DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, July, 2022.

Page Updated:- Monday, 18 July, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1870

(Name from)

Druid's Arms

Latest 1878

(Name to)

78 Bail Street

Folkestone

 

Originally the "Cooper's Arms" then to the "London Stores," this pub became the "Druid's Arms" in 1870.

An inventory in on 15th December 1870 valued the goods of the house to be worth 25 10s 0d. It remained under that name for 8 years and then the building was demolished for some reason and rebuilt on its foundations and renamed the "Isle of Cyprus."

 

Folkestone Observer 23 November 1867.

Advertisement:

DANCING.

Every Wednesday, at Eight O'Clock, at the DRUID'S ARMS, Bayle Street.

Professional pianist engaged.

Note: This advertisement pre-dates the date listed in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Observer 10 April 1869.

Wednesday, April 7th: Before R.W. Boarer and J. Gambrill Esqs.

Charles Holland, of the Druid's Arms, Bayle Street, was summoned for the non-payment of a gas bill.

Mr. Page, collector to the Company, stated that defendant owed 1 17s. 6d. for gas supplied, and 2s. 6d. for meter, making in the whole 2.

The defendant said the reason he had not paid was because his business was slack.

The Bench said the defendant must pay the amount in seven days, or a distress warrant to issue, and in default of effects, seven days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Observer 11 September 1869.

Wednesday, September 8th: Before Capt. Kennicott R.N., James Tolputt, A.M. Leith and W. Bateman Esqs.

The following public house was granted a spirit license: Druid's Arms, Clarence Monckton.

 

Folkestone Express 11 September 1869.

Adjourned Licensing Day.

Wednesday, September 8th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., A.M. Leith and J. Tolputt Esqs.

Spirit license was granted to Clarence Monckton, of the Druids Arms.

 

Folkestone Express 7 January 1871.

Wednesday, January 4th: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer, J. Clarke and C.H. Dashwood Esqs.

Mr. Cobb applied for a license for the Druid's Arms, Bayle Street. The house had been closed, but Mr. Cobb had taken it on lease and intended to put a man named Parks into it. The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 24 August 1878.

Wednesday, August 21st: Before The Mayor, Captain Crowe, and Alderman Caister.

This was the Annual Licensing Meeting. There were two applications for provisional licenses for houses not yet built, both of which were refused, but all the old licenses applied for were again granted.

The Druids Arms, The Bayle.

Superintendent Wilshere opposed the granting of the license to the new building which has been erected by Messrs. Langton on the site of the old Druids Arms or London Stores. Mr. Wightwick supported the application.

Superintendent Wilshere gave evidence that the house now standing was of a very different character and structure to the old one.

In cross-examination by Mr. Wightwick, the Superintendent said he believed a portion of the old premises were still standing, but he could not say whether the old foundations were built upon. It was an entirely different class of house to what it was before. He believed the holder of the license slept upon the premises during the time the alterations were being made.

Mr. Wightwick said it was a very cruel thing that this opposition should be offered. He had looked carefully and he could not find a single instance of a similar opposition against a public house that had been pulled down and rebuilt. In this case, however, it was only an alteration and improvement. He need not say how seriously it affected a man who laid out his money, because if the license was taken away it would become ordinary cottage property, worth only about one half or perhaps one third of what it was with a license. He thought it was beyond doubt that there had never been a single complaint against the house.

Mr. Wilshere, in reply to Mr. Wightwick, said the house bore the best character possible.

Mr. Wightwick hoped the Bench would not think of refusing the license on such a frivolous ground, and further produced the advertisement calling for tenders for an “alteration” of the premises.

He called Mr. Holdom, the builder, who said he tendered for an alteration of the premises. The house was not pulled down altogether, and the foundations were not removed. He produced a plan showing the portion of the old house still in existence. The Bench decided to renew the license.

 

Southeastern Gazette 24 August 1878.

Annual Licensing Session.

