DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, September, 2022.

Page Updated:- Monday, 12 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest Sept 1778

(Name from)

Folkestone Arms

Latest 1846

 6 (Old) High Street

Folkestone

Former Folkestone Arms

The former "Folkestone Arms" is shown as the building next to the dilapidated former coach house shown centre-left.

 

Pigot's directory of 1839 gives the "Folkestone Arms" as also being an excise office.

The pub was originally called the "White Hart" but in September 1778 new licensee James Bateman was instructed by the Earl of Radnor to rename it the "Folkestone Arms." The pub closed in 1846, one year before the "Folkestone Arms Tavern" was opened. It is believed there is no connection between the two.

 

Kentish Gazette 23 September 1780.

Advertisement: "Folkestone Arms," (late the "White Hart") Folkestone, James Bateman informs his friends and the public in general that he has completely rebuilt his house and fitted it up in the most genteel and commodious manner for the reception and accommodation of all who will do him the favour of their company.

He has also provided himself with a fresh assortment of liquors of every kind, and of the best sorts; he therefore humbly hopes for a continuance of that encouragement which, having long experienced he most gratefully acknowledges, and will endeavour to deserve in future.

Folkestone Sept. 22nd, 1780.

 

Kentish Gazette 20 January 1781.

Advertisement: Notice: Whereas a black mare was put into the stable of the "Folkestone Arms Inn," Folkestone, on Friday the 12th, and has not been enquired after since, whoever can prove the said mare their property may have her again by paying the expenses.

Folkestone, Jan. 19, 1781.

 

Kentish Gazette 18 August 1781.

Advertisement extract: To be sold publicly to the highest bidder, on Monday, the tenth day of September next, at two o'clock in the afternoon, at the Folkestone Arms, in the town of Folkestone, unless disposed of before by private contract, of which timely notice will be given: A messuage or tenement, with the barn, stable, outhouses, edifices and buildings, with the appurtenances thereto belonging, in good repair; in the parish of, and near or adjoining to the town of Folkestone aforesaid, in the occupation of Mr. John Baker, Brewer.

 

Kentish Chronicle 28 February 1804.

Lost, stolen or strayed, from Folkestone, on Saturday last, a white pointer dog, with liver-coloured head, and a large liver-coloured spot on one side, and answers to the name of Don.

Any person who shall bring the said dog to the "Folkestone Arms," Folkestone, shall receive a reward of two Guineas, and anyone found detaining him after this notice will be prosecuted to the utmost rigour of the law.

Feb. 20, 1804.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 11 September 1804.

On Saturday last Thomas Baker Esq. was elected Mayor of Folkestone for the year ensuing. After the election, the Corporation and many other gentlemen of the town partook of a handsome dinner provided at the "Folkestone Arms Inn," and the remainder of the day was spent with the utmost conviviality.

 

Kentish Gazette 8 April 1808.

Advertisement.

NOTICE.

The Creditors of Thomas Rouse, of Folkestone, are requested to meet the Trustees of his estate and effects on Monday next, the 11th day of this instant, April, at the Folkestone Arms, in Folkestone, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.

 

Kentish Chronicle 10 May 1808.

Death: May 7th, at Folkestone, at an advanced age, Mr. George Janeway, of the Folkestone Arms Inn.

 

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811.

General Sessions 25 April 1808.

Before Thomas Baker (Mayor), Joseph William Knight, John Castle, John Gill, John Bateman and James Major.

The following person was fined for having short measures in their possession, viz.:

George Janeway 2/6.

 

Kentish Gazette 13 May 1808.

Obituary.

Died, May 7th, at Folkestone, at an advanced age, Mr. George Janeway, landlord of the Folkestone Arms inn.

 

Kentish Gazette 25 November 1808.

Advertisement.

To be peremptorily sold by Auction, at the Folkestone Arms, in Folkestone, on Friday, the 2nd day of December next, at two o'clock (unless disposed of by private contract, of which notice will be given;)

All that substantial Freehold messuage or tenement, with the wash-house and joint use of the yard, well therein, and passage from the street thereto, with the adjoining messuage or tenement and premises of Mr. Paul Rayner, situate, lying, and being in Dover Street, Folkestone, and now in the occupation of Mr. William Moon.

Further particulars may be had of Mr. Knocker, attorney at law, Dover.

 

Kentish Gazette 29 November 1808.

Advertisement.

The estate at Folkestone, advertised to be sold at the Folkestone Arms, in Folkestone, on Friday, the 2nd day of December, is disposed of by private contract.

 

Kentish Gazette 26 December 1809.

Advertisement.

To be sold by Auction, on Wednesday next, 27th December, at noon, at the Folkestone Arms, Folkestone: The Hull of His Majesty's Gun-Brig, Defender, which has been driven on shore at Cock Point, near Folkestone.

Conditions will be made known at the time of sale.

J. Trounsell, Naval Officer, Deal, 23rd Dec., 1809.

 

Kentish Gazette 12 January 1810.

Auction Advertisement.

To be sold by Auction, by Mr. David Major.

On Tuesday, the 16th day of January instant, at two o'clock in the afternoon, at the Folkestone Arms, Folkestone, subject to such conditions as will be then and there produced, the following Freehold and Copyhold Premises:

Lot 1: All that freehold messuage or tenement, with a convenient room behind the same, and garden thereto adjoining, situate and being in George Lane, Folkestone, now in the occupation of Mr. John Butcher.

