DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, July, 2022.

Page Updated:- Sunday, 17 July, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1865

(Name from)

Skylark Inn

Latest 1887

(Name to)

24 Radnor Street

Folkestone

 

Traced back to 1865, the pub changed name in 1887 to the "Jubilee," although the licensee responsible for the name change wanted it to be called the "Royal Jubilee."

 

Folkestone Chronicle 11 March 1865.

Thursday March 9th:- Before Captain Kennicott, A.M. Leith, James Tolputt and James Kelcey Esqs.

Emma Smith, a tramp, was brought up in custody, charged with being drunk and riotous in Radnor Street on the previous night, and further charged with wilfully breaking three squares of glass, the property of Richard Bayley, at the Skylark beerhouse.

P.C. Hills deposed he was on duty in High Street a little before nine o'clock on the previous evening, when from information received he went to Radnor Street and found the prisoner outside the Skylark, using disgusting language to the landlord, who was holding her. There were a number of persons collected; prisoner was drunk, but knew what she was about. Witness took her into custody and brought her to the station.

Prisoner upon being asked what she had to say replied she was singing in a public house, when the landlord threw her out and hurt her knee. She then broke the windows.

Prisoner was then committed for seven days with hard labour for breaking the glass, and a further period of seven days without hard labour for being drunk and riotous.

 

Folkestone Observer 11 March 1865.

Thursday March 9th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N., Captain Leith V.R., J. Kelcey and J. Tolputt Esqs.

Emma Smith, a vagrant, was charged with being drunk and riotous, and breaking three panes of glass, value 3s., the property of Richard Bayley, of Radnor Street, on the 8th instant.

Prisoner pleaded guilty to breaking the panes of glass, but said she was not drunk and riotous.

P.C. Baker (9), said he was on duty in High Street about 9-20 last night when, hearing a noise in Radnor Street, he proceeded to the "Skylark" public house and saw the prisoner outside. She was using profane language, swearing, and making a great noise, which had the effect of collecting a mob of people round her. Prisoner was drunk, but not so much so as not to know what she was doing. He took her into custody, and the property found on her was 4d.

Prisoner said she went into the house to sing a song, when the landlord threw her forcibly out and hurt her knee, and she then broke the windows.

The magistrates sent the prisoner to gaol for one week with hard labour for breaking the windows, and for one week without hard labour for being drunk and riotous.

 

Folkestone Observer 26 August 1865.

It was licensing day on Tuesday, when the magistrates suspended the license for the Skylark, Radnor Street, for harbouring prostitutes.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 4 November 1865.

Water Rate Summons.

Thursday November 2nd:- Before the Mayor, J. Kelcey and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

Richard Bayley, landlord of the Skylark, Radnor Street, was summoned for non-payment of 5s 3d.

The debt was proved by the collector, and it appeared that the defendant had given the company a good deal of trouble.

The magistrates ordered the claim to be paid, with costs, in default a distress warrant to issue, and in default of sufficient distress, defendant to be imprisoned for 21 days with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Observer 27 July 1867.

Friday, 26th July: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

William Spearpoint was charged with allowing prostitutes to assemble and continue in his house. Defendant's wife appeared and said her husband was at sea. The case was adjourned.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 14 December 1867.

Wednesday, December 11th: Before R.W. Boarer and J. Tolputt Esqs.

William Spearpoint, of the Skylark, Radnor Street, was summoned for a violent assault on his wife, Amelia, on Monday last.

The complainant deposed: My husband was from home on Monday evening last, and I went to the Star about eleven o'clock, and found him standing at the bar. I asked him to come home and see to his own house. He came home, but went back again immediately. At twelve o'clock I went for him again and he came out and knocked me down. He struck me four blows about the head with his fist, and another while I was on the ground, saying “There's one, two, three, four, and one for five”. My head and arms are all in lumps from his blows. He got home before me, and as soon as I got there I went up into my bedroom. He followed me, and with an oath asked for some money, which I refused to give him. He took me with both hands by my hair, and hammered my head on the floor. He had his hand on my throat, and would have choked me, but the servant girl said “Oh, don't, Mr. Spearpoint”. He then ran down the stairs, and I went to the bottom of High Street, and found two policemen. I was bleeding about the face, and as I was afraid to go home, P.C. Reynolds went with me. After Reynolds was gone, defendant began to abuse me again, knocking my head on the floor, striking, and kicking me. He used bad language to me. He said that if I did not bring the child down out of bed, he would throw it downstairs. The child is my sister's child. I brought it down and sat by the fire with it. I was sober, but defendant had been drinking. He is always at Hall's (the Star) when Hall's back is turned.

Isabella Larkin, defendant's servant, corroborated the statement of her mistress, as to the assault in her bedroom.

Defendant did not deny the assault, and called no witness. He said he had been at home all evening, only going out twice for a few minutes to see to his boat; that he was sober, but his wife was beastly drunk; and that he merely “put her on her back” in the street.

The Bench said the summons was granted under a clause relating to aggravated assaults on women and children, and the had the power to fine him 20 or six months' imprisonment. Believing it was a brutal assault, they sent him to prison for six weeks without the alternative of a fine.

(I believe mention of the "Star" in the above passage is incorrect, and it should have read as the "North Foreland," as there is no Hall mentioned at the "Star" but there was a Daniel Hall licensee at the "North Foreland" two years after this event. Paul Skelton.)

 

Folkestone Observer 14 December 1867.

Wednesday, December 11th: Before James Tolputt and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

William Spearpoint was charged with assault.