On Wednesday the annual licensing meeting was held at the Town Hall. The Mayor (J. Fitness, Esq.), Alderman Caister, Mr. J. Clarke, and Captain Crowe were on the bench.

The renewal of one existing licence and the applications for the granting of two new ones were opposed.

The application for a renewal of the licence to the Druid’s Arms was opposed by Supt. Wiltshere on the ground that the premises had been so altered that the house was really a new building. Mr. Wightwick represented the applicant. The Supt. said sinoe the last licensing day the old house had been pulled down and the present one erected. In answer to Mr. Wightwick the Supt. said he could not say whether the old foundations remained; neither could he say that some of the old rooms were not now existing. He knew that there had been a bedroom there all the time the alteration had been going on, and that the landlord slept there every night. The Bench ultimately granted the renewal of the licence.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 19 October 1878.

Wednesday, October 16th: Before R.W. Boarer Esq., and Capt. Crowe.

The landlord of the Druids' Arms, Bayle Street, applied for an extension of hours until 1 a.m. on Wednesday next, as a society's dinner would be held then.

In reply to a question the Superintendent said the house had recently been erected in the place of an old building, and he had every reason to be satisfied with the manner in which the business was conducted.

The Magistrates' Clerk: What is the name of the Society which takes part in this festivity?

The Landlord: The Blasphemy Society, sir.

Captain Crowe (in astonishment): What?

The landlord explained that the company of choice and select spirits that assembled under his roof to engage in profitable conversation, and to emulate one another's example in the practice of virtue went by the title of “The Folkestone Universal Blasphemy Society”.

The magistrates being in a “fog” about the nature of the Society, the Superintendent explained that it was a Society to which many butchers and others belonged, that they agreed to punish themselves and one another by a fine if the were caught swearing in the public house or in front of the bar, and this annual festivity was held to commemorate their rejoicing over their abstention from the use of objectionable expletives.

Extension granted.

 

Southeastern Gazette 1 September 1879.

Local News.

At Saturday’s Police Court, Richard Lyne, the landlord of the Druids’ Arms, was summoned for keeping his house open during prohibited hours. Mr. W. Wightwiok defended.

P.C. Smith said that on the 23rd August he was on duty on the Bayle and saw the door of the Druids’ Arms open. It was twenty minutes to six in the morning. He went in and saw a man named Thomas Golder in the bar, and the defendant behind the bar. There was a glass of malt liquor on the counter.

For the defence it was stated that the man Golder, who was seen on the premises, was a man whom the defendant employed to come every morning for a short time to assist him in cleaning up, and that the reason why the door was open was because defendant had just let one of his lodgers out.

Mr. Wightwiok submitted that if a conviction followed, the defendant, in future, would not be allowed to let his lodgers out of his house before six o’clock without committing an offence. It was not charged that he drew any liquor on that morning.

The magistrates considered the case proved, and fined the defendant 2 10s., costs 10s., or 21 days’ imprisonment. Notice of appeal was given.

Thomas Golder, a labouring man, was summoned for being found on the licensed premises at the same time and place. He pleaded not guilty. Mr. Wightwiok defended.

The evidence was the same as in the last case, with the exception that the constable swore that when he saw defendant outside the house he asked him to have half a pint, which he refused. He followed the defendant in two or three minutes afterwards.

For the defence, Mr. Lyne, the defendant in the last case, was called and stated that there was no other means of exit from his house excepting by the front door. On the morning in question he let a lodger out about twenty minutes to six, and at the same time let defendant in. He employed Golder as a servant to do sundry odd jobs for him before he went to his work. He had been employed in this manner for more than twelve months.

By Mr. Bradley: He paid him 1s. or 1s. 6d. per week according to the work he did.

The Bench considered the case proved, and fined the defendant 5s., costs 10s., or seven days’ imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 September 1879.

Saturday, August 30th: Before J. Banks, J. Clarke, and T. Caister Esqs., and Gen. Cannon.

