time, and on their return the Chairman announced that they were unanimous in their opinion that the offence had been committed. The full penalty was 10, but they fined him in the mitigated of 2 and one guinea costs.

Arising out of the same offence was a charge against a young woman named Alice Marsh, who was engaged to the Artilleryman West, for assaulting the military police in the execution of their duty.

In the melee it transpired she was knocked down on the pavement and laid insensible in Tontine Street for a quarter of an hour.

The evidence in this case was so conflicting that the Bench decided to dismiss it.

Mr. Haines also defended in this case.

 

Folkestone Express 8 January 1910.

Local News.

The Magistrates at the Borough Police Court on Wednesday were engaged for some considerable time in hearing a summons against Albert Taylor, landlord of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, for permitting drunkenness on his premises on Dec. 24th. Mr. Haines defended, and pleaded Not Guilty.

Lance Corporal G. Edmunds, of the military foot police, said he was on duty on Christmas Eve in Tontine Street. At 9.45 p.m. he was called to the Brewery Tap. He went into the bar and found an artilleryman, named West, with his coat off, and he was very drunk. He saw the landlord, who told him he wanted the man ejected, as he was creating a disturbance and had broken a picture. He asked him if he wanted to charge him, and he said he did not; all he wanted was to get him out of the house. He took West into custody, and he became very violent. Witness called for assistance, and West was taken to the police station. He had no doubt as to the man being drunk. The picquet took him from the police station.

Corporal Pollard, of the Oxfordshire Light Infantry, said he went into the Brewery Tap at about 8.15, and saw West there. Witness remained there until 9.45, and West was there the whole time. He was either drunk or acting drunk. He did not see West supplied with anything to drink. He tried to take his coat off and could not. He wanted to fight half a dozen men. The landlord was not there when the picture was broken, but the barman was. It was about ten o'clock when the police were called in. He did not see any blows struck.

Pte. Thomas Rose and Corpl. Kirk, of the same regiment, said West was drunk.

Insptr. Lawrence said on Dec. 24th he was called to the Brewery Tap, in Tontine Street, and saw West being ejected by the military police. He was called upon by Corpl. Edmunds to assist him, and he and P.C. Taylor and Corpl. Edmunds took West to the police station. The latter was drunk and very violent, and had to be carried. He called at the Brewery Tap on December 27th, and saw the landlord respecting the disturbance. He told him he had made enquiries, and that he should report him for permitting drunkenness on his licensed premises. Taylor replied that he was sorry; the soldier did not appear to be any the worse for drink that he had had there, for he was in the bar all the evening except just before the disturbance occurred, when he was called up. West was then struggling with a young woman who was with him. He was not drunk, and if it had not been for the man's temper he should not have had him removed. The disturbance arose through a man in the Oxfordshire L.I., as far as he could make out.

P.C. Taylor said he was on duty in Tontine Street on Dec. 24th, and saw the military police at the Brewery Tap. He was called upon to assist in conveying West to the police station. The man was very drunk and violent, and had to be carried to the police station.

The defendant said he did not serve West. He was in the bar and his wife was assisting. He had given instructions to his barman with regard to keeping order. He was downstairs, and was called up and informed about West, and asked him to leave. There was nothing about West to suppose that he was drunk. He (Taylor) had not heard of any row with the man Kirk. He never had any row if he could help it. West touched the picture and the glass fell out. It was quite an accident, and anyone could have done it. He offered to help West on with his coat before he was put out.

Arthur West, of the Royal Artillery, said West was not drunk.

E. Jones, of the O. and B.L.I., also said that West was not drunk.

J.F. Knight, a seaman in H.M. Navy, said he was in the Brewery Tap on Christmas Eve for about ten minutes, and there was nothing in West's appearance to show that he was drunk. He appeared to be upset about something.

---- Brook, the barman, said he had instructions from the landlord as to keeping order, and if anything went wrong he was to call Taylor. He saw West, and there was nothing in his condition to suppose that he was drunk. He was having an argument, and was asked to leave.

Mr. Haines made an able speech in defence of Taylor.

The Magistrates then retired to consider the case, and on returning announced that they had decided that the offence was proved against the landlord, who was liable to a fine of 10. They fined him 2 and 21s. costs.

Arising out of the same case was a charge against a young woman, named Alice Marsh, for assaulting the military police in the execution of their duty.

The evidence in this case was so conflicting that the Bench decided to dismiss it.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 January 1910.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday, before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Messrs. J. Stainer, E.T. Leggett, G.I. Swoffer, and R.J. Linton, two cases of special interest were heard.

Alice Marsh was summoned for assault. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for the defence.

George Edmunds stated that he was a corporal of the Military Foot Police, stationed at Shorncliffe. He was on duty in Tontine Street on the 24th December, 1909, at about 9.40 p.m. He was called into the Brewery Tap to eject an artilleryman, and whilst in the execution of his duty, the defendant (who was with the soldier) ran at him several times and struck him about the left eye. She clung round witness, and was trying to release the soldier from him. Witness called on Inspector Lawrence and P.C. Taylor, and they assisted him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines: When he called for help it was to keep the defendant off, and also to keep the crowd back. They left the door of the bar clinging to him, and they all fell on the pavement together. He did not know whether he left defendant senseless on the pavement.

Pte. F. Jones, of the 1st Leicestershire Regiment, stated that he was on duty with lance corporal Edmunds on Christmas Eve, in Tontine Street. They went to the Brewery Tap, and witness saw Edmunds eject an artilleryman. The defendant hung on to Edmunds, but witness only saw one blow struck, and he was not sure whether that was struck by the defendant or another woman behind.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines: Corpl. Edmunds wanted the soldier to leave the bar, and he did not refuse. The defendant fell right out on to the pavement. Witness was there to help Lance Corpl. Edmunds, and if he had seen him attacked by the defendant he would have interfered.

A statement signed by the witness was here produced. Witness acknowledged that the signature was his, but denied that it had been read to him before he signed it. It was written by Lance Corpl. Edmunds.

Lance Corpl. Edmunds stated that the statement was read over to the witness before it was signed.

George Pollard, of the Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, deposed that there was an argument between the soldier in question and another man, and when they were putting the soldier out the young lady stood in front of the door and hit Corpl. Edmunds several times over the left eye.

Cross-examination elicited the information that the disturbance was caused by the soldier nudging his knee against a man named Kirk. Kirk told him to stop, and on that the artilleryman wished to fight him. Kirk then went out.

Thos. Rose, of the Oxfords, deposed to seeing the defendant strike Corpl. Edmunds several times over the left eye.

Inspector Lawrence deposed to seeing the defendant, the artilleryman and Lance Corpl. Edmunds all come “flying on to the pavement together”. The defendant was clinging on to Edmunds. Edmunds called witness and P.C. Taylor to his assistance, and they helped to bring the artilleryman up to the police station.

Defendant gave evidence on oath. She said she was with the artilleryman, and was helping him on with his coat when Lance Corpl. Edmunds came in. He did not give him time to put his coat on, but pushed him outside. He pushed witness outside, and she fell on the pavement, and was unconscious for a quarter of an hour. Witness did not say anything at all. She never struck Edmunds or hung on to him.

John Thomas Knight, of the Royal Navy, also gave evidence denying that the defendant struck Edmunds.

Wm. John Franks deposed to seeing the defendant come “flying from the door of the Brewery Tap”, and a few seconds later the artilleryman and Edmunds came out together. The defendant was lying on her back to the right side of the door, and remained so until they got the artilleryman away.

Ed. Brook, barman at the Brewery Tap, and the landlord, Albert Taylor, corroborated defendant's story.

The Chairman said that the evidence was very conflicting, and they did not want to decide which of the two parties was right. One or the other was telling an abominable and deliberate lie. The case would be dismissed.

Albert Taylor was then summoned for permitting Gunner West, R.F.A., to be drunk on licensed premises.

Lance Corpl. Edmunds deposed to being called on the 24th December to eject a soldier from the Brewery Tap. West was very drunk and quarrelsome, and had his coat off. Eventually witness ejected him from the house. When he was taken into custody, West became very violent; he required the assistance of three others, and they were also compelled to use handcuffs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines: His violence and the manner in which he was staggering about were evidence of West's drunkenness. He did not ask to walk on the way to the station. They had to carry him, as he would not walk.

George Henry Pollard, of the Oxfords, said West was either drunk or acting drunk.

A statement was produced signed by the witness, in which he deposed conclusively that West was drunk. Witness eventually said that West was drunk.

Ptes. Rose and Kirk also gave evidence.

Pte. Jones denied that West was drunk, and said that he was only excited. He asked to walk up to the station, but was not allowed.

Witness admitted that he signed a statement produced, but said it had not been read to him.

Inspector Lawrence swore that it was read to him before he signed it.

P.C. Taylor stated that West was drunk.

Mr. Taylor, on oath, denied that West was drunk.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, defendant said he wanted him to leave the house because there had been a disturbance with another man, and he did not want there to be a repetition of it. When witness helped West on with his coat he was cool, but he became very excited when he was ejected from the house.

Gunner Arthur Nash, of the R.F.A., and Arthur Parker, also testified to West being sober. They had both been in company with him earlier in the evening.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: They did not know that West had pleaded Guilty to the charge of being drunk at the Camp when he was tried before his Colonel.

J.S. Knight again gave evidence corroborating the statement of the landlord as to West's condition.

Thomas West, a gunner in the R.F.A., denied the charge of drunkenness.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, he denied pleading Guilty to being drunk at the Camp, stating that he only admitted at that time that he had had a couple of drinks.

Ed. Brooks also gave evidence for the defence.

Mr. Haines maintained that the evidence was not conclusive enough to convict. The man was very excitable, and his violence was caused by seeing his young lady pushed from the door as she had been.

The Magistrates retired to consider their decision, and on their return the Chairman announced that they were unanimously of opinion that the case was proved, and a fine of 40s., with 21s. costs, would be imposed.

 

Folkestone Express 15 January 1910.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Wednesday Mr. G.W. Haines applied to the Magistrates to fix the amount of the sureties in the matter of an appeal against the conviction recorded last week for permitting drunkenness on the licensed premises of the Brewery Tap. The Magistrates fixed the sums at 25 for Mr. Taylor, the landlord, who was convicted, and another surety of 25.]

Folkestone Daily News 31 January 1910.

Monday, January 31st: Before Messrs. Herbert, Swoffer, Linton, Stainer, and Leggett.

Sydney Arthur Smith, a tall young fellow, was charged with committing an indecent assault on Ellen Staples on Saturday night.

Prosecutrix deposed that she was the wife of Edward Staples, an engine fitter, residing at 7, Garden Road. On Saturday night at 11.30 she was going home through Bradstone Road, and when near the Viaduct she saw the prisoner coming in front of her. As he passed her he said “Goodnight” and she replied “Goodnight”. She looked round to see who it was. Prisoner was a stranger to her, and she had never seen him before. He commenced to follow her, and overtook her just through the arch. He took hold of her by the shoulder and spoke to her. She replied that it would pay him better to go about his business as she was a married woman. He then dragged her across the road towards the passage in Kent Road, near Bradstone Avenue. She resisted him, and said she was not going along there. Finding he was getting the best of her she commenced to scream and threatened to give him in charge. He then put his hand over her mouth to prevent her from screaming, but she bit his hand, and he threatened to choke her. He then put a cap, or bag, or something in her mouth. At this time prisoner had got her near the back gates of the second house in the passage. Her clothes were disarranged. She screamed “Murder” and “Police”, and he pushed the cap further into her mouth so that she could not holler. He lifted her clothes and assaulted her. Someone then called from a house in Bradstone Avenue, asking what was the matter, and prisoner then ran away in the direction of Foord Road. Constable Waters came up, to whom she complained of what had taken place. She then saw P.C. Butler near Kain's shop in Foord Road, and asked him if he had seen a tall man about. Prisoner came up and said “I am the tall man you are looking for”. She then gave him into custody. She had been down the town shopping with her husband, whom she left at 8.30 in the High Street. From that time she had been in the company of two girls who worked in the laundry with her. She left them in South Street at ten minutes to eleven, when she went to look for her husband. The whole affair of the assault lasted about ten minutes. Nobody passed along during that time.

In reply to prisoner: She did not see him in the Brewery Tap. She had never been in the Brewery Tap in her life. She denied speaking to him in Bradstone Road. She did not ask him for a shilling, and did not say she would tell his wife.

P.C. Waters deposed that he was in his bed at his lodgings, 5, Bradstone Avenue, at 11.30 on Saturday night, when he heard screaming shouts of “Murder” and Police” from the passage mentioned leading into Kent Road. He opened his window and asked what was the matter. He then heard someone run away. He also heard a woman's voice saying “Won't someone come to help me?” He dressed and went down into the passage and saw the prosecutrix, who was excited and bleeding from the lips. She complained to him of the assault, saying she did not know the man, but he had gone in the direction of Foord Road, where he accompanied her. They met P.C. Butler, whom the prosecutrix asked if he had seen a tall man go that way. Just then prisoner crossed the road and said he was the tall man they were looking for. Prosecutrix replied “That's the man”. Witness and Butler brought prisoner to the police station and charged him. He made no reply at that time. He was taken below by Butler, and on his way down he said he gave the woman a shilling to go up the passage with him. He also said he had been in the Guildhall Vaults with her during the evening.

P.C. Butler corroborated the previous witness, also testified as to the evidence of a struggle having taken place in the passage, where he found a bag belonging to prisoner. On being charged at the police station prisoner said he went out with the bag to get some coal. Prisoner's hand was bleeding. Both prosecutrix and prisoner appeared to be perfectly sober.

Prisoner was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 5 February 1910.

Monday, January 31st: Before Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, and R.J. Linton, and Major Legget.

A young man named Sidney Alfred Smith, married and living at Folkestone, was charged with indecently assaulting Ellen Staple on Saturday evening. The court was cleared and the case was heard in camera.

Ellen Staple said she was the wife of Edward Staple, an engine fitter, and lived at 7, Garden Road. On Saturday evening, about 11.30, she was in Bradstone Road. She was returning home alone. She was near the Viaduct, when she saw the prisoner walking towards her. As he was passing he said “Goodnight”. Witness answered “Goodnight” and looked round to see who it was. Prisoner was a stranger to her. As she looked round, prisoner also looked round, and then turned and followed her. She continued to walk on. Prisoner overtook her near the Corporation gate, just through the Viaduct, and caught hold of her by the shoulder. He said something to her, and she replied “It would pay you better to go about your business. I am a married woman”. The prisoner then dragged her across the road towards Kent Road, in the direction of the passage which runs at the rear of Bradstone Avenue. Witness resisted him, and said she was not going along there. Finding he was getting the better of her, she screamed and told prisoner if he did not let her go she would give him in charge. Prisoner then put his hand over her mouth and she bit his hand, which caused him to remove it. Prisoner then said that if she screamed he would choke her, and he placed some soft substance in her mouth. He was carrying a bag under his arm. Prisoner and witness at that time were in the passage at the rear of the second house in Bradstone Avenue. Witness screamed “Murder” and “Police”, and prisoner then pushed the soft substance further into her mouth. He then indecently assaulted her. Someone called from one of the windows of the houses in Bradstone Avenue “What's the matter over there?” and prisoner ran away in the direction of Foord Road. Witness walked to the top of the passage, where she met P.C. Waters. She made a complaint to him as to what had happened. P.C. Butler was at the corner of Kent Road and Foord Road, and witness went across to him and said “Have you seen a tall man about?” Prisoner immediately came from the direction of the Viaduct, in Foord Road, and said “I'm the tall man you're looking for”. Witness then gave him into custody. Witness had been in the town with her husband shopping, and met two young women who worked in the same laundry. She left her husband at 8.30 in High Street, and from that time until ten minutes to eleven she was in company with the two women. She left them in South Street, and then went to look for her husband, but she did not find him. The affair with the prisoner lasted about ten minutes. Nobody passed during that time.

Cross-examined by prisoner, witness said she did not see him in the Brewery Tap in the early part of the evening, and she did not ask him to treat her. She did not see him outside of his house in Bradstone Road and ask him for a shilling.

P.C. Waters said at about 11.30 on Saturday evening he was in bed at his lodgings, 5, Bradstone Avenue, when he heard screaming and shouting coming from the passage at the rear of Bradstone Avenue. He got up and opened the back window and shouted out “What's the matter out there?” He then heard footsteps running away up the passage into Kent Road. He also heard a woman's voice say “Oh, won't someone come to help me?” Witness partly dressed and ran down into the passage, and as he did so he tripped over the sack produced. He saw the last witness at the top of the passage. She was very excited and bleeding from the lips. She told him a man had dragged her up the passage and had assaulted her. Witness asked her if she knew the man, and she replied “No”. He asked her in what direction he had gone, and she replied “Out in the Foord Road”. Witness accompanied her to the Foord Road end of Kent Road, where they met P.C. Butler at the corner of Kent Road. The last witness ran across the road and asked Butler if he had seen a tall man run along that way. Almost immediately, just across Foord Road, prisoner came up to them and said “I am the tall man you are looking for”. Mrs. Staple said “That's the man”, and P.C. Butler then took him into custody on the charge of indecently assaulting Staple. Prisoner made no reply. On the way to the police station prisoner said he gave the prosecutrix a shilling to go up the passage with him. He further said he had been in the Guildhall Vaults with her during the evening, and also in the Honest Lawyer public house.

P.C. Butler corroborated. He gave evidence of finding the bag, and spoke of seeing marks of a struggle in the passage in Kent Road. In reply to the charge at the police station, prisoner said he went out with his bag to get some coals. Witness noticed prisoner's clothing was disarranged, and that he had a slight cut on the knuckle of his right hand, which was covered with blood. Prosecutrix and prisoner both appeared to be perfectly sober.

The Chairman advised Smith to reserve his defence, which he did.

Prisoner asked for bail, as he had a wife and three little children. He was committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions. Bail was allowed, himself in 20 and one surety in 20, or two in 10.

The Chairman commended P.C. Waters on his prompt action in the matter.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 February 1910.

Monday, January 31st: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Major Leggett, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, J. Stainer, and R.J. Linton.

Sidney Arthur Smith was charged with indecently assaulting Emily Ellen Staple, a married woman. The Chairman ordered the Court to be cleared.

Mrs. Staple stated that she was the wife of Edward Staple, and she lived at 17, Garden Road. Last Saturday, at about 11.30, in Bradstone Road, as she was returning home alone, prisoner, who was a stranger to her, spoke to her, caught hold of her by the shoulder, and dragged her across the road towards the passage in Kent Road. She resisted him, and finding he was getting the better of her, she commenced to scream. She said “If you don't let me go, I'll give you in charge”. He then held his hand over her mouth and tried to stop her from screaming. She bit his hand, which caused him to remove it. He said “If you scream, I'll choke you”. He then placed some soft substance in her mouth, either his bag or cap. She screamed “Murder” and “Police”. He tightened the substance which was in her mouth so that she could not scream. Prosecutrix deposed to the nature of the assault alleged, and, proceeding, said someone shouted out of a window at the back “What's the matter over there?”, which caused accused to run away. She only had time to get to the passage before P.C. Waters saw her. She then told him what had occurred, and accompanied him to the corner of Kent Road and Foord Road, where they met P.C. Butler. She said to him “Have you seen a tall man about?” Prisoner then came from the direction of Foord Road, and said “I am the tall man you are looking for”. She then gave him into custody. She had been out shopping. She met two young women that worked with her in the laundry. She left her husband at 8.30 p.m. in the High Street, and she was with her companions until 10.50. She left them in South Street, and then she looked for her husband, but missed him.

In answer to the accused, Mrs. Staples said she had never seen him before. She did not ask accused to “treat” her, and she did not see him at the Brewery Tap. She did not ask accused for a shilling.

P.C. Waters stated that at about 11.30 p.m. on Saturday evening he was in bed at his lodgings, at 5, Bradstone Avenue, when he heard someone screaming “Murder”, “Help”, and “Police”. The sound came from the passage at the rear of Bradstone Avenue, at the beginning of the Kent Road. He opened his window and shouted “What is the matter out there?” He heard a woman shouting “Oh, won't someone come to help me?”, and he heard someone running away. He then partly dressed and ran down into the passage. He tripped over something which was lying there. He then saw complainant at the Kent Road end of the passage. She appeared to be very excited and was bleeding from the lips. She told him that a man had assaulted her. He asked her if she knew the man, and she replied “No”. He then asked in which direction he had gone. She replied “Out into Foord Road”. She then accompanied him to the corner of Kent Road and Foord Road, and he there met P.C. Butler. The prosecutrix asked “Have you seen a tall man run along this way?”. Almost immediately the prisoner crossed the Foord Road. He came right up to them, and said “I am the tall man you are looking for”. He was then told by P.C. Butler that he would be brought to the police station and charged with indecently assaulting Mrs. Staples. Prosecutrix, when she saw the prisoner, said “That's the man”. Prisoner made no reply at the time.

Prisoner: I said I was innocent.

Witness, continuing, said that P.C. Butler took accused away, and he (witness) accompanied him. Prisoner said on the way that he gave prosecutrix a shilling. He also said that he had been in the Guildhall Vaults with complainant during the evening, and also in the Honest Lawyer public house.

Prisoner: If I was Guilty, why did I come back again? She asked me for 1s.

P.C. Butler also gave evidence. He said he went to the passage and saw evidence of a struggle. He found the bag owned by accused. In reply to the charge, accused said “I went out with my old bag to get some coal”. He noticed a slight cut on the right knuckle of prisoner's hand. His hand was covered in blood.

Prisoner, who protested his innocence, was committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions for the borough, and was allowed bail, himself in 20, and one surety of 20, or two of 10.

The Chairman said the Bench complimented the constables on their very smart conduct.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 February 1910.

Local News.

In reference to the charge of assault heard before the Folkestone Magistrates last week, we are requested to state that Mrs. Staple, the prosecutrix, does not live at 17, Garden Road, but at another house in the road.

 

Folkestone Daily News 2 April 1910.

Quarter Sessions.

Saturday, April 2nd: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Sidney Alfred Smith was charged on the 31st January with indecently assaulting Mrs. Ellen Staple, a married woman. He was also charged with a common assault.

Mr. Dickens, who prosecuted, elected not to proceed with the serious charge.

Mr. Pitman advised accused to plead Guilty to the common assault, which he did, and was bound over to be of good behaviour for six months.

The Brewery Tap Appeal Case.

Mr. T. Matthew appeared for the Justices, and Mr. Pitman for Mr. Albert Taylor, the landlord.

