DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, July, 2022.

Page Updated:- Wednesday, 20 July, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1862

Star and Garter

Latest Oct 1975

21 Harvey Street

Folkestone

Former Star and Garter

Above photo kindly sent by Jan Pedersen on 16 May 2011, showing the former "Star and Garter"

 

Izy Morcroft-Sharp says "Annie Arthur, I believe is Williams daughter-in-law/wife of his eldest son who died during ww1 in 1918." An email received from Clive Batcheldor (5 Nov 2013) states the following:- "I think you will find that Annie is in fact the widow of William Arthur who died in the final quarter of 1911. Anna nee Hollands, the widow of William Neville Arthur (the son of William Arthur) died in 1935."

 

Folkestone Chronicle 16 February 1867.

Tuesday February 14th: Before R.W. Boarer Esq.

Alfred Hughes, landlord of the Star and Garter, was summoned for trespass. Mr. Minter defended him.

George Laval Chesterton, Gentleman, of 4, Martello Terrace, said: On Saturday evening at half past seven a knock came to my door and my son opened it: a short man entered the passage, apparently to get possession, as Mr. Hughes followed him. Defendant reproached me for not having called on him, and said he and his friends were come to remove me and my family and take possession. Mr. Unwin had procured a policeman, who was there at this time. Mr. Hughes then claimed some property in the house; there was a considerable crowd collected outside the house; defendant was half drunk at the time; he clamoured, and made use of bad language. The constable told him he must go out, and he went, saying he should be there the next morning at eleven o'clock, and would visit me frequently. In consequence of that threat, a policeman walked before the house for some time. I now anticipate another visit and much annoyance.

Cross-examined: I told him I would call on him on Saturday at eleven o'clock, with reference to some blinds which he said belonged to him. I did not call. There was furniture in the house when I took it, which has since been removed. When he called, he did ask for payment. I told him I had been informed he had nothing to do with it, and should not pay him until I had ascertained. He did say the house was his legally, and if the blinds were not paid for, he should not let me remain in the house. I told the policeman to take him in custody if he would not leave my house.

Re-examined: I hired the house from Mr. Unwin, for Mr. M'Leod of Dover. I came into the house on the Thursday previous, having just arrived from France. Mr. Unwin gave me possession.

P.C. Swain said: On Saturday evening I was directed to pay attention to No. 4, Martello Terrace. About half past seven I saw Mr. Hughes and another man go up to the front door and knock. The door was opened and they went in. I went in after them. Prosecutor was going to eject me, but I said “I'm a policeman”. “Oh” he said, “Come in”. Hughes said “I am come to take possession of the house, or my goods, which I claim”. He was very excited. Prosecutor said “If you don't leave, I shall give you in charge”. A man named Moat came down the stairs and spoke to defendant, who said with an oath, “You've nothing to do with it”. After a little while I told defendant he had better go quietly, and asked him to conduct himself properly, when with another oath he went, saying he would come and take lunch with prosecutor at eleven o'clock the next morning.

Mr. Minter characterized the case as a most ridiculous one. There was no legal status, and he commented on the discrepancies between the two witnesses. The bench had no jurisdiction, for there was a real question of title. Defendant hired the house on 6th January 1866, for three years, at 20 a year. Therefore prosecutor is a trespasser in law, and defendant has a right to take possession. Last autumn Mr. M'Leaod was willing for Mr. Hughes to let the house, and he accordingly left it in October last, but retained the key. Mr. Unwin's man came for the key to repair something, and the house has been let during the time the key was so taken. Defendant was now charged with illegally going upon these premises. But according to prosecutor's own statement, he went there to ask for his own property, which he had a perfect right to do. He will, however, not do so again, but take the proper legal course to recover his goods.

Prosecutor said the law had been stated most unfairly and improperly, and was about to address the court, but was prevented.

Mr. Boarer dismissed the case, saying he had very great hesitation in granting the summons.

Prosecutor left the court commenting on the unfairness and partiality shown him.

Note: There is no record of Alfred Hughes having been landlord of the Star and Garter, or indeed ANY pub in Folkestone, according to More Bastions.

 

Southeastern Gazette 19 February 1867.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Borough Police Court, on Tuesday (before R. W. Boarer, Esq.) Alfred Hughes, landlord of the Star and Garter, appeared to answer a summons for trespass. Mr. Minter appeared for the defendant.

George Lavel Chesterton, gentleman, of 4, Martello Terrace, said that on Saturday evening, at half-past seven o’clock, the defendant and another man came to his house and said they were come to remove him and his family and take possession. A policeman came in and told defendant he had better go away quietly. Defendant was half drunk, and claimed some property in the house. After using abusive language, be was got out of the house, threatening that he would be there the next morning at 11 o’clock, and would visit him frequently. Plaintiff now anticipated much annoyance, and asked for defendant to be bound over to keep the peace.