Richard Keyne, the landlord of the Druid's Arms, was summoned for keeping his house open during prohibited hours.

He pleaded not guilty.

Mr. W. Wightwick appeared to defend.

P.C. Smith said on the 22nd August he was on duty on The Bayle and saw the door of the Druid's Arms open. It was twenty minutes to six in the morning. He went in and saw a man named Thomas Golder in the bar, and the defendant behind the counter. There was a glass of malt liquor on the counter. He reported the case to the Superintendent.

Cross-examined: The door in question was the only means of exit to the house. He knew the defendant had several lodgers.

For the defence it was stated that the man Golder, who was seen on the premises, was a man who the defendant employed to come up every morning for a short time and assist him in cleaning up, and that the reason why the door was opened was because defendant had just let one of the lodgers out. Mr. Wightwick submitted that if a conviction followed, the defendant, in future, would not be allowed to let his lodgers out of the house before 6 o'clock without committing an offence. It was not charged that he drew any liquor on that morning.

The magistrates considered the case proved, and fined the defendant 2 10s., and 10s. costs, or twenty one days' imprisonment.

Thomas Golder, a labouring man, was summoned for being found on licensed premises at the same time and place.

He pleaded not guilty.

Mr. Wightwick defended.

The evidence was the same as in the last case, with the exception that the constable swore that when he saw defendant outside the house he asked him to have half a pint, which he refused. He followed defendant in two or three minutes afterwards.

For the defence, Mr. Keyne, the defendant in the last case, was called, and he stated that there was no other means of exit from his house, excepting by the front door. On the morning in question he let a lodger out about twenty minutes to six, and at the same time let defendant in. He employed Golder as servant to do sundry odd jobs for him before he went to his work. He had been employed in this manner for more than 12 months.

By Mr. Bradley: He paid him 1s. or 1s. 6d. per week, according to work he did.

The Bench considered the case proved, and fined defendant 5s., and 10s. costs, or seven days' imprisonment.

Note: Licensee is listed as Richard Lyne in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 6 September 1879.

Saturday, 30th August: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Caister and Sherwood, General Cannon, Captain Carter, W.J. Jeffreason and J. Clark Esqs.

Richard Lyne was summoned for keeping open his house, the Druids' Arms, otherwise the Isle Of Cyprus Inn, on Saturday, the 23rd ult. during prohibited hours.

P.C. Montague Smith said on Saturday the 23rd he was on duty in Bayle Street at twenty minutes to six in the morning and saw the door of defendant's house open. He went inside and saw the landlord at the counter. A glass was standing there, three parts full of malt liquor. A man named Thomas Golder was in front of the bar. He said to the landlord “This won't do”, and told him he should report the occurrence.

Cross-examined: No-one told me to go to the house. I do not know if there is another door leading to the street. I do not know how many lodgers there were in the house, but several. I did not taste the liquor, but it looked like porter. The man Golder was standing about a yard from the glass.

Arthur Darrell, a visitor, lodging in the house, proved that on this morning another lodger went out at about 20 minutes to six to bathe.

Mr. Wightwick, who appeared for the defendant, said the facts were that the man Golder, referred to by the Constable, was an industrious man, who went to the defendant's house early every morning to scrub down the passage and outside premises, and had done so ever since Mr. Lyne had been in the house, upwards of a year. There was no liquor drawn, and the small quantity which the constable saw in the glass was left standing on the counter the night before.

The Magistrates consulted for a few minutes on the bench, and then retired. On their return the Mayor said they had decided to convict, and defendant would be fined 2 10s. and 10s. costs, or 21 days' imprisonment.

Mr. Wightwick said his client would appeal against the conviction.

Thomas Golder was then summoned for being found on the above premises on the same occasion.

P.C. Smith repeated his evidence. He said he saw Golder go into the house, and before he went in he asked witness if he would “have half a pint”, but he declined. Witness was standing outside a few minutes before he went in.