This was a charge for permitting drunkenness on Christmas Eve, whereby the appellant, Albert Taylor, was convicted by the borough Justices, and fined 2. A full report of the case appeared in our columns at the time.

Mr. Matthew pointed out that the onus of proof was on the licensee to show that precautions were taken, and submitted that the man West ought to have been turned out before, and thus a disgraceful scene would have been avoided.

Ernest Edmonds, of the Military Police, deposed to being called to the Brewery Tap and finding West very drunk. The landlord said he had broken a picture, but he did not want to charge him with that offence. West would not put his coat on, and he had to get the assistance of Inspector Lawrence to eject him. West was very drunk.

Corpl. Kirk, examined by Mr. Matthew, said he was a Corpl. In the 2nd Oxford Light Infantry. At 8.15 on Christmas Eve he was in the Brewery Tap with two comrades, Pollard and Rose. West was then in the bar in company of a young lady. West was served with drink, but by whom witness did not know. West commenced to push witness, who at once remonstrated. West at once wanted to fight. In witness's opinion West at that time was sober. To save any further trouble, witness walked out of the bar. He returned later, and West was then against the partition with several people round him. West attempted to rush at witness, but was prevented by those standing round. Witness at once left the house.

In reply to Mr. Pitman, witness said West made a suggestion that he had spoken to his young woman, but that was untrue.

The Recorder: You have given your evidence very well, Kirk.

Private Thomas Rose corroborated.

Private Pollard further corroborated, and gave an opinion that West was drunk at 8.15.

Cross-examined: He might have been acting drunk; they do that sometimes out of swank.

Inspector Lawrence repeated the evidence given before the Justices that he took West, who was very drunk, to the police station. He reported the case to Albert Taylor the next day and told him he would be summoned. Taylor replied that he did not want any bother. West was not drunk from anything he had at the Brewery Tap, and he should not have sent for the Military Police, but for his temper.

Cross-examined: West was very drunk.

William Rye, Arthur Goddard, and Sergt. Dunster were fresh witnesses called.

Mr. Pitman said he would commence calling his witnesses first, and asked the learned Recorder to consider the point whether the appellant had not taken all reasonable precautions.

After hearing the evidence of the appellant and his barman, the Recorder quashed the conviction, deciding the point that the appellant had taken all reasonable precautions.

Conviction quashed with costs.

 

Folkestone Express 9 April 1910.

Quarter Sessions.

Saturday, April 2nd: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

An appeal was heard from Albert Taylor, landlord of the Imperial Brewery Tap, against a conviction by the Magistrates for permitting drunkenness on his premises on Christmas Eve.

Mr. T. Matthew (instructed by Mr. A.F. Kidson, the Town Clerk) appeared to uphold the conviction, and Mr. Pitman (instructed by Mr. G.W. Haines) appeared for the appellant.

Mr. Matthew, in opening, said the charge was made under section 13 of the Licensing Act, 1872, and section 4 of the Licensing Act, 1902. The former prohibited drunkenness on licensed premises, but the section of the Act of 1902, which was the important one for his purpose, shifted the onus on the licensed person to prove that he and persons employed by him took all reasonable steps to stop drunkenness on the premises. He noticed that one of the grounds of appeal was that the man was not in fact drunk, but he thought there was ample evidence that the man, in fact, was drunk. The military police were sent for to eject the man from the house, and his submission would be that the man was in such a state that the military police or the police ought to have been sent for long before the step was taken, and that the licensee or his servants ought to have got rid of the man at a much earlier hour in the evening.

George Edmonds, a lance corporal in the military foot police, said about 9.40 in the evening of Christmas Eve he was sent for to the Brewery Tap, and he went there with Pte. Jones of the Garrison Police, who was on duty with him. On arriving at the Brewery Tap he saw in the private bar Gunner West of the Royal Field Artillery. The man was drunk, quarrelsome, and it appeared to him he wanted to fight. He had his overcoat off. West was trying to stand, but he could not stand steady. Mr. Taylor, the landlord, asked him to remove West from the house, as he had broken a picture. He asked him to leave, but he would not. He was fumbling about with his coat, trying to put it on, and was staggering about. He appeared as if he did not intend to go, so witness ejected him by force. Outside witness arrested him and he became so violent that he had to call Inspector Lawrence and P.C. Taylor to assist him to take the man to the police station.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pitman, witness said he did not know the lining of the sleeve of West's coat was torn. He did not get a little impatient when West fumbled about with his coat. He did not use more force in ejecting the man than was necessary. West's girl, Alice Marsh, was clinging on to him, and the three of them went out of the house together. He did not know the girl lay insensible in the street. West was angry previous to falling down and was abusive.

Louis Edward Kirk, a corporal in the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, said about a quarter past eight on Christmas Eve he went into the Brewery Tap with two men of his regiment – Ptes. Pollard and Rose. The private bar was then full, and Gunner West was there. West was sitting down, but he saw him served with drink, and saw him bring the beer back from the counter to his seat. Witness was standing with his back to West, who began to push his leg. He turned round and told him to stop it, and West immediately got up and wanted to fight. The gunner was then perfectly sober, and the time was about a quarter to nine. Witness, to save any trouble, then walked out. The suggestion was made that he had insulted West's young woman, but he had not spoken to her. Later he went back to the house. He put his head round the door and partly got into the bar. West, who was against the partition, tried to make a rush for him, so he went out again. The people standing round West prevented him coming to the door.

Cross-examined, witness said so far as he could see the man was perfectly sober, but quarrelsome from excitement.

Thomas Rose, a private in the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, said he accompanied Kirk and Pollard to the Brewery Tap. He then corroborated the former as to what occurred, which led Kirk to leave the house. When Kirk came back to the house, West was in a drunken condition, and he tried to get at Kirk. When he was trying to get out of his overcoat, West broke a picture.

Cross-examined, witness said Kirk never said anything to West's girl, but West imagined he had. West was in a drunken condition a long time before Kirk returned a second time.

In answer to Mr. Matthew, witness said West was angry a long time before he was thrown out.

George Henry Pollard, a private in the Oxfordshire and Bucks Light Infantry, corroborated his comrade's evidence as to what occurred in the private bar. With regard to the condition of West, he said that he should say he was drunk when Kirk told him to stop knocking his leg. He saw Kirk have two half pints before he knocked West. After the former had left West wanted to fight a good many in the place.

Cross-examined, witness said apart from the fact that he wanted to fight Kirk there was nothing to make him think that West was drunk. Before the Magistrates he said West might have been “acting drunk”, and he went on to explain if a soldier had a pint of beer he sometimes “acted drunk”, “just for swank”.

The Recorder: I really do not understand you. You told me in your examination in chief that West was drunk. Now you have just told Mr. Pitman that there was nothing to make you think he was drunk apart from his quarrelsomeness. Do you mean he was drunk or not?

Witness: Yes, sir, he was drunk.

The Recorder: What do you mean by saying he was not drunk apart from his quarrelsomeness?

In reply to Mr. Matthew, the witness said a lot of soldiers had two glasses of beer, then rolled home and got put into the guardroom.

The Recorder: Why should a soldier go home as though he was drunk? What is the fun of it?

Witness: I don't know and I cannot say. I have seen it done many times.

The Recorder: Do you think he was “acting drunk”?

Witness: I think he was acting drunk.

Mr. Matthew: Do you mean he was not drunk, but acting?

Witness: The excitement and beer made him a lot worse.

Inspector Lawrence said he assisted the military police in getting West to the police station. The man was drunk and very violent.

William Rye, of 74 St. John's Street, Arthur Goddard, 29, Dudley Road, and Walter Banks, 20, Grove Road, all gave evidence of seeing West outside the house, and their opinion was that he was drunk.

Sergeant Dunster said when West was taken to the police station at 10 o'clock he was drunk and riotous. Later he looked through the peep-hole of the cell in which West was placed and saw the man lying face downwards, vomiting. When the picket came for him at 12.40 a.m. he was not able to stand. It was the custom for a fine of 3d. to be imposed on the military for fouling the cells, and West was too drunk to take the money from his pocket. Bombardier Davenport took the money from West's pocket and paid him (witness).

The Court at this stage adjourned for lunch, the case for the police having closed.

On the resumption Mr. Pitman said he proposed to call the landlord and the barman, and if the Recorder was satisfied that every reasonable step was taken by them to prevent drunkenness there would be no necessity to go into any further evidence.

Albert Taylor, the appellant, said at Christmas time he had an assistant, in addition to his wife and the barman, to help him in the business. On Christmas Eve he was on duty behind the bar from six o'clock in the evening. About half past nine he had occasion to go down into the cellar and had only been gone a matter of two minutes when his wife called out to him that there was a disturbance in the bar. During the evening his wife, the barman, and the other man had been in the bars all the evening and his instructions to them were to keep a strict eye on the condition of the people, and that if they noticed anyone under the influence of drink they were to notify him. When his wife called him from the cellar she said there was a little argument going on. When he got into the bar he was told it was an artilleryman who was responsible for it. He had not previously noticed Gunner West. There were about thirty of forty people in the bar. Up to that point there had been no disturbance in the bar, and he had never seen his house more orderly at a holiday time. He inquired of a sailor what was wrong, and he said that an artilleryman was the cause of it because someone had upset his girl. When he asked West what was wrong, he said he did not like what an Oxford had said to his young lady. He replied “Because you did not like that you are creating a disturbance in my house”, and told him to leave, because he was concerned in trying to make a disturbance. There was nothing to lead him to think that he was drunk. West's speech was thick, but nothing more than ordinary, as he was always rather thick in the voice. The reason he insisted on West going out was, as he told him, because he did not want a second edition of the row in the house. West stood firmly all through the conversation. Eventually the military police were called in, because West said he could not put him out. With regard to the broken picture, he himself broke it in putting up decorations for Christmas.

Mr. Matthew, in the course of cross-examination said he understood it was not part of the appellant's case that West was not drunk.

Mr. Pitman said what he did say was that if the Recorder was satisfied that Taylor discharged the onus upon him it would be unnecessary to go into the other evidence.

The Recorder said he took it that Mr. Pitman did not dispute that West was drunk afterwards, but did dispute that he was drunk at the time, so that the landlord could be charged with permitting drunkenness.

Mr. Taylor, in answer to Mr. Matthew, said he should have seen the first incident, when Kirk left the bar, if it was going on. He suggested it was a lie. Kirk, Pollard, and Rose might have made it up, for they were all three chums.

Edward Brooks, the barman, said he was on duty the whole of the evening in the public and private bars. He remembered Gunner West coming to the house about eight o'clock and having a glass of ale. He was in the other bar at the time of the disturbance about half past nine, and his attention was drawn to it by Mrs. Taylor. He went into the private bar, and asked West what he was doing, and he said an Oxford had interfered with his young lady. Mr. Taylor came and he (witness) went to open the door. He eventually called in the military police. There was nothing to indicate to him that West was under the influence of drink.

Cross-examined, witness said the reason the man was put out of the house was because he tried to create a disturbance. If there had been any disturbance at 8.15 he would have seen it.

Mr. Matthew addressed the Recorder and suggested that from 8.15 onwards West ought to have been under the strict supervision of those who were in the house.

The Recorder said he had very carefully considered the evidence. He was of opinion that the appeal must be maintained. The grounds upon which it was sought to set aside the conviction were five in number, but the fourth ground seemed to ne the material ground upon which he gave his judgement, and it was that the landlord and the persons employed by him took all reasonable steps for preventing drunkenness on the premises. He did not come to that conclusion upon any suggestion Mr. Matthew had made – that it might be thought to be a hard case, and that it was Christmas Eve and so forth, because it was just as great an obligation upon a licensed person to look after his house at such times – in fact, it was a greater one. He had come to the conclusion, on the evidence that he been brought before him, and that evidence satisfied him that within the meaning of section 4 of the Licensing Act, 1902, that Mr. Taylor and his agents did take all reasonable steps to prevent drunkenness on the premises. He did not propose to go to any length through the evidence that had been given before them, but he was much struck by Kirk's evidence. Kirk arrived at that licensed house about a quarter past eight in the evening. He said when he got there West was there with a young lady in the bar. He saw West bringing drink from the bar to the seat, so at any rate at that time West was in such a condition as to be able to walk to and from the bar. Kirk himself said West was perfectly sober when he went out the first time. Apparently it was not until 9.40 or thereabouts that Kirk returned, and that unquestionably was the signal for West to immediately lose his temper, and try to go for Kirk. The landlord said, and had sworn it, and he (the Recorder) believed him, that there was nothing to direct his attention to Gunner West previous to that. The landlord's evidence was corroborated by the barman and he was asked to say that the landlord did not take all reasonable steps to prevent drunkenness. He was unable to do so. Mr. Matthew drew his attention very properly to a section of the Act, and a not to it stated the effect of that section appeared to be that where any person was drunk on licensed premises that would be prima facie evidence of permitting drunkenness, and to rebut that the licensed person must prove that he and his servants took all reasonable care to prevent drunkenness. There was a further addition to the note – if a licensed person or his servant as soon as he found the person was drunk turned him off the premises he was rebutting the prima facie evidence. He did not think it was necessary to ascertain whether West was drunk or not. He thought he was drunk some time during the evening, but not in the house. The struggle with the police might have brought it about and the nausea that took place in the cells. As far as he could see the landlord had discharged all the onus upon him, and that appeal must be allowed, and allowed with costs.

Sidney Alfred Smith, 23, a labourer, was charged with indecently assaulting Ellen Staple on January 20th. He pleaded Guilty to a charge of common assault.

Mr. Dickens prosecuted, and Mr. Pitman (instructed by Mr. G.W. Haines) defended.

Mr. Dickens said no doubt the Recorder had read the depositions, and he was going to suggest that owing to the various circumstances, as well as certain information above suspicion, which the Chief Constable had received from other persons, that the man and woman were seen talking quietly together before the assault, it would be advisable for him not now to press the charge of indecency against the man, for he felt it would be practically impossible under the circumstances to obtain a conviction. The prisoner, however, did assault the woman in such a way that she bit his hand enough to make it bleed. He would be satisfied with the plea that the prisoner had made, and take a verdict of Guilty of the common assault.

Mr. Pitman said, having regard to what Mr. Dickens had said, and also to certain circumstances which had impressed themselves very much on his mind, it would have resulted in a verdict which would amount to guilty of a common assault. Mr. Dickens was satisfied that the additional information the defence could bring forward could not be doubted for one moment, and that the two were seen talking together and walking quietly along to the place into which the woman alleged she was dragged could not be doubted. The case he was instructed to put forward was entirely consistent with the story told by independent witnesses, and that the suggestion of indecency came not from the man, but from the woman, he being a married man, living with his wife quite close to the spot. The prisoner absolutely denied the suggestion that he put anything into her mouth, but he pushed her away with the sack which he was carrying. He would like to point out that Smith had been four or five weeks in prison, he not being bailed out until March 7th, and he should ask the Recorder, having regard to the whole circumstances of the case, and the undoubted unreliability of the woman's story, to take a lenient course. The woman, according to his instructions, made a demand for money, and threatened to cry if he did not accede to his request. He then lost his temper.

The Recorder said at the Police Court the prisoner said he reserved his defence.

Mr. Pitman said the prisoner outlined his defence in cross-examining the witnesses, and he was beginning to make a statement, when, at the Magistrates' suggestion, he reserved his defence.

The Recorder, addressing Smith, said he had heard what both counsel had said, and he had already formed his own opinion. He did not think it desirable to go into details. The less said about the case the better. He advised him to be careful in the future. He would be bound over to be of good behaviour for six months.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 April 1910.

Quarter Sessions.

Saturday, April 2nd: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

An interesting appeal was heard against the decision of the borough justices in convicting Albert Edward Talyor, the lessee of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, for permitting drunkenness on licensed premises.

Mr. Albert Taylor, licensee of the Imperial Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, appealed against a decision of the borough justices in convicting him for permitting drunkenness on licensed premises. Mr. Pitman (instructed by Mr. G.W. Haines) appeared for the appellant, and Mr. Matthew (instructed by the Town Clerk, Mr. A.F. Kidson) resisted the appeal.

Mr. Matthew, in outlining the case, said that the appellant was accused of permitting Gunner West, of the R.F.A., to be drunk at the Brewery Tap on Christmas Eve last. West was, in point of fact, drunk, and very drunk at 9.40 on the evening of December 24th. He was exceedingly violent; he was abusive and quarrelsome, and when he was removed to the cells he was helpless and incapable. He thought it was clear, also, that West was in the bar of the Brewery Tap from 8.15 to 9.40 p.m., when he was ejected, and there was distinct evidence that he was served with drink between those hours. At 8.15 p.m., when he was first noticed in the bar, he was quarrelsome, and was showing signs that he had had enough drink.

Evidence in support of the conviction was then called.

Corporal G. Edmunds, Military Foot Police, said that on December 24th he was on duty in Folkestone, and about 9.40 p.m. was sent for to the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street. He went there with Private Jones and found Gunner West there. He was drunk; he was quarrelsome, and had his overcoat off. He was inside the bar. He was not exactly standing there – he was “trying to stand” there. Mr. Taylor said “I want this man removed from my house; he has broken a picture”. Taylor said he did not want him charged. Witness asked him to leave, and he would not. He was fumbling about with his coat for two or three minutes, so witness had to eject him by force. After that he became very violent, and witness had to call for the assistance of Sergt. Lawrence and P.C. Taylor to take him to the police station. There was no doubt he was drunk.

Cross-examined: The barman called him in. Taylor asked him to remove prisoner from the house. West did not intend to get his greatcoat on. He was in the position of putting it on. Witness did not become impatient, but he had to throw him out. His girl was there, and was clinging on to him. West was angry, and hit out.

You have heard of a man getting angry when he thinks his girl is being insulted? – Yes.

That is a human instinct, even in the Military Foot Police? – Yes.

Continuing, witness said that the soldier did not receive an unnecessarily rough handling. Pte. Jones did not think he was roughly handled at first, but he changed his opinion afterwards. Pte. Jones was a private soldier, lent to do duty as a military policeman for the night. He was very sorry to have such men as police.

Corporal Lewis Edward Kirk, of the 2nd Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, said that on December 24th last, at about 8.15 p.m., he was in the Brewery Tap. He went there with Pte. Collard and Pte. Rose, of witness's regiment. The bar was full, and West was seated there with a young lady. He was served with drink. There was a disturbance in the bar. West began to push witness's legs, and witness turned round and told him to stop it. West then got up and wanted to fight. West was then perfectly sober; that was about 8.45 p.m. To save any trouble, witness walked out. Witness had not spoken a word to West or his girl. Witness returned later on. Pollard and Rose were still in the bar. West was up against the partition with several people round him. When he saw witness he tried to make a rush for the door, and witness went out again. Witness then told the military police of the disturbance.

Cross-examined: West might have thought that he had insulted his girl, but that was not so. He went out because as he and West were of different rank, a quarrel would have meant trouble for two.

This witness was complimented by the Recorder on the way he had given his evidence.

Pte. Rose deposed that on December 24th he went to the Brewery Tap with the last witness. West was there, but he did not see him drinking. He was sitting beside his young lady. He corroborated the evidence of the last witness, but said that when Kirk came back West was in a drunken condition. While West was getting his coat off to fight Kirk he broke some pictures in the bar. Witness saw West being taken out by the Military Police. When he was taken out the young woman who was with him was hurt.

Cross-examined: Witness could not be certain whether West left the bar for a minute or two or not during the evening.

In answer to the Recorder, witness said he could not tell how long West had been drinking before Kirk returned. He did not agree that West was sober when Kirk first left.

As to the struggle at ejection, witness said that West resisted.

Mr. Matthew: I suppose if they had been gentle, if they had beckoned to him to come out, he would have been there still. (Laughter)

Pte. Pollard, who went into the bar on the occasion in question with Kirk and Rose, gave his account of the affair. He said that West was drunk when Kirk first went out. He saw West served with drink, and saw him have two half pints. After Kirk left, West wanted to fight three or four people in the bar; he did not say why. Kirk was away about twenty minutes.

Cross-examined: There was nothing else, apart from the quarrelsomeness and excitement, to make him think that West was drunk. He observed that sometimes when a soldier had a pint of beer he rolled home “acting drunk” for “swank”.

The Recorder: Why should a soldier “act drunk?” – I do not know, but I have seen it many times. I thought that West was “acting drunk” in this case. It was very good acting.

Inspector Frank Lawrence, of the Folkestone Police, said that on the evening in question he saw West being ejected from the Brewery ap. West was drunk, and there was a struggle. Witness helped to take West to the police station. On the 27th the landlord made a statement to witness about the affair. He said “I am very sorry to have had any bother; the soldier did not appear to be any the worse for anything he had to drink whilst here. I was in the bar all the evening, but when the disturbance occurred I was down in the cellar when my wife called me up. He was then struggling with the girl he was with. He was not drunk, and if it was not for his temper I would not have called the military police in to put him out. The trouble arose over a dispute with a corporal of the Oxfords, as far as I can find out”.

Cross-examined: He had no reason to doubt that it was Mr. Taylor who sent for the military police.

Mr. William Rye said that about 9.45 on Christmas Eve he was in Tontine Street, when he saw a soldier and a woman being taken out of the Brewery Tap by the police. He should say that the soldier was “mad drunk”. The soldier was picked up; he used filthy language, became very violent, struck Inspector Lawrence, and was then handcuffed.

Cross-examined: He did not think that the woman was ejected; she came out backwards. The language used by the soldier was “very filthy for Christmas time”, when there are many females and children about.

Mr. Arthur Goddard, 29, Dudley Road, said he was a fish buyer, and on the occasion in question was in Tontine Street, and saw the soldier and woman being ejected: the soldier was drunk and spoke very hoarsely.

Cross-examined: The soldier was handcuffed because he would not walk.

Mr. Walter Banks, 20, Grove Road, said that he was a caterer, and saw the soldier and the woman being ejected. The soldier was drunk. When the soldier was on the ground he was “rather more than talking; he was swearing”. He could not walk.

Cross-examined: Witness was first asked by the police to give evidence at an election meeting held by Mr. Clarke Hall. (Laughter) That was some time after the incident.

Sergt. Dunster, of the Borough Police said that when West was brought in to the police station by the military police at 10 p.m. on the evening of December 24th he was drunk and riotous. He had no doubt as to his condition. He was put into a cell with difficulty. Witness afterwards saw West in the cell lying on the floor face downwards and vomiting. At 10.50 p.m. witness saw West again still in the same position. Corporal Edmunds then tried to rouse him, but he could not do so as he was too drunk. At 12.40 a.m. the escort came for him. He could not walk then, and had to be supported.