Lot 2: All that freehold messuage or tenement, with the ground and appurtenances thereto belonging, situate and being in Fancy Street, in Folkestone aforesaid, now in the occupation of Mr. John Butcher.

Lot 3: All that copyhold messuage or tenement, lately used as a baker's shop, desirably situated in Radnor Street, in Folkestone aforesaid, now or late in the occupation of Mr. Thomas Mummery.

Further particulars may be known by applying at the office of Messrs. Tournay, Hythe.

 

Kentish Gazette 22 June 1810.

Auction Advertisement.

On Monday, the 2nd day of July, 1810, at the sign of the Folkestone Arms, at two o'clock in the afternoon, the following Freehold Premises, situate and being within the parish and town of Folkestone and the liberty thereof, in the following lots, subject to the conditions of sale to be then and there produced:

Lot 1: A piece of pasture land, part of a piece of land, now in one piece, formerly in two pieces, lying at or near a place called the Forstall, in the parish and within the liberty of the town of Folkestone, as the same is now stumped off from Lot 2, and contains three acres and one rood, more or less, now in the tenancy of Wilson Wiles.

Lot 2: A piece of pasture land, part of and the residue of the said piece of land, now in one piece, and formerly in two pieces, adjoining Lot 1, as the same is now stumped off from Lot 1, and adjoins the Wheeler's shop there, and contains three acres and one rood, more or less, now also in the tenure of the said Wilson Wiles. A fence is to be made between Lots 1 and 2, as it is now stumped off, by, and at the joint expense of the purchasers of Lots 1 and 2.

Lot 3: A piece or parcel of pasture land, called Round Close, lying and being at or near a certain place called Foord, near and adjoining Park Lane, in the parish of Folkestone, containing one acre, more or less, now in the tenure or occupation of William Brann or his undertenants.

Lot 4: Two tenements, formerly in one, with the barn, stable, gardens, and one piece or parcel of meadow or pasture land, to the same belonging, containing in the whole five acres, more or less, situate and being in the said parish of Folkestone, now in the occupation of the said William Brann, or his undertenants.

The last lot, to which there is a good road at a short distance from the turnpike roads from Dover to Sandgate and from Folkestone to Canterbury, is particularly well-adapted for a tanner's yard or fellmonger's yard (part of which was formerly used in that trade), or for erecting a mill, as a strong and constant stream of water runs through the premises.

The tenants are tenants at will, and have notice to quit at Michaelmas next. The land tax is redeemed.

Further particulars may be known by applying to Mr. Reynolds, Attorney, Folkestone, Kent.

 

Kentish Gazette 22 January 1811.

Advertisement.

The creditors of Mr. William Reynolds, late of Folkestone, attorney at law, deceased, are requested to meet at the Folkestone Arms Inn, Folkestone aforesaid, on Wednesday, the 30th day of January instant, at twelve o'clock at noon, and such creditors who hold mortgages, bonds, notes or other securities are requested to present the same at the meeting.

 

Kentish Gazette 25 January 1811.

Advertisement.

The creditors of Mr. William Reynolds, late of Folkestone, attorney at law, deceased, are requested to meet at the Folkestone Arms Inn, Folkestone aforesaid, on Wednesday, the 6th day of February next, at twelve o'clock at noon, and such creditors who hold mortgages, bonds, notes or other securities are requested to present the same at the meeting.

Folkestone, 24th Jan. 1811.

 

Kentish Gazette 26 February 1811.

Advertisement.

The creditors of Mr. William Reynolds, late of Folkestone, attorney at law, deceased, are requested to meet at the Folkestone Arms Inn, Folkestone aforesaid, on Friday, the 1st day of March next, at one o'clock in the afternoon, on important business relative to his concerns, and to execute the deed approved of at the first meeting of the creditors.

Folkestone, 25th February, 1811.

 

Kentish Gazette 27 August 1811.

The King v Richard Hambrook.

Assizes, Civil Side, Thursday, August 22, before Lord Chief Justice Ellenborough.

This was an indictment against the defendant for aiding in the escape of prisoners of war from Chesterfield, and for that purpose harbouring them in his house at Folkestone.

Mr. Serjeant Shepherd opened the case on behalf of the prosecution. The prisoner kept a small public house, called the Blue Anchor, so the question to be decided was whether the defendant was aiding in the escape of the prisoners in question, named Chanmont, Latardie, Jessileux, J.B. Marten, Laddie, Nutali and Bouet.

Mr. John Bouser, agent for the French prisoners of war at Chesterfield, deposed that all the above-named persons, except Bouet, were on their parole at Chesterfield, and absented themselves on the 18th of September last. The prisoners were brought into court and identified.

Lieut. Christie, of His Majesty's sloop Cordelia, saw a boat on the night of the 22nd Sept., which they brought to, after having fired at, although the person in it answered on being hailed that it was a Folkestone boat. There was a jar on board with some ale in it, and bread and rum, together with a large deal box. Next morning the witness sent them to the flagship on the Downs.

