DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Dover, December, 2018.

Page Updated:- Thursday, 20 December, 2018.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Barry Smith and Paul Skelton

Earliest 1805

Rose Inn

Latest Jan 1973

24 Cannon Street Pikes 1924Pikes 1932-33Kelly's Directory 1950

1 Cannon Street Pigot's Directory 1832-34Pigot's Directory 1839Pigot's Directory 1840Post Office Directory 1874

Dover

Rose Inn

Mr Henry James Wells standing outside the Rose Inn where he stayed from 1912 to 1916. (Obviously not outside for that time though).

Rose date unknown

A similar shot of The Rose Inn.

Rose Inn

Rose Inn date circa 1904.

Rose Inn 1918

Above picture kindly sent by Stuart Kinnon, showing the "Rose Inn" on the right, and the "Wellington Hotel" on the left of the church. Postcard taken 1918.

 

There have been many guesses concerning the origin of this one so let us spend a minute looking at local history. We know that Challice kept a forge on this corner, outside the town gate, up to 1613 when he moved to another world. The gate itself was taken down in 1752 and some say that the "Rose" was built or rebuilt after that removal. Part of the adjoining town wall still standing in 1827, was removed that year. That led some to believe it was done so that the "Rose" could be built. New Street dates from 1783.

 

It is also recorded that four years after the gate disappeared a stone was inserted into the wall of the pub to mark the spot. There are prints in possession of Dover Museum which give the impression that it was built on 'stilts' for want of a better word, with steps leading up to it.

 

Biggin Gate Stone

 

When its successor closed in 1973 it was said to be nearly one hundred and fifty years old.

 

So, having digested all that, I can now assure you that the pub was kept by Cleveland in 1805. When auctioned, in May 1859, together with its so described excellent yard and outbuildings, it realised £870. The house number will vary over the years. The low numbers started from this end at one time.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, Saturday 25 August, 1838.

CRIMINAL ASSAULT

Henry Cloke, labourer, aged 19, was charged on Tuesday, by Martha Moore, a young woman of 18, servant at the "Rose Inn," with violently assaulting her on Sunday night. It appeared that the prosecutrix, accompanied by another young woman, was returning from Capel; and between 8 and 9 o'clock, when within a quarter of a mile of Dover, the prisoner, whom they had previously seen on the road, came up; and after an observation or two, seized the prosecutrix; and throwing her down in the hedge, proceeded to take liberties with her. She screamed murder; on which he put his hand on her mouth, and swore he would cut her throat if she did not hold her tongue. The prosecutrix, however, to use her own words, was as strong as the prisoner, and scratched his face, the marks of which were visible against him. Her companion, on his commencing the attack, ran towards the town for assistance; and meeting two young men who had heard the cries of murder, they hastened to the spot. As they approached, the prisoner got up, and ran into a field of barley, out of which he was seen to come next morning at half past five. The prisoner admitted his being in the field at that hour; but said he was returning from a walk. He also denied the charge, saying they were mistaken in the person, and that he went to bed at home, on Mount Pleasant, at the time stated. His witness failed to prove this; and after the bonnet, shawl, &c. of the prosecutrix were produced as evidence of the outrage she had been subjected to, he was committed for trial.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, Saturday 24 February, 1844. Price 5d.

CORONERS INQUEST

An inquest was held at the "Rose Inn" on Wednesday last, before G. T. Thompson, Esq., coroner for the Borough, on the body of Judith Laws, aged 65.

Mrs. Mary Austen being sworn, deposed - On the 19th of Dec. last, about 6 o'clock in the morning, the deceased and Mrs. Stubbersfield and myself were going along Folkestone Road, to work at Mr. Carter's, on Priory Terrace. When opposite the New Church I heard deceased, who was a few steps behind, call out, and saw that she was sitting on the bank. On going to her she said she had hurt her foot, and I then discovered that her leg was broken. I went and called my husband, and we removed her to her house.

Mr. G. E. Rutley, surgeon, stated - I was called to attend the deceased on the 19th of Dec., and found her leg fractured, attended by great haemorrhage, which, after some hours, I succeeded in stopping. I then dressed the leg, and attended her until her death on Sunday last. I attributed her death to the injuries she received from the fall. The jury returned a verdict to that effect, and stated that the footpath, being dangerous, ought to be lowered and levelled.