This concluded Mr. Matthews' case.

Mr. Pitman said that his contention would be that the prisoner had had a slight amount of drink, and the fighting and excitement made him into a drunken condition.

The Recorder said that it was clear that West was drunk at some time during the evening.

An adjournment for lunch was then taken.

On the resumption Mr. Pitman said that his defence would consist of two parts, first that the landlord took every reasonable precaution, and secondly if that was not sufficient grounds for the appeal to be upheld, he would deal with the question as to whether West was or was not drunk. To save time if possible, he would only deal with the first line of defence indicated to begin with, and would not proceed to the other unless it became necessary.

Mr. Albert Taylor said that he was the appellant in the case. He was the lessee of and resided at the Imperial Brewery Tap. There were two bars in the house, a private bar and a public bar. At Christmas time he had an extra assistant to help him. The plan now produced showed the accommodation at the bar. On the evening of December 24th witness was in the bar from six, and remained there all the time, except for a couple of minutes when he went down to the cellar. His wife was assisting him all the evening, and the barman, Brooks, was in the bars among the customers to pick up the glasses, and note the condition of those who came in. There was also an extra assistant. Witness had told Brooks to notify him if he saw anyone come in the worse for drink. The house was a tied one, and the brewers were Messrs. Mackeson, of Hythe. Witness had been in the house for about four years; he had never been in the trade before. Witness was 33 years of age, and lived with his wife and two boys at the house. The rent of the house was 50 a year, and the trade was between eight and ten barrels of beer a week. On the evening of December 24th, witness had just gone down to the cellar to draw some beer, when his wife sent for him to come up. There were at the time between 30 and 40 people in the private bar, and more in the public bar. Up to then there had been no disturbance; in fact, he had never seen his bar so quiet at a busy time. Witness went into the bar, and a sailor said that someone had upset the Artilleryman's girl, but that whoever it was had gone. West was then pointed out to him. Witness asked West what was wrong, and West replied “I did not like what he said to my young lady”. Witness said “Because you did not like that you are going to make a row in my bar”, and added that he would have to leave the premises. There was nothing in West's manner at that time (about 9.30 p.m.) to lead witness to think he was drunk. West said that he had done nothing wrong, and that he did not see why he should go out. Other people in the bar also said that he had done nothing wrong. Witness insisted that West should go because he did not want a “second edition” of the row; he thought that the other man might come back. West's speech was not then unusually thick, and he stood up properly, with his coat over his arm. Witness told West that if he did not leave he would have to put him out. West said that he could not do that, and witness then said that there was another course open, and he could fetch the police. West said “Fetch them. I have done nothing wrong, only as any other man would do”. Witness then told his barman to fetch the military police. The barman did so, and Corpl. Edmunds and Pte. Jones came. When the military police came West's young woman was assisting him to put on his coat. The lining was torn, and his arm would not come through the sleeve. As a result of that he took some time to put his coat on. While witness was trying to help him Edmunds said “You are not trying to put that coat on”. The girl stepped up and said “The lining is torn. What if he is not trying to put his coat on? He has done nothing wrong”. As soon as she stepped between Edmunds and West to do this Edmunds put his elbow against her and pushed her right backwards; she fell out over the step into the road. West then rushed forward at Edmunds, and they both fell out of the door together, the military police on top. The door was held wide open by the barman. The girl fainted outside. Apart from this there was no disturbance whatever in the house during the evening. In sending for the police witness was not influenced by any idea that the man was drunk. The picture in the bar was broken by witness himself before Christmas. The glass fell out at the struggle, but that might not have been West's fault. Witness had never had any convictions against him before.

Cross-examined: Witness noticed nothing whatever wrong with West till the incidents he had described. If he had heard the incident between West and Kirk before he would have insisted on both of them going out. He did not see West offering to fight several people, as Pollard had suggested. If it had gone on, witness would have seen it. He suggested that Pollard was lying about that. If it had been going on witness must have seen it.

Mr. Matthew: I quite agree; you must have seen it. Do you suggest also that Kirk and Rose have made this tale up?

Witness said they might have done; they were thee chums. He saw no reason why he should have sent for the military police before he did. West was thrown out with unnecessary violence. Outside West was trying to get up, but Edmunds was kneeling on him.

Mr. Edward Brooks said that he had been employed as barman at the Brewery Tap for about eighteen months. On December 24th he was in the bar, and was instructed to pick up the glasses, to see the condition of the people who came in, to see that anyone who came in drunk was put out, and to inform Mr. Taylor if there was any disturbance. Witness was in the bar all the evening, as were Mr. and Mrs. Taylor, and an extra assistant. West paid two visits to the bar during the evening. The first was somewhere near 8 o'clock, and he then had one glass of ale. About 9.20 p.m. he came in again, and had one more glass of ale. Witness saw Kirk come in, but did not see anything take place the first time between West and Kirk, because then he was in the other bar. Mrs. Taylor told him to go into the other bar when the disturbance began, and he did so. Kirk had then gone, and West told witness that someone had insulted his girl. Witness said that he must not make a disturbance in the bar; if he wanted to do so he must go outside. Mr. Taylor then came up, and witness held the door open. He did not see anything to lead him to think that West was drunk. He corroborated the evidence of Mr. Taylor as to the circumstances of the ejectment and the treatment of the girl.

Cross-examined: West was put out because he was trying to create a disturbance with Kirk. West was violent and excited when he was piu out of the house; he was angry with Kirk. He was sure that West was only served with two glasses of ale in the bar during the evening. Witness did not see any row between West and Kirk earlier in the evening, nor did he see West offering to fight people in the bar. West, at 9.30 p.m., was perfectly sober.

Mr. Pitman intimated that this concluded the first part of his case. He desired to know whether the Recorder wished him to address the Court on those points now, or proceed with evidence as to the second part of the defence to the charge.

The Recorder said that he did not desire that Mr. Pitman should address him at all. He had carefully considered the evidence in the case, and he was of opinion that the appeal must be maintained. The grounds upon which it was sought to set aside the conviction were five in number, but the fourth appeared to be ample, and on that he gave his judgement, namely that the landlord and the persons employed by him took all reasonable steps for preventing drunkenness on the premises. He had not come to that decision upon any suggestion that had been made that this might be thought a hard case, and that it was Christmas Eve, and so forth, because it was just as great an obligation upon a licensed person to look after his house at those times as on ordinary occasions. He had come to his decision upon the evidence that had been put before him in that Court, and that evidence satisfied him that within the meaning of Section 4 of the Licensing Act, 1902, Mr. Taylor and his agents had taken all reasonable precautions to prevent drunkenness on the premises. He did not propose to go at any length into the evidence given before him, but he was much struck by Kirk's evidence. Kirk arrived at that licensed house about 8.15 p.m. He said that when he got there West was there; West was served with drink, and he saw West bringing the drink from the bar to his seat, so that, at that time at any rate, West was in a condition that he could walk to and from the bar. It was about 8.45 p.m. that West began to push Kirk. The place where West was sitting had been pointed out to him (the Recorder). It was some way from the counter, and there were some thirty or forty men in the private bar at the time. Was it to be said that when that man stood up at 8.45 p.m. – when Kirk said that West was perfectly sober – was it to be expected that the landlord was to be convicted for not turning him out? At nine o'clock Kirk said that he went out, and that West was then quite sober. Apparently it was not till 9.40 p.m., or thereabouts, that Kirk returned, and that was unquestionably the signal for West to immediately lose his temper, and to go for Kirk. The landlord said – and he (the Recorder) believed him – that there was nothing to attract his attention to West up to that time. The remarks of the people around to the landlord that West had done nothing wrong were an important point. However, the landlord decided that West must go, and took steps to have him ejected. He did not think it was necessary for him (the Recorder) to find whether the man was drunk or not. He thought that he was certainly drunk at some time during that evening, but that he was not drunk at 8.30 or 9 p.m. was quite probable. Men did get overtaken by fumes, and a state of excitement and struggling such as had been described might have brought about the nausea in the cells. The landlord had discharged himself of the onus laid upon him, and the appeal must be upheld, with costs.

Sidney Alfred Smith, aged 23, a labourer, was indicted first for an indecent assault, and secondly for a common assault, on Ellen Staple, on January 29th, at Folkestone. He was committed for trial on the first count only on January 31st, and was not bailed out till March 7th. Mr. Dicken prosecuted on behalf of the Crown, and Mr. Pitman defended.

Acting on the advice of his counsel, prisoner pleaded Guilty to a common assault, but Not Guilty to an indecent assault.

Mr. Dickens intimated that he would accept the plea of Guilty to a common assault, and not proceed with the other charge. He said that the prisoner and the woman were seen talking quietly together before the assault, by a witness who did not appear at the Police Court, and he thought it would be inadvisable for him to press the charge of indecency against the man; indeed, he might also say that it would be impossible to obtain a conviction for indecent assault. That there was a common assault there was no doubt. The prisoner put something into the woman's mouth, and as a result she bit his hand till the blood came.

The Recorder said that having regard to what Mr. Dickens had said, and to certain circumstances which had impressed themselves very much on his mind in connection with the deposition as to the time and the hours that the woman appeared to have been about the town, he thought that Mr. Dickens had taken a very proper course.

Mr. Pitman, for the defendant, said that his story was that the prisoner and the woman met, that they walked and conversed together, and that the suggestion came not from the man, but from the woman. They all knew the story of Potiphar's wife. Prisoner had been recently married, and his wife lived near. Being indignant with the woman, prisoner did push her back, and she, according to a threat she had made before, cried out for the police, and so on. Prisoner absolutely denied the suggestion that he put anything into her mouth. He was carrying a sack at the time, having been picking up coal, and that might have accidentally struck her. Prisoner had already been in prison for four or five weeks, since he was committed on January 31st, and not bailed out till March 7th. In conclusion, counsel referred to the “undoubted unreliability of the woman's story”, and said that it was a little difficult to know what a man was to do under the circumstances.

The Recorder said that in such cases he always desired to see what answer the prisoner made at the time when he was first charged. He saw that at the Police Court this man said “I reserve my defence”. Why was that?

Mr. Pitman said that the prisoner's remark was one that was often made. At the Police Court he had put a good many questions to the woman, and as those questions disclosed his defence, the Magistrates' Clerk afterwards advised him to reserve the defence.

The Recorder said that that cleared up his doubt on the point, but he always did feel himself that it was very desirable to know what the answer of the man was at the time. He thought that the less said about that case the better. He would advise prisoner to be careful in the future. He would now bind him over to be of good behaviour for six months.

 

Folkestone Daily News 24 December 1910.

Saturday, December 24th: Before Messrs. Penfold, Ward, Fynmore, and R.G. Wood.

Charles Bryant was charged with breaking a window at the Brewery Tap, in Tontine Street, at 10.30 on the 23rd December.

Albert Taylor deposed that he was the landlord of the Brewery Tap. The prisoner was in his house on the 23rd. A soldier came in the worse for drink, who he refused to serve. Then prisoner asked to be served. Witness told him that the law did not permit him to serve him as he was in company with a drunken man. Prisoner became very abusive when asked to leave the house, and eventually witness ejected him through the doorway, which he shut and bolted. Prisoner then smashed the panel of the door. Witness kept it bolted while prisoner stood there using bad language. He sent for the police and gave him into custody. The damage was estimated at from 3 to 3 10s.

Joseph Hawk, of the Military Police, deposed that at about 10.40 he saw the prisoner ejected by the previous witness. He tried to get in again. Finding the door fastened he deliberately smashed the panel with his right hand. He was using filthy language the whole time he remained there, till P.C. Bourne came up and took him into custody.

R. Bourne, a Borough Constable, deposed to seeing prisoner with his hand bleeding. The landlord Taylor came out and gave him into custody. On taking him to the station he was very violent and he had to get assistance to take him to the station.

Prisoner said he went into the Brewery Tap at 5 p.m. and stopped there till 9.30, when a soldier came in and had a drink. He went out and came back, when the landlord refused to serve him. He denied breaking the window, but said the landlord pushed him through it.

The Bench considered the case proved, and fined him 3 11s. 6d. including costs.

 

Folkestone Express 31 December 1910.

Saturday, December 24th: Before Alderman Penfold, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and E.T. Ward and R.J. Wood Esqs.

Charles Bryant was charged with wilfully breaking a glass panel door at the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, the previous evening. He pleaded Guilty.

Albert Taylor, the landlord of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, said at about 10.30 the previous evening he was serving in the public bar, when one of the 11th Hussars came in. Prisoner was seated in the bar at the time. Owing to the apparent condition of the soldier, witness refused to serve him. The Hussar then said something to the prisoner, who came forward and asked for drinks for himself and the soldier. Witness told him that he could not serve him as he was getting a drink for a man who was the worse for drink. Prisoner replied “Serve me; I'm not drunk”. Witness said he could not as he was with the Hussar. Prisoner then became very abusive, and witness told him to leave the house. Bryant refused, and witness went round to him and again asked him if he would walk out of the house. Prisoner said he should not, and witness then got hold of him. Bryant twisted away and attempted to strike him. Witness closed with him and put him outside. He closed the door and held it to. Prisoner tried to return, and witness bolted the door. He then heard a smash, and some glass fell in on him. The door had one plate glass panel in it. He sent for the police, and as soon as the constable came witness went outside. Prisoner was standing about three yards from the door and was talking to the constable. He made a rush at witness, but the constable caught hold of him. Witness then gave him into custody. The amount of the damage was about 3 10s. to 4. Witness added that he saw the prisoner's hand go up through the panel, and afterwards he noticed that his right hand was bleeding.

Joseph Hawkes, corporal in the military foot police, said he was on duty in the town the previous night. At about 10.30 he was in Tontine Street outside the Brewery Tap. He saw prisoner ejected from the public bar of the Brewery Tap by the landlord, who closed the door. Prisoner tried to get in again, but finding he could not do so, he deliberately struck the glass panel of the door with his right hand and broke the glass. Prisoner remained there, and was afterwards given in custody by the landlord.

P.C. Bourne said at 10.45 the previous evening he saw prisoner standing outside the Brewery Tap. His right hand was bleeding, and he noticed the glass panel of the door of the public bar of the Brewery Tap was broken. He asked him what he had been doing, and prisoner replied “Nothing”. Then the landlord came out, and prisoner immediately attempted to strike him. The landlord charged Bryant, who became very violent on being taken into custody. Witness obtained assistance and brought him to the police station. When charged he said the landlord made him do it. Bryant was not drunk.

Prisoner was fined 5s. and 6s. 6d. costs, and ordered to pay the damage, 3, or go to prison for one month. He was taken below.

The Magistrates commended Taylor for his conduct in the case.

 

Folkestone Herald 31 December 1910.

Saturday, December 24th: Before Alderman Penfold, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Messrs. E.T. Ward and R.G. Wood.

Charles Bryant was charged with wilfully breaking a pane of glass at the Brewery Tap Inn, Tontine Street, the previous evening, and pleaded Not Guilty.

Albert Taylor, the landlord of the Brewery Tap, said that about 10.30 p.m. the previous evening he was serving in the public bar. One of the 11th Hussars came in, but witness refused to serve him, as he was drunk. The soldier then said something to prisoner, who came forward and asked for drinks for himself and the soldier. Witness refused to serve him on the grounds that he was going to get a drink for a man who was drunk. Prisoner then became very abusive, and witness had eventually to eject him. He put him outside the glass door and bolted it. Prisoner then smashed one of the glass panels. Witness then sent for the police, and gave the prisoner in custody. The extent of the damage was from 3 10s. to 4.

Corpl. Hawkes, of the Military Police, deposed to seeing prisoner ejected, and afterwards seeing him strike the glass panel of the door with his hand and break it.

P.C. Bourne said that when he took the prisoner into custody his hand was bleeding. He was very violent on the way to the police station, but was not drunk.

Prisoner was fined 5s. and 6s. 6d. costs, and the damages, 3, or, in default was committed to prison for one month. The Magistrates commended Mr. Taylor for his action in the matter.

 

Folkestone Daily News 28 June 1911.

Local News.

Alderman Vaughan and Col. Fynmore comprised the Folkestone Bench of Magistrates on Wednesday, and were occupied for two hours in adjudicating on several summonses for assault in connection with quarrels among persons residing in Bridge Street and the vicinity.

Courtenay Williams, with his wife and family, brother-in-law and friends, were in Tontine Street on Coronation evening about 7.30. Some of the part went into the Brewery Tap for the purpose of obtaining refreshment. Two men, named Todd and Barton, seemed to be out for a fight. The latter sent a lad into the Brewery Tap to ask Williams to come out. Williams responded, when Todd asked him to stand a drink, to which he agreed.

This generosity apparently did not satisfy Todd, who told him to keep his adjective drinks and come round the corner and have an adjective fight. Williams declined the invitation, and headed homewards with his party. In endeavouring to make a detour by the Linden Crescent path they went up Bellevue Street. When reaching the Honest Lawyer, Todd and Barton overtook them and commenced to fight.

Mrs. Williams went for a policeman, and Mrs. O'Brien, the sister-in-law, got between the men and endeavoured to prevent the fight.

Williams, it was alleged, was struck three times before he retaliated. He was then knocked down by Barton and brutally kicked by Todd.

The policeman arrived, Barton and Todd disappeared, and the constable dispersed the crowd that had assembled.

Several witnesses were called, including an independent one who lived in the neighbourhood. The all corroborated Williams' story in the main, although there were some trifling divergences.

The Bench, in the most inexplicable manner, dismissed the case.

Mr. G. W. Haines, the solicitor who appeared for Williams, endeavoured to address them on the fact that Williams had been assaulted many times, had sought the protection of the Bench by summoning the parties, but, with one exception, the cases had been dismissed. Mr. Haines said that murder might result unless the authorities took some firm action in maintaining the peace.

He was simply told that the case was dismissed and the Bench could hear no other application.

Henry Todd was summoned for assaulting Henry Williams, father of the previous plaintiff. He was an old man, appeared with a terrible black eye and produced a torn waistcoat, &c.

The story he told was that he was sitting by his fireside at 10 o'clock on Coronation night when Henry Todd, a powerful young man, brother of defendant in the previous case, knocked at his door, and when he opened it struck him in the eye. He and his son went outside, when he was knocked down and rendered insensible. His daughter-in-law went for the police, and Todd cleared off.

The Bench mulcted Todd in 15s. costs and required him to fix a surety to be of good behaviour for six months, or in default to go to prison for two months' hard labour.

Courtney Williams was summoned for assaulting Louisa Todd, mother of the previous defendant, at the scene of the struggle in the previous case.

Mrs. Todd swore that he attacked her with a wood chopper, or what is known as a bill-hook.

Her daughter was called as a witness, who gave an entirely different version of the matter.

However, the Justices mulcted Williams in the costs, and bound him over in his own recognisances, his offence being, as disclosed by the evidence, protecting his aged father from a brutal assault.

Elizabeth Brien was summoned for assaulting Mrs. Barton, wife of one of the men who fought in the first case.

The evidence was very conflicting, and the case seemed to have been brought for the purpose of counteracting any effect of the first charge.

However, the Justices bound the woman over in her own recognisances, and mulcted her in 11/6 costs.

We say that it was hard, and she felt indignant, paying the money, saying it was the first time she had been in a police court, and she hoped it would be the last. But if she did come again, it would be for something.

 

Folkestone Daily News 1 July 1911.

Comment.

We have no desire to criticise Messrs. Justices Vaughan and Fynmore in their extraordinary decisions of Wednesday last, neither do we wish to criticise other Justices who have adjudicated between the parties on other occasions.

We, of course, can only judge by the evidence given in Court, and by the cases as they appear to us. The Justices and Police Authorities may be in possession of other facts of which we know nothing, and they may be influenced by other matters of which we are equally ignorant.

Be that as it may, we are bound to say that the unfortunate Williams family – father, sons, sons' wives, etc. – have been most brutally treated on many occasions by various persons, from whom we should not expect much gentleness.

They have appeared in Court – man and women with terrible black eyes, bruises, proving great brutality. Except in one case, where a trifling fine was inflicted, their summonses have been dismissed, and we can hardly say, from the evidence as we heard it, that they had had justice.

Certainly such decisions will lead, unless the Justices act differently, to more serious offences, and perhaps murder.

Mind you, we are perfect strangers to both parties, and only have the cases, as presented in Court, to judge by. We have mentioned it on previous occasions, and our forecast has been accurate by repetitions of the assaults and what seems to be the persecution of the Williams family.

On Wednesday last the decision of the Justices in the first case was inexplicable. The men Todd and Barton did not take the trouble to deny that they were the originators of the disturbance, and they refused to give sworn evidence and submit themselves to cross-examination, while the case on the other side was corroborated by sworn evidence from independent witnesses, including the constable, and all witnesses were out of Court during the hearing. And yet the Bench dismissed the case. We should have thought, in the interests of maintaining the peace of the borough, that Barton and Todd would have been bound over.

In another case a man was ordered to find sureties for an assault while protecting his aged father on the evidence of two interested witnesses – a mother and daughter – who contradicted each other on every material point. Either one or the other committed deliberate perjury. A story was introduced alleging that Williams had two murderous weapons, a hammer and a chopper, one of which it is stated he used in the assault. Everyone denied ownership of these weapons, and a great deal would have depended on the proof of the ownership as to whether it was a murderous attack on the part of one side or a trumped-up story to defend the other.

If anyone had been killed, the ownership of the weapons would have had to be proved, which we say would not have been a difficult matter. To our simple minds, the police should have impounded those weapons and taken steps to prove the ownership.

We reiterate and emphasise our previous remarks – that this feud that exists, and which seems to be the brutal persecution of the Williams family, ought to be dealt with fairly and firmly in the interests of justice and the protection of human life.

 

Folkestone Express 1 July 1911.

Wednesday, June 28th: Before Alderman Vaughan and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

The Magistrates were engaged in hearing five summonses for assaults, arising out of a feud between the families of Todd and Williams, who quarrelled in Tontine Street. At the time the inhabitants of the country were supposed to be happy and rejoicing over the Coronation, the two families were going for one another, more after the fashion of Kilkenny cats, finally culminating in police court proceedings.

The first case heard was that in which Sidney Barton and Adam Todd were summoned by Ernest Edward Williams for assaulting him.

Mr. Haines appeared for the complainant in this case.