James Butler deposed that he was chaise driver at the Fountain Inn, in Canterbury, and on the evening of the – Sept., three gentlemen came there in a chaise, and the witness was desired to drive them to the "Blue Anchor," an inferior inn at Folkestone. He there saw the landlord, the defendant, who told the gentlemen, who had got out of the chaise, that he had got lodgings for them (on the question being put to him), but not in his own house. He had made no previous enquiry of them, or had any other conversation. The deal box they brought, they left till the landlord came back, when he paid the witness for the chaise, and desired him to put the box into his house. He also asked if the witness knew if there were any more coming, to which he replied in the negative. The witness had seen the box taken out of a boat at sea, which was the same as that he carried in the chaise.

Sherwood, another driver at the "Fountain Inn," at Canterbury, said that on the 19th Sept., a chaise came in from Sittingbourne, and the witness drove them to Folkestone. The witness took them to the "Folkestone Arms," but they were shown down the road to the "Blue Anchor" by Janeway, the son of the landlord of the "Folkestone Arms." When they got out he saw that they were foreigners and he recognised none of them.

James Janeway conducted the foreigners from the "Folkestone Arms" to the "Blue Anchor." They were all gone to bed, but Hambrook opened the door, and the gentlemen went in without having any conversation. The "Blue Anchor" was a small ale-house.

Sally Newman, servant to Hambrook, deposed that they had only one spare room in the house, that she remembered the foreigners coming, and identified the deal box taken from the chaise.

Thos. Mantell Esq., resident Agent for the Transport Board at Dover: He went on board the Guard ship on the Downs, hearing that the foreigners' boat, the Cat, had been taken. He saw the gentlemen and M. Bouet, who had made his escape.

Mr. Gurney made a most able address to the Jury on behalf of the defendants. He maintained that there was not the slightest evidence to affect the defendant, or to say that he was aiding those men in escaping. If Hambrook could be found Guilty, he would venture that there was not an innkeeper between Chesterfield and Folkestone who furnished a post-chaise or a lodging for the night who might not be indictable. Under the maxim of English law, that all men were deemed innocent till it were proved they were Guilty, were to be laid aside, the Jury could not come to the dreadful conclusion that the defendant was the base, disloyal subject to assist the enemies of his King and country. He then entered into the particulars of the evidence to show that there was nothing in it which showed that the defendant was aiding and assisting in the escape of prisoners of war.

Lord Ellenborough detailed the evidence delivered, dwelling particularly on the expressions used by the landlord, which His Lordship thought very equivocal, and he left it to the Jury to draw what inference they thought proper. His Lordship was much surprised that the French prisoners had not been called for the defendant.

Verdict: Guilty on the first count of concealing and secreting French prisoners of war.

 

Kentish Gazette 13 December 1811.

Advertisement.

To be sold by auction at the Folkestone Arms Inn, Folkestone, on Monday, the 30th day of December instant, at two o'clock in the afternoon, by David Major, the following freehold estates in lots:

Lot 1: A capital dwelling house, with the stable, yard, convenient garden and appurtenances, situate in Church Street, in Folkestone, forming a very desirable family residence, and now in the occupation of Mrs. Jordan.

Lot 2: A dwelling-house and shop, very desirably situated for trade, in High Street in Folkestone, with the garden, backside, appurtenances thereunto belonging, now in the occupation of Thomas Johnson.

Lot 3: A messuage and small garden, situate upon The Bayle, in Folkestone, in the occupation of Richard Benfield.

Lot 4: The scite and materials of part of an old building, adjoining the last-mentioned lot, containing 25 feet and five inches in front, and 72 feet in depth, in the occupation of Thomas Weekes.

Lot 5: The remaining part of the scite and materials of the said old building, of the same dimensions as the last lot, in the occupation of John Tart.

Lot 6: A messuage and garden, adjoining the last lot, in the occupation of Richard Major.

Lot 7: A small messuage and garden, adjoining the one last mentioned, now in the occupation of William Benfield.

Lot 8: A messuage, yard and appurtenances, in North Street, in Folkestone, now in the occupation of William Andrews.

Lot 9: A dwelling-house and shop, very eligibly situated for trade, in the main street of Hythe, with the yard, stable and appurtenances thereunto belonging, now in the occupation of ---- Watts.

 

Kentish Gazette 10 January 1812.

Advertisement.

To be sold by auction on Tuesday, the fourth day of February, 1812, at twelve o'clock at noon, at the Folkestone Arms Inn, in Folkestone, by David Major, in one lot;

A modern and substantially built Freehold mansion house, the late residence of Mr. William Reynolds, Attorney at Law, deceased, situate on the beautiful rising ground near the town of Folkestone, on the turnpike road leading from thence to Hythe, commanding on the landside a picturesque view of the adjoining country, and in front extensive sea prospect, and a long range of the French coast.

The house, which with corresponding wings, forms a very handsome elevation, comprises on the ground floor a spacious dining room, drawing room, and four good parlours, six airy and well proportioned chambers, with a dressing room on the second floor; on the attic storey, three good chambers and a laundry. The basement storey comprises two kitchens and a dairy, excellent cellarage and other suitable conveniences. The offices attached and detached are numerous and convenient, comprising a coach-house, capacious stabling, &c., with an excellent garden, encompassed by a twelve feet wall, clothed with choice fruit trees in high perfection. The house is fitted up in a handsome style, is in perfect repair, and altogether forms a most beautiful and complete residence for a family of distinction.

Also a rich meadow adjoining the house, containing about three acres and a half, fenced round with flourishing young quick, and a valuable piece of orchard and meadow land, adjoining the turnpike road and extending from the house to the town of Folkestone, containing in length 276 feet, and in depth 174 feet, most beautifully situated, from its extensive land and sea prospect, for building.