 

From the Dover Telegraph 7 November.1846 p.8

Mr Elias COULTHARD - transfer of licence of the "Rose Inn." Dover Petty Sessions.

 

From the Dover Telegraph 17 Oct 1846 p.8 col 4

Mr Elias COULTHARD, landlord of the "Rose Inn" - notice of marriage to Louisa Charlotte WOOD, daughter  of Mr James WOOD of the "Fountain Inn," Dover.

 

From the Dover Telegraph and Cinque Ports General Advertiser, Saturday 24 October, 1846. Price 5d.

DOVER PETTY SESSIONS

Permission was granted to Mr. Elias Coultard to carry on the "Rose Inn" until transfer day.

 

From the Dover Telegraph 4 Sep 1847 p.8 col.4

Mrs Elias COULTHARD of "Rose Inn" - birth of a daughter on 3 Sept.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 28 January, 1860.

SMASHING A BAR WINDOW

Christopher Manson, was charged with being drunk and disorderly and breaking a pane of glass, value 7s. 6d., the property of Mr. T. E. Petts, the landlord of the "Rose Inn," Cannon Street.

Mr. John Coulthard said he was at the "Rose" on Saturday night at 8 o'clock, awaiting the arrival of the omnibus, when the defendant, who was drunk, came in and addressed two other men standing in the bar. He appeared to know both men, as he called them by name, and, making use of very bad language, asked them if they were not going to give him some beer. The men he addressed said, "No, I won't give a blackguard like you beer." After a few other words had passed between them a scuffle took place, and the defendant, while in the set of striking one of the other men, drew his hand back and ran his elbow through one of Mr. Petts's windows.

By the defendant - I did not see the younger man first interfere with you by striking you. I saw him go behind his father, but he did not commence the affray.

Mr. T. K. Petts said he was landlord of the "Rose." He saw defendant in his house on the preceding evening, but he did not see him break the glass. The value of it was 7s. 6d.

The defendant, in answer to the charge, said he was first interfered with by the other men, and as this was the cause of the accident he had refused to bear the whole of the damage. At the time of the occurrence he had offered to pay half; and he appealed to Mr. Petts for confirmation of this statement.

Mr. Petts said he believed this was so; but he had declined taking half the money, thinking that defendant was liable to pay the whole.

he Mayor confirmed this opinion, and said it was of no consequence how the row commenced. Defendant's hand had broken the window, and his common sense should have informed him that it would have been better to pay the money. As it was he had incurred the costs of this proceeding.

Fined, the damage 7s. 6d., and in default commitment to prison for seven days.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 22 July, 1949.

STOLE PINT GLASS

When a local man was fined for stealing a glass from a public house, Dover Magistrates on Friday complimented Sgt. Reid on his prompt action on arresting the man after he noticed him carrying the glass in the man street late at night.

The man, James Murray, of Squires Way, pleaded guilty to stealing a pint glass mug from the “Rose Inn,” Cannon Street, the property of Herbert Osbourne Morrison, on July 7th.

Inspector Piddock said that at 10.30 p.m. Sgt. Reid saw defendant who was carrying something in his hand, with two other men in Cannon Street. When the officer approached defendant turned away and when he turned back he had nothing in his hands but there was a bulge in his coat. When he was questioned he said he was taking the mug home for drinking purposes, and indicated the “Rose Inn” as the public house from which he had stolen it. The officer took him to the inn, where the licensee identified the glass as his property as defendant as a man who had been in the bar with two others. On defendant's own behalf, said Inspector Piddock, it was fair to say that although he was not drunk he had had “a lively evening.”

The Chairman (Mr. G. D. Clark) announcing a fine of £1 said the Bench hoped it would teach defendant a lesson, and others as well.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 9 June, 1871. Price 1d.

DISCHARGED SUMMONS

George Clark, the landlord of the "Rose Inn," Canon Street, appeared in answer to a summons which had been served on him for using threatening language towards James Powell; but the complainant not appearing, the Bench dismissed the case.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 5 September, 1873.