Williams said he resided at 69, Greenfield Road. On Coronation Day, about half past seven in the evening, he was in Tontine Street with his wife and his wife's sister. They went into the Brewery Tap and a boy made a communication to him, so he went outside. There he saw Todd, who asked him if he was going to treat him. He replied that he had twopence and he could have a drink. Defendant said “You come to the back, and I will ---- show you”. Complainant went into the Brewery Tap, and afterwards joined his wife and his sister outside. They went up to Belle Vue Street, and he then saw the two defendants following. They overtook him, and Barton threw up his hat and said “Me and my father are the best men in Folkestone”. He took off his jacket and complainant's sister-in-law pushed him away, when he struck at complainant. Todd came behind him and hit him in the eye, so he turned round and went for him. Barton then came behind him and knocked him down, and also kicked him. Then both of them kicked him. A policeman came up shortly after.

Cross-examined by Todd, complainant said Mike O'Brien was not present in the party. He took off his coat and fought the two of them, after he had been down two or three times.

Stephen Clarke, a labourer, of 23, Peter Street, said he knew Williams by sight, but was no acquaintance of his. He came out of doors when he saw Barton throw up his hat. Todd was with him, and Williams was walking up the street. Williams and Barton had a tussle, and Williams was thrown down, when Todd rushed across the road and kicked Williams. It was not a fight, but a tussle. Williams added “Ne'er one of them could fight for nuts”.

Elizabeth Brien said she was the wife of Michael Brien, and lived at 33, Marshall Street. Complainant was her brother-in-law, and he was out with her sister and her in Tontine Street on Coronation Day. She corroborated what Williams said with regard to what occurred in Tontine Street and Belle Vue Street. She also said that Todd knocked Williams down and then kicked him. Her husband was with them at the time.

Lily Williams, the wife of complainant, corroborated her husband's statement. She further stated that Brien was among their party.

P.C. Allen said when he arrived at Belle Vue Street it was crowded from top to bottom. Williams was bleeding from the right eye, and he complained of having been assaulted. The parties appeared to be sober.

Todd, in his defence, said he was in the Brewery Tap when Williams, Mike Brien and the party came over to him and “argued the point”. He and Barton came out of the house, and they went up Belle Vue Street. Mike Brien said “I am going to fight you”. Barton, however, tried to pacify Brien, and Williams then said they would both go for him. Williams did so, and instead of hitting him, hit Barton, who retaliated.

Barton's statement was practically similar, and a witness, named Jack Harris, called by them, apparently did not remember much about the affair.

The Chairman said the evidence was so very conflicting that it was very difficult to decide who was right. The witnesses did not seem to have stuck to the whole truth. Under the circumstances they must dismiss the summons.

Henry Todd was summoned for assaulting Robert Williams.

Complainant, a painter, of Marshall Street, said at half past ten on Coronation night a knock came at the door. Defendant stood there, and when he (complainant) opened the door, Todd struck him in the eye, which was blackened. Defendant afterwards knocked him down in the street and said “That's one laid out”. He became insensible for a time, and afterwards got up and went indoors.

Cross-examined by defendant, complainant said he had not a hammer and his son a chopper when they came out in the roadway. The chopper and hammer were produced, and complainant denied that he had ever seen them before.

Courtenay Williams said he saw his father get a blow when he went to the door. Two minutes afterwards he went outside and saw his father in the road. Todd was standing up, and witness went to pick his father up, when he (witness) got a blow. He had never seen the hammer and chopper before.

Mary Williams, the wife of the last witness, said when Todd came to the door he pulled her father-in-law into the street and struck him in the eye.

Defendant said he went to the Williams's house to tell them not to hit his sister again and to leave her alone. The two illiams' then pulled him down and he struck them. Then another of the Williams' brought out a hammer and a chopper, which he handed to his father and brother.

Lilian Todd said she saw her brother go to the door of the complainant's house. When old Mr. Williams came to the door he struck at her brother with a quart bottle. She then went to call her mother and on her return saw the father and son on top of her brother. Courtenay Williams struck at her mother with a chopper and cut her hand.

The Magistrates bound the defendant over to be of good behaviour for six months, in a surety of 10, and himself in 10, and to pay the costs, 15s., or two months' hard labour.

Courtenay Williams took his stand before the Magistrates for assaulting Mrs. Todd.

Mrs. Elizabeth Todd, the mother of Henry Todd, said she saw the two Williamses beating her son. She pulled one of them off, and then a smaller brother handed to the defendant a chopper and to his father a hammer. Defendant said “Get away; I will chop his head off”. He struck at her with the chopper and cut her hand, and also with a second blow he cut her clothing and into the flesh in her back. She eventually grasped the chopper and wrested it from him.

Lilian Todd also gave evidence, which did not tally with that of her mother.

Williams was also bound over to be of good behaviour for six months, and the Chairman said the conduct of the whole of the people was reprehensible, and the sooner they conducted themselves in a proper manner the better it would be for them.

Elizabeth Brien was summoned for assaulting Mrs. Barton.

Mrs. Barton, the wife of the former defendant, said she met Mrs. Brien in St. John's Street, and she was struck by her three times before she struck the defendant in self defence.

Lilian Todd, her sister, corroborated.

Defendant said she was not guilty, and the complainant's story was a made up affair. She did not wish to call any evidence, as it was no use.

The Magistrates ordered the defendant to be bound over to be of good behaviour for six months, and to pay the costs.

Defendant: The next time I come here I hope it will be for something. How much have I to pay?

The Chief Constable: 12s. 6d.

Defendant: Well, I hope to live for another Coronation.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 July 1911.

Wednesday, June 28th: Before Alderman T.J. Vaughan and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Adam Todd and Sidney Barton were summoned for an assault on Ernest Edward Williams. Both pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for the complainant.

Ernest Edward Williams, a painter, said that on Coronation Day he was in the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, at about 7.30, when he was called out to speak to someone. When he went out he saw defendant Todd, who asked witness if he was going to treat him. Witness said “Yes”, but defendant said he didn't want the drink, and asked complainant to come round the corner and fight. Witness walked back and finished his drink, and afterwards went up Tontine Street and proceeded to Belle Vue Street, where he and some friends went to avoid the two defendants, who followed them. Defendants overtook them at the corner of Belle Vue Street, and Barton came up and threw his hat into the air, shouting that he and his father were the two best men in Folkestone. Witness's sister-in-law tried to push Barton back, but he struck over her shoulder at complainant. Todd then came up behind complainant, and also struck him. Witness turned round and went for Todd. Barton joined the fight, and complainant was thrown to the ground, both defendants on the top of him. They both kicked him. A policeman then came up, and defendants went away. Witness had not seen either of them before that day, nor during the week to his knowledge. He could not account at all for the assault upon him. He had had no words with either defendant.

Stephen Clark, a labourer, of 23, Peter Street, said he knew complainant and defendants by sight. On Coronation Day he witnessed the scene at the end of the road. It appeared that Barton threw complainant down, and then Todd ran across the road and kicked him. “It was a cowardly action”, confirmed witness, “and if I had been a younger man I would have stopped it”. He further stated there was no actual fighting going on at all. There was simply a tussle. “Neither man could fight for nuts”.

Lily Williams, complainant's wife, gave corroborative evidence.

P.C. Allen deposed that he was called to the street. All the men appeared to be sober.

Elizabeth Brien also gave evidence to prove the assault.

Defendants both said that complainant had started the row, and that they hit him in self-defence. They called John Harris, who apparently did not witness much of the quarrel, and not enough to give a definite opinion as to who started it.

The Chairman said that on the evidence the Magistrates had nothing to do but dismiss the case.

Henry Todd was summoned by Robert Williams. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Complainant deposed that defendant came to his house on the previous Thursday evening (Coronation Day) and knocked at the door. When he went to the door defendant struck him in the face. Complainant fell, but crawled out into the street, and defendant again struck him, saying “That's one of them laid out”.

Questioned by defendant, complainant said he and his son did not attack him. They did not have a hammer and a chopper.

Defendant said he would like to produced a hammer and chopper, which, he alleged, complainant and his son had in their hands.

The hammer and chopper were produced, but complainant denied most emphatically any previous knowledge of them.

Courtenay Williams, complainant's son, and Mary Williams, his wife, corroborated.

Lilian Todd, defendant's sister, said that when her brother went to the door and spoke to complainant, Williams struck at him with a quart bottle. She did not see her brother do anything. Later she saw the Williams's in the road on the top of her brother. She also deposed that the father and son had the hammer and chopper produced.

The Bench bound defendant over in his own recognisance to be of good behaviour for six months, and also ordered him to find a surety in the sum of 10. In default, two months' hard labour.

Courtenay Lewis Williams, summoned for assaulting Elizabeth Todd on June 22nd, also pleaded Not Guilty.

Elizabeth Todd said that she was the mother of the last defendant. At 10.30 on the 22nd June she was sitting in her room when, from what her daughter told her, she went down to the bottom of the steps, and saw two men beating her son. One was the defendant, and the other was his father. Witness pulled one of them off, and then a little boy ran and gave a hammer to the defendant's father and a chopper to the defendant. Witness went to take the chopper away from defendant, and he struck at her, hitting her on the wrist, and piercing her clothes to her back. She managed, as he was striking a third time, to take the weapon from him. She then fell to the ground. When she recovered she was outside her daughter's house.

Lilian Todd, daughter of complainant, corroborated as to the defendant striking at her mother. She said, however, that her brother was not on the ground at the time, but had returned indoors. Asked how they came by the hammer and the chopper (produced), she said that her mother took the chopper from the defendant, and she found the hammer when she returned to get her mother's coat.

Defendant was bound over in his own recognisances for six months, and the Chairman remarked that the sooner the people in the neighbourhood conducted themselves in a respectable manner, the better it would be for all concerned.

Elizabeth Brien was summoned for assaulting Mrs. Eva Barton on the 22nd June. She pleaded Not Guilty.

Mrs. Barton said that on the previous night, between 8 and 9, she went to meet her husband. She was with her sister. When near the salvation Army Barracks she heard a row, and ran up St. John Street. On turning a corner she met the defendant, who struck at her and used bad language towards her. After prisoner had struck her three times she returned the blow.

Lilian Todd, sister of the defendant, gave corroborative evidence.

Defendant said that this was a made up affair between the complainant and her mother. She did not wish to call any evidence; it would be no use if she did.

Defendant was bound over in her own recognisance to be of good behaviour for six months, and had to pay the costs (12s. 6d.).

 

Folkestone Daily News 26 September 1911.

Tuesday, September 26th: Before Messrs. Ward, Fynmore and Vaughan.

Walter John Woods was charged with stealing a basket of mushrooms.

William Gower, a carrier, of Swingfield, deposed to having a cart containing mushrooms, and prisoner asked him the price of them. He replied “Fourpence a pound”. Prisoner said it was too much, and asked witness to weigh them. Witness took them to Mr. Davison's store for that purpose, and left his vehicle in the street with no-one in charge. The basket of mushrooms was left on the lorry. The prisoner was gone and the basket missing. It contained 12lbs., valued at 4s. 6d. He subsequently saw the prisoner near the Brewery Tap, and said to him “How do”. Prisoner replied “How do”. Witness gave information to the police. Just before 3 he replaced the basket, and said he had been up to Mr. Mills', in High Street, who would not give him more than 2d. per lb. for them. He said he would go and see Mr. Mills. Prisoner went away, and witness afterwards pointed him out to Sergt. Sales.

Mr. Croupe, barman at the Brewery Tap, deposed to seeing prisoner with the mushrooms.

Sergt. Sales deposed to receiving information as to the loss of the mushrooms and taking prisoner into custody.

The Bench dismissed the case.

 

Folkestone Express 30 September 1911.

Tuesday, September 26th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Alderman Vaughan, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Walter John Woods was charged with stealing a basket containing twelve pounds of mushrooms.

Wm. Gower, a carrier, living at Swingfield, said he was in Tontine Street the previous afternoon about 2.30, and he had with him a cart in which was a quantity of mushrooms. The prisoner, a stranger to him, came up to him in the street and asked him the price of the mushrooms. Witness replied “Fourpence a pound”. Prisoner said he thought it was too much. He then asked witness to weigh them, and he took the bath containing the mushrooms to Mr. Davison's store, leaving the lorry in the street without anyone in charge. In the lorry was a basket of mushrooms. Witness returned in about two minutes, and the prisoner was gone. The basket of mushrooms was also missing. They weighed twelve pounds and the value of the basket and mushrooms was 4s. 6d. About five minutes after witness saw the prisoner near the Brewery Tap. He had not then the basket of mushrooms. Prisoner said “How do”, and witness said the same. Witness gave information to the police, and at about ten minutes to three he again saw the prisoner. The lorry was still outside Davison's stores. The prisoner came up to the lorry and put the basket of mushrooms on it. He said he had been to Mr. Mills, High Street, and he would not give him more than 1d. a pound. Witness said he would go and see Mr. Mills, and prisoner went away. Soon afterwards witness saw prisoner in Tontine Street, and pointed him out to P.S. Sales. He had given the prisoner no authority to take the mushrooms from the cart, and prisoner had said nothing about finding a customer for them.

Prisoner: Didn't you give me permission to try and sell them for you? – No.

Herbert George Croucher, barman at the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, said prisoner, in company with another man, came into the bar the previous afternoon at about 2.30. The two men remained in the bar about a quarter of an hour. Then prisoner left the house. He returned in about five or ten minutes, when he had a basket of mushrooms similar to the one produced. He heard prisoner say to the other man “Take these home”, pointing to the mushrooms. The other man said “Now?” The prisoner replied “Not yet; Stokes might want to buy them”. Witness then left the bar, leaving prisoner and his friend there. He returned in about twenty minutes, and the men were still there. The basket of mushrooms was gone. P.S. Sales then came into the next bar and spoke to witness. Prisoner and the other man, who saw Sales, left the bar hurriedly. When the prisoner first came into the bar he was wearing a hard felt hat, and when he returned to the house the second time he wore a cap.

P.S. Sales said he received information the previous afternoon about the loss of a basket of mushrooms, and at about 3.20 the prosecutor pointed out the prisoner to him in Tontine Street. He went up to him and said “Woods, I shall take you to the police station and charge you with stealing about six gallons of mushrooms”. He replied “When was this? I took them back. I took them for a party to try and sell them for him. You don't call that stealing, do you?” Witness took him to the police station and charged him with the theft. He replied “I took them to try and sell them”. Prisoner gave an address at 31, Millbay, which was about one hundred yards from the Brewery Tap. There was a passage from the side of the Brewery Tap to Millbay.

The Chairman said that was a rather suspicious case, but still the Magistrates were giving the prisoner the benefit of the doubt, and they discharged him.

George Herbert Clark was charged with being drunk and disorderly.

Inspector Lawrence said at ten minutes to nine he was in Tontine Street, where he saw the prisoner ejected from the Clarendon Hotel by the manager. He was drunk and his wife tried to get him away. He refused to go and commenced fighting.

Stanley Rishton, manager of the Clarendon Hotel, corroborated.

Fined 5s. and 5s. 6d. costs, or seven days'.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 September 1911.

Tuesday, September 26th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Walter John Woods was charged with stealing a basket containing a quantity of mushrooms, the property of William Gower.

William Gower, a carrier, residing at Swingfield, stated that he was in Tontine Street the previous afternoon, at about 2.30, with a cart, upon which there was a quantity of mushrooms. Prisoner came up to him and asked the price of the mushrooms. Witness told him they were 4d. a pound. Prisoner then said he thought it too much, and asked witness to weigh a quantity of mushrooms that were in a bath on the cart. Witness took the bath for the purpose of weighing the mushrooms, leaving the cart in the street with no-one in charge. He left a basket full of mushrooms there. Witness returned in about two minutes, but prisoner was gone, and the basket of mushrooms also. There were 12lbs. of mushrooms in the basket, which, together with the basket, he valued at about 4s. 6d. Witness saw the prisoner about five minutes afterwards near the Brewery Tap. Witness then gave information to the police. He saw prisoner about 2.50 p.m. near the Co-Operative Stores. Witness's cart was opposite Mr. Davison's stores. Prisoner came up and put the basket containing the mushrooms back. He said he had been to Mr. Mills, in High Street. Witness said he would go and see Mr. Mills. Prisoner then went away, leaving the mushrooms. Witness, in company with Sergt. Sales, saw prisoner in Tontine Street. He pointed accused out to Sergt. Sales, who took him into custody. Witness gave prisoner no authority to take the mushrooms, nor had anything been said about prisoner selling them.

Albert George Croucher, barman at the Brewery Tap, said that prisoner came into the bar in company with another man on the afternoon in question at about 2.30. They remained for about a quarter of an hour, when prisoner left. Accused returned in about five or ten minutes with a basket of mushrooms similar to the one produced. Prisoner told the other man to take them home, and he asked “Now?” Prisoner said “Not now. Stokes may want to buy them”. Witness then left the bar, leaving prisoner and his friend there. A short time after they were still there, but the basket and mushrooms were gone. Sergt. Sales then came into the bar and made some inquiries. Prisoner and his companion saw Sergt. Sales from where they sat, and left hurriedly.

P.S. Sales said that he received information the previous afternoon of the loss of the mushrooms, and the prosecutor subsequently pointed out the prisoner to him. Witness went up to him and said “I shall take you to the police station and charge you with stealing some mushrooms”. Accused asked “When was this? I took them back. I took them to try and sell them for him. You don't call that stealing, do you?” Witness then took the prisoner to the police station and formally charged him. Prisoner replied that he took the mushrooms to try and sell them for the prosecutor.

The Chairman remarked that it was a very suspicious case. They would give prisoner the benefit of the doubt, and he would be discharged accordingly.

George Robert Clark was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street the previous day. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

Inspector Lawrence stated that at about 9.50 the previous evening he was in Tontine Street, where he saw prisoner ejected from the Clarendon Hotel by the manager. Prisoner was drunk, and remained in the road. He would not go away. His wife tried to get him to go, but he would not. Witness eventually took him into custody.

Stanley Rishton, manager of the Clarendon Hotel, said the prisoner came into the house at about 10 p.m. the previous day and asked for a shandy. He was drunk, and witness said he would not be served. He told him to get outside. This he would not do, and witness ejected him. There was no doubt that he was drunk.

Fined 5s. and 5s. 6d. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 30 November 1912.

Monday, November 25th: Before W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd Esqs. Edward Leary was charged with being drunk and disorderly. Prisoner, who had a large patch of sticking plaster over his eye, pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Whitehead said at 6.20 on Saturday evening he was in Tontine Street, when he saw the prisoner being ejected from the Queen's Cinema. He then went into the Brewery Tap, where he was refused drink. He (witness) went up to him and advised him to go away, but he commenced to shout and caused a crowd to assemble, so he had to take him into custody. With the assistance of P.C. Prebble he brought him to the police station. On the way he began to struggle, and while doing so he slipped and fell, cutting his eye.

Prisoner said he met a few friends from London, who gave him a drink, and it overcame him. He would leave the town if the Magistrates would let him go.

It was stated that there was nothing known of the prisoner, who was a stranger to the police.

In default of paying a fine of 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, Leary went to prison for seven days with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 November 1912.

Monday, November 25th: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. R.J. Linton, and Mr. G. Boyd.

Edward Leary, charged with being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street on Saturday night, pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Whitehead said he saw accused being ejected from the Queen's Cinema in a drunken condition. Witness advised him to go away, but he went across to the Brewery Tap, where he was refused drink. As he would not go away, witness took him into custody. At the bottom of High Street prisoner became violent and fell down and bruised his eye (which was very much swollen and inflamed).

Accused expressed regret, and said if the Bench would give him a chance he would leave the town.

Fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or 7 days' hard labour.

Prisoner went below.

 

Folkestone Express 18 January 1913.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Wednesday an occasional licence was granted to Mr. Taylor, of the Brewery Tap, to sell at the Territorial Ball at the Drill Hall on Wednesday night.


 

Folkestone Herald 18 January 1913.

Local News.

At a special transfer sessions of the Folkestone Borough Bench, before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Major G.E. Leggett, Mr. R.J. Linton, and Mr. G. Boyd, application was made by Mr. Taylor, landlord of the Brewery Tap, for an occasional licence at the Buffs' Drill Hall, from 8 p.m. on January 22nd to 3 a.m. on January 23rd for the Buffs' Annual Ball. The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 26 September 1914.

Saturday, September 19th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, G. Boyd Esq., and Col. Owen.

James Molloy was charged with stealing a pair of boots from outside the shop of Mr. J. Bainbridge, Tontine Street, and Alfred Cole was charged with receiving one of the boots well-knowing it to have been stolen. Both prisoners were privates in the Northamptonshire Regiment, and members of the new Army.

Mr. J. Bainbridge, a boot factor, of 39, Tontine Street, said on the previous day he placed a number of pairs of boots outside the shop, and they were all right during the day. About a quarter past eight, from what his next door neighbour, Mr. Whittingstall, told him, he examined his stock in the doorway, and he missed a pair of boots. The boots (produced) were his property, and he valued them at 10s. 6d.

William Whittingstall, a fruiterer, of 41, Tontine Street, said he identified Molloy. The previous evening he was by the doorway of his shop, when he saw Molloy standing by the baskets of fruit along the front of his shop. He watched him for about a quarter of an hour, when he saw him take a pair of boots from the doorway of Mr. Bainbridge's shop. He walked up the street and entered the Brewery Tap. He went into Mr. Bainbridge's shop and made a communication to him, and they then went towards the Brewery Tap, which he entered. He saw Molloy, and came out and spoke to Mr. Bainbridge, who fetched P.C. Simmonds. When Cole walked out of the public house he saw the constable take one of the boots from under Cole's tunic. The constable took Cole into custody. Before that he had seen Molloy walk out of the public house and go towards the harbour. Later he accompanied P.C. Simmonds to the True Briton Inn, and there he saw a number of soldiers in uniform. He pointed Molloy out to the constable.

George Fagg, a fisherman, of 101, Dover Street, said he was in the harbour with his boat that morning when he found the new boot (produced), and took it to the police station.

P.C. Simmonds said he was on duty about 8.10 the previous evening, when Mr. Bainbridge made a communication to him. A few minute later he saw Cole outside the Brewery Tap. Seeing he was bulky, he stopped him and asked him what he had got. He (witness) then took the left boot (produced) from under Cole's tunic. He brought him to the police station, but before doing so asked him where he got it from, and the prisoner replied “Find out”. He was detained at the station, and later he went to the True Briton Inn with Mr. Whittingstall. The bar was practically full of soldiers, and Whittingstall pointed out Molloy, whom he told he should charge with stealing a pair of boots from a shop doorway in Tontine Street that night. He replied “I know nothing about them”. He brought him to the police station and showed him the left boot (produced), and told him he should charge him with stealing it. He replied “Fourteen days will do me good. It will be better than going to the front”. He charged Cole with being in possession of the boot well-knowing it to have been stolen. He made no reply.