Immediate possession may be had, and particulars known of Mr. Shipdem, Solicitor, Dover, Mr. Mount, Solicitor, Canterbury, and Mr. Webb, Solicitor, Folkestone.

 

Kentish Gazette 17 April 1812.

Auction Advertisement.

To be sold by Auction, on Monday, the fourth day of May next, between the hours of twelve and one in the forenoon, at the Folkestone Arms Inn, Folkestone, by David Major,

All that spacious and substantially-built dwelling house, the late residence of Mr. William Reynolds, deceased, most delightfully situated on the rising ground, near the town of Folkestone, by the side of the turnpike road leading from thence to Hythe, with the front court and back garden. As the whole premises have been planned and divided into lots, forming three very desirable residences.

Also, the valuable piece of garden ground on the south side of the said dwelling House, adjoining the turnpike, road, being encompassed by a substantial and high wall, which is clothed with the choicest fruit trees.

A plan of the dwelling house, as divided, may be seen by applying to Mr. Webb, Solicitor, Folkestone, of whom, and of Mr. Shipden, Solicitor, Dover, Mr. Mount, Solicitor, Canterbury, further particulars may be known.

 

Kentish Chronicle 29 May 1812.

Advertisement (Part)

To Brewers and others; To be sold by Auction, by Ayerst and Reeve, at the Folkestone Arms, in Folkestone, on Monday, the 22nd day of June, 1812, at four o'clock in the afternoon:

Lot 1: All that freehold, well-accustomed public house and premises called the Folkestone Lugger, with a large piece of ground adjoining, situate in Cowgate Street, in the Town of Folkestone, in the occupation of Francis Poskett, who has had notice to quit at Michaelmas next.

Note: Date is at Variance with More Bastions.

 

Kentish Gazette 29 May 1812.

Advertisement (Part)

To Brewers and others; To be sold by Auction, by Ayerst and Reeve, at the Folkestone Arms, in Folkestone, on Monday, the 22nd day of June, 1812, at four o'clock in the afternoon:

Lot 1: All that freehold, well-accustomed public house and premises called the Folkestone Lugger, with a large piece of ground adjoining, situate in Cowgate Street, in the Town of Folkestone, in the occupation of Francis Poskett, who has had notice to quit at Michaelmas next.

Note: Date is at Variance with More Bastions.

 

Kentish Gazette 21 July 1812.

On Thursday evening, the 16th inst., as Mr. And Mrs. Nicholson, of Lewes, were descending Folkestone Hill in a single horse chaise, he, thinking it safer to lead the horse down, gave the reins to Mrs. N. previous to his getting out, which unfortunately dropped from her hold, and the spirited animal finding himself at liberty, was in the act of setting off at full speed, when Mr. N., by a sudden spring, caught the reins, and in his endeavours to stop him overturned the vehicle, by which accident Mrs. N. sustained considerable injury, and now lies confined at the Folkestone Arms Inn. Mr. N. had the good fortune to escape with only a slight bruise on each thigh, although the horse knocked him down and rode over him, and nothing of the chaise remains whole but the wheels and springs.

 

Kentish Gazette 25 August 1812.

Advertisement.

Folkestone, to be sold by Auction, by Ayerst and Reeve;

At the Folkestone Arms, in Folkestone, on Thursday, the tenth day of September, 1812, at one o'clock in the afternoon, in one lot (unless previously disposed of by private contract, of which notice will be given in this paper).

All that Freehold piece or parcel of land, called Red Gate Field, containing by a late admeasurement 12 a. 3r. 37 p. little more or less, lying within half a mile of the town of Folkestone, on the turnpike road leading from thence to Hythe, commanding on the sea-side a long range of the French coast, and an extensive sea prospect; and in front, a fine view of the adjoining country, being most eligibly situated for building on.

Possession may be had at Michaelmas next, and half part of the purchase money may remain on mortgage, if required.

For further particulars apply at the Office of Messrs. De Lasaux and Boghurst, Solicitors, Ashford, who are authorised to treat for the sale by private contract.

 

Kentish Gazette 11 September 1812.

Tuesday last being the Mayor's choice for the town of Folkestone, Thomas Baker esq. was elected to the chair, who, after taking the necessary oaths, adjourned to the Folkestone Arms Inn, accompanied by the Jurats and the Primoris Offidi, where a sumptuous and well served up dinner was prepared for them. After the cloth was drawn the following toasts, &c., were pronounced from the chair: “The King and God Bless Him”, “The Prince Regent, and under his benign auspices may the Imperial Eagle be experimentally taught to play the wing at the roaring of the British Lion”, “The Queen and Royal Family”, “The Army and Navy”, “Alexander, and may the Gallick Cock be finally brought to feel the ascending influence of the Northern Constellation”, &c. Thus passed on the fleeting hour, interspersed with the convivial song and merry joke, until Nox was contemplating to withdraw her sombre curtain from the dusky landscape, which suggested to the company the idea of “ite domum”, and on which they unanimously arose, and congratulated the worth Mayor on his tenth election to the honour of the white wand.

 

Kentish Chronicle 15 September 1812.