TRANSFERS

William Charles Wilson applied that the license of the “Rose” might be transferred to him.

The Superintendent of Police said he believed the applicant was at one time the landlord of the “Grapes;” and had been convicted for selling liquor during prohibited hours.

It appeared that the conviction to which the Superintendent alluded occurred some four years since, the Magistrates granted the transfer.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 15 May, 1885. Price 1d.

A PUBLICAN IN TROUBLE

John Hubert Parsons was charged with assaulting Albert Stokes on the 6th of May, and also with breaking windows and doing damage to the amount of 10s.

The prosecutor, a poulterer, living in new Street, said: On Wednesday evening last, about ten o'clock, I was in the “Rose” public-house, which is kept by the defendant. I was talking to a woman, who said she was born in Africa. A man said, “That is a lie,” I told her it was Mr. Ralph. Shortly after defendant came in. She told him what I had said, and he came and struck me in the face. I went outside to my wife, and defendant followed me up to my house. He broke all the windows at the bottom of the house with his fist. He also broke the door post. I am doubtful if 10s. will pay for all the damage done.

Defendant said that he did not break the windows, although he admitted going to the house.

The Bench fined defendant 10s. for assault, 8s. 6d. costs, and 10s. for damage done, and costs, amounting in all to £2 7s. The money was paid.

 

 

Road widening was spoken about in October, 1891 when a Common Hall called on the town council to widen the main thoroughfare; and parliamentary power for that purpose was obtained in 1892. In due course, negotiations were entered into, and the property on the west side of the street was purchased obliging Dover Corporation to purchase the property, including the stables, for £1,594.6s. We know that following that widening, the pub was rebuilt on the corner with New Street. Quite quickly too. Bourner was the licensee from 1895.

 

 The widening of the road went from the "Rose" Inn down as far as Bryson's Bakery, for which slice £24,201 28. 1d. was paid.

 

The new pub was fed latterly by Whitbread-Fremlin but closed finally on 13 January 1973. The premises were then altered to accommodate a building society, another stone concerning Biggin Gate taking its place in the side wall.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 24 August, 1900. Price 1d.

A QUICK RE-APPEARANCE

John Holmes was charged with being drunk and disorderly in the market Square and in Cannon Street.

Acting Police Sergeant Scutt said that the prisoner, who was very drunk, came up to witness who was in uniform ion the market Square, and asked for a 1d. for half a pint of beer. Witness asked him if he took him for a kitten, and told him to go off to his lodgings. He saw the defendant stop two gentlemen afterwards, and witness told him if he did that again he should take him into custody. He shouted very loud and went into the “Rose Inn.” He was ejected from there, and was taken into custody.

The prisoner, who had been before the Magistrates the previous day, asked the Magistrates to send him to Canterbury.

The magistrates decided to oblige the man, and sent him to Canterbury Prison for seven days' hard labour.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 7 October, 1904. Price 1d.

The plans of some small alterations to the "Rose Inn," Cannon Street, were approved.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 27 September, 1912.

ROBBERY IN PUBLIC HOUSE

At the Dover Police Court on Tuesday, before Messrs. W. W. Burkett (in the chair) and J. Scott.

Albert Cansfield, of no fixed residence, was charged with stealing, whilst in the public bar of the "Rose Inn," Cannon Street, from the jacket pocket of Thomas Wakerall, 8, New Street, a purse containing about 10s. in money, the property of Thomas Wakerall, fruit seller.

Thomas Wakerall, a fruit dealer, living at 8, New Street, said: Yesterday afternoon between 1 and 1.30, I was in the public bar of the "Rose Inn," Cannon Street. Here were four or five others in the bar and the prisoner also came in. I was about to call for a drink and put my hand into my left-hand pocket for my purse, but found that it had gone. I had between 10s. and 15s. in silver and copper in the purse. I asked the other chaps if they were having a joke with me, I had previously been in conversation with them and the prisoner in te bar. "Sandy" Allison said he had not been joking, but had suspicions. I left the bar and went to the kitchen of the "Eight Bells" lodging house. I there saw the prisoner who was asleep, I at once came to the Police Station, reported the matter, and went back to the kitchen with P.C. Detective Southey. He took prisoner into the yard, searched him, and found the purse (produced) upon him. The purse was thus empty. Prisoner was under the influence of drink when I saw him at the bar of the "Rose Inn." he is a stranger to me. He was brought to the police station and charged.