In reply to Molloy, witness said it was not he (the constable) who said a month's imprisonment would do him good.

Questioned by the Chairman, the constable said Tontine Street was very crowded, and anyone could take boots off the hook. The boots were in the doorway of the shop, but were not exposed the same as in some other shops. They were not hanging over the footpath.

Both prisoners asked for the case to be dealt with summarily, and pleaded Not Guilty.

Molloy said he knew nothing about the boots. He was walking up and down Folkestone for three hours, and was out enjoying himself. He had never seen the other prisoner before. He met two or three friends and remained with them about an hour.

Cole said he would admit that a soldier came up to him in the public house and told him to put the boot up his coat. Being half-drunk, he did as he was told. That was all he knew about it.

An officer from the regiment stated that both prisoners, who had recently joined the Army, had military offences against them.

The Chairman said the prisoners had disgraced the uniform they were wearing by their conduct. The Magistrates were very sorry to see two men in the new Army come before them. They would be both sentenced to a month's hard labour.

Mr. Bainbridge was called forward, and the Chairman asked if he could not look after his own goods a little better, especially in those times when Tontine Street was so tremendously crowded. It was a temptation to those men when they saw goods exposed.

Mr. Bainbridge said his goods were not displayed outside on the window, but in the doorway of the shop.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 September 1914.

Saturday, September 19th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. G. Boyd, and Col. G.P. Owen.

James Molloy was charged with stealing a pair of boots, the property of Mr. J. Bainbridge, and Alfred Cole was charged with receiving the same. They pleaded Not Guilty. Both men are soldiers in the new Army.

Mr. Bainbridge, who carries on a boot and shoe business at 39, Tontine Street, deposed that on the previous day, about 9 a.m., he placed outside the shop, in the ordinary way, a pair of men's boots. He saw them there safe several times during the day. In the evening, about 8.15, Mr. Whittingstall communicated with him. He examined the stock, and found one pair of Territorials' boots missing. He identified the boots produced.

Mr. Wiliiam Whittingstall said about 8 p.m. he was in the doorway of his shop, when he saw Molloy standing by his baskets. He watched him for about 15 minutes, and then saw him take the boots from the doorway of Mr. Bainbridge's shop next door. Prisoner walked up the street and went into the Brewery Tap. Witness spoke to Mr. Bainbridge, and together they went to the Brewery Tap. He entered the bar and recognised Molloy. He went out and called P.C. Simmonds. When he returned Molloy had gone. P.C. Simmonds, seeing that Cole, who was in the house, looked bulky, asked him what he had under his tunic. He made no reply, and was taken into custody. Later witness accompanied P.C. Simmonds to the True Briton Inn and pointed Molloy out among a number of soldiers who were at the bar.

Mr. George Fagg, a fisherman, of 7, Dover Street, said he was in the Harbour with his boat about 6.15 a.m. that morning, and found one of the boots produced in the sand. He washed it out and took it to the police station.

P.C. Simmonds corroborated the evidence given by Mr. Whittingstall, and said he found one of the boots under Cole's tunic. Molloy, when charged, said “Fourteen days will do me good. It will be better than going to the front”.

Molloy and Cole were sentenced to one month's imprisonment with hard labour. The Chairman said they had disgraced the uniform they were wearing.

The Chairman told Mr. Bainbridge that he ought not to leave his boots in a position where it was easy to steal them. It was a great temptation.

 

Folkestone Express 27 February 1915.

Monday, February 22nd: Before J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, and W.J. Harrison Esqs.

Ptes. Albert Shingleton and William Harrison, of the Middlesex Regiment, were charged with stealing twelve shirts and six pairs of pants, the property of Mr. R.G. Wood, of Tontine Street, on Saturday evening.

Albert Currie, an assistant to Mr. R.G. Wood, of Tontine Street, said on Saturday evening, about seven o'clock, he missed a bundle of six pairs of pants and a bundle of twelve shirts from a shelf in the doorway at the edge of the pavement. They were not secured in any way. He saw the articles there an hour previously. Shortly afterwards, Corpl. Inwood, of the Military Police, spoke to him, and he accompanied him and P.C. Lawrence to the lower end of Tontine Street. On their return they went into the Brewery Tap, and he there saw Pte. Shingleton coming towards the door of the house, carrying a bundle in his arm. He pointed the man out to the constable, and then went back to the shop. Shortly after P.C. Lawrence came to the shop, bringing two pairs of pants and three shirts, which he identified. The total value of the articles had not been found.

Corpl. Inwood, of the 11th Middlesex regiment, billeted in Folkestone, said he was in charge of a picket in Tontine Street on Saturday evening about a quarter past seven, when he saw the two prisoners together outside Mr. Wood's shop. They were walking towards the Harbour, and he noticed that Allen had a bundle under his arm. A few minutes afterwards he saw the last witness come to the door of the shop, and he (witness) spoke to him. From what Mr. Currie said he went with him and P.C. Lawrence to the Brewery Tap and saw the prisoners in the house. Each had a small bundle, Allen's not being wrapped up in paper, and it appeared to consist of soft goods. P.C. Lawrence took the prisoners to the police station.

P.C. Lawrence said on Saturday evening he accompanied the last witness to the Brewery Tap, where he saw the two prisoners at the rear of the house. Allen had the three shirts under his arm, and when he saw him he threw them down in the corner. He did not notice that Shingleton had anything. He brought them to the police station, and when Shingleton got there he undid his tunic and produced two pairs of pants, and said “There you are. That is all I have got”. He then charged them with stealing the articles mentioned in the charge. They made no reply.

Both prisoners pleaded Not Guilty.

Shingleton said they were in the public house sitting down when a soldier came in with the articles. He asked them to buy them, and he (prisoner) gave 1/6 for two pairs of pants. They did not steal the articles.

Allen said the soldier asked him if he could do with a couple or three shirts, and suggested that he should give him two bob for the shirts. He eventually gave the man 2/- for them. While he was examining them the constable and the “red cap” came in. He had six years' character for honesty. They did not know the other soldier.

P.C. Lawrence said Allen was the worse for drink. Shingleton was sober, but had been drinking.

An officer from the regiment said the men had nothing but military offences – really for being absent. They were both leaving on the following day with the regiment.

The Magistrates bound both men over in the sum of 5 to be of good behaviour for six months.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 February 1915.

Monday, February 22nd: Before Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. R.J. Linton, and Councillor W.J. Harrison.

Arthur Shingleton and William Allen, privates in the Middlesex Regiment, were charged with stealing twelve shirts and six pairs of pants, the property of Mr. R.G. Wood.

Mr. Albert Curry, assistant to Mr. R.G. Wood, outfitter, said that about 6.50 on Saturday evening he missed a bundle containing six pairs of pants and a bundle of twelve shirts from the doorway. They were at the end of the shelf nearest the pavement, and were not secured. Shortly afterwards Corporal Inwood, of the Military Police, spoke to him, and he accompanied him and P.C. Lawrence to the arbour end of Tontine Street. He afterwards saw Shingleton at the Brewery Tap with a bundle wrapped in paper under his arm. He called a constable and returned to the shop. Shortly afterwards P.C. Lawrence brought to him two pairs of pants and three shirts, which he identified as part of the missing bundles. He valued the whole of the bundles at 1 12s. 6d. A quantity of the pants and shirts had not been recovered.

Corporal William Inwood, Middlesex Regiment, billeted in Folkestone, said that on Saturday evening, at 7.15, he was in charge of a picquet in Tontine Street, when he saw the prisoners together outside Mr. Wood's shop. They were walking towards the Harbour, and Allen had a soft bundle wrapped in paper under his arm. A few minutes afterwards he saw the last witness come to the door of the shop. Witness spoke to him, and from what he said he went with P.C. Lawrence into the Brewery Tap, where he saw the prisoners. Each had a small bundle. Allen had a bundle of soft goods under his arm, and Shingleton had a bundle wrapped up in paper. They were taken into custody.

P.C. Lawrence said he accompanied the last witness to the Brewery Tap, where he saw the two prisoners. Allen had the three shirts produced under his arm, and when he saw witness he threw them down in a corner. He did not see whether Shingleton was carrying anything. He took them to the police station, where Shingleton unfastened his tunic and brought out the two pairs of pants produced. He said “There you are. That is all I've got”. Witness charged them with stealing six pants and twelve shirts from Mr. Wood's shop. They made no reply.

Prisoners pleaded Not Guilty.

Shingleton said they were having a drink in the Brewery Tap, when a soldier came in with the bundles and asked them to buy the goods. He (Shingleton) gave him 1s. 6d. for two pairs of pants. They did not steal them.

Allen said the soldier sold him three shirts for 2s., and while he was examining them the constable and corporal came up. He did not steal them. He had a six years' character for honesty before he joined the Army, and had never been in a police court before.

P.C. Lawrence, re-called, said Allen was the worse for drink, and Shingleton had been drinking, but was not drunk.

An officer said there were only military offences against the men; they had been absent at one time and another. Both joined on August 7th, and were leaving on Tuesday with the regiment.

The Chairman said the Bench were satisfied of prisoners' guilt, but would give them a chance to redeem their characters. They would each be bound over to be of good behaviour for the next six months.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) pointed out to the men that a person found in possession of stolen articles who could not give a satisfactory explanation was deemed to have participated in the theft.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 September 1915.

Friday, September 24th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. H.C. Kirke, and Alderman A.E. Pepper.

Henry Francis Hasson was charged with stealing a bottle containing brandy from the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, the property of Mr. A. Taylor.

Frederick Sydney Taylor, son of Mr. A. Taylor, landlord of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, said he was in the bar when prisoner entered that morning, about 9.20 a.m. Defendant had a glass of ale. There was another customer in the opposite bar. After prisoner had drunk a portion of the ale, witness left the bar, leaving the prisoner there alone. He returned in about three minutes’ time, and prisoner was still there. Three minutes later he found prisoner had left the house. A customer in the adjoining bar made a communication to him. He looked round, and found that a bottle containing brandy (produced) was missing. He missed it from a corner on the shelf opposite the counter. He did not miss anything else at the time. He then went to the door, and down Tontine Street, and saw P.C. Stevens. He proceeded later to the Marine Gardens with P.C. Stevens, and he saw the prisoner there in charge of two military policemen and his barman. He took the bottle of brandy from the barman. He had seen the bottle safe when prisoner came into the bar. He valued the brandy at 3s., and the measure attached to the bottle at 6s. 4d. They were his father's property.

P.C. Stevens said he went to the Marine Gardens with the last witness. He there saw the prisoner, who was being detained by two military police corporals and the prosecutor's barman. The barman had in his possession the bottle of brandy with the measure attached. When charged at the police station, prisoner replied "All right”.

Accused was remanded till Saturday (today).

 

Folkestone Express 2 October 1915.

Friday, September 24th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., and other Magistrates.

Henry Francis Hassen was charged with stealing a bottle containing some brandy.

Percy Sydney Taylor said he was the son of the landlord of the Brewery Tap. He was in the bar about twenty minutes past nine that morning when the prisoner came in and asked for a bottle of beer, which witness served to him. There was no-one else in the bar. He left the prisoner in the bar alone, returning in about three minutes. The prisoner was still there. Three minutes later he found Hassen had left, and a customer in an adjoining bar made a communication to him, and in consequence he looked round the bar. He then missed the bottle of brandy with the spirit measure from the corner of the shelf, which, in order to be obtained by the prisoner, must have meant him stretching full length. He went down Tontine Street, where he saw P.C. Stevens. He ultimately proceeded to the Marine Gardens with the constable, and there saw the prisoner in the company of two of the military police and the barman, who handed the bottle of brandy to him. The bottle was safe when prisoner came into the bar. The value of the brandy was 3/6, and of the plated measure 6/4.

P.C. Stevens said he accompanied the last witness to the Marine Gardens, where he saw the prisoner being detained by the military police and the prosecutor's barman, the latter having in his possession the bottle of brandy and the measure attached. He took the prisoner into custody. When formally charged at the police station, Hassen said “All right”.

The case was adjourned until the following day in order that further evidence might be called.

On Saturday the chair was again occupied by E.T. Ward, when an additional witness was called.

Edmund William Hall, 32, Greenfield Road, potman employed at the Brewery Tap, said the previous morning he was on the premises when the prisoner came in. He saw him drink some beer and leave the premises. That was half past eight. He saw the prisoner half an hour later in the saloon bar. He had a glass of ale in front of him. There was no-one else in that part of the bar. That would be about nine o'clock. Ten minutes afterwards he was outside the premises when Mr. Taylor made a communication to him. He spoke to a military policeman, and went with him to the Marine Gardens, where he saw the prisoner. He went to him and said “Where is that bottle of stuff you have got?” He replied “I have not got any”. Noticing that prisoner's right hand trousers pocket appeared to be bulky, he (witness) put his hand in the pocket and took the bottle containing brandy from it. He told the prisoner he would have to go with him. He made no reply. Hassen was taken into custody. P.C. Stevens and young Mr. Taylor asked him where the measure was, and he replied “It is in my jacket pocket”. He then handed the measure to Mr. Taylor. He saw the prisoner leave the house and proceed towards the Harbour.

Mr. Taylor said the prisoner took the measure from his pocket and gave it to him.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty. He said he was sorry for what he had done. He was drunk at the time, and he did not remember stealing the brandy. He was certainly not in his right mind.

P.C. Stevens, in reply to the Clerk, said Hasses appeared to have been drinking.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Reeve) said the prisoner had only been in Folkestone a day or two. He had in his possession Army discharge papers, which showed that after serving 84 days in the King Edward's Horse he had been discharged owing to being medically unfit.

Prisoner said he had come from New Brunswick and enlisted at Liverpool, being discharged owing to heart disease. He came down to Folkestone as he was told he could enlist in the Royal Canadian Regiment.

A letter found on the prisoner was produced, and it was to the effect that if he proceeded to Canterbury he could obtain a pass to take him back home again from the military authorities. The Magistrates bound Hassen over for three months, it being a condition of his probation that he should proceed to Canterbury immediately, obtain the pass, and go back to the States.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 October 1915.

Saturday, October 25th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. H.C. Kirke, and Alderman A.E. Pepper.

Henry Frances Hasson was charged on remand with stealing bottle of whisky from the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street.

Edmund William Hall, of 32, Greenfield Road, a bottler at the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, stated that on the previous Friday morning he was on the premises about 8.30, when the prisoner came in. He saw him have some beer and leave the premises. About half an hour later he saw defendant in the saloon bar, drinking a glass of ale. There was no one else there. Shortly afterwards witness left the shop, and about 9.10 he was standing outside, when Mr. Taylor (junr.) made a communication to him. Witness spoke to a military policeman, and then went towards the Marine Gardens, when he saw the prisoner. He went up to him and said to him “Where is that bottle of stuff you have got?” He replied: "I haven’t got any”. Witness noticed that prisoner's right-hand trouser pocket seemed to be bulky, and he took from it the bottle produced. He said to the accused “You will have to come along with me”. Defendant was then taken into custody. Mr. Taylor, junr., had come up in the meantime, and he asked where the stopper was. Prisoner replied: “It is in my jacket pocket”, and took it out, handing it to Mr. Taylor, junr.

Prisoner pleaded guilty, and said he was drunk at the time, and did not remember stealing the whisky. He was not in his right mind.

P.C. Steven said prisoner was sober, but appeared to have been drinking.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) said the man was a perfect stranger to them. He was discharged after 84 days' service in King Edward's Horse for being medically unfit.

The Chairman: What is that badge you are wearing?

The prisoner replied that it was the badge of the National reserve. He was in Canada at the beginning of the War, on a steamer at New Brunswick. He joined the King Edward's Horse, as it was a Colonial regiment. He came to Folkestone with a Canadian to join the Canadian army. He was a steward on a boat.

The Chairman said defendant would be put on probation for three months upon agreeing to go to the Officer of the Records at Canterbury, who would give him a free passage to the United States.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 April 1916.

Friday, April 28th: Before Mr. R.G. Wood and other Magistrates.

Albert Taylor, the landlord of the Brewery Tap, was summoned for allowing drunkenness.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) said he had issued the summons on information received from the military authorities, but after making several inquiries, and after an interview with the Town Commandant (Col. Burns Begg), he had decided not to offer any evidence, but to ask that the summons might be withdrawn.

Mr. G.W. Haines, who appeared for the defendant, said he was not at all surprised at the course the Chief Constable had taken. Of course, he was justified in issuing the summons on the information he had had before him. He (Mr. Haines) might say that the landlord took every precaution, and he had notices in the rooms asking any persons requested to leave the premises to do so at once. They did their best, and there was no stain on the occupier of the house.

The Chairman said the case would be withdrawn. At the same time, they were glad to see that the landlord had taken precautions.

 

Folkestone Express 6 May 1916.

Local News.

Before a sitting of the Police Court on Friday, before Councillor R.G. Wood and other Magistrates, Albert Taylor, landlord of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, had been summoned for (it was alleged) permitting drunkenness on his licensed premises. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for Mr. Taylor.

The Chief Constable said Mr. Taylor had been summoned by him on reports received from the Military Authorities. Since the issue of the summons, however, he had cause certain enquiries to be made, as a result of which he had an interview with the Town Commandant, Colonel Burns-Begg, who agreed that the best course to adopt would be for him (the Chief Constable) to offer no evidence against the landlord, and ask their worships to allow the case to be withdrawn.

Mr. Haines, on behalf of the landlord, said he was not surprised at the course taken, and he felt it was only right to say that the course taken was perfectly correct. The chief witness for the prosecution was in the Court on two other occasions, and without going too much into the matter, he was not at all surprised the prosecution did not think fit to bring him there that day. So far as the house was concerned, the landlord had always tried to do his best, and he had a notice up that anyone requested to leave the premises should do so at once. The landlord, as he had said, tried to do his best, and he (Mr. Haines) understood there was no stain on the character of the house.

The Bench agreed to the summons being withdrawn, the Chairman observing that the Bench were glad to hear that everything that could be done for the proper conduct of the house was being done.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 December 1920.

Friday, November 17th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. W.J. Harrison and Miss E.I. Weston.

Albert Taylor, landlord of the Brewery Tap, was summoned for a breach of the Shops Order. Mr. A.F. Kidson prosecuted, and Mr. V.D. De Wet appeared for the defendant, who pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Arthur John Wort said at 6.10 p.m. on Wednesday, November 21st, he visited the defendant's house. He asked for a packet of cigarettes, and he was served by the defendant's son with a 6d. packet.

Cross-examined, witness said defendant's son and he had played football together. He did not know him personally as he did not speak to him in the street. (Laughter)

Mr. De Wet submitted that the Order did not apply to licensed victuallers. They were exempted under the schedule which exempted other trades. The licensed victuallers were never asked if they wished to be exempted from being allowed to open on Wednesday afternoons. Were 110 licensed victuallers, not consulted, to be bound by a three-fourths majority of the tobacconists?

Defendant was fined 10s.

Mr. De Wet said this was a trade affair, and he asked the Magistrates to state a case, which request was granted.

Gertrude Florence Lucas (True Briton Hotel) and Ernest Mainwood (Harbour Hotel) were each fined 10s. for similar offences.

 

Folkestone Express 25 December 1920.

Local News.

On Friday morning at the Police Court summonses were heard against three defendants for a breach of the Shops (Closing) Order, for having sold cigarettes on a Wednesday afternoon, which day is the recognised half day holiday for shops in Folkestone.

The Magistrates were Dr. Tyson, Mr. Swoffer, Councillors Miss Weston, Boyd, Mumford, and Harrison. Mr. A.F. Kidson (Town Clerk) prosecuted, and Mr. De Wet defended.

Albert Taylor, licensee of the Brewery Tap, was concerned in the first case heard, and Mr. De Wet pleaded Not Guilty.

Arthur John Wort said he visited the Brewery Tap about 6.10 p.m. on the 24th November, and asked for a packet of cigarettes. He was served by the defendant's son, Albert George Taylor. He paid sixpence for the cigarettes.

Cross-examined by Mr. De Wet: No-one was in the bar when he went in, and defendant's son was behind the bar, and he thought he took the cigarettes from a shelf. He used to play football in the school team with defendant's son. He did not know him personally – he did not speak to him in the street. Mr. Pearson went to the door, and he gave him the cigarettes.

Mr. De Wet submitted that the Order did not apply to licensed victuallers. They were a class which were exempted by the very schedule the Town Clerk had referred to. Licensed victuallers were not retailers of tobacco and smokers' requisites. Had all the 110 licence holders to be bound if they were not consulted for the purposes of securing a three-fourths majority of what they were not – retailers of smokers' requisites? He asked the Bench to hold that the case was not applicable to licence holders.

The Bench retired, and on their return to Court the Chairman said the Magistrates had decided to convict, and the defendant would be fined 10s.

Mr. De Wet said it was a trade offence, and asked the Magistrates would agree to state a case.

Mrs. Lucas was summoned for the same offence.

Mr. De Wet said the case was similar to the other, and he must plead Guilty, with compunction.

A.J. Wort said he visited the True Briton, and was served by Mrs. Lucas with a packet of cigarettes.

Fined 10s.

Ernest Leonard Mainwood was similarly summoned, and A.J. Wort said he visited the Harbour Hotel about 6.15, and purchased a packet of cigarettes, for which he paid 6d.

Fined 10s.

 

Editorial Comment.

Probably we have not heard the last of the licence holders and their action concerning the sale of tobacco on the early half-closing day. The penalty inflicted on Friday last was not a severe one, but it shows they are breaking the law if they serve to their customers after the hours for the sale of tobacco. It, on the face, appears unjust, that when those hours were fixed by the Town Council, following a request by the tobacconists of the town, that the licensed victuallers were not consulted as to their wishes. If they had been the voting would doubtless have been different to what it was. It seems an anomaly that at Cheriton and Sandgate cigarettes and tobacco can be purchased on the early half-closing day, yet on the Folkestone side of the boundaries a smoker, if he has run out of his choice weed, will have to wait until the following day before he can enjoy his pipe or cigarette again. There are always officials ready to pounce on innocent offenders, but to the man in the street it seems strange that so much time can be devoted to pin-pricking tradesmen, who are endeavouring to make an honest living, yet at the same time such danger spots as that brought to the light of day by an inquest held last week are allowed to exist in a civilised community and in a fashionable town like Folkestone. It would be of interest to learn what action the Sanitary Department took in that particular matter.