Mr. Minter characterised the case as a most ridiculous one. The bench had no jurisdiction, as there was a question of right. Defendant had taken the house in January, 1866, for three years at 20 a year. He had not given up possession; therefore the prosecutor was the trespasser in law.

The case was dismissed.

 

Folkestone Express 28 August 1869.

Spirit License (Fresh Application).

Wednesday, August 25th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Bateman. J. Tolputt, A.M. Leith, and J. Gambrill Esqs.

Thomas Chittenden, of the Star And Garter, Harvey Road, applied. A memorial was put in by Mr. Minter.

Note: No record of Chittenden listed in More Bastions.

The Court was then cleared. When re-opened the Chairman said that the Magistrates had come to the unanimous decision that no more licenses should be granted, but in exceptional cases, as they were of opinion that too many licensed houses already exist. The application would be refused.

 

Southeastern Gazette 30 August 1869.

Annual Licensing Day.—A full bench of magistrates attended on Wednesday to grant renewals and hear fresh applications.

Mr. Arthur Andrews, of the Guildhall Hotel; Mr. Burgess, Richmond Tavern; Mr. Thomas Wilson, of the Prince of Wales; and Mr. Chittenden, of the Star and Garter, made fresh applications but were refused; the magistrates stating that no more licenses would be granted except under exceptional circumstances.

 

Folkestone Express 26 November 1870.

Transfer of License.

Wednesday, November 23rd: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer and J. Tolputt Esqs.

Mr. P. Maskell applied for a transfer of the license of the Star and Garter from Mr. Chittenden. The license was granted.

Note: No mention of Chittenden in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 7 January 1871.

Transfer of License.

Wednesday, January 4th: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer, J. Clarke and C.H. Dashwood Esqs.

Transfer was granted to the Star And Garter.

 

Folkestone Express 19 September 1874.

Wednesday, September 16th: Before The Mayor, J. Tolputt and J. Clark Esqs.

The following received temporary authority to sell intoxicating liquors at the houses named until the transfer day:

Mrs. Maskell, Star And Garter.

 

Folkestone Express 31 October 1885.

Local News.

On Wednesday afternoon a little child named Dane, whose parents reside at the Star And Garter public house, was run over by an omnibus, but fortunately not seriously injured.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 1 September 1888.

Saturday, August 25th: Before The Mayor, J. Holden and J. Fitness Esqs.

Robert Hawkins was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Charlotte Street on Monday. He pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Dunster preferred the charge, and said defendant was making a disturbance, threatened his wife, and refused to go away.

A witness named Dane, landlord of the Star And Garter, said the defendant's wife went to his house for protection. Defendant was a constant source of annoyance to the people in the street.

Defendant said his wife belonged to him, and she ran away.

There were previous convictions against the defendant, who was fined 20s. and 8s. costs, or 14 days'.

 

Folkestone Express 1 September 1888.

Saturday, August 25th: Before The Mayor, J. Holden and J. Fitness Esqs.

Robert Hawkins was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Charlotte Street on Monday. He pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Dunster preferred the charge and said defendant was making a disturbance, threatened his wife, and refused to go away.

A witness named Dane, landlord of the Star And Garter, said the defendant's wife went to his house for protection. Defendant was a constant source of annoyance to people in the street.

Defendant said his wife belonged to him, and she ran away.

There were previous convictions against the defendant, who was fined 20s. and 8s. costs, or 14 days'.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 8 February 1890.

Monday, February 3rd: Before Major H.W. Poole, Col. De Crespigny, W. Wightwick and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Alfred Court, a lad of about 18, was charged with stealing 2s. 3d. from the till at the Star And Garter Inn on the 1st of February.

Mrs. Danes, wife of Henry Danes, of the Star And Garter, said the prisoner came into the bar at two o'clock on Saturday and called for a glass of beer, for which he paid 1d. Witness served him, and during the time he was there she had occasion to leave the bar. She went into a room at the side of the bar, and saw the prisoner move some of the glasses. He then reached over the counter to the till. Witness said “What are you doing with my money?” Prisoner ran out, and witness pursued him, and overtook him just as he got outside. The prisoner took hold of her hair and threw her backwards. Her head came in contact with the edge of the kerb. Witness called a man named Hogben, who took hold of the prisoner. He took him to the bar, and witness requested him to give her the money he had stolen. The prisoner handed her back two single shillings. He threw a threepenny piece away, and witness's little boy picked it up and gave it back to her immediately.