Detective P.C. Southey said: Yesterday, about 4 p.m. I accompanied the last witness to the "Eight Bells" lodging house, 8 New Street. I there saw prisoner, who was asleep in the kitchen and the last witness pointed him out to me as the person who he suspected of having stolen his purse. I aroused prisoner, called him into the yard, told him I was a police officer, cautioned him and told him that he was suspected of having stolen the purse containing about 15s., the property of Thomas Wakerall. I asked him what money he had about him, and he put his hand into his jacket pocket and produced five-pence in coppers. Not feeling satisfied I put my hand into his watch pocket and pulled out 9s. 6d. in silver. He previously put his hand into that pocket before he produced the five-pence, and I heard the money rattle. In another waistcoat pocket I found the purse (produced) which Wakerall identified as his property. I told prisoner I should take him into custody, and then I brought him to the Police Station. At the Police Station I found another penny and a farthing, on the prisoner, making 10s. 0½d. He was charged with stealing a purse and about 10s., and in reply said "On the face of it I am not guilty, and that's done with it."

Prisoner on formally being charged, said he wished the case to be dealt with summarily, and pleaded guilty. He said he was under the influence of drink at the time, or he should not have done such a thing. He had no other excuse to make. He did not want money, as he had some.

The Chairman said he saw prisoner  was classed as an orderly.

Prisoner: I am really a ship's steward. I have no fixed residence. I come from York, and came straight from Folkestone to Dover on Friday. I last sailed in March at Liverpool.

Detective P.C. Southey said in the morning prisoner had been seen with hand in handkerchief selling postcards. There was nothing the matter with prisoner's hand.

Prisoner said there was something the matter with it.

The Magistrates committed prisoner to three weeks' hard labour, and ordered the purse and money to be returned to Wakerall.

 

From the Dover Express, 13 October, 1916.

LICENCE TRANSFERS.

At the Dover Police Court on Monday, before Captain R. B. Cay, R.N. (in tie chair), Messrs. J. W. Bussey, H. Hobday and Kdward Chitty.

The licence of “ The Rose,” Cannon Street, was transferred from Mr. Wells to Mr. Hilton.

 

Dover Express, Friday 22 September 1939.

Breaches of Blackout Rules.

Frank Monk, the "Rose Inn," Cannon Street, who pleaded guilty, was also fined 10s. for allowing light to be emitted when the bar doors were opened at 8:30 p.m. on September 3rd.

Chief Inspector Saddleton said that defendant told P.C. Page he would screen the lights as soon as he could get the materials.

 

Dover Express. 22 July, 1949.

When a local man was fined for stealing a glass from a public house, Dover magistrates on Friday complimented Sgt. Reid on his prompt action in arresting the man after he noticed him carrying the glass in the main street late at night.

The man, James Murray, of Squires Way, pleaded guilty to stealing a pint glass mug from the "Rose Inn," Cannon Street, the property of Herbert Osbourn Morrison, on July 7th.

Inspector Piddock said that at 10.30 pm. Sgt. Reid saw defendant, who was carrying something in his hand, with two other men in Cannon Street. When the officer approached defendant turned away and when he turned back he had nothing in his hands but there was a bulge in his coat. When he was questioned he said he was taking the mug home for drinking purposes, and indicated the "Rose Inn" as the public house from which he had stolen it. The officer took him to the inn, where the licensee identified the glass as his property and defendant as a man who had been in the bar with two others. On defendant's own behalf, said Inspector Piddock, it was fair to say that although he was not drunk he had had "a lively evening."

The Chairman, (Mr, G. D. Clark) announcing a fine of £1 said the Bench hoped it would teach defendant a lesson, and others as well.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 12 March, 1971.

PENNY PUSH

Penny push at Rose 1971

Eight thousand six hundred and forty pennies came tumbling down at the "Rose Inn," Cannon Street on Friday - to help the Senior Citizens Riverside Centre.