On Tuesday last Thomas Baker Esq. was chosen Mayor of Folkestone for the year ensuing, and has appointed Thomas Farley Esq. his deputy. Mr. John Hart was, at the same time, elected Chamberlain. At three o'clock the Corporation sat down to an elegant dinner at the "Folkestone Arms," supplied by Mrs. Janeway, where the utmost harmony and conviviality prevailed until a late hour. This is the tenth time Mr. Baker has been elevated to the civic chair by his fellow townsmen.


Advertisement.

Freehold Brewhouse, to be disposed of by private contract (with immediate possession).

All that very desirable and substantial well built brewhouse and malthouse, with store-houses, drying oast, stable sheds and other outbuildings; large yard, and pump of exceeding good water; also a large modern built messuage or tenement adjoining the same and communicating therewith, situate and being in the most eligible and convenient part of the town of Folkestone. Also four several old established public houses, situate in Folkestone, and two in Romney Marsh, let to respectable tenants from year to year.

The above mentioned brewhouse, malthouse, messuage and one of the public houses, form a complete square, and surround the yard, with a communication to two of the principal streets in the town. The malthouse is capable of making 1,000 quarters of malt in the season. The brewery is also capable of very great improvement, and is altogether well worth the attention of any person who is desirous of entering into a good trade, The coppers, tuns, coolers, vats, casks, utensils, stock, and fixtures, to be taken at a valuation.

Further particulars, and to treat for the same, enquire (if by letter, post paid) of Mr. Robert Marsh, Coolinge, near Folkestone; Mr. Thomas Nichols, Seabrook; or Mess. Tournay and Janeway, Solicitors, Hythe.

Note: This was the Marsh Brewery, Rendezvous Street, and the pub described was The George.

 

Kentish Gazette 29 September 1812.

Advertisement.

To be peremptorily let to the highest bidder, by Ayerst and Reeve at the Folkestone Arms, in Folkestone, on Saturday the 10th day of October, 1812, at four o'clock in the afternoon, subject to such conditions as shall then be produced, (unless previously sold by private contract, of which notice will be given in this paper) for the term of seven years;

All that piece or parcel of arable land called or known by the name of Red Gate Field, containing by estimation 15 acres, little more or less, lying within half a mile of the town of Folkestone, and now in the occupation of Mr. Wiles, who quits possession at Michaelmas next.

For further particulars apply at the office of Messieurs De Lasaux and Boghurst, Solicitors, Ashford.

 

Kentish Gazette 6 October 1812.

Advertisement.

To be peremptorily let to the highest bidder, by Ayerst and Reeve at the Folkestone Arms, in Folkestone, on Monday the 12th day of October, 1812, instead of Saturday the 10th, as before advertised, at four o'clock in the afternoon, subject to such conditions as shall then be produced, for the term of seven years;

All that piece or parcel of arable land called or known by the name of Red Gate Field, containing by estimation 15 acres, little more or less, lying within half a mile of the town of Folkestone, and now in the occupation of Mr. Wiles, who quits possession at Michaelmas next.

For further particulars apply at the office of Messieurs De Lasaux and Boghurst, Solicitors, Ashford.

 

Kentish Chronicle 19 February 1813.

On Monday was fully committed to Folkestone gaol, by Thomas Baker Esq., Mayor, Francis Grimm, private in the 52nd Regiment, charged on the oath of John Hitchcock, with stealing three pairs of new shoes from the "Folkestone Arms Inn," his property.

 

Kentish Chronicle 16 November 1830, Maidstone Journal 16 November 1830.

Death: Nov. 10, at Folkestone. Mrs. Elizabeth Janeway, aged 79, late of the Folkestone Arms, much respected by her family and friends.

 

Kentish Gazette 21 May 1833.

Advertisement.

To be sold cheap, a neat, strong Stanhope and Harness. Apply to the Ostler, Folkestone Arms Inn, Folkestone.

 

Kentish Chronicle 4 March 1834.

On Tuesday evening last Folkestone was enlivened by a card and quadrille assembly held at the Guildhall Rooms. Dancing and hilarity prevailed till a late hour. The music and refreshments furnished by Mr. Cork, of the Folkestone Arms Inn, gave much satisfaction to a numerous and highly delighted party.

Note: Does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Dover Chronicle 22 April 1837.

Advertisement.

Capital Hotel in Folkestone, Kent.

To be disposed of with immediate possession, the lease and goodwill of the well-known, and long-established Free Inn, called the "Folkestone Arms,2 together with the spacious and convenient Coach Houses and Stables adjoining thereto. The fixtures, stock, furniture, plate, linen, china &c., to be taken at a valuation.

For further particulars apply to Mr. R.W. Watson, Solicitor, Dover, or Messrs. Brockman and Watts, Solicitors, Folkestone.

Dover, April 19th, 1837.

 

Kentish Gazette 6 June 1837.

Advertisement: Folkestone, to tailors and drapers: To be disposed of, with immediate possession, an old-established shop, with the stock-in-trade &c., &c. The premises are freehold, situate in the High Street, and very commodious for a family. The business of tailor and draper has been carried on to a considerable extent for the last 50 years, now in the occupation of the proprietor, Thomas Golder, who has taken the "Folkestone Arms Inn," from whom further particulars may be had, Letters, post paid.

 

Kentish Gazette 14 August 1838.

Advertisement: To Publicans, Brewers and Others, To Let, a very capital Free Inn, with excellent stabling, situated in one of the principal streets in Folkestone, where the excise office is held, rent moderate, incoming can be reduced to 100, and the most satisfactory reasons will be given for the present tenant leaving.