James Hogben, a painter, stated that he saw the prisoner holding the last witness by the hair and throw her down. She shouted to witness, saying “Hold him; he's robbed my till”. Witness made him turn his pockets out. There were two shillings, and he said “They belong to me”. He afterwards gave Mrs. Dane the money.

Supt. Taylor said he searched the prisoner at the Star And Garter. There was no money on him. Mrs. Danes handed him the 2s. and the 3d. piece, and witness charged the prisoner with stealing them. He replied “I did not”.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty to stealing the threepenny piece only.

Supt. Taylor said the prisoner bore a very bad character. He had been convicted on three previous occasions.

Sentenced to two months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 9 December 1893.

Wednesday, December 6th: Before H.W. Poole, W. Wightwick and W.G. Herbert Esqs., and Surgeon General Gilbourne.

Temporary authority was granted to Frederick William Arthur to sell at the Star and Garter.

Note: Date for this is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 18 January 1895.

Local News.

On Tuesday afternoon whilst a pair horse dray, belonging to Messrs. A. Leney and Co., brewers, was standing outside the Star And Garter, Charlotte Street, the horses took fright and bolted. They ran down Richmond Street at a terrific pace, turned the corner at St. Michael's Street, and proceeded down the narrow and precipitous thoroughfare of Fenchurch Street. Having turned into Harbour Street by Piggott's corner, and passing Iverson's, they ran round the fountain, and eventually pulled up outside of Mr. Leney's store, near the Radnor Street Arch. At the bottom of Dover Street the corner of the dray struck one of Pickford's horses, slightly injuring it's head, which, strange to say, was the only accident.

 

Folkestone Express 14 October 1911.

Obituary.

We regret to announce that Mr. W. Arthur, licensee of the Star and Garter Inn, Harvey Street, died at midnight on Monday, after having been ailing for a short time. It will be remembered that his father, who was licensee of the Princess Royal Hotel, South Street, died very suddenly a few years ago.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 October 1911.

Obituary.

We regret to announce that Mr. William Harry Arthur, the licensee of the Star and Garter public house, Harvey Street, died at his residence on Monday, after a rather short illness. Mr. Arthur was a well-known Folkestonian, having lived in the town for a large number of years. He was for many years a member of D Company, 4th Battalion, The Buffs, and was respected by all who knew him. The funeral took place yesterday.

 

Folkestone Daily News 30 November 1911.

Wednesday, November 29th: Before Messrs. Stainer, Linton and Leggett.

The licence of the Star and Garter was transferred from the late Mr. Arthur to his widow, Mrs. Arthur.

 

Folkestone Express 2 December 1911.

Wednesday, November 29th: Before J. Stainer and R.J. Linton Esqs., and Major Leggett.

Mr. G.W. Haines said he was instructed to apply for the transfer of the licence of the Star and Garter Inn, Harvey Street. He applied on behalf of the widow (Mrs. Arthur), who from her earliest childhood had been associated with the business.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 December 1911.

Wednesday, November 29th: Before Mr. J. Stainer, Major Leggett, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

Mr. G.W. Haines asked for a transfer of the licence of the Star and Garter. The licence had been held by the applicant's husband, who had recently died, and this was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 4 October 1919.

Tuesday, September 30th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillors A. Stace, G. Boyd, C.E. Mumford and E.T. Morrison, Dr. Nuttall and Mr. L.G.A. Collins.

Mrs. Annie Arthur, landlady of the Star and Garter beerhouse, Harvey Street, was summoned for having sold one quart of stout to a young woman for consumption off the premises at 9.30 p.m. on the 25th September. The young woman was summoned for obtaining the stout. Both defendants pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Budgen said he had been on duty in Harvey Street, and seen a young woman enter the Star and Garter by a side entrance. After a few minutes she left the premises with a quart bottle, and he asked her if she had just got the beer. She replied “No, it's stout”. Mrs. Arthur said she had quite forgotten the Order, and the woman said she did not know of the restriction.

Mrs. Arthur said she was very sorry, but she had quite forgotten the Order for the minute, as she was busy listening to a conversation in the bar.

The other defendant said she was not aware of the restriction in time, as she was not in the habit of going for any beer.

Mr. Reeve (the Chief Constable) said Mrs. Arthur had been at the Star and Garter for 26 years, and when her husband died eight years ago she took the licence over. There had been no previous complaint against her.

The Clerk said the woman could have bought the stout for consumption on the premises up to ten o'clock, but she could not buy it for consumption off the premises after nine o'clock.

The Bench fined Mrs. Arthur 10s., and dismissed the other case.