It happened on Friday when Alderman Arthur Husk vice-chairman of the Trust committee and Mr. Wilf Farringdon the organiser were invited to demolish the pile.

The final count was £36.

Alderman Husk thanked the landlord and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. John Hutley and their customers for their generosity. He said the cash would buy extra tables.

 

Rose 2009

Above photo by Paul Skelton, 19 August 2009, showing the "Rose" as it is today.

 

LICENSEE LIST

CLEVELAND 1805

CLEVELAND William 1823-28+ Pigot's Directory 1823Pigot's Directory 1828-29

WRATTON Richard 1832-39+ Pigot's Directory 1832-34Pigot's Directory 1839Pigot's Directory 1840

COULTHARD Elias Nov/1846-48 Dover TelegraphBagshaw's Directory 1847

PHILPOTT 1851

CLARK Werter 1856

PETTS Thomas Edward 1858-60 Melville's 1858

FENIMORE T 1864-July/68 dec'd Dover Express

FENIMORE Mrs July/1868+ Dover Express

Last pub licensee had WILSON Henry Charles Sept/1873+ Dover Express

CLARK George Hurst 1871-74+ Post Office Directory 1874

BINFIELD/BURFIELD William July/1878-Jan/80 Dover Express

SMITH Alfred Jan/1880+ Dover Express (from Snargate near Romney)

CASH John William 1882 Post Office Directory 1882

BAYNTON F T 1883

Last pub licensee had BIRCH Joseph John 1883 end

PARSONS John Hubert or C 1884-Sept/85 Dover Express

BIRCH Joseph George Sept/1885+ Dover Express

BOURNER William John 1895-1903 Next pub licensee had Pikes 1895Kelly's Directory 1899Post Office Directory 1903Post Office Directory 1903Dover Express

WALTON John William 1903-04 end

GRINDELL Henry 1904-Nov/08 Pikes 1909Dover Express

KIDD/KEMP Frank Beecher Nov/1908-Jan/12 Dover Express

WELLS Henry James Jan/1912-Oct/16 Dover ExpressPost Office Directory 1913

Last pub licensee had HILTON Thomas Oct/1916-28 end Post Office Directory 1922Pikes 1924

YOUNG Henry James 1928-June/29 Post Office Directory 1930Dover Express

HARRIS William June/1929-Dec/30 (George Beer & Rigden secretary) Dover Express

MARTIN Wilfred Dec/1930-44 (George Beer and Rigden secretary) Dover ExpressPost Office Directory 1938

MONK Frank 1939+ (manager age 53 in 1939)

MORISON Herbert O 1944-54 end Pikes 48-49Kelly's Directory 1950Kelly's Directory 1953

Last pub licensee had BRIGHTWELL Charles S 1954

WILLIS Frederick H G 1955-56 end Kelly's Directory 1956

NOAKES H R 1956

???? DENNIS  or Dennis ???? 1959

KELLY or Kerry F P 1961-62 end

KERRY Frederick P or Kelly 1961-62 end

GARTON Arthur Edward 1962-67

HUTLEY John C M 1967-73 end

 

It was reported by the Dover Express 1908 that when the transfer from Henry Grindle to Frank Kemp(Kidd?) was applied for at the magistrates court, it was stated by Mr. K. A. K. Mowll that the outgoing tenant was too ill to attend.

 

Pigot's Directory 1823From the Pigot's Directory 1823

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-9

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

Pigot's Directory 1839From the Pigot's Directory 1839

Pigot's Directory 1840From the Pigot's Directory 1840

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Melville's 1858From Melville's Directory 1858

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Pikes 1895From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1895

Kelly's Directory 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1901

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Pikes 1909From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1909

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Pikes 1924From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1924

Post Office Directory 1930From the Post Office Directory 1930

Pikes 1932-33From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1932-33

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

Pikes 48-49From Pikes Dover Blue Book 1948-49

Kelly's Directory 1950From the Kelly's Directory 1950

Kelly's Directory 1953From the Kelly's Directory 1953

Kelly's Directory 1956From the Kelly's Directory 1956

Dover TelegraphFrom the Dover Telegraph

Dover ExpressFrom the Dover Express

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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