Folkestone Herald 25 December 1920.

Editorial.

Bumble oracularly declared that “the law is a hass”. It is not unlikely that many people, after reading the reports of the cases in which three licensed victuallers were fined for the heinous crime of selling cigarettes on Wednesday afternoon, expressed themselves in a similar fashion. We make no reflection upon the Folkestone Magistrates who heard the prosecutions. The law being as it is, they probably felt they had no alternative but to fine the defendants. At the same time they would have shown a greater appreciation of the fitness of things by imposing a mere nominal penalty of one shilling. But the amount of the fine is not a very serious matter one way or the other. The material point is the state of things in which it is an offence for a publican to sell a cigar, cigarette or tobacco after one o'clock on Wednesday. One satisfactory result of the proceedings is that the Magistrates consented to state a case, and, as we understand, the licensed victuallers intend to take steps with a view to securing the removal of this gross anomaly. We are firm believers in law and order, but when the application of the law leads to such a pass as this we venture to suggest that it is time to enquire whether there is not some error either in the application or in the law itself.

The cases were the outcome of the operation of the Shop Hours Act, containing provision for the closing of shops one half day in every week. That measure allows a certain amount of latitude to tobacconists. They are set apart in a class distinct from shopkeepers generally; they are under no obligation to shut on the customary closing day unless a two-thirds majority petition the Town Council to make an order that they shall do so. That is what happened some years ago. The tobacconists wished to come within the scope of the general order, and the necessary majority memorialised the Corporation accordingly. But – and this is a big “but” – the licensed victuallers, who are also tobacconists, were not consulted in the matter at all. Yet they are expected to conform to an order in the making of which they had no voice! Could anything be more unfair? Simple justice and common sense alike dictate that either they should be regarded as “tobacconists”, and therefore consulted before the order is applied to them or they should not be affected by the order. Licensed victuallers are, indeed, provided for by legislation as a separate class, and they are hedged about and harassed by many restrictions from which other traders are immune. They have therefore the stronger claim to consideration in this matter.

Possibly the result of the case to be stated by the Justices will be a decision that they cannot be regarded as coming within the scope of the order. If not, then it must be hoped that the powers that be will rule that the publicans must be classed as “tobacconists” in so far as the matter of petitioning the local authority for an order is concerned. In justice to the tobacconists it must be said – so we are informed on good authority – that the majority of them are not opposed to licensed victuallers and cinemas selling cigars, cigarettes, or tobacco on Wednesday afternoon. But it is not merely the tobacconists or the licensed victuallers who have a claim to be heard on this subject. The public generally has a voice in the matter, and many people consider it is a serious grievance that they are debarred from purchasing their smoking materials at hotels and public houses on Wednesday afternoons when the ordinary tobacconists are closed. True, smokers living at Morehall, at Cheriton, at Sandgate, and at Hythe can get what they want that afternoon from the ordinary cigar stores, these being open for business as usual. Viewed in the light of this fact, the state of things at Folkestone is a still greater anomaly.

There is another aspect of the case. We are convinced that it is detrimental to the interests of Folkestone as a health and pleasure resort that the tobacconists as a body close on Wednesday afternoon, especially in the summer. If, however, they elect to close, they are free to do so. But let those who wish to meet the convenience of the public by supplying them with cigarettes and the like and also the public itself be likewise free to do as they wish. Let us have freedom all round.

Comment.

The recent prosecution of certain licensed victuallers and the Managing Director of a cinema, for selling cigarettes on Wednesday afternoon has been the subject of much comment since the cases were reported in last week's Herald. The state of affairs is anomalous in the extreme. Whilst an innocent cigarette is forbidden to freedom loving Britons in Folkestone on Wednesday afternoons, he can cross the border either to Sandgate or Cheriton and purchase all he desires in this respect. Surely it is time that steps should be taken to bring about some alteration.

With the object of securing the views of “The Trade” on this subject a Herald representative waited on the Chairman of the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers' Association (Mr. Rivers) at the Victoria Hotel, Risborough Lane. Unfortunately he was confined to his room through indisposition, but he kindly sent a message through his daughter to the effect that it was a most absurd position that a body of about a dozen men (an insignificant minority) should be able to control a majority as was done in this case.

Mr. Albert Hart, the energetic Secretary of the Licensed Victuallers' Association, on being asked his opinion on the subject, emphatically replied “Absolutely rotten. In the first place I should think the Health Committee of the Town Council would be doing a good thing if they directed Inspector Pearson to get on with his duties as Sanitary Inspector, instead of hiding up behind walls and doors whilst a boy is utilised to trap honest traders. Here is the situation. Some time ago about fourteen members of the tobacco trade (if indeed there was such a number) asked the Council to apply the provision of the Shop Hours Act to the tobacco trade in the borough. Now the enforcement of the Act means that 300 licensed tobacco dealers in the town are prevented from selling tobacco in any form after one o'clock on Wednesday”.

In answer to another query, Mr. Hart said “Yes, it applies to hotels and restaurants. All liberty-loving Englishmen revolt at such a situation, and they revolt also at the methods employed in order to secure a paltry conviction. We as a trade – combined with other tobacco licensees – intend to take steps to secure the revocation of this absurd application of a law, which was never intended to apply to the tobacco trade”.

Our representative also interviewed the manageress of a large hotel, and she kindly showed him her written instructions that tobacco could not be sold in any licensed house after one on Wednesdays, nor after eight p.m. on other days, with the exception of Saturday, when the hour was extended till nine. It was possible if a chance bar customer ordered a meal to secure a cigarette or cigar, but as to what constituted a meal there was some doubt. Some men, she remarked, could make a good meal off a hunk of bread and cheese, whilst another would probably require several courses to make up a meal. Hotel guests cannot be served after the hours mentioned above unless they are sleeping in the house.

The Manager of the Leas Tobacco Company, Sandgate Road, said it was necessary in the interests, not only of the trade itself, but the public generally, that the vexatious restrictions should be swept away. It was intolerable that an insignificant minority should rule, as in this case.

 

Folkestone Express 1 January 1921.

Local News.

On Monday John Allen, of the M.G.C., was charged before the Folkestone Magistrates with breaking into the shop of of Mr. E. Lambrini, 49a, Tontine Street, on Sunday night.

Mr. A. Taylor, licensee of the Brewery Tap, said that at 11.10 on Sunday night he heard a smashing of glass, and on going to the door of his premises he saw accused standing in front of Mr. Lambrini's shop. The window of the shop was broken, and there was broken glass on the pavement. Prisoner took a box of cigars from the shop front and placed them in the doorway of the adjoining shop. When he asked prisoner what he was doing he replied “I will let you see if you touch me; I will hit you with this” (a boot). After taking another box of cigars from the window prisoner ran away, and witness followed him as far as the church. Allen threw the box of cigars into the middle of the road, and witness picked them up. He also recovered the other box of cigars and a pipe-case which was on the pavement.

Mr. Arthur Taylor, son of the previous witness, corroborated, and said he followed prisoner into Foord Road. He gave information to a policeman in Rendezvous Street, and he later pointed out Allen to Sergt. Stiles near the Central Station, where he was talking to some civilians. Prisoner had one of his boots unlaced when they caught him.

Mr. E. Lambrini, tobacconist and hairdresser, 34 and 49a, Tontine Street, said the pipe produced belonged to the case picked up by Mr. Taylor. The value of the property was about 3.

Sergt. Stiles said prisoner was under the influence of drink when he arrested him, and his right hand was bleeding. On the way to the police station prisoner said “It is no good beating about the bush; I broke the window. I did it to get my ticket”. The pipe was found when prisoner was searched at the police station, and he also said “I am a hospital patient. I broke out of hospital”.

The Magistrates committed prisoner for trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 January 1921.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Boxing Day, before Sir Stephen Penfold and other Magistrates, John Allen, of the Machine Gun Corps, was charged with breaking into the shop of Mr. E. Lambrini, 49a, Tontine Street, on the previous night.

Mr. Albert Taylor, licensee of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, said on Sunday night, about 11.10, he heard a smashing of glass in the street. He immediately went to the door and saw the prisoner standing in front of Mr. Lambrini's shop, 49a, Tontine Street. Witness walked down to the shop, and he noticed broken glass on the pavement. The window was smashed. It was a very thick, plate glass window. Prisoner was taking a small box of cigars from the shop front, and he placed these in the doorway of the shop next door. Witness asked him what he was doing, and he said “I will let you see if you touch me, I will hit you with this” (a boot he was holding in his hand). Prisoner then took another box of cigars from the window, and ran round witness and away up the street. Witness followed him as far as his wind would allow him to run. He followed as far as the church. Accused threw the box of cigars away into the middle of the road. Witness picked them up. His son, who had been with him, kept up the chase. When he went back to the shop he collected the other box of cigars, which was in the adjoining doorway. He also found on the pavement a pipe case, which was empty. He later handed the articles over to Mr. Lambrini. The prisoner had had too much to drink.

Arthur Taylor, junr., the son of the last witness, gave corroborative evidence. He said prisoner threatened to knock his father's brains out. Witness went for a police officer, but when he had gone a little way he turned round and saw prisoner was making off, so he immediately took up the chase. He followed him and saw him go into Foord Road. He went into Rendezvous Street, where he saw a policeman, and later they saw the prisoner in Cheriton Road standing talking to some civilians. Witness pointed him out to Sergeant Styles, who then arrested him. When they caught the accused he had one of his boots unlaced.

Mr. Ernest Lambrini, tobacconist and hairdresser, carrying on business at 34 and 49a, Tontine Street, said the shop was safely locked up on Christmas Eve. He was called to the shop by the first witness about 11.20 on Sunday night. Later Sergeant Styles showed him a pipe (produced) which belonged to the case picked up by Mr. Albert Taylor. The value of the whole property was about 3.

Sergeant Styles said he arrested the prisoner near the Central Station. Prisoner was under the influence of drink. His right hand was bleeding. On the way to the police station prisoner said “It's no good beating about the bush. I broke the window. I did it to get my ticket as I am suffering from a disease”. When searched at the police station the pipe produced was found on him. Later prisoner said “I am a hospital patient. I broke out of hospital and got into these clothes”.

Accused was committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 15 January 1921.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, January 10th: Before Sir Lewis Coward.

John Allen (26) was charged with feloniously breaking and entering the shop of Ernest Lambrini, 49a, Tontine Street, and feloniously stealing therein two boxes of cigars and one tobacco pipe in case, of the total value of 3. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty. He was further charged with having received the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen, and he also pleaded Not Guilty to this charge. Mr. J.W. Weigall (instructed by Mr. A.F. Kidson) prosecuted on behalf of the Crown.

Albert Taylor, licensee of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, said that at 11.10 on the 26th December he was at supper and heard a crash. On going to the door he saw the prisoner in front of Mr. Lambrini's shop. He walked towards prisoner, and he saw him take something from the window and put it in an adjoining shop door. The window was broken, and there was a lot of glass on the pavement. He saw prisoner take a box of cigars from the window, and asked him what he was doing. Prisoner replied “I will let you see if you touch me; I will bash your head in with this” (indicating a boot he had in his hand). Prisoner, who had one boot on and one off, immediately put his hand in the window, took another box of cigars, and ran round him. Witness followed him as far as the Congregational Church. Prisoner threw the gigars into the road, and he picked them up, and gave up the chase. His son then followed prisoner, who was under the influence of drink, but he could run all right.

Albert George Taylor, son of the previous witness, corroborated, and said he was going for the police, and on turning round he saw prisoner running away. He then followed prisoner as far as Foord Road. Later on he saw prisoner talking to some civilians near the Central Station, and he was arrested by Sergt. Styles.

Sergt. Styles said that when he arrested prisoner he was bleeding from a cut on the right hand, and his right boot was not laced. Prisoner said “It is no good beating about the bush; I broke the window to get my ticket, as I am suffering from venereal disease”. At the police station he found a pipe in prisoner's pocket. Prisoner also said “I am a hospital patient. I broke out of hospital and got into these clothes” (indicating his khaki uniform).

Ernest Lambrini, hairdresser and tobacconist, said 49a, Tontine Street, was a lock up shop, and identified the cigars and pipe and case. The value of the articles was 3.

Prisoner elected to give evidence on oath, and said that on the night in question he was drinking, and was with two men. He did not remember breaking the window, but two men proposed that the window should be broken. If it was broken, the other two men must have broken it, and he told them he had no wish to break it, or to steal from anyone.

In reply to the Recorder, prisoner said he had served four years in France and Belgium with the Yorkshire Light Infantry. He had a good character when he left the Army. He was demobilised in January, 1919, and joined the M.G.C. in May, 1919.

Cross-examined by Mr. Weigall: He could not say who the two men were – they were casual strangers to him. He left them at eight o'clock, having promised to meet them at ten o'clock.

The Recorder: I should like to know how the pipe got into your pocket. – I may have done it under the influence of drink. Probably I put it there, but I cannot remember it.

The jury returned a verdict of Guilty.

Lieut. Leslie Shepherd Boyd, 1st Depot, M.G.C., produced the prisoner's conduct sheet, and the Recorder said it disclosed a terrible record.

Prisoner said he was wounded in the head while fighting on the Somme in 1916, and every time he got drunk it played on his head.

The Recorder sentenced prisoner to twelve calendar months' hard labour, and described the Army record as a scandal.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 January 1921.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, January 10th: Before Sir Lewis Coward.

John Allen, 26, a private in the Machine Gun Corps, was indicted for having, on December 26th, broken into and entered the shop of Ernest Lambrini and stolen therein two boxes of cigars, and a tobacco pipe in case, value 3. He was further charged with reeiving the goods knowing them to have been stolen. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. J.W. Weigall appeared for the Crown.

Mr. Albert Taylor, the licensee of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, deposed that at 11.10 p.m. on December 26th he heard a crash. He went outside, and, seeing the prisoner standing in front of Mr. Lambrini's shop, 49a, Tontine Street, he went up to him. He saw him take something from the window. He asked him what he was doing, whereupon accused threatened him, and said he would bash his head in with a boot, which he had in his right hand. He put his hand into the window again, and took another box of cigars (produced). He then dodged round witness, and made off. Witness followed him as far as the Tontine Congregational Church. His son kept up the chase, and witness returned to the shop. Prisoner was under the influence of drink. He was in a stupefied condition, but he could run all right.

Mr. Albert George Taylor, son of the last witness, stated that he went to fetch a policeman, but on looking round he saw the prisoner making off, and so he took up the chase. At the corner of Rendezvous Street he saw a policeman, and later they saw prisoner near the Central Station talking to some civilians. The police officer arrested the prisoner. He heard the prisoner threaten his father with a boot. Accused was under the influence of drink, but he could run very well.

Sergeant Styles, who arrested the accused at the Central Station, said Allen had a cut on the right hand, his right boot was unlaced, and he was under the influence of drink. On the way to the police station prisoner said “It's no good beating about the bush. I broke the window to get my ticket as I am suffering from venereal disease”. A pipe – found on prisoner – fitted an empty pipe case picked up by Mr. Taylor. Prisoner also stated that he had broken out of hospital.

Mr. Ernest Lambrini identified the two boxes of cigars, which were handed to him by Mr. Taylor on the night of December 26th. The valued of the cigars and pipe was about 3. It was a very thick plate glass window, and it would require a heavy blow to break it.

Prisoner, on oath, said on the night of December 26th he was drinking. As to telling P.S. Styles that he broke the window and stole the articles he did not know what he did at the time. He did not think he broke the window. He was with two men and they proposed that the window should be broken. He thought that when it was broken these men must have made off. He (witness) was only half sober at the time. He told the two men he did not want to break the window or steal anything from anyone. He was drunk at the time, and the two men might have influenced him to break the window. When he had too much to drink he became a bit mad. He was demobilised in January, 1919, after serving four years in France and Belgium with the Yorkshire Light Infantry. He had lost his discharge papers, but he left with a good character. Being unable to find employment, he joined the M.G.C. in May, 1919. Since then he had been stationed at Shorncliffe and Grantham.

Cross-examined, defendant said he did not know who the two men were. They were perfect strangers to him.

The Jury found a verdict of Guilty.

The Clerk of the Peace (Mr. H.W. Watts) said prisoner was further charged with having been convicted at Litchfield on August 5th, 1919 for stealing a bicycle.

Prisoner said that was so, but he was not Guilty then. His mate took the bicycle.

Lieutenant Leslie S. Boyd, 1st Depot Battalion, M.G.C., handed to the Recorder Allen's conduct sheet, and the Recorder said prisoner had a very bad record.

Accused said he was wounded on the Somme in 1916, and since then he had been bad, and every time he got drink it played on his head.

The Recorder sentenced prisoner to twelve months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 26 February 1921.

Local News.

Mary Ann Williams made another appearance to the Folkestone Police Court on Monday, when she was charged with having been drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street, and she pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Stevens said at 8.25 on Saturday night he ejected prisoner from the Brewery Tap, where she had refused to pay. When ejected she used filthy language.

Prisoner: I am very sorry again. I had a little drop, and it overcame me. If you will be lenient with me I will try to be good again.

The Clerk: Word for word that is what she has been saying for a long, long time.

Mr. Reeve (the Chief Constable) said prisoner was the biggest nuisance in the town. She had been convicted four times last year, three times in 1919, twice in 1918, three times in 1917, once in 1916, and so it went on right back until 1900, and altogether there were 25 convictions against her.

Prisoner was committed to prison for 14 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 7 January 1922.

Local News.

The following extension was granted at the Police Court on Tuesday: Mr. Taylor, Brewery Tap, occasional licence from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the Drill Halls, Shellons Street, on the occasion of the local R.F.A. Battery dance.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 January 1922.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Tuesday, Colonel G.P. Owen presiding, Mr. A. Taylor, of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, was granted an occasional licence to sell at the Drill Hall, from 8 p.m. yesterday till 1 o'clock this (Saturday) morning for the annual Territorial Ball.

 

Folkestone Express 11 March 1922.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 8th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and Colonel P. Broome-Giles.

Mr. Reeve (the Chief Constable) said Mr. Taylor, the licensee of the Brewery Tap, in Tontine Street, applied for an occasional licence to sell drink in the Drill Hall on Friday evening, on the occasion of a boxing tournament. The notice Mr. Taylor had sent to him was from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. He understood the boxing tournament did not commence until 8 o'clock, and why they wanted to start selling at 6 o'clock he did not understand.

Mr. Taylor said Major Bell had asked him to get the occasional licence. The present bar would be closed during the boxing, and they wanted the outside public to be on the same footing as members of the Club.

The Chief Constable suggested that the licence should be granted from 7.30 to 10.30, and he thought that would meet the case.

The Magistrates granted the licence from 7.30 to 10.30.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 March 1922.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 8th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and Colonel Broome-Giles, C.B.

Mr. Taylor, the licensee of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, was granted an occasional licence to sell drink at the Drill Hall last night, on the occasion of the boxing tournament, from 7.30 to 10.30.

 

Folkestone Express 9 December 1922.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Tuesday Andrew Devine was charged with having been drunk and disorderly the previous day in Rendezvous Street, and he pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Thorne said that at 2.20 p.m. he saw the prisoner in Tontine Street. He was offering to fight two working men, and he thrust a clenched fist into their faces. He advised defendant to go away, and he went. He saw him enter the Brewery Tap public house, and he went after him and stopped his beer. With the assistance of the landlord he ejected him.

The Clerk: What do you mean; prevented him being served?

P.C. Thorne: Yes. At 2.45 he saw the prisoner in Rendezvous Street and enter the bar of the Rose Hotel. With the assistance of P.C. Simpson he took prisoner to the police station.

Devine: I am sorry it happened.

Inspector Bourne said prisoner had been in the town about a month. He had no money in his possession.

Devine: My wife has got the money. I came here on account of my health. (Laughter)

The Clerk: You have been doing nothing since you came here except rest?

Devine: That's it, sir.

The Clerk: And this is the end of it.

Fined 10s.

 

Folkestone Express 20 October 1923.

Monday, October 15th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Alderman Dunk, Mr. W.R. Boughton, Mr. G. Boyd, Dr. Nuttall, and Councillor Miss I. Weston.

Edward Care was charged with having been drunk and disorderly, and also with committing wilful damage. Defendant pleaded Guilty to both offences.

P.C. Oliver said that at 9.15 on Saturday night he was in Tontine Street, and heard the smash of glass. He ran back to the Brewery Tap, where he saw the landlord, who pointed out the defendant, and said “That man has broken my window”.

Mr. Albert Taylor, the son of the landlord, said defendant went into the bar and was refused drink, and he said he would fetch a policeman and doctor to prove he was not drunk. He became very excited, and smashed the window.

Mr. Taylor, the landlord, said the value of the broken window was 6.

Defendant said he had been up until about two o'clock in the morning, and he was tired. He had a glass or two, which upset him, and he did not remember much about it.

Inspector Bourne said defendant had not been in Court for about eighteen years, and since that time had led a very respectable life. In February this year he was presented by the Mayor with a gold medal for splendid services rendered to an American Ship.

Defendant said the medal was presented to him by the late President Harding for saving life at sea.

Defendant was fined 5s. for having been drunk and disorderly, 5s. for the wilful damage, and 15s. costs, and the Chairman said they had never before let a man off without paying for the full damage.

The Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) said it was the first time since he had been at the Court.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 October 1923.

Monday, October 15th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Alderman W. Dunk, Mr. W.R. Boughton, Dr. W.W. Nuttall, and Miss E.I. Weston.

Edward Care was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street and doing wilful damage.

P.C. Oliver stated that at 9.15 p.m. on Saturday he was on duty in Tontine Street, near Messrs. Stokes' Stores, when he heard a smash of glass behind him. He ran back and saw the landlord of the Brewery Tap, who said “That man broke the window”, and pointed to defendant, who was being carried away by two men. Defendat shouted “I will smash the ---- house up”. He asked defendant if he had broken the window, but he made no reply, and continued shouting. With the assistance of P.C. Stevens he brought him to the police station.

Albert Taylor, son of the landlord of the Brewery Tap, said about 9.05 p.m. on Saturday he noticed Care come up the street with his wife. He was the worse for drink. He followed witness into the public bar and he then went round to the private bar, where he was refused drink. He went outside and said he would fetch a policeman and a doctor to prove he was not drunk. He made a rush at the window and smashed it.

Mr. Taylor, landlord of the Brewery Tap, said the glass was valued at 6. It was insured.

Defendant said he had been at work until 2 o'clock and was tired, and had a drink or two. He was drunk, but he did not remember breaking the window.