In cross-examination witness said he did not see the door opened, nor had he seen anyone go in or come out.

Mr. Wightwick said the man went there to do his work. He had always been employed by Mr. Lyne to clear up the premises, and did not go for the purpose of obtaining drink.

Mr. Lyne was called, and said he had several lodgers in the house, and that there was no way out except by the front door. About sixteen minutes to six he opened the house to let one of the lodgers out, and at the same time Golder came in for the purpose of doing his work. His duty was to call up the lodgers and to clear up the bar. He neither drew any beer nor sold any that morning. Defendant, he believed, worked for Mr. Tolputt, and had to be at his work at six o'clock. Witness paid defendant a shilling or eighteen pence a week, according to what he had done, and frequently gave him clothing and other articles.

The Magistrates consulted for some minutes as to this case, and on the Mayor announcing that the Bench had decided to convict, General Cannon interposed the remark “A majority of the Bench”.

Defendant was fined 5s. and 10s. costs, or seven days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 23 April 1881.

Saturday, April 16th: Before The Mayor, Alds. Sherwood and Caister, Gen. Cannon, Col. De Crespigny, J. Clarke and J. Holden Esqs.

Richard Lyne of the Druids' Arms was charged with keeping his house open during illegal hours on Sunday last, but from the evidence it appeared he simply asked a man who came to his house on business to take a glass of beer, and the case, upon this, was dismissed.

 

Folkestone Express 23 April 1881.

Saturday, April 16th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Caister and Sherwood, General Cannon, Colonel de Crespigny, J. Clark and J. Holden Esqs.

Richard Lyne was summoned for opening his house, the Druid's Arms (or Cyprus Inn), on the 10th inst. during prohibited hours. Mr. Wightwick appeared for the defence.

Superintendent Rutter said on Sunday the 10th, at 8.25 in the morning, in company with Sergeant Ovenden, he visited the defendant's house, the Cyprus Inn, on the Bayle. The front door was shut, but not locked. He saw two men standing in front of the bar; one had a pint glass in his hand, containing malt liquor, the other man was standing near him talking. He did not see defendant.

Cross-examined: I saw the defendant's wife. She came in whilst I was there. He asked why the men were there, and she said she didn't know.

Mr. Wightwick explained that one of the men, named Jordan, was called in by the landlord and asked to fetch some flour, for which he gave him a glass of beer. The other man, named Stevenson, went in to explain his neglect in not delivering some coal, and to ask if Monday would do for them.

The defendant was sworn, and said on Sunday, the 10th inst., he saw a man named Jordan and asked him to get some flour, for which he gave him a glass of beer. Another man named Stevenson went in to give a reason for not delivering some coals. He had nothing to drink. Jordan did not fetch the flour after the police came in, nor would witness allow Stevenson to bring the coal in.

Richard Jordan said Mr. Lyne opened the door of his house and asked him to fetch some flour. He said he would, and Mr. Lyne gave him a glass of beer. Stevenson followed witness in, and asked Mr. Lyne about some coals.

In reply to the Magistrates' Clerk, witness said he did not pay any money.

Stevenson said he heard defendant call Jordan. He followed him in and asked defendant if Monday would do for the coals he had ordered.

The Bench dismissed the case, considering there was a doubt as to whether an offence had actually been committed. They, however, cautioned the defendant.

Richard Jordan and William Stevenson were summoned for being on licensed premises during prohibited hours.

Superintendent Rutter asked permission to withdraw the summons in consequence of the former case having failed, and the Bench consented to the withdrawal.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

HOLLAND Charles 1869

MONCKTON Clarence 1869-70 Bastions

COBB Thomas 1870-71 Bastions

Last pub licensee had PARKS Thomas Henry 1871-77 Next pub licensee had Post Office Directory 1874Bastions

 

Renamed "Isle Of Cyprus."

 

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

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LINK to Even More Tales From The Tap Room