For further particulars apply to Mr. Friend, Auctioneer, Northgate Street, Canterbury, or to Mr. Goulder, boat-builder, Folkestone. Letters to be post paid.

 

From the Kentish Gazette, 27 October 1840.

FOLKESTONE.

The mayor, magistrates, and members of the council, together with a numerous company of gentlemen belonging to Folkestone and its vicinity, partook of a dinner at the "Folkestone Arms Inn," on Wednesday, the 14th instant, in celebration of the nuptials of Lord Folkestone and the Lady Mary Grimstone. The dinner was served up in excellent style, and the hilarity of the meeting was sustained till a late hour.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, Saturday, 27 September, 1845. Price 5d.

DOVER POLICE COURT

FOLKESTONE: On Tuesday evening, about 9 o'clock, as Mr. Holley, employed in erecting coke ovens for the Railway Company, was passing from the Bail into the town, he missed his road, and, from the darkness of the place, fell a distance of 16 feet into the yard of the “Old Folkestone Arms Inn,” by which he sustained a dislocation of the knee and other injuries. Great complaint is made at the partial manner in which the town is lighted with gas.

From a correspondent.

 

From the Kentish Gazette, 18 January 1846.

Folkestone.

We understand that a new church will be shortly built on the East Cliff (the site for the new town of Folkestone,) by the Earl of Radnor.

The projected new street, from High-street to the Mill-Lane, has at last been commenced by the pulling down of the old "Folkestone Tavern," and clearing the garden grounds adjacent.

 

South Eastern Gazette, Tuesday 4 March 1851.

FOLKESTONE, KENT. Mr. Godden.

To sell by public auction, on Monday, the 17th day of March, 1851, at Folkestone.

The "Folkestone Arms Inn," situate at the bottom of High Street, in Folkestone aforesaid.

Possession will be given on the completion of the purchase. The owner, who is the occupier, is retiring from the public business.

For particulars apply to Messrs. Hart and Kipping, Solicitors, Maidstone and Folkestone; and to Messrs. Bower and Son, 46, Chancery Lane, London.

 

South Eastern Gazette, Tuesday 10 June 1851.

Coroner's Inquest.

An inquest was held yesterday week, before John Bateman, Esq., coroner, and the jury of tradesmen, on the body of James Johnson, otherwise James Newbury.

James Steer, inspector of Folkestone police, deposed that on Saturday afternoon, he saw the deceased much intoxicated, and very disorderly; he has just quittted the "Folkestone Arms," his conduct being so bad there, that they turned him out; he locked him up in the station house, where he became very violent, kicking the door of his cell, so that witness was obliged to take his shoes off for some time. He constantly supplied him with water, brought a 2lb loaf, and gave him half of it. He left the station at about 5:45 and return at 6:40. In looking through the small aperture in the door he perceived the breast of the deceased, and on looking up saw a handkerchief fastened to the bars. He immediately cut it and heard something fall; he called for assistance, opened the door, and saw that deceased had suspended himself and appeared dead. He found upon his person a ticket of membership of a Teetotal Society at Hastings, in the name of James Newbury, also part of a charge sheet, wherein he was charged with ill-using his wife. He ha had ascertained that the gaoler of Dover knew him there by the name of Johnson.

Edward Harris, tailor and draper, deposed that he was called by the inspector to assist him, and deceased appeared to be dead.

Mr. William Bateman, surgeon, was called by the police, and found life had been extinct about half an hour, apparently from strangulation.

The jury returned a verdict, "That the deceased destroyed himself while labouring under a fit of temporary insanity," and they wished the coroner to request the corporation to remove the iron bars of the sell to prevent a similar occurrence and future.

The deceased obtained his living by making moss baskets, and was well known at Dover and Hastings; from the latter place the inspector received the letter a reply to a letter he sent, stating that they knew of no relations there belonging to the deceased, but that they had had him in custody 11 times.

 

Holbein's Visitors' List 2 March 1887.

Local News.

I am indebted for the following curious and interesting reminiscence of ancient Folkestone to an old inhabitant

 of the town, and I doubt not that many an old lady and gentleman can recall to mind the time at which the incident happened. At the corner of George Lane, on the site where Messrs. Gosling and Co.'s establishment now stands, the Folkestone Arms hung out it's sign in the days of long ago, before the town had become a holiday resort, and when the mammoth lodging house was a thing undreamed of by the Folkestonians of those primitive days. Folkestone is dull nowadays in the winter – wherefore we may conclude that it was even duller then. A young military officer, passing through the town, lunched at the Folkestone Arms, and after his repast embodied his views of the deadly-lively town in the following lines, which he pencilled on the wall of the dining room:

Since the Almighty Creator of Heaven

For our sins a punishment has given
Why need He send His creatures down to Hell?
Send them to Folkestone – that'll do as well

 

Shortly after he had delivered himself of this effusion, one of the tradesmen of that day (a shoemaker), who came to the coffee room every afternoon to smoke a digestive pipe, came in and read the lines. He took up cudgels on behalf of his native place, and pencilled beneath the officer's lines:

You red-coat poet

Why take you so much pains

To show at once

The virtue of your brains?