Inspector Bourne said it was a sad case. Defendant had not been in Court for eighteen years. In his younger days he had been there four times, but since that time he had lived a respectable life. On February 28th last he was presented with a gold medal, which had been given him by the late President Harding, by the Mayor of Folkestone for his services in rescuing passengers off an American ship.

The Chairman said defendant would be fined 5s. for being drunk and disorderly, and 5s. for causing wilful damage, and he would have to pay 15s. towards the cost of the window. If it had not been for his good character he would not have been let off so lightly.

The Magistrates' Clerk said the Bench had never previously let off a man without making him pay the full cost of the window.

 

Folkestone Express 15 May 1926.

Saturday, May 8th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer Alderman C E. Mumford, Mr. A. Stace, Dr. W.W. Nuttall, Col. Broome-Giles.

Corpl. Joseph James Newall, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was charged with wilfully breaking a hurricane lamp in Beach Street on Friday night, the property of the Corporation, and of the value of 2s. Prisoner pleaded not guilty.

Joseph Barrett, casual dock porter, employed by the Southern Railway Company, said he was in Beach Street on Friday night, at 9.40, and saw three soldiers, two privates and an N.C.O. As the soldiers got in line with him lie heard the remark “We will go on strike.'’ A hurricane lamp on a caution board was struck, and the glass broke. The N.C.O. struck the lamp with his cane. He reported the matter to P.C. Simpson, and the soldier was then running in the direction of Tontine Street. P.C. Simpson blew his whistle, and gave chase. Later he identified en the prisoner at the police station.

P.C. Simpson said that when lie gave led chase he missed prisoner at Harbour Street. He returned to Beach Street, and took the other two soldiers to the police station for enquiries. Later he saw defendant in the custody of Sergt. Hollands. Prisoner was paraded with other men, and in fairness to himself was allowed to wear a private’s jacket. He was identified by the last witness, and when charged made no reply.

Sergt. Holiands said he last saw prisoner at the London and Paris Hotel, and from what he was told he went up the Bayle steps, and saw defendant come from a passage at the rear of the houses. He stopped him outside the Globe Inn, and said “Where did you come from, Tommy?” He replied “I have just left my young lady in that passage”. He noticed he was out of breath, and his face was flushed. He said to him “You look like the soldier I am looking for. You come back with me, and we will find your young lady”. Prisoner indicated the place where he thought she went in, and he made enquiries but failed to find any young lady who knew prisoner.

Prisoner said he left barracks at 7-3O p.m., and came into the town. He had two drinks in the Guildhall, left there, and went to the Brewery Tap, and had about four drinks there. He came out about 9-16, and made his way down to the harbour. He went into another place. There was a girl sitting there, and, as soldiers did, he gave her the “glad-eye”. He got into conversation with her, and had a couple of drinks. It wanted about two minutes to 9.30, and he asked her if she would go for a walk round, and she said “Yes”. She took him round some steps, and he started to talk to her, and arranged things for the following night and left her. He came up the passage way, and when he had gone about fifty yards the Sergt. caught hold of him. He (prisoner) refused to go at first, and asked why he had taken him. Sergeant Hollands went to one house only, and asked if the daughter had been out with a soldier. The woman said "No”. A civilian went running up, and said he had seen a girl go down the other steps. They took him to the Station and they started to argue so he said he would make a complaint. He could not say much, because there was six speaking to him, and he kept his mouth closed He was not with the other soldiers.

An officer said prisoner’s military character was good. He had had about lour years service. He was made Lance-Corporal in 1923, and promoted to full Corporal in March, 1925. There was nothing against him at all.

The Chairman said they considered the case proved, and he would be fined 5s., 2s. the costs of the damage, and 2s. 6d. witness’ costs (9s 6d). They thanked Mr. Barrett for the trouble he had taken, and the very nice way he had given his evidence.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 May 1926.

Saturday, May 8th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Alderman C.E. Mumford, Mr. A. Stace, and Dr. W.W. Nuttall.

Corporal Joseph James Newell, of the 1st Battn. R. Warwickshire Regt. was charged with wilfully damaging a hurricane lamp, the property of the Corporation. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Joseph Barratt, a casual dock porter, employed by the Southern Railway, said the previous night about 9.30 he was in Beach Street, when he saw three soldiers – two privates and one N.C.O. There were two road notice boards, one at each end of Beach Street, and on each board were two lamps. As the soldiers came into line with him (witness) he heard the remark passed “We will go on strike”, and as soon as the remark was passed the lamp was struck. The N.C.O. who now stood in the dock did it.

P.C. Simpson deposed that at 9.40 p.m. the previous evening he was proceeding from the Fish Market into Beach Street, when he heard the last witness shout “That soldier has broken a danger lamp”. The soldier was on the run about 50 yards ahead. Witness immediately blew his whistle and gave chase. Prisoner ran into Harbour Street, where the chase was taken up by Sergt. Hollands. Prisoner was paraded in witness's presence at the police station with seven other men, and was allowed to put a private's tunic on. All the men were dressed alike. Prisoner was picked out by the last witness. When charged he made no reply.

Sergt. Hollands said he chased the prisoner, who ran round the corner of the London and Paris Hotel. From what he was told, witness continued up the Bayle Steps on to the Bayle Parade and by the Globe Inn he saw prisoner, who said he had just left his young lady. He made enquiries where prisoner said his young lady had gone, but could not find her.

Prisoner said he had had two drinks at the Guildhall, and then went to the Brewery Tap, where he had four drinks. He came out at about sixteen minutes past nine and went towards the Harbour. He went into the London and Paris, where he saw a young lady, got into conversation with her, and asked her what she would have to drink. About two minutes to half past nine they went for a walk round and the young lady took him round the back and up some steps to the very top. When they reached the top they talked and made arrangements for the next night, and he left her. When he came through the alleyway the sergt. came up to him and caught hold of him. The sergt. only went to one house, and that satisfied him. Afterwards a civilian came up the road and said a girl had come out of the alley. He (prisoner) was not with the two other soldiers.

An officer said prisoner's military character was good, and had no civil convictions.

Prisoner was fined 5/- and ordered to pay 2/- for the damage to the lamp, and 2/6 witness's expenses, making 9/6 in all.

The Chairman, calling Barratt before the Bench, said the Magistrates thanked him for the trouble he had taken.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 December 1928.

Local News.

“I had a drop of drink and don't remember much what passed” was the explanation of Bridget O'Leary, a charwoman, who pleaded Guilty at Folkestone Police Court on Monday to a charge of being drunk and disorderly in Tontine Street on Saturday night.

Alderman C.E. Mumford was in the chair, and on the Bench with him were Dr. W.W. Nuttall, Alderman T.S. Franks and Mr. W. Smith.

P.C. Stevens said that at about 9.45 p.m. on Saturday night he was on duty in Tontine Street, where he saw the prisoner go into the Brewery Tap public house entrance. He called her outside and told her to go away. She refused to do so and commenced to shout at the top of her voice. As she continued to do so he brought her to the police station, where she was charged.

Prisoner said she was very sorry.

Chief Constable Beesley said prisoner was not a local woman and had lately been staying at a women's hostel at Paddington. Apparently she had no home.

Prisoner was discharged on giving an undertaking to leave the town.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 April 1930.

Tuesday, April 15th: Before Colonel G.P. Owen. Mr. W. Griffin, and Miss A.M. Hunt.

Lena Lee was charged with being drunk and begging. She pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Finn said at 9.30 p.m. the previous day he was in Tontine Street, near the Brewery Tap, when he saw the prisoner. Noticing that she was drunk he advised her to go home. She then went away and started going into the Brewery Tap. He again advised her to go home as she had had enough to drink. Prisoner then went off up Tontine Street and accosted two pedestrians. He saw her receive something from two different people and not give anything in return. She was carrying a tin containing packets of lavender. She became very violent and with assistance he brought her to the police station. In her possession she had two sixpences and tenpence in coppers.

Prisoner said she was very sorry. There were other people much worse than she was. She worked hard in the fields during the summer months, and she had held a pedlar's licence for many years, although she had not got one now.

Inspector Cradduck said she was before that Court in June, 1926, charged with begging and using obscene language. On that occasion she was discharged on condition she left the town. Apart from that very little was known about her. She was a street hawker and was employed on the land at times.

The Chairman: Once before when you were in trouble you were allowed to go on undertaking to leave the town. Here you are back again.

Lee: I shan't come back again.

The Chairman: We don't want to send you to prison. We will let you go on promising to leave the town and not to come back.

Lee: I have only been here twice in 24 years.

The Chairman: If you come back you will have to take the consequences.

Lee: I will take your advice straight away.

The Chairman: Very well, you are discharged.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 December 1932.

Advertisement.

Any advertisement, whether it appears in a newspaper or elsewhere, has little or any value if it is not associated with originality. It has no influence on the mind of the individual; in other words, it has no magnetic or pulling power. Whatever we may say with regard to the above it assuredly cannot apply to the most original and beautiful display now to be seen within the portals of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street. For 27 years Mr. A. Taylor, the licensee, has had at this joyful season of the year a series of Yuletide displays, naturally of varying merit. Originality and up-to-datedness have always been associated with them.

It is the opinion, however, that this year's really charming decorative feature surpasses all that has gone before it. The entire scheme of decorative advertisement is interwoven with all that appertains to the virtues of Whitbread's ales and stouts which are on sale at that establishment here referred to,

The saloon bar, with its cosy and blazing fire, is in ordinary times always a picture, but Mr. Albert Taylor, the son of the proprietor, has waved a magician's hands over it with a notable result. In this he has been assisted by Mr. Prince, the bar attendant. He had used the colours of amber and brown to emphasise the fact that Whitbread's double brown ale, besides other beverages associated with the firm's name, are dispensed in this cosy and comfortable saloon bar. The cabinet, designed and constructed in beautifully grained British oak, is a picture, and young Mr. Taylor has here again woven in the colours with a deftness and skill which is remarkable. Attractive by day, it is doubly so by night. This long corridor-like bar is the acme of comfort.

In the adjoining public bar, owing to its construction, it lends itself more fully to the decorator. And it is here that Mr. Percy Taylor, the elder son of the proprietor, has proved once again that in decorative art, of which he has given several notable instances, he is worthy of wide recognition. On entering the room the sight is again delighted with the blending of colours, orange, red, brown and amber. The cabinet itself is also rendered very attractive.

A wonderful picture is the model of an aeroplane suspended from the ceiling. The body of the machine represent a giant bottle of Whitbread's stout or ale. The machine is at full speed, whilst the exhaust smoke from the tail end is spouting out and curling in irregular letters the words “Whitbread's stout”. At night time, when illuminated with regulation lights, this aeroplane is wonderfully attractive. A delightful little picture is a scene on the Hythe canal. The artist has depicted a stretch of water in which a graceful swan is gliding by. Folded in the wings of the bird is to be seen a bottle of Whitbread's stout.

In a small compass it is impossible to detail all that can be seen at the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, but enough has been said to prove that it is something out of the common.

In order to gain a closer acquaintance the public is invited to visit the establishment, where a cordial welcome awaits them. Mr. Taylor and his two sons are to be congratulated upon the very notable display.

 

Folkestone Express 25 March 1933.

Friday, March 17th: Before Mr. L.G.A. Collins and Eng. Rear Admiral L.J. Stephens.

Hilda May Barton (23) was charged that on the 16th March she feloniously stole from the person of William Nix a pocket wallet containing a 10s. note, a fountain pen, and some letters, to the value of 1. Defendant said she was Guilty of taking the wallet, but she took nothing out of it. She could not tell them a thing that was in it.

William Nix, of 18 Chapel Place, Dover, said he was in Folkestone the previous day on business. In Tontine Street, about midday, he was going into the Brewery Tap, when he saw the defendant, who asked him if he was going to treat her. He took her into the public house.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. C. Rootes): To more than one, I think?

Witness: Yes, sir.

Proceeding, witness said they went to a cinema in the afternoon about 3.45 p.m. They occupied seats together and defendant sat on his right hand side. Defendant said “Take off your overcoat. It must be wet”. He hung it over a seat in front. During the performance she put her head on his right shoulder. Subsequently she intimated to him that she wanted to go out. She did not return, and after a time – about a quarter of an hour – he wondered what had happened. He felt in his jacket pocket, where he had had the wallet (produced), and missed it. It had contained a 10s. note, which he had seen in it just before he went in. There were also some letters and cards and a fountain pen in the wallet. He rushed out and looked for the defendant. He saw her going down the High Street, and asked her for his wallet. She said she had not got it, and added “It must be on the seat”. He said he would give her in charge if she did not hand the wallet over. She said she had not got it, and she went up every by-street where he could not see a policeman. She ran away and dodged him in some little narrow turning. He found her creeping behind some trees, and he said he was going to follow her until he met a policeman. She took him all over the Leas and everywhere, and eventually he saw a constable and shouted out. He then gave her in charge. He valued the wallet and contents at 1, not including the 10s. note. Defendant gave him the wallet some time after he kept following her about. He said “I am going to give you in charge”, and she then handed him the wallet, saying “Here you are”. The 10s. note was gone, and so he kept following her. He asked her about the 10s. note and she said she had not got it.

Defendant said that witness returned with her to the Playhouse, where she gave him back the wallet.

Witness: I never went near the Playhouse, because the attendants know.

Defendant: After I had said I had not got the 10s. note, he followed me a good way.

The Clerk: He said that.

Defendant: We went for a bus ride before this. He has not told you about that.

By the Clerk, witness said he did not go over to the Royal Oak, on the Dover Road. Defendant said she would like to go for a ride and he took her.

Defendant: I did not ask for his company.

The Clerk: How many public houses did you go to?

Witness: Three, sir.

How many drinks did you have? – One, two, three, sir.

P.C. Brittain said at about 4.50 p.m. he was on a motorcycle patrol in Cheriton Place, where he saw the defendant and the last witness running. Nix called out “Will you stop this girl? I want to give this girl in charge. She has stolen my wallet and a 10s. note”. The girl then said “I took the wallet, but did not have the money”. He cautioned her, and told her she would have to proceed to the police station for enquiries. They proceeded to the Police Office and he was present when defendant was charged and cautioned. She replied “I admit taking the wallet, but I did not take the money”.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said he suggested that the defendant should be remanded to Holloway for a week in custody. He was not quite sure of her mental condition, and it would give an opportunity to examine that.

The Bench agreed to remand defendant for a week.

 

Folkestone Express 1 April 1933.

Friday, March 24th: Before Mr. L.G.A. Collins and Eng. Rear Admiral L.J. Stephens.

Hilda May Barton (23), a Folkestone woman, appeared on remand, charged that on the 16th March she feloniously stole from the person of William Nix a pocket wallet containing a 10s. note, a fountain pen, and some letters, to the value of 1. Defendant denied that she took the money, but she admitted taking the wallet, although she said she did not open it.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said in September, 1931, defendant was charged with vagrancy, and bound over for twelve months on condition that she went to a home at Maidstone. “Since January, 1932”, he added, “she has been wandering about sleeping out. She has been found on at least one occasion sleeping in a shed not far away from the Fishmarket, and has been taken to St. Agnes' Hostel. She is a bit of a problem and a nuisance to us. I do not know what we shall do with her”.

The Probation Officer (Mr. A.D.Z. Holmes) said that girl was ordered by that Court to enter Hope House, Maidstone, for six months, and for the greater portion of that time she did very well, but towards the end her conduct was not quite so satisfactory, and as a result of a report he had from the matron of that institution, he had the girl medically examined. The doctors, however, would not give the certificate for the purpose for which he wanted. Defendant remained in the institution for some considerable time and then begged him to get her out. A situation was found for her and she remained in that situation for something like five months. The employer's report was that she was a good worker, but inclined to stay out late at night. “She is more unmoral than immoral”, he went on. “She is a girl that apparently cannot take care of herself. She cannot stay on her feet very long without aid, and if I might suggest that she should remain in a home for two years, nominated by me, it would be better in her interests, perhaps, and in ours”.

In reply to the Bench, Mr. Holmes said the defendant's parents were very poor people, and if she went home she would not stay there very long.

The Chairman asked defendant if she was prepared to enter a home as the Probation Officer had suggested.

Defendant: Yes, sir.

The Chairman: Then you will be bound over for two years to enter a home according to Mr. Holmes.

The Probation Officer: Meanwhile she enters St. Agnes' Hostel.

The Chairman: Yes.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. C. Rootes) then asked if the prosecutor, Mr. Nix, was present, and the man was called forward.

The Chairman: We don't think very much of the part you took in this, to take a young girl round to public houses like you did.

Mr. Nix: Well, I don't know, sir. She asked me.

The Chairman: Well, you ought to know better.

The Clerk: I am not sure if the excuse he gives is sufficient.

Eng. Rear Admiral Stephens: Perfectly disgraceful, I call it, for a man of your age.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 April 1933.

Local News.

Hilda May Barton, a young woman, who had been remanded on a charge of stealing a wallet from William Nicks, an elderly man, was brought before the Court again on Friday of last week, when she was sent to a home. It was alleged that Barton stole the wallets from Nicks whilst they were at a cinema.

The Clerk (Mr. C. Rootes) said at the previous hearing prisoner had pleaded Not Guilty.

Barton said she did not take the money, although she admitted taking the wallet, which she could not open.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said Barton was born at Ashford in 1910, and later went to Mersham and Smeeth. She stayed at home until she was 17, and then she went to Brighton, where she was a waitress for two years. Since then she had been employed at various places in Folkestone. On September 23rd, 1931, she had been charged at that Court with vagrancy, and bound over for 12 months on condition she went to a home at Maidstone. She remained there until March 9th, 1932. Since January of this year she had been wandering about and sleeping out. She was found on one occasion sleeping in an old shed. She was a bit of a nuisance to the police.

The Probation Officer (Mr. A.D.Z. Holmes) said during the greater part of the time Barton was at the home she did very well, although towards the end of the period her conduct was not so satisfactory. She was in an institution for a time, and begged him to get her out. He did so, a situation being found for her. She remained in the job for some five months. Her employer stated that she was a good worker but inclined to stay out late at nights. He (Mr. Holmes) thought Barton was more unmoral than immoral. She was a girl who could not take care of herself. He thought it would be to her best interests for her to enter a home for a period of two years.

The Chairman (Mr. L.G.A. Collins): Are you prepared to enter a home? – Yes.

The Chairman (continuing): Then you will be bound over for two years on condition you enter a home chosen for you by Mr. Holmes.

The Clerk then asked if the prosecutor was in Court, and when Mr. Nicks, a Dover man, came forward the Chairman said the Magistrates did not think much of the part he took in taking this young girl round to a number of public houses.

Mr. Nicks: I did not know.

The Chairman: You ought to have known better.

Admiral L.J. Stephens (sitting with Mr. Collins): It is perfectly disgraceful for a man of your age.

 

Folkestone Express 2 February 1935.

Saturday, January 26th: Before Dr. W.W. Nuttall, Alderman T.S. Franks, and Mr. R.J. Stokes.

Trooper Frederick Robert Paxton, 15th/19th Hussars, was charged with wilful damage by breaking a glass panel in the door of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, the previous night. He pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Dolbear said at 10.30 the previous night he was instructed to proceed to the Brewery Tap. On arrival there he saw the defendant in conversation with Mr. Peter Taylor, the eldest son of the licensee. In consequence of what was said he cautioned Paxton and asked him if he knew anything about the breaking of the glass panel. He replied he knew nothing about it. He (witness) then noticed there was blood on the back of his left hand, and he said he did not know how that was caused. Later he charged Paxton with the offence, and he replied “All right”.

Mr. P.S. Taylor said at about 10.30 the previous night he was in the public bar when he heard a repeated knocking at the back door. He hesitated for a moment before he went to the door, and then upon opening it a blow shattered a panel of glass in the window of the door. He heard footsteps running through the passage and he followed. He found his brother detaining the defendant, who said he had not been there before. The value of the window was 2s. 6d.

Defendant had no explanation to make.

P.C. Dolbear, re-called, said the defendant smelt of drink, but was not drunk.

An officer from the regiment said Paxton had been with them over four years and during the last 18 months he had been in charge of the stores. His conduct was satisfactory, and he was a very hard worker.

A fine of 20s. was imposed, and the defendant was ordered to pay 2s. 6d. for the damage.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 February 1935.

Local News.

Trooper Frederick Robert Paxton, of the 15/19th King’s Royal Hussars, pleaded guilty at the Folkestone Police Court on Saturday to wilfully damaging a glass panel of a door at the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, the previous night.

The Magistrates were: Dr. W.W. Nuttall (in the chair), Alderman T.S. Franks and Mr. R.J. Stokes.

P.C. Dolbear said at 10.30 p.m. on Friday he was instructed from the police office to go to the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, where a window had been smashed. When he arrived he saw Paxton being spoken to by Mr. Peter Taylor, the elder son of the licensee. In consequence of what he heard he cautioned defendant. He said to him “Do you know anything about this?” He replied “I know nothing”. Witness then noticed that there was blood on the back of Paxton’s left hand. He asked him to explain it and he said he did not know. Later Paxton was charged with breaking the panel of glass and he replied “I did it all right”.

Mr. Percy S. Taylor, Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, said about 10.30 the previous night he was in the public bar when he heard a repeated knocking at the back door. He hesitated for a moment before going to the door and he was about to go to it when a blow from outside shattered a panel in the door. He heard footsteps running through the passage. He followed and found his brother detaining defendant. The value of the broken panel was 2s. 6d.

Paxton said he had no explanation to make. He admitted doing it.

P.C. Dolbear, re-called, said defendant smelt of drink, but he was not drunk.

The Chairman: Have you no explanation of your conduct?

Defendant: No.

An officer said Paxton had been with them for four years. During the last 18 months he had been in charge of the musketry stores, and he had shown himself a very good worker.

The Magistrates fined Paxton 20s. with 2s. 6d. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 January 1943.

Local News.

At a licensing transfer sessions at the Town Hall, Folkestone, on Wednesday, the licence of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, was transferred from Mr. Albert Taylor to Mr. R.P. Rawlings, a Director of Hythe Brewery.

Note: Not listed in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 January 1945.

Local News.

The licence of the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, which has been in suspense since September, 1940, when the premises were closed through damage caused by enemy action, was at Folkestone Transfer Sessions on Wednesday transferred from Mr. R.P. Rawlings, Managing Director of Messrs. Mackeson and Co., Ltd., to Mr. A. Taylor, the former tenant.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 May 1947.

Obituary.