Amelia Spearpoint said: I am the wife of defendant, and live in Radnor Street. My husband went out on Monday evening about seven, and not returning at eleven, I went out and found him at the "North Foreland," standing at the bar. I requested him to come home and see to his own house. He would not come home and I returned home. I keep the "Skylark," and wished defendant to come home and clear the house. About twelve o'clock I went after him again outside the "North Foreland" He came up to me and knocked me down in the street. I got up and went home. Defendant followed me into the house and said “You ----, give me that money”, and held me with his hands round my neck on to the floor, and would have choked me, but the servant intervened, and he ran downstairs. I went out and found a policeman, and told him my husband had been ill-using me, and he said he could do nothing for me. He has ill-used me before. P.C. Reynolds went to the house with me, and defendant said to him “There is the door. I never turned her out”. As soon as Reynolds had gone, he again ill-used me. He took hold of me by my hair, and knocked my head against the stairs and said “I'll knock your ---- out”. He was going to throw the child out of the window. It is not his child. It was between one and two o'clock in the morning. My husband was not sober. He had been drinking all the evening. He is constantly at the "North Foreland."

Isabella Hart said: I am servant to defendant. I was indoors on Monday last. I saw the defendant in at tea at four o'clock. I never saw him again till past eight. He was in the house then, but a very little while. I never saw him again till past eleven. Mistress went upstairs about eleven to get some money, and defendant followed her up to the bedroom. He asked her for the money, and she (plaintiff) wouldn't give it to him. He took hold of her by the hair with both hands, and knocked her head against the wall. This was at half past eleven. He squeezed her throat, and I said “Oh, Mr. Spearpoint, you will choke her”. He left off and went downstairs. Mistress had been for defendant. She went out afterwards to look for a policeman, and I followed her. I met P.C. Reynolds and went back again to the house. After a little while Mr. Spearpoint opened the door. Plaintiff went in the house with P.C. Reynolds, and I followed. I fastened the back door and went to bed. My mistress was sober. Defendant was sober when he went out, but not when he came in.

The defendant, in defence, said he went out about six o'clock on Monday evening to see his boat, and called into Mr. Hall's, and was standing at the bar when his (defendant's) wife came in and told him to go home. She began to abuse him, and he ran home to avoid a disturbance.

The Bench sentenced the prisoner to 21 days' imprisonment.

Mrs. Spearpoint applied that the prisoner might be bound over to keep the peace toward her, but the request was refused.

 

Folkestone Express 23 January 1869.

Saturday, January 16th: Before R.W. Boarer Esq.

John Saunders, a private of the 3rd Regiment at Shorncliffe, was charged with deserting.

P.C. Marsh said: I was on duty in Radnor Street about half past eight on Friday evening. I went to the Skylark in search of the prisoner and found him there. I asked him if he had a pass. He said “Yes”, but he could not produce it. He felt in his pocket. I then charged him with being a deserter. E said he was no deserter. I then took him into custody, and the landlady gave me 4 6s., which the prisoner had dropped out of his pocket. I then brought him to the station and found 11d. in his pocket.

The defendant stated he had no intention of deserting.

Mr. Boarer said he was a deserter because he had no pass, and he should order him to be taken to the Camp in civil custody.

 

Folkestone Express 28 August 1869.

Spirit License (Renewal)

Wednesday, August 25th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Bateman. J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith, and J. Gambrill Esqs.

William Spearpoint, of the Skylark, made an application. Mr. Martin complained of the bad character of the people who went to this house. The license was suspended.

 

Folkestone Express 11 September 1869.

Adjourned Licensing Day.

Wednesday, September 8th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., A.M. Leith and J. Tolputt Esqs.

Spirit license was granted to William Spearpoint, of the Skylark.

Note: Observer lists this change at the Star, Radnor Street.

 

Folkestone Express 3 June 1871.

A False Charge.

At the Ashford Police Court on Thursday, Mrs. Amelia Spearpoint, of the Skylark Inn, Folkestone, was charged with attempting to steal a watch from George Harnden, at Wye Races. The prosecutor was the proprietor of a bicycle machine and he alleged that in a row which took place the prisoner made a grab at his watch. The Magistrates dismissed the case as there was not sufficient evidence of a felonious intent.

 

Folkestone Express 30 August 1873.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

Wednesday, August 27th: Before The Mayor, J. Gambrill, J. Tolputt, and J. Clarke Esq.

The licensing committee met at ten o'clock for the purpose of taking into consideration the question of making any alteration in the hours for opening and closing public houses. Shortly after eleven o'clock the licensed victuallers present were called into Court, where the Clerk said the Bench would hear anything with reference to the alteration of the hours for the opening and closing.

The license of the Skylark, Radnor Street, was renewed, Mrs. Spearpoint being cautioned as to the conduct of the house, Supt. Wilshire having complained of the kind of company resorting there.

 

Folkestone Express 1 March 1879.

Advertisement.

Sale Next Wednesday, Folkestone, Kent.

Auction Sale of a Copyhold Full Licensed Public House.

John Banks will sell by Auction at the King's Arms Hotel, Folkestone, on Wednesday, March 5th, 1879, at three of the clock in the afternoon.

Lot 1: All that substantially built Copyhold Full Licensed Public House.

THE SKYLARK.

Containing Beer Cellar, Bar, Four Bedrooms and Attic, Taproom with large boat builder's workshop over, situate in Radnor Street and The Stade, in the occupation of William Spearpoint and Richard Saunders. The lease of the public house expires on the 6th of April next, the whole producing the annual rent of 39 per annum. The Copy Quit Rent payable to the Lord of the Manor is 4d. per annum.

Particulars and conditions of sale may be had at the office of the Auctioneer, Tontine Street, Folkestone, and of

Mr. W.G.S. Harrison,

olicitor, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Express 8 March 1879.

Local News.

On Wednesday Mr. John Banks sold by auction the Skylark, freehold fully licensed public house, Radnor Street. It was purchased for the sum of 605 by Messrs. Langton and Co.

 

Folkestone Express 26 April 1879.

Monday, April 21st: Before J. Kelcey, J. Fitness and R.W. Boarer Esqs, and Ald. Hoad.

Bridget Clark, a wretched looking woman, was charged with stealing a black cloth jacket, value 14s. 6d., the property of Mr. Cephas Chasmar, draper, of High Street, on Saturday evening, the 19th inst.

Rosecutor said on Saturday evening, about eight o'clock, he missed the jacket, which had been hanging on a stud in the doorway of his shop, 68, High Street. He had seen it at six o'clock. The same evening, about half past nine, it was shown to him at the police station by P.C. Willis.

P.C. Willis said he went to the Skylark public house about a quarter to nine on Saturday evening. He found the prisoner in front of the bar, with the jacket lying in her lap. He asked if it belonged to her, and she said “Yes”. He asked where she got it, and she said she “begged it”. He took her to the police station on suspicion of stealing it. At the police station she said she had found it in the road.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty, and was sentenced to two months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 2 August 1879.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Town Hall on Thursday evening, before J. Minter Esq., Coroner, on the body of William Hall, Fish salesman. The Jury having been sworn, Mr. Farley was chosen foreman. Considerable interest was evinced by the public over the enquiry, and before the conclusion of the case the small hall, and the approaches to the Hall were crowded.

William Hall, having identified the body as that of his father, who lived in Stade Street, who was about fifty years of age, said that on Monday the 28th, between about half past twelve and a quarter to one, his father was standing on the kerb opposite Mrs. Spearpoint's house talking to William Spearpoint, landlord of the Skylark. Thomas Anthony Hall was standing in the Market seven or eight yards from the deceased, and he shouted out “There's two fine fish salesmen, been to college to get their learning”. Deceased said to Spearpoint “Hold on, we'll make him spiteful”. Mr. Spearpoint replied “Hold on, Will, don't say nothing”. Father said afterwards “Some people have children, and say they don't belong to them”, a remark intended to apply to Hall, but he (witness) did not know whether Hall (who was not related to the deceased) heard what his father said as Hall stood in the Market considering. Hall then came across to where deceased was standing and said “What have you to say about the baby, Will?”. He up with his fist immediately and struck deceased on the left side of his face. The blow knocked his father down and he fell onto James Spearpoint's lap, who was sitting on the doorstep, and then rolled into the gutter. Deceased lay there on his back for about a minute and a half, trying to get up by putting his hands behind him and trying to raise himself up. During the time he was trying to get up, Thomas A Hall ran towards him with the purpose of striking him with his fist. He (witness) was sitting about 3 yards from his father, and he then jumped up and ran towards his father. The statement he made to Ovenden was wrong, when he said Hall struck deceased when on the ground. He (witness) got between them, and Hall said “And you, too”. After his father got up he told him to go indoors. His father wanted to fight Hall for a sovereign. He then got hold of him, and with the help of the landlady of the North Foreland they faced him indoors to prevent him fighting. His father was not drunk, but he had had some liquor. He went home about half past eleven and found his father in bed moaning and groaning. His mother was attending him.

William Spearpoint, landlord of the Skylark, sworn, said he was present on the occasion referred to by the last witness, when deceased came and spoke to him. He heard Hall make some observation, which appeared to have some reference to them, but he could not say what it was. Deceased said to him “I'll let him have it presently”. In a loud voice he said to Thomas Hall “Some people have children and don't like to own them”. Hall came across to where deceased was standing and said “What do you know about the Bab?”, and then took hold of deceased by his guernsey and turned him round, and struck him in the face and the blow knocked him down. Deceased fell on his back, partly in the street and partly on the pavement. He laid there not more than half a minute, and then got up with the assistance of James Spearpoint. Deceased then ran at Hall and struck him, who was going to return the blow when the son got in between them and prevented them. Hall was drunk and could not walk straight. He afterwards said to Hall “You had no right to strike the old man”, when Hall replied “What do you know about it?”, to which he (witness) said “Nothing”, and he commenced jangling with me. While this was going on deceased came back again, and offered to fight Hall for a sovereign, who made no reply. Deceased then went away. Thomas A Hall was not sober. About five or ten minutes after he saw deceased go away, he (witness) was in the Royal George bar when deceased came in, and he heard them say to each other that they were very sorry for what had happened, and they should think no more of it.

James Spearpoint gave corroborative evidence, with the exception that prior to Hall addressing the remark “There's two fish salesmen who've been to college to get their learning” to deceased and last witness, there had been a dispute between deceased and Hall regarding the mode of sale of fish.

Brett Mercer, a joiner, having given corroborative evidence, William Bateman, surgeon, sworn, said that he attended deceased and found him in bed in convulsions and insensible, in which state he continued with symptoms of pressure on the brain until he died on Thursday morning at six o'clock. He examined deceased's head. Externally he found a large bruise on the left hip, likely to be produced by a fall. The upper lip was swollen and discoloured, as if from a blow, and cut on the inside. The left temple was discoloured about on a level with the other angle of the eye. There was a slight discolouration of the chest. He found a clot of blood at the base of the skull on the left side, opposite to the external bruise. There was a large effusion of blood, at least, I should think, altogether three ounces in the base of the brain. The brain was in a diseased state. Softening had commenced in the centre. The clot of blood which I had observed, and which corresponded to the external injury, came from a blood vessel. The cause of deceased's death was effusion of blood upon the brain from a ruptured blood vessel. In his opinion that rupture was caused by such a blow or fall as he had heard described, but with such a diseased brain, excitement might have caused death. In his opinion the clot of blood which he found lying so close to the external mark on the left side of the temple showed that injury caused the rupture of the blood vessel.

Thomas Anthony Hall was called, but on being warned, declined to be sworn.

The Coroner, in summing up, said that if the blow was struck in a sudden heat of temper, caused by the action, and in consequence of the acts of the deceased himself (and it was quite clear from the evidence that deceased intended and succeeded in getting him into a passion) that would be manslaughter. In his opinion, after the evidence of Dr. Bateman, there could be but one result to their deliverations.

The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased man came by his death from the result of a blow struck by Thomas Anthony Hall, but that there was no intention on the part of Hall to do him serious bodily harm.

A warrant was immediately issued by the Coroner for the apprehension of Hall, who was taken in custody the same evening by Supt. Wilshere.

Yesterday the prisoner was brought before The Mayor, Gen. Cannon, J. Clark, T. Caister, J. Jeffreason and W. Carter Esqs., and after similar evidence to that given above had been taken, the prisoner was remanded until today (Saturday).

 

Folkestone Express 2 August 1879.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Town Hall on Thursday evening before J. Minter Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of William Hall, a fish dealer, who died under the following circumstances:

William Hall deposed: I am a costermonger, living in Stade Street. I identify the body now viewed as that of my father, William Hall. He was a fish salesman, and lived in Stade Street. His age was about 50. On Monday, the 29th July, between half past 12 and a quarter to one, my father was standing on the kerb opposite Mrs. Spearpoint's house, near the fishmarket. He was talking to William Spearpoint, landlord of the "Skylark." Thomas Anthony Hall was in the market, seven or eight yards from the deceased. He sung out “There's two fine fish salesmen been to college to get their learning”. I do not know who he meant. Father said to Spearpoint “Hold on, we'll make him spiteful”. Spearpoint said “Hold on, Will, don't say nothing”. Father then said “Some people have children and say they don't belong to them”. I do not know whether Hall heard what he said, as he stood in the fishmarket two minutes considering. Hall then walked over in a passion across the street to where father was standing. I knew he was in a passion because he was very red in the face. He said “What have you got to say about the baby, Will?” Then he raised his fist and struck my father on the left side of the face. The blow knocked my father down. He fell into the lap of James Spearpoint, who was sitting on the doorstep of Miss Cook's house, and then rolled on to the street. Father laid there about a minute and a half on his back. He recovered, and as he was about to try to get up Hall ran at him to strike him again. I was sitting on the steps when father was knocked down, and when Hall tried to strike him I jumped up to prevent him, and succeeded in doing so. (In giving a statement of the affair to Sergt. Ovenden, the witness said Hall struck the deceased as he was trying to get up.) When I got between them, Hall said “You too”. When my father got up he wanted to fight Hall. I told him to go indoors and lie down, and with the help of the landlady of the "North Foreland" I got him indoors to prevent him fighting. I did not see where Hall went to. I came outdoors again, and father came out just after and refused to go in. My father was not drunk, but had had some liquor. I went home about half past eleven at night, and found my father in bed, moaning and groaning. My mother was with him, and she told me I had better go to bed, and I did so. When I got up in the morning, about half past six, I heard him still groaning. I was out with fish all the morning, and in the evening I went for Dr. Bateman.

William Spearpoint said: I am the landlord of the "Skylark" public house. I was sitting on the doorstep of Mrs. Spearpoint's house, opposite the fishmarket, between twelve and one o'clock on Monday, the 28th inst. Deceased came across from the fishmarket and spoke to me. I heard Thomas Anthony Hall say something, which appeared to be addressed to us, but could not hear distinctly what it was he said. Deceased said to me “I'll let him have it presently”. Then he said “Some people get children and don't like to own them”, addressing himself to Thomas Anthony Hall, who came across from the market to where deceased was standing and said “What do you know about the bab?” He then took him by the Guernsey, and turning him round, struck him with his right hand in the mouth and the blow knocked him down. I only saw one blow, and if there had been another I must have seen it. Deceased fell backwards on to his back, and his head did not appear to strike the ground. Deceased did not lie there more than half a minute. While he was lying there Hall did not attempt to strike him. James Spearpoint helped him up. When he got up he ran at Thomas Anthony Hall and struck him. Hall was going to return the blow when deceased's son got in between them and prevented it. The deceased walked away, but as he was drunk he could not walk straight. I said to Thomas Hall “You had no business to strike the old man”. He said to me “What do you know about it?”, and I replied “Nothing”. He then commenced “jangling” with me. While he was there, deceased came back and wanted to fight Thomas Hall for a sovereign, but Thomas Hall made no reply and deceased then went away. I think deceased was about 49 years of age. Thomas Anthony Hall was not sober. I then went to the "Royal George," and about ten minutes after deceased and Thomas Hall met there. Both men said they were sorry, and that nothing more should be heard of it. I left them there together.

James Spearpoint, a fish hawker, living in Radnor Street, gave corroborative evidence. He added that there was a dispute between deceased and Thomas Anthony Hall as to the counting of some mackerel, and this led to the first remark. Deceased got up without any assistance from him. He was intoxicated and was lying on the ground about a minute trying to get up. When deceased got up, he struck Thomas Hall, who returned the blow by striking deceased in the mouth, when he fell back into witness's arms. Deceased's son then came and put him indoors. Thomas Anthony Hall was sober. Deceased was indoors about five minutes and again came out and said “I'll fight Thomas Hall for a sovereign, and you (meaning witness) shall pick me up”. He pulled out some money from his pocket, but put it back, and witness then went away.

Brett Mercer, a joiner, of 19. St. John Street, who saw the occurrence, said he thought the deceased was struck by Thomas Hall near his ear. Deceased seemed to him to fall sideways, and laid on the ground about a minute, having evidently been drinking. When he got up he struck Thomas Anthony Hall in the face, and Hall struck deceased again on the right side of the mouth, and as he was falling the second time someone caught him. Deceased still wanted to fight.

Mr. William Bateman, surgeon, said: On Tuesday, the 24th inst., I was sent for to attend deceased, and went to his residence in Stade Street, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon. I found deceased in bed, in convulsions, and insensible. He continued insensible, with occasional convulsions, and symptoms of pressure on the brain, until he died this morning at six o'clock. I attended him up to the time of his death. I made a post mortem examination about five hours after deceased died. I opened deceased's head. I found externally there was a large bruise on the left hip. It was such as would be produced, in my opinion from a fall. The upper lip was swollen and discoloured, as if from a blow, and it was cut on the inside. There was a discolouration upon the left temple, about on a level with the outer angle of the eye. There was a slight discolouration on the chest, below the left nipple, and the discolouration on the temple was such as would be produced either by a blow or a fall. I found a clot of blood at the base of the skull on the left side, opposite to the external bruise. There was a large effusion of blood, at least, I should think, altogether three ounces in the base of the brain. The brain itself was in a diseased state. Softening had commenced in the centre. The blood vessels of the brain were diseased and dilated, and in such a state as would be likely to be ruptured from a slight cause. The clot of blood which I observed and which corresponded to the external injury came from a blood vessel. I believe it was a small one, and it had bled slowly, and therefore the symptoms of compression did not show themselves for some time. The cause of deceased's death was effusion of blood upon the brain from a ruptured blood vessel. In my opinion that rupture was caused by such a blow or fall as I have heard described. But with such a diseased brain excitement might have caused death. In my opinion the clot of blood which I found lying so close to the external mark on the left side of deceased's temple shows that that injury caused the rupture of the blood vessel.

Thomas Anthony Hall was then called, and the Coroner pointed out to him that he could refuse to be sworn or give evidence, and informed him that there was a very serious charge hanging over him, and it would be for the jury to say upon the evidence before them whether he was Guilty or not of manslaughter or murder.

Hall replied that he was an ignorant man, and would prefer to consult someone who could advise him in the matter. He added that he was well known to be of a peaceable disposition, and a respectable man.

The coroner therefore thought it better that he should not be sworn.

He then summed up the evidence to the jury, commenting upon those portions which did not agree. He pointed out the law as regarded manslaughter and murder, and then said “If you are satisfied that this man's death arose from a blow which he received from Thomas Anthony Hall, and if you are of opinion that he struck that blow with malice, intending really to do him serious and mortal injury and to kill him, then undoubtedly he would be guilty of murder. If on the other hand you are of opinion the blow was struck in sudden heat of temper, caused by the action and in consequence of the acts of the deceased himself (and it is quite clear from the evidence you have before you that deceased intended to get him into a passion, and he succeeded) that would be manslaughter. Therefore it seems clear that Hall would be guilty of the manslaughter of this man, because no person has a right to kill another, although he might have been put into a passion by some act that other has committed. It could not be tolerated that he would be entitled to strike deceased and kill him simply because he said something which put him in a passion. In my opinion, after the evidence of Dr. Bateman, there can be but one result of your deliberations”.

The jury retired for a short time, and then returned a verdict that the deceased man came by his death from the results of a blow struck by Anthony Thomas Hall, but that there was no intention on the part of Anthony Thomas Hall to do him serious bodily injury.

A warrant was immediately issued by the Coroner for the apprehension of Anthony Thomas Hall on the charge of manslaughter, and handed to the Superintendent of Police, together with a warrant to the Governor of St. Augustine's gaol to detain him in custody.

The names of William Harrison Marsh, of the "Raglan Inn," and Alfred Noel, fruiterer, South Street, were tendered as bail, but as the Superintendent said Hall was in custody on a police charge, the Coroner had no power to grant bail.

The prisoner will be brought before the Magistrates this (Friday) morning.

 

Southeastern Gazette 2 August 1879.

Local News.

An inquest was held at the Town Hall on Thursday evening, lasting four hours, respecting the death of William Hall, who died from injuries received from a blow struck him by a man named Hall.

It appeared from the evidence that the deceased gave Hall considerable provocation and that Hall struck him in the heat of the moment. The deceased wanted to fight him afterwards, but was prevented from doing so. Subsequently both men went into a public-house near and expressed their regret at what had happened. Eventually, however, deceased went home and was taken ill and died on Thursday morning.

Dr. Bateman said the cause of death was effusion of blood on the brain, caused, in his opinion,-by the blow which he had received, stating at the same time that the brain was in a very diseased state and liable to be ruptured from a very slight cause.

The jury returned a verdict of “Manslaughter,” and Hall was taken into custody.

 

Southeastern Gazette 4 August 1879.

Local News.

On Friday morning Thomas Anthony Hall was charged with killing and slaying William Hall. The evidence taken was the same as that adduced before the coroner on the previous evening, the cross-examination being postponed until Saturday in consequence of the unavoidable absence of the prisoner’s solicitor, Mr. Mowll.

On Saturday the prisoner was again brought up and William Hall, son of the deceased, said the quarrel took place between twelve and one o’clock in the day. His father was out during the afternoon, and when he appeared at tea time he seemed to have been drinking.

William Spearpoint said when deceased and the prisoner made up their quarrel at the "Royal George" they called for some more beer. Deceased was intoxicated at that time.

Brett Mercer said he did not think deceased’s head hit the pavement when he fell.

Dr. Bateman said the fact that the man was drunk all day undoubtedly accelerated his death. Death in his case might have been caused by excitement, but in his opinion it was either the blow or the fall.

This being all the evidence, Mr. Mowll, in a very forcible address, submitted that there was no evidence to prove, first, that the deceased died from the effects of the blow which the prisoner gave him, because it was stated that during the afternoon deceased was out and had some drink, and might probably have fallen down whilst in an intoxicated condition; secondly that the evidence showed that deceased was struck in the mouth or thereabouts and not in the temple, and, therefore, the bruise which was discovered there could not have been caused by the prisoner; and thirdly, that the evidence distinctly stated that deceased’s head did not strike the pavement. Mr. Mowll therefore asked the Bench to say there was no prima facie case against the accused, and to decline to commit the prisoner for trial.

The Mayor said the Bench thought there was a prima facie case against the prisoner, and therefore he would be committed for trial on the charge of manslaughter. Bail for the prisoner’s appearance was put in and accepted, and Hall left the court with his friends.

 

Folkestone Express 9 August 1879.

On Friday Thomas Anthony Hall was charged before the borough Magistrates with causing the death of William Hall. The evidence taken was the same as that given at the Coroner's enquiry and which we reported last week, and when the depositions had been completed, and application was made on behalf of Mr. Mowll for an adjournment until Saturday for the cross-examination of the witnesses.

On Saturday the prisoner was again brought up before the Mayor, Alderman Caister, General Cannon, J. Clark and W.J. Jeffreason Esqs.

William Hall, son of the deceased, in reply to Mr. Mowll, said he saw his father at tea time and told him he had no business to say what he had done. Deceased had been drinking all day, and was worse for drink at tea time than he was in the middle of the day.

William Spearpoint said when deceased and the prisoner made up their quarrel at the "Royal George" they called for some more beer. Deceased was intoxicated at that time. Witness saw him again that day, but not to speak to.

Brett Mercer said he did not think deceased's head hit the pavement when he fell.

Dr. Bateman said the man being drunk all day undoubtedly accelerated his death. Death in his case might have been caused by excitement, but in his opinion it was either the blow or the fall.

Mr. Mowll then addressed the magistrates, urging that if they analysed the evidence carefully and looked at all the circumstances of the case, they would come to the conclusion that there really ought to have been no committal at all. No doubt the law was very jealous indeed with regard to human life, but if they looked at the evidence they would see that there was nothing to show that the blow which caused the death of the deceased was struck by the prisoner. There was no evidence that deceased was struck on the temple, and it was only an inference that when he was struck he fell, and in falling struck his head on the pavement. But the evidence did not justify even that inference. He contended that there was not a particle of evidence to justify a committal for manslaughter. Dr. Bateman spoke of several external bruises and marks on the body, but the inference was that the deceased, being in a state of drunkenness all day, had been falling about and hurt himself. He also deal with the case on the supposition that death had not occurred and that the prisoner had been summoned before the Bench for an assault. Would they, he asked, have convicted him, taking into the consideration the gross provocation he had received? The Bench might consider that as the prisoner was really committed for trial on the Coroner's warrant, it would make no difference to him if he was also committed by the Bench, but if the Bench decided that there was not a clear case against the prisoner, and dismissed him, his acquittal at the assizes would follow as a matter of course.

The Magistrates, however, after a short consultation, considered there was a prima facie case against the prisoner, and decided to commit him.

Bail was accepted, prisoner in 50, and two sureties (Mr. W. Harrison Marsh and Mr. George Prebble) in 25 each.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 January 1880.

Kent Assizes.

Monday, January 12th: Before Mr. Justice Denman.

Anthony Hall, of Folkestone, was charged with the manslaughter of William Hall, of the same place.

Mr. Denman prosecuted, and Mr. Glynn defended.

The facts connected with this case, when heard before the magistrates, were fully reported.

Some contention arose between prisoner and deceased, in which the latter applied some opprobrious reflection upon the former's married life, which resulted in his receiving a severe blow from prisoner.

Dr, Bateman stated that the blow might have caused his death, but under any circumstances this would be accelerated by the bad condition of his blood.

Whilst the doctor was giving his evidence the jury stopped the case, being satisfied that the further hearing of the same evidence was not sufficient to alter their determination to return a verdict of Not Guilty.

 

Folkestone Express 17 January 1880.

Local News.

At the Maidstone Assizes on Wednesday, Anthony Hall, a fisherman, surrendered to his bail, charged with the manslaughter of William Hall on Monday, the 29th July.

The facts of the case will be in the recollection of our readers. The two men were standing near the fishmarket, and the deceased provoked the accused, who struck him a blow which caused him to fall. They subsequently met in a public house and drank together, having made up the quarrel, but during the night following, William Hall died. A post mortem examination showed that death resulted from the effects of a blow on the head, and the Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of manslaughter against Anthony Hall, and the accused man was subsequently committed for trial by the Magistrates.

The presiding judge on Wednesday was Mr. Justice Denman. The grand jury found a true bill, and the prisoner was accordingly arraigned to take his trial, Mr. Denman being engaged to prosecute, and Mr. Lewis Glyn, instructed by Mr. Mowll, defended.

Witnesses were called for the prosecution, who deposed to the facts of the case, and Mr. William Bateman, surgeon, gave evidence as to the cause of death. He stated, however, that the deceased man was in such a diseased state that a very little excitement would have induced immediate death, and the jury thereupon, with the consent of the judge, stopped the case, and gave a verdict of acquittal.

The learned judge, in addressing the prisoner, said the coroner's jury and the court of magistrates had done quite right, under all the circumstances, in sending the case for trial.

With reference to this case, it was currently reported that the father of the accused man had been so affected by the position of his son that he had died suddenly in consequence. There is no truth whatever in the statement, except the coincidence that his father, after serious illness from congestion of the lungs, died while his son was away on Wednesday.

 

Southeastern Gazette 17 January 1880.

Kent Assizes, Wednesday.

Thomas Anthony Hall, mariner, on bail, was indicted for the manslaughter of William Hall, at Folkestone, on the 1st July. Mr. G. L. Denman prosecuted, and Mr. L. Glyn defended.

Mr. Denman having opened the case for the prosecution, the first witness called was William Hall, fish salesman, son of the deceased, who stated that on the day in question his father was near the Fish Market, at Folkestone, where some words passed between him and the prisoner. The deceased said “Some people have children and say they don’t belong to them.” He did not know to what this alluded. The prisoner then came over, and asked deceased what he had to say about the baby, and struck deceased in the face. Deceased fell into the lap of a man named James Spearpoint, and rolled on the kerb. He laid on the ground for two minutes or more, and then got up and said he would fight the prisoner for a sovereign. Witness got between them, and deceased received no more blows, but witness got a blow in the face from prisoner. Witness’s father had had quite enough to drink, and in fact was not quite sober. The accused had also had a little too much drink, bat he was more sober than the deceased.

In reply to Mr. Glyn, the witness said his father ran at prisoner, and he thought the deceased struck at the prisoner after the blow. He did not know the deceased had been teased about his child.

James Spearpoint, fisherman, corroborated, and in reply to Mr. Glyn said he did not think the deceased’s head struck the pavement. He thought the deceased did not get up because he was intoxicated, and not because he was hurt.

William Spearpoint stated that after the occurrence he was in the bar of the "Royal George Inn," when the prisoner and the deceased came there to drink together. They both said that they were very sorry for what had occurred, and should not think any more of it. They went out on very friendly terms.

In reply to Mr. Glyn, the witness said the prisoner was a respectable, quiet, good tempered man.

Brett Mercer, carpenter, Folkestone, stated that the deceased, after he was knocked down, was unable to get up because he was too drunk.

Mr. W. Bateman, surgeon, stated that he was called in about 24 hours after the occurrence, and found the deceased insensible. He remained so till his death, suffering from symptoms of compression of the brain. A post mortem examination showed a bruise on the left temple, and an effusion of blood had run down from a small ruptured vessel there, and collected at the base of the brain. The brain itself was in a very diseased condition, the blood vessels had lost their elasticity, and were becoming hard and would easily break, and softening of the brain had commenced. If the deceased had been a healthy subject there could be no danger from the bruise.

In reply to the learned Judge, the witness said that death from rupture of the blood vessel through excitement would produce the same appearances as in this case.

His Lordship said he thought the case was one in which the jury would be very doubtful as to whether it was made out that the death of the deceased was directly attributable to the prisoner’s acts. It was very proper that the case should be investigated, but he did not think death was proved to have arisen from a blow from the prisoner.

The jury returned a formal verdict of Not Guilty.

His Lordship remarked that it had certainly not been established that the prisoner caused or materially hastened the deceased’s death. It might be that the man, looking at the condition to which he had reduced himself by drink, would go off at any moment, or would burst a blood vessel from the effects of the excitement. It was satisfactory that the prisoner and the deceased had shaken hands over the matter, but it ought to be a warning to the accused not to take too much liquor in future.

 

Folkestone Express 26 March 1881.

Notice.

I, William Spearpoint, herby give notice that I will not be answerable for any debts that my wife, Amelia Spearpoint, may contract after this date.

Signed, W. Spearpoint.

March 25th, 1881.

 

Folkestone Express 26 August 1882.

Licensing Day.

Wednesday, August 23rd: Before J. Clark, F. Boykett and J. Holden Esqs., and Alderman Caister.

All the old licenses were renewed with the exception of three – that of the "Skylark," the "George," and the "Cinque Port Arms" – against which there were complaints, and the consideration of the applications was postponed till the adjourned licensing day.

 

South Eastern Gazette 26 August 1882.

Annual Licensing Session.

This session was held on Wednesday.

On the tenants of the "Skylark," the "George Inn," and the "Cinque Port Arms" applying for a renewal of their licences, Supt. Taylor said he had received information from Inspector Gosby that all three houses were meeting places for women of ill-fame, and the Bench decided to adjourn each case till the 27th Sept.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 30 September 1882.

Disorderly Houses.

Wednesday, September 27th: Before W. Bateman Esq., Ald. Caister, F. Boykett, J. Clarke and J. Holden Esqs.

Opposition was made to the granting of the licenses to the "George," George Lane, the "Skylark," and the "Cinque Port," on the ground that they harboured bad women.

The Bench administered a severe caution, but especially to the landlord of the "George," impressing on them that they would lose their licenses if the offence was repeated.

 

Folkestone Express 30 September 1882.

Adjourned Licensing Meeting.

Wednesday, September 27th: Before W. Bateman, F. Boykett, J. Clark and J. Holden Esqs., and Alderman Caister.

The granting of the licenses to the George, the Skylark, and the Cinque Port Arms was adjourned at the last meeting, the Superintendent of Police opposing their renewal on the ground that women of bad character were allowed to resort there.

Inspector Gosby was called, and said he occasionally visited the houses and found prostitutes at the bar. They went in for refreshments, but hung about the house. A month ago there were some of these women lodging at the Cinque Ports.

The Superintendent said in the cases of the George and the Skylark there had been a great improvement since the annual licensing meeting.

Mr. Mowll addressed the Bench on behalf of the licensees of the George and the Skylark, urging that they were doing their best to conduct their houses properly, and the Bench renewed all three, but with a strong caution in the case of the Cinque Ports.

 

Southeastern Gazette 30 September 1882.

Licensing Meeting.

An adjourned licensing meeting was held at the Town Hall, Folkestone, on Wednesday morning, the magistrates present being Dr. Bateman, Alderman Caister, Messrs. J. Clark, F. Boykett, and J. Holden.

Mr. Mowll, on behalf of G.L. Quin, of the George Inn, Robert Carter of the Skylark, and William Lywood of the Cinque Ports, explained that the cases had been adjourned from the last court in order that Inspector Gosby, of the Metropolitan Police, might be present. The cases were of a similar nature, and he asked that the evidence in all three should be taken together. The suggestion was that the houses were the resorts of fast women. Evidence was called, and Messrs. Mowll and Ward addressed the Bench on behalf of the tenants.

The magistrates, after a short deliberation, said that in the cases of the George and Skylark they were quite satisfied that it was the intention to discontinue any irregularities. The other case was a very different one, for it appeared if the tenant had been prosecuted for having women of that class in his house he would have been convicted. If the tenant allowed such women to live in his house, he would have his licence taken away, but the Bench would not do so on this occasion. They, however, desired to caution him that if the practice was not discontinued his licence would be taken away.

 

Southeastern Gazette 12 February 1883.

Local News.

Saturday: (Before the Mayor, Dr. Bateman, J. Holder and J. Pledge, Esqs.)

Mary Fagg was charged with assaulting Mrs. Amelia Spearpoint, on the31st ult.

Complainant stated that Mrs. Fagg went to her residence, the “Skylark,” and after collecting a number of children outside tha house and giving them coppers to call Mrs. Spearpoint bad names, she went into the bar and struck complainant.

Henry Watkins corroborated Mrs. Spearpoint’s evidence.

Defendant was bound over in a bond of 10 to keep the peace for six months.

 

Folkestone Express 17 February 1883.

Saturday, February 10th: Before The Mayor, J. Holden and W. Bateman Esqs.

Mary Fagg was summoned for assaulting Amelia Spearpoint. Mr. Minter represented the complainant.

Complainant, who resides at the Skylark, said defendant, with her daughter, went to the house on the 27th ult., and was very abusive. On the 31st she went again with about a hundred children, whom she gave pence to, to call her names. She afterwards struck complainant on the arm over the counter.

Henry Watkins, a sailor, gave evidence in support of complainant's statements. He said there were between 20 and 30 children outside the house.

Defendant denied the assault and called her daughter, Ann Avery, as a witness, but it appeared that she was not present on the 31st ult.

The Bench ordered defendant to be bound over in one surety of 10 to keep the peace for six months, and to pay 18s. 6d. costs.

 

Folkestone Express, Sandgate, Shorncliffe & Hythe Advertiser, Saturday 1 March 1884.

To Let.

The "Skylark Inn," Radnor Street, Folkestone. In present hands 18 years. A Coal Store is attached to the premises, and a good trade could be done. Present occupier suffering from all health is the only cause for leaving. Further particulars apply T. J. Harrison, auctioneer, 17, Guildhall Street, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Express 1 November 1884.

Monday, October 27th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Sherwood, Captain Crowe, and W. Bateman Esq.

Walter Fuller, an ostler, was charged with stealing a china vase, a milk jug and a cloth, value 1s., the property of Mrs. Spearpoint, of the Skylark Inn.

Charles Crumby, potman, in the employ of prosecutrix, said on Saturday he saw the prisoner take a flower vase from the window, and subsequently he took a milk jug from the sitting room. He gave information to the police and the prisoner was taken into custody.

The prisoner said he merely took the things for a lark, and the witness Crumby admitted, in reply to the Bench, that prisoner saw him before he took the articles.

Sergt. Ovenden said the prisoner had frequently been before the Bench for drunkenness and for interfering with the Salvation Army.

Prisoner was discharged, the magistrates regarding the matter as a very silly practical joke.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 14 May 1887.

Saturday, May 7th: Before The Mayor, J. Fitness, J. Holden and E.T. Ward Esqs.

The licence of the "Skylark" public house, Radnor Street, was transferred to a man named Hollington.

The applicant was reminded by Mr. Bradley that the house had a very bad character, and he replied that the name would be altered to the "Royal Jubilee" (Laughter).

Mr. Bradley: Then perhaps in altering the name you can alter the character too.

The applicant said he would try.

 

Folkestone Express 14 May 1887.

Saturday, May 7th: Before The Mayor, J. Fitness, J. Holden, and E.T. Ward Esqs.

The licence of the Skylark, Radnor Street, was transferred to a man named Hollington. The applicant was reminded by Mr. Bradley that the house had a very bad character, and he replied that the name would be altered to the Royal Jubilee. (Laughter)

Mr. Bradley: Then perhaps in altering the name you can alter the character too.

Applicant said he would try.

 

Folkestone Express 25 April 1936.

Editorial Comment.

How many Folkestone people would be able to say where the sign of the Skylark used to adorn the Fish Market? Very few I should imagine. In days gone by, about the time of the Napoleonic wars, a licensed house hearing the name of the Skylark was one of the chief meeting places, not only of the fisher folk, but even of the “big” men of the town, and the dangers of invasion were discussed. The new Jubilee Inn, which opened its doors on Wednesday, and which now adorns the Fish Market, ha& brought to mind that its predecessor was the Skylark of well over a century ago.

It was in the Queen Victoria’s jubilee that the name of the house was changed to the Jubilee. The subsequent jubilees since also had a connection with the house, for in the diamond jubilee year, the old house was rebuilt, and the new and attractive Jubilee, which supercedes its namesake, was commenced in King George’s silver jubilee year. The site on which it now stands was formerly a portion of Radnor Street, Mr. Goddard’s herring hang, and the Packet Boat Inn.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

BAYLEY Richard 1865-66 Bastions

SPEARPOINT William 1866-80 (age 26 in 1871Census) Post Office Directory 1874Bastions

SPEARPOINT Amelia 1881+ (age 68 in 1881Census)

CARTER Robert 1882-86 Next pub licensee had Post Office Directory 1882Bastions

KITCHEN William 1886-87 Bastions

Renamed "Jubilee Inn."

 

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

CensusCensus

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

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