If Folkestone is a Hell

A Devil it must need;

You want preferment

Try – perhaps you may succeed

 

The officer was delighted with this repartee, sought out it's author, and the rhymesters spent a very pleasant evening together over a bottle of port.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 January 1899.

A Glimpse of Old Folkestone (Taken from The Watering Places of Great Britain)

The Folkestone Arms Commercial Hotel and Excise Office.

This is the principal hotel in Folkestone, and one, as regards comfort and convenience, of which any town might be proud. The beds are excellent; of the cookery the choicest epicure could not complain; the wines and spirits challenge competition with any; the management reflecting the greatest credit; the posting equal to any on the road; and, though last, not least of its recommendary qualities, the charges reasonable. It is situated in Bayle Street, and is within five minutes' walk of the sea-side.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 January 1901.

Felix.

If there is a watering place in the United Kingdom that ought to be justly proud of the magnificence of its hotels, surely it ought to be Folkestone. Strange, then, it is to read the following:- “The Folkestone Arms Commercial Hotel and Excise Office is the principal hotel in Folkestone, and one, as regards comfort and convenience, of which any town might be proud. The beds are excellent; of the cookery the choicest epicure could not complain; the wines and spirits challenge competition with any; the management reflecting the greatest credit; the posting equal to any on the road; and, though last, not least of its recommending qualities, the charges reasonable.” The site of this hotel was in Bayle Street, near the Herald printing works of today. Mr. Venner, the present genial proprietor of the Rose will probably learn that his house in the far-off days I am alluding to was considered a “a very comfortable establishment, with good accommodations, including stabling and lock-up coach-houses. It is situated in Broad Street (now High Street), opposite the entrance from Sandgate Road, commanding a fine land prospect, and within a few minutes' walk of the beach. Coaches and vans to and from London, Dover, Sandgate, Hythe, and every other part of the coast call daily.”

Folkestone, it would seem, was years ago well provided with public houses, for the writer says: “Of inns and public houses in Folkestone, it may be said, like churches in an old city, they are more numerical than ornamental; without wishing to be invidious, we would name the North Foreland, the George, the King's Arms, the Folkestone Cutter, the Folkestone Lugger, and the Fleur-de-lis, affording a variety of accommodations, which we have not space to enumerate.” The North Foreland was in the neighbourhood of the Fish Market, and it was here of an evening that the Town councillors and Jurats of the day would enjoy a rubber of whist and discuss the town's affairs. But “The Foreland” has disappeared, and on its site the Fishermen's Bethel has been erected. The palatial Queen's Hotel covers the ground on which once stood the King's Arms. As Folkestone grew I suppose it was considered infra dig to term a house “The Lugger” in the fashionable part of the town. Then it was altered to the East Kent Arms – the name the old, but renovated house in Sandgate Road is now known by.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 August 1916.

Felix.

Who can throw some light on the following note I have received from Lieut. Col. Fynmore, J.P.?

“Sandgate Castle, 31st July, 1916. Dear Felix, You asked some years ago if there had ever been a barn on The Bayle. I notice in the 1782 plan John Hobday held plots 32, 33, and 34. In 1792, John Hobday is described as a farmer. In Stock's Handbook, p. 89, reference is made to a barn and buildings, which in 1769 passed to Henry Hobday. In connection with this occupation by the Hobdays in 1769, Stock brings in the two shields of arms of Herdson and Dixwell that I drew attention to some years ago. Can it be that originally this was the Folkestone Arms? In 1776 we have the White Hart at the top of High Street, and this, in the 1782 plan, had become the Folkestone Arms, probably reviving a sign which had formerly existed, and where there was a more probable site than that of Hobday's, on The Bayle, and that the arms of the landlords (Herdson and Dixwell) should be placed on either side of the doorway, hence the Folkestone Arms. The proprietor might well in those days have been a farmer as well, and, judging by the plan, there was ample room for yard and stabling”.

I am told the site of the Folkestone arms now forms a part of Gosling's Stores. The old porching – and a fine specimen, too – still stands there. Here, too, the coaches started for London, and there are now the old waiting rooms, etc., still in existence. The stabling was in close proximity, too. I dare say some of the oldest inhabitants cane recall the scene when the coach started on its daily journey. I believe Mr. Tilden Tunbridge or Mr. Jenkings could throw some light on this.

Note: Actually a reference to the "Green Dragon," The Bayle.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 March 1929.

Felix.

“I thank you very much for your last week's article, and particularly that part referring to the Assembly (Corporation) meeting at the old Kings Arms Hotel and the Marquis of Granby”. Thus Mr. F. Hedges, of the Bouverie Arms, Cheriton Road, spoke to me on the bright and beautiful morning of Monday last. It is nice to have a “Thank you” now and then, because it is my main desire to please in these small weekly efforts of mine. I do not soar towards the impossible, viz., to please everybody. I remarked this much, many years ago, to a gentleman, who was then, as he is now, associated with the Folkestone Herald. His reply was brief and to the point. It was this “You will be a darned big fool if you try. Do the right as far as you can and let the rest alone”. I have tried to follow this advice. Now, to return to Mr. Hedges and his thanks. His establishment is a place where men congregate largely, and naturally many subjects crop up for discussion. There are arguments, friendly and sometimes highly controversial. It is the latter that this particular gentleman mostly dreads.