Mr. Albert Taylor, of the Imperial Brewery Tap, Tontine Street, one of Folkestone’s oldest and best known licensees, died after an illness of a few days on Thursday last week. He was 69.

Born at Littlebourne, Mr.Taylor came to Folkestone in 1906, when He took over the management of the Brewery Tap.

He had a narrow escape from death in the 1914-18 war. During the disastrous air raid on Tontine Street in the spring of 1917 he was in the Brewery Tap; although premises on either side and opposite were seriously damaged, and his own premises suffered considerably by blast, he escaped uninjured. During the last war he moved with his wife to Devonshire, her former home. After a sojourn of two years there, they took up residence in Hertfordshire where they remained for three years before returning to Folkestone.

The funeral took place at Hawkinge on Wednesday.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 June 1966.

Local News.

Albert Taylor was seven years old when his parents arrived in Folkestone 60 years ago to take over the licence of the Brewery Tap in Tontine Street. Man and boy, Mr. Taylor has been there ever since. If a prize was given for the best-kept public house in Folkestone it would surely go to the Brewery Tap. Mr. Taylor, who took over the licence when his father died in 1947, is a publican with an inordinate pride in his trade. Every glass, every mirror and every piece of glass shines. Not a speck of dust sullies the shelves or counters, No doubt about it, Mr. Taylor and his wife, Ivy, are very public house proud.

“When my father first came here from Tilmanstone in 1906 he was warned that the house had a bad name”, said Mr. Taylor, as he leaned across the spotless counter of the saloon bar. “The place was very dirty and the trade had fallen off very badly”. A big change came over the Brewery Tap after the arrival of the Taylors. Very soon, everything was spick and span. Young Albert, who went to the old Wesleyan School on Hillside, Dover Road, helped his parents in his spare time. “One of my jobs was to fill the containers of matches and clay pipes on the counters”, he told me. “The matches and pipes were free to customers”. And what about the prices 60 years ago? Proprietary whisky at 2d. a nip or 3s. 6d. a bottle. Whisky drawn from bulk at 1d. a nip or 2s. 6d. a bottle, beer at 2d. a pint and a packet of cigarettes for a penny.

They were the days when Tontine Street was in its heyday – Folkestone's principal shopping centre, thronged with people until midnight on Fridays and Saturdays. “Very often, after the pub had closed, we used to go out into the street”, Mr. Taylor recalled. “Many of the shops would still be open and doing brisk business”. He can still recall most of the names of the old traders in the street. Only three remain – Palmer, Moody and Stokes. Opposite the Brewery Tap was Gosnold Bros. Drapery emporium, and on the other side of the street Waite's the confectioners. Then there was Mr. William Hall, the pork butcher, Mr. W.J. Franks, the decorator and plumber, Mr. H.R. Springate, newsagent, Mr. John P. Marsh, draper, Mr. R.G. Wood, the outfitters, and many more in the thriving business thoroughfare.

War brought two breaks in Mr. Taylor's long association with Tontine Street. In 1917 he joined the Suffolk Regiment and went to France, where he was wounded on the Somme. Invalided out of the Army in 1919, he came back to help his father at the Brewery Tap and in 1922 to marry Miss Ivy Freezer. Mr. Taylor's second break with the street came in 1941, when the Brewery Tap closed its doors for the duration. “Folkestone, its population down to about 7,000, was almost a ghost town”, he recalled. “Tontine Street, right in the target area for the German long-range guns on the French coast, was an unhealthy place in which to live. Not only did we have to contend with shells but bombs as well. One, which fell in Harvey Street, blew a tree right across Tontine Street and through the roof of the pub. The tree landed on a bed in the front of the house, a few minutes before my father was due to take his afternoon nap”. Shells which fell in Payer's Park damaged the Brewery Tap. One day Mr. Taylor was walking in Payer's Park when he found an unexploded bomb under a sheet of corrugated iron. “The bomb was still ticking”, he said. When the pub closed, Mr. And Mrs. Taylor and their family went to lice in Downs Road. He worked for Alfred Olby, the builders' merchant, and served in the Home Guard.

But a day in the life of the old street that will always live in Mr. Taylor's memory is May 25, 1917. It was a warm evening in late spring. The sun was shining from a cloudless sky as Mr. Taylor and Miss Freezer walked across the fields and under the viaduct towards Mount Pleasant. “I had stopped to have a second cup of tea at my future wife's parents' home, otherwise I would have reached Tontine Street in time to open the pub at six o'clock”, he recalled. That second cup of tea probably saved Mr. And Mrs. Taylor's lives. As they walked under the viaduct a score of German aircraft had crossed the coast. Soon Folkestone was to suffer its first daylight raid of the Great War. One bomb fell on the pavement outside Stokes Bros. Greengrocery shop next door to the Brewery Tap. The street was thronged with shoppers. Many from country districts had driven into town on horse and carts. The single bomb killed 63 people and injured 125. “I will never forget the scene”, said Mr. Taylor. The street was filled with dead and dying. Among the bodies of men, women and children were the carcases of horses. The gutters were running with blood. The ghastly scene was lit up by a great sheet of flame from a fractured 18-inch gas main”. When Mr. Taylor reached the Brewery Tap he found a child's head on the front step. “To this day I can still see the bloodstain on the step”, said Mr. Taylor. “The tiled front of the public house was pitted with shrapnel. The scars are still there to this day”.

Although many people died in the raid by the German Gothas, a number had remarkable escapes. One was P.C. Whittaker, who was left standing when the bomb dropped, and immediately went to the help of the wounded. Councillor John Jones, who was sitting on a chair outside his printing shop, escaped with a shrapnel wound in the leg, while people further up the street were killed. A plaque on a lamp standard outside Stokes’ shop commemorates the tragedy of that terrible day 49 years ago. “For years afterwards a wreath was always hung on the lamp post on the anniversary of the raid and the Salvation Army held a service on the spot where the bomb dropped”, recalled Mr. Taylor.

Mr. Taylor has known Tontine Street in prosperity and tragedy. And he has seen the business life of the town move slowly but surely westward away from the old street.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 April 1967.

Local News.

A well-known licensee, Mr. Percy Sidney Taylor, aged 66, died at his home last week.

Mr. Taylor, of 175 Downs Road, lived in Folkestone all his life and until the second world war conducted the Brewery Tap public house in Tontine Street. After the war he bought the Imperial off-licence in Ashley Avenue, Cheriton, where he stayed until he retired. Mr. Taylor leaves a widow, Mrs. Elna Taylor, a son, Mr. Norman Percy Taylor, and a grandson, Barry Taylor.

A funeral service was held at St. John's Church, Folkestone, on Friday, and cremation at Hawkinge followed.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 August 1970.

Local News.

It was a situation that smacked of the cheerful camaraderie of a Coronation Street instalment.

SCENE: Not the Rover's Return, but the empty bar of the Brewery Tap in Tontine Street, Folkestone. It is the evening of the retirement of landlord and landlady, Albert and Ivy Taylor.

ACTION: Ivy enters behind the bar and tells a reporter “We haven't planned a farewell do. It will just be a quiet Monday night". She moves off to serve in the public bar and the reporter watches in amazement as the saloon bar regulars creep in carrying plates and trays of food, a bouquet of flowers, and presents. Further amazement as two men enter carrying a guitar and electric organ, which they calmly set up in the bar. One regular, Bert Whale, described as the longest-serving saloon bar customer, buys the reporter a drink and whispers “Albert and Ivy have been here more years than we like to admit. We couldn't let them go without showing our appreciation, so we all mucked in and laid on a bit of a spread, music and all. But somehow we forgot to tell Albert and Ivy anything about it”. Beside him at the bar stands Barbara Patrick, nervously steeling herself to make a speech.

Then, ENTER the Taylors, with their Alsatian dog, Brandy. “What a surprise!” gasps 71-year-old Albert, who has spent 64 years at the pub. “I didn't have the faintest idea that this had been planned”. Ivy, who is 73 and a little overwhelmed, adds “It's marvellous. Thank you, everyone”. Barbara hands over a large barometer on behalf of the regulars, and says “We would all like to wish you well in your well-deserved retirement”. Greetings cards and telegrams from well-wishers are read out, and the musical chaps strike up.

And so, as a noisy toast to the couple is drunk by everyone in the crowded bar.... FADE OUT.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 May 1971.

Local News.

When 1,400 continentals visit Folkestone next Thursday the doors of local pubs will be open to them all afternoon. On Tuesday local Magistrates decided in favour of a second application to allow 17 pubs to remain open especially for the visitors. They had vetoed a previous application. The second made by publicans was amended to allow for a half-hour break at 5.30 p.m. before their premises opened for the evening session.

Mr. J. Medlicott, for the publicans, told the Magistrates that the visitors were delegates attending a conference in Bruges. One of its highlights was to be a visit to England. He referred to a letter received by Folkestone Corporation from the British Tourist Authority supporting the publicans' application. The visit – by Dutch, Swiss, Belgians and Germans – was a special occasion, not just a shopping expedition, said Mr. Medlicott. It had been arranged by a Bruges tourist organisation which had particularly asked that pubs should be open in the afternoon.

Police Inspector R. Sanders made no formal objection to the application – but doubted whether the visit was a special occasion.

The Chairman of Folkestone Chamber of Trade, Mr. Alan Stephenson, said later “The cross-Channel visitors' committee of this Chamber is very pleased that this has been seen as a special occasion by the Justices. When one is reminded that this extension is no more than happens in many market towns every week of the year, it seems a fair request, especially as Folkestone’s image abroad could be much influenced by the original decision not to allow the pubs to open”.

The pubs which will stay open are; Jubilee, Ship, Oddfellows, Royal George, London and Paris, True Briton, Harbour Inn, Princess Royal, Clarendon, Brewery Tap, Earl Grey, Prince Albert, George, Globe, East Kent Arms, Guildhall and Shakespeare.

 

Folkestone Gazette 15 September 1971.

Local News.

The night two Irishmen decided to settle an argument with their fists ended when one was taken to hospital and the other was arrested. On Friday, John Riley, a labourer, of Grove Road, Folkestone, pleaded Not Guilty at Folkestone Magistrates’ court to assault occasioning actual bodily harm on John Fitzpatrick. Riley was given an absolute discharge, and both he and Fitzpatrick were bound over in the sum of 10 to keep the peace for 12 months.

Inspector Ronald Young, prosecuting, said “This is a simple case of two men who had an argument in a pub. They went outside to settle it, and one was rather badly beaten”.

Fitzpatrick, of Dallas Brett Crescent, said in evidence that he argued with Riley in the Brewery Tap, Tontine Street. They went into the car park to fight. “After ten minutes or so, I went down and woke up in hospital with four stitches under my eye”, he said. Asked who started the fight, Fitzpatrick, replied “I think I did. I asked him to go outside. I'd had a lot to drink”.

Riley said in evidence that the fight was bound to happen. There had been a difference of opinion between Fitzniatrick and himself for a long time. “He wanted to fight, so I said we would go to the car park”, he said. Answering Inspector Young, Riley said he knocked Fitzpatrick down, but he did not know if he gave him a parting kick or not.

Binding over both Riley and Fitzpatrick, the Chairman, Mrs. Dorothy Buttery, said “We don't like this sort of behaviour in Folkestone”.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 September 1978.

Local News.

A man who was ejected from a Folkestone pub returned with a meat cleaver, threatened customers and then smashed a window causing 145 of damage, Canterbury Crown Court was told on Tuesday. As he ran away, 20-year-old Peter Hutton, of Rendezvous Street, Folkestone, smashed a number of windows in a nearby shop, doing a further 112 of damage, the court heard. Hutton denied causing criminal damage at the Brewery Tap and to Shepway Autos, but was found guilty and jailed for six months.

The court heard that he had a number of previous convictions for assault and that in 1976 he had been sentenced to two years imprisonment for assault with intent to rob and burglary. Then in September last year, Folkestone magistrates had ordered him to do 100 hours community service for using threatening behaviour. This was later revoked and a 25 fine substituted.

Passing sentence, Deputy Circuit Judge Michael Balstan told Hutton “We do not see why the public should be put at risk again by allowing you to have your liberty”.

Hutton, unemployed, admitted being thrown out of the pub after a scuffle, in May this year, but denied he had returned with a cleaver and broken the windows or threatened anyone. He said that after leaving he had gone home and on finding the door locked had decided to sleep under a hedge in the garden. He denied that this had keen an attempt to hide from police.

After the jury’s verdict his counsel, Mr. Brian Pryor said that the offence had been committed on impulse. They were the actions of an angry, half-drunk young man.

 

South Kent Gazette 15 June 1983.

Local News.

A former pub landlord was found dead in a pool of blood in a graveyard on Wednesday afternoon. Mr. John Knight, aged 63, was found by a resident of a nearby estate that backs on to St. Michael's Church, Tenterden.

On Friday his wife Joan said from the couple's home at Kingstone Court, Shorncliffe Road, Folkestone, he was a well-known and well-liked man around the town. Mr. Knight spent many years as a publican in Folkestone. Around 1971 he took over at the Brewery Tap in Tontine Street. He then moved to the Valiant Sailor, which he left nearly 18 months ago shortly after a fire wrecked the pub. For a year Mr. Knight took on the lease of the bar at Folkestone's Courtland Hotel.

Police are investigating his death and there is to be an inquest. A post mortem has been held but there are no suspicious circumstances.

Chairman of the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers' Association, Mr. Vic Batten, said he was shattered to hear the news. Mr. Batten, who runs the Jubilee pub, added “He was a well-known and a loyal member of the licensed trade”. When Mr. Knight moved to the Capel pub a lot of his customers followed him even though it was out of their area, said Mr. Batten.

Fellow publican and friend of Mr. Knight, Mr. Stanley Dawkins, of the Ship, Folkestone, said “John was a great man, and his customers thought the world of him”.

The funeral is likely to be in a few weeks' time.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 June 1983.

Local News.

The funeral of publican John Knight was held on Tuesday. Relatives and friends gathered to pay their last respects at St. Michael’s Church, Tenterden. It was at the church that Mr. Knight, 63, of Kingston Court, Shorncliffe Road, Folkestone, was found dead in a pool of blood two and a half weeks ago. Police are investigating his death and there is to be an inquest.

His widow, Joan, is distraught by his death. She said she would like to have a memorial service for him in Folkestone in about July. Mr. Knight spent many years as a publican in Folkestone. He took over the Brewery Tap in Tontine Street in 1971, later moving to the Valiant Sailor at Capel. He left there nearly 18 months ago shortly after a fire wrecked the pub, and for a year took on the lease of the bar at Folkestone’s Courtland Hotel.

 

South Kent Gazette 6 July 1983.

Inquest.

A former pub landlord badly in debt slashed his wrist and died on the grave of his two former wives. John Knight, aged 63, former landlord of the Valiant Sailor pub at Capel, killed himself at St. Michael's churchyard, Tenterden, late on June 7. His partly-clothed body was found in a pool of blood with his left wrist slashed. The rest of his bloodstained garments lay around him.

His third wife Joan told Coroner Mr. Ralph Vaughan she had no idea of his financial troubles. It was only after his death that she discovered he owed money to Whitbread brewery, the Inland Revenue, VAT authorities and his bank. Mrs. Knight told the inquest at Tenterden “He was a nervous man and would never worry me with unpleasant things. He never talked about his financial problems”.

Mr. Knight's body was found by the grave, where his first two wives are buried by a resident of a nearby estate, Mr. Colin Roberts, who was putting potato peelings on a compost heap when he looked over his garden fence and saw the body. A police search uncovered a bloodstained razor blade between cigarette papers in Mr. Knight's jacket pocket.

Consultant pathologist, Dr. Noel Padley, said Mr. Knight died from lack of oxygen as a result of blood loss from his wrist. Dr. Padley said cuts above one eye and along the jaw were probably caused by Mr. Knight falling on some nearby barbed wire.

Mrs. Knight, of Shorncliffe Road, Folkestone, said her husband's manner was strange a week before she last saw him. He said he was going to visit his brother at Kingston, Surrey – the first time they had been separated in their three year marriage. Mr. Knight had been taking sleeping pills and showed her how to deal with the boiler, a task he always did. “I think he was preparing for his death”, she said.

A few months before the couple left the Valiant Sailor last May, a fire wrecked the bars. Mrs. Knight said this disturbed her husband greatly and he would wake up some time afterwards saying he could smell smoke.

Mr. Vaughan's verdict was Mr. Knight took his life while the balance of his mind was disturbed.

Mrs. Knight said her husband was a kind and caring man. He always played Father Christmas for the children of Capel and would help anyone in trouble.

Before taking on the licence of the Valiant Sailor Mr. Knight used to run the Brewery Tap in Tontine Street, Folkestone. After leaving the Capel pub he had the lease of the bar at Folkestone's Courtland Hotel for a year.

Mrs. Knight plans to hold a memorial service for her husband in Folkestone in a few weeks.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 March 1985.

Local News.

A pub landlord claims his business will die if the council does not demolish the fire-gutted building next door. Edwin Giles, 38, landlord of the Brewery Tap in Folkestone's Tontine Street, claims the Stokes Brothers greengrocer's is an eyesore, a health hazard and a ruin that will dry up the pub trade he's built up over the last two years. “The place stinks, it's making my cellar stink and it's driving my customers away”, he said on Wednesday. “The place should be demolished because it's a health hazard. People will come up Tontine Street and when they see it they won't come any further. We're all fighting to make a living and we've got this eyesore. They should get the bulldozers on it”, he added angrily.

Fire ripped through the timber-framed shop killing one man and injuring two firemen last month. Mr. Giles said he was amazed the council were prepared to leave the building in its current condition.

Greengrocer Bill Lane, who has rented the premises for the last six years, told the Herald he was in the process of clearing out the rubbish and shutting up the shop. He added he was attempting to sell off undamaged goods but didn't know when he would finally pull down the shutters on the business.

A spokesman for Shepway's Environmental Health Department said no complaint had been received from Mr. Giles. “If a complaint is made to us we will respond by visiting the site in the normal way”, he said.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 July 1985.

Local News.

A publican deserted his pub and locked the doors behind him. At the weekend regulars at the Brewery Tap in Folkestone's Tontine Street found the premises closed at opening time. And brewers, Whitbread, say it could be weeks before another tenant is found to take over. Edwin Giles, 38, has experienced difficulty running the business since the departure of his wife, Caroline, 36, and their four children. Caroline left her husband last month.

A spokesman for Whitbreads, Mr. John Norton, told the Herald “The licensee has left unexpectedly, and we have no-one to run the Brewery Tap. It is certainly an unusual situation which we hope can be resolved as soon as possible”.

Earlier this year Mr. Giles and his family were evacuated from the pub when the adjacent greengrocery store was set alight. Since then he has complained about the burnt-out shop driving custom away. In March he told the Herald “The place stinks, it's making my cellar stink and driving customers away. We are fighting to make a living, and we have got this eyesore”, he said.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 August 1985.

Local News.

Whitbread, the brewers, said this week that the Brewery Tap in Folkestone's Tontine Street would remain closed until a suitable tenant could be found. Last week the Herald reported the disappearance of landlord Edwin Giles. Since then the pub has remained closed to trade. A spokesman for the brewery said candidates for the tenancy were being interviewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 November 1988.

Local News.

Two brave pool players became as bald as billiard balls for charity. Builder Grant Leizert and cycle-shop work Nick Price, decided to part with their locks after a suggestion over the pool table at their pub, the Brewery Tap in Tontine Street, Folkestone. The 18-year-olds charged 1 a hack at their hair, and raised 300 for Cancer Research.

Landlady Doreen Steinberg said “It was a great evening and everyone had a good laugh. My daughter, Teresa McLoughlin, is a hairdresser, so she tidied up afterwards, but one of the sponsors, fresh from the Doner Kebab shop, bought along his own cutter - a huge knife for the Greek meat. He gave Grant and Nick a real hair-raising time”.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 June 1992.

Local News.

A publican has failed to get a licence for bands to play for most of the day up to midnight on his premises.

Martin Foulkes, of the Brewery Tap in Tontine Street, Folkestone, asked Shepway Council's entertainment licensing sub-committee for clearance for live music from 11 a.m. until midnight on Fridays and Saturdays. He also wanted the licence for 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays and 7 p.m. until 10.30 p.m. on Sundays.

A letter of objection had come from the St. Michael's Street Residents' Association, who feared noise problems.

Mr. Foulkes told the committee “We would need to keep the noise levels down anyway so people could talk to us at the bar. We are not good lipreaders!” He said the hours of the licence would not be used every week but would give customers more time to enjoy the music and drink up.

The sub-committee granted him an indoor licence for just 7 – 11 p.m. from Monday to Thursday, 7 – 11.30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 7 – 10.30 p.m. on Sunday nights.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 August 1998.

Local News.

Three Folkestone watering holes have new owners after the sale of more than 250 pubs owned by brewing giant Whitbread.

The Royal Standard and the Two Bells, both on Canterbury Road, and the Brewery Tap at Tontine Street have been sold to Avebury Taverns.

Martin Foulkes, landlord of the Brewery tap, believes the new ownership could have positive effects. He said “No changes are going to be made to the pub for three months, but then Avebury Taverns are talking about introducing some new beers”.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

POWELL James c1870-73 Bastions (Also of "British Colours")

SUMMERS William 1873-75 Bastions (Also of "Raglan")

WALLIS Frederick 1875

WATSON James 1875-78 Next pub licensee had Bastions

LANGTON Arthur 1878-79 Bastions

KNOTT Richard 1879-1900 BastionsPost Office Directory 1882Post Office Directory 1891Kelly's 1899

THOMASSON William T 1900-06 Post Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903Bastions

TAYLOR Albert 1906-43 Post Office Directory 1913Post Office Directory 1922Kelly's 1934Post Office Directory 1938Bastions (License suspended 1943-45)

RAWLINGS R P 1943-45

TAYLOR Albert 1945-47

TAYLOR Albert G 1947-70 Bastions

KNIGHT John 1970-76 Next pub licensee had Bastions

Last pub licensee had MCNELLY Michael & CONSTABLE Stuart 1976-78 Bastions

KNIGHT Gordon Next pub licensee had & EVANS Brian 1978-82 Bastions

GALES Edwin 1982-85 Bastions

STEINBERG Steven 1985-90 Bastions

EVERSON Doreen 1990-91 Bastions

Last pub licensee had FOULKES Martin 1991-2000 Bastions

FOULKES Martin & JENKINS Julie 2000-03 Bastions

REID Richard 2003-04 Bastions

REID Richard & Darren 2004+ Bastions

http://www.closedpubs.co.uk/brewerytap.html

 

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

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