 

Folkestone Herald 4 October 1919.

Tuesday, September 30th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. A. Stace, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. C. Ed. Mumford, and Mr. L.G.A. Collins.

Annie Arthur, landlady of the Star and Garter beerhouse, was summoned for selling a quart of stout after nine o'clock for consumption off the premises, and Miss L. Clariss was summoned for obtaining it. They pleaded Guilty.

P.C. Bugden deposed to seeing a lady leave the house with a bottle of stout at 9.30 p.m. on Sept. 25th.

Mrs. Arthur said she was very sorry. She quite forgot what the time was.

Miss Clariss said she was not aware of the restriction. She was not in the habit of fetching stout.

The Chief Constable stated there were no previous complaints against Mrs. Arthur, who had held the licence for 8 years since the death of her husband. She had been there 26 years altogether.

The Magistrates' Clerk remarked that a person could not buy liquor for consumption off the premises after 9 o'clock, but they could drink it on the premises until 10 o'clock.

The Chairman, in fining Mrs. Arthur 10s., said the Bench hoped she would be more careful in the future. The case against the purchaser was dismissed.

 

Folkestone Express 14 February 1920.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 11th: Before The Mayor, Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Councillor A. Stace, Col. Owen, Rev. Epworth Thompson, Councillor Hollands, Councillor Morrison, and Mr. L.G.A. Collins.

Mr. H. Reeve (the Chief Constable) presented the following report: I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 113 places licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor by retail, viz.; Full licences 70, beer on 7, beer off 6, beer and spirit dealers 15, grocers, etc. off 6, confectioners wine on 8, confectioners wine off 6, a total of 113. This gives an average, according to the Census of 1911, of one licence to every 296 persons, or one on licence to every 495 persons. During the past year 13 of the licences have been transferred. Since the last annual licensing meeting the licensees of the undermentioned premises have been convicted as follows: Prince of Wales Tavern, fined 10s. on 23rd May, for allowing a child to be in the bar of his licensed premises; East Kent Arms, fined 10s. on 29th August for supplying drink for consumption off the premises after 9 p.m.; Star and Garter, fined 10s. on 30th November for supplying intoxicating drink for consumption off the premises after 9 p.m.; Globe Hotel, fined 10 on each of two summonses on 4th December for charging more for whisky than the maximum price allowed under the Order made by the Food Controller. During the year ended 31st December, 46 persons (35 males and 11 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 34 were convicted and 12 discharged after being cautioned by the Bench. In the preceding year 26 persons (17 males and 9 females) were proceeded against, of whom 14 were convicted and 12 discharged. The regulation of the Liquor Control Board restricting the hours for the sale and consumption of intoxicating liquor remains in force. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is supplied are registered under the Act. There are 24 premises licensed for music and dancing, 2 for music only, and 2 for public billiard playing. Numerous visits have been made by the police at irregular intervals during the year to the licensed premises and places of entertainment, and I am pleased to report that the houses generally have been conducted in a satisfactory manner.

The Mayor said the Magistrates had considered the report, and they thought it very satisfactory. There had been a little increase in drunkenness, but they hoped that would disappear again. With reference to the licences, the Bench had decided to renew them all, except the Prince of Wales Tavern, East Kent Arms, Star and Garter, and Globe Hotel, in consequence of new legislation that might come on. The licences referred to would come up for consideration at the adjourned meeting.

The adjourned sessions were fixed for the 10th March.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 February 1920.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The annual licensing sessions for Folkestone were held at the Police Court, the Mayor presiding.

Mr. H. Reeve presented his report (for details see Folkestone Express).

The Mayor said the report was very satisfactory, although there was a little increase in drunkenness. They would renew all the licences to the licensed premises, except the four mentioned in the report, which would be adjourned to a later court.

 

Folkestone Express 13 March 1920.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 10th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer and G. Boyd, Col. Owen, and Messrs. A, Stace and G.H. Blamey.

The licences of the East Kent Arms, the Prince of Wales, the Globe, and the Star and Garter were renewed, they having been adjourned from the annual meeting.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 March 1920.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 9th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Councillor G. Boyd, Colonel G.P. Owen, Councillor A. Stace, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, and Mr. J.H. Blamey.

The licences of the East Kent Arms, Star and Garter, Globe, and Prince of Wales, deferred at the annual sessions, were now renewed.

 

Folkestone Express 31 October 1925.

Local News.

On Tuesday at the Folkestone Police Court, before Alderman R.G. Wood and other Magistrates, the Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) said a summons had been issued against Mrs. Annie Arthur, licensee of the Star and Garter Inn, Harvey Street