It appears one of the company at the Bouverie Arms on Saturday night, after reading my paragraph, asked of another “Where was the Marquis of Granby situate?” That was enough. The argument as to its whereabouts went on fully for a couple of hours, and it was only when the Speaker called “Time” that the controversy ceased. Now, to be fair, I must plead guilty to providing, what after all was a friendly argument, for discussion. In my last paragraph on this subject I declared the Marquis of Granby was situate in Seagate Street. This was wrong. It should have been High Street. I can't give the exact site, but there are those living amongst us who can. It is probably difficult for the present generation to realise that this present beautiful town of Folkestone was confined to three, four, or five thoroughfares (not paved in some cases) when the late Queen Victoria came to the throne in 1837. Such however was the case.

Perhaps the Cheriton Road unofficial debating Society would like to discuss the whereabouts of the Folkestone Arms. The site of it appears, as far as I can make out, to have been where now stands the commanding corner premises at the bottom of High Street at the junction formed by Harbour and South Streets. The Folkestone Arms, it would seem, was an important establishment in those days. I will prove it. Here is an extract from an old Kentish newspaper and it will be read, I feel sure, with interest by all true Folkestonians. “September 11th, 1812. Tuesday last being the Mayor's choice for the town of Folkestone, Thomas Baker Esq. was elected to the chair, who after taking the necessary oath adjourned to the Folkestone Arms Inn, accompanied by the jurats and the principal residents of the community, where a sumptuous and well-served dinner was prepared for them. After the cloth was drawn (removed), the following toasts, etc., were pronounced from the chair; “The King and God Bless Him”; “The Prince Regent” (and under his benign auspices may the Imperial Eagle be experimentally taught to fly the wing at the roaring of the British Lion); “The Queen and Royal Family”; “Alexander (and may the Gallic Cock (France) be finally brought to feel the ascending influence of the Northern constellation)”. Thus passed the fleeting hours, interspersed with convivial song and merry joke, until “Nox” was contemplating to withdraw her sombre curtain from the dusky landscape, which suggested to the company the idea of “iit domum”, and on which they unanimously rose and congratulated the Mayor (Thomas Baker) on his tenth election to the honour of the white wand”. The foregoing, although an involved and rather complicated composition, gives an insight into the life of Folkestone 117 years ago, and incidentally reminds us that our forefathers well enjoyed themselves in their own way, not only at the table, but with convivial song and merry joke.

Note: Felix again gets it wrong. The Folkestone Arms referred to was located at the top of High Street, and closed in 1846. The Folkestone Arms Tavern, at the bottom of High Street, opened in 1847.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 November 1930.

Felix.

Councillor – or rather Jurat – Thomas Baker was elected Mayor of Folkestone on ten or twelve different occasions. He it was who laid the foundation stone of Folkestone Harbour when it was owned by a local company. In the brief record I have before me I find that 115 years ago a banquet in honour of the election of Mayor Baker was held at the Folkestone Arms, situate at the top of High Street. The landlady, it appears, surpassed herself in the cooking of the joints (boiled or roast), whilst the vegetables and all the etceteras were, without doubt, prepared to a turn. My report states that after the cloth had been removed a few toasts were proposed and responded to. And then the company spent the rest of the evening, or rather night, in mirth and harmony. The company “kept it up” right enough, for I read that it was not until the brilliancy of the dawn wiped out the sombreness of Nox (night) that the company separated.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 November 1934.

Felix.

I am certain the following extract, taken from an old county newspaper, will be read just now with interest by all Folkestonians:- “ September 11th, 1812: Thursday last being the Mayor's choice for the town of Folkestone, Thomas Baker Esq. was elected to the civic chair, and who, after taking the necessary oath, adjourned to the Folkestone Arms Inn, accompanied by the jurats and the primores oppidi (principal residents of the town), where a sumptuous and well-served dinner was prepared for them. After the cloth was drawn (removed), the following toasts, etc., were pronounced from the chair; “The King and God Bless Him”; “The Prince Regent” (and under his benign auspices may the Imperial Eagle be experimentally taught to fly the wing at the roaring of the British Lion); “The Queen and Royal Family”; “Alexander (and may the Gallic Cock (France) be finally brought to feel the ascending influence of the Northern constellation)”. Thus passed the fleeting hours, interspersed with convivial song and merry joke, until “Nox” was contemplating to withdraw her sombre curtain from the dusky landscape, which suggested to the company the idea of “iit domum”, and on which they unanimously rose and congratulated the Mayor (Thomas Baker) on his tenth election to the honour of the white hand of office”.

The aforesaid Thomas Baker of over 100 years ago was considered something of a “big noise” in his day. He it was who, amongst other things, laid the foundation stone of the original Folkestone Harbour before it was taken over by the then South Eastern Railway Company.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

BATEMAN James 1772-86 Bastions

JANAWAY George 1786-1808 Bastions

JANEWAY Elizabeth 1808-26 Bastions(Pigot's Directory 1823 & Posting)

JANAWAY James 1826-30 BastionsPigot's Directory 1828-29

HART Daniel Listed 1833+ Bastions

CORK Daniel 1839 Pigot's Directory 1839

BROWN Ann 1838-40+ Pigot's Directory 1840Bastions

BAMFORD John 1842-46 Bastions

 

Pigot's Directory 1823From the Pigot's Directory 1823

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-29

Pigot's Directory 1839From the Pigot's Directory 1839

Pigot's Directory 1840From the Pigot's Directory 1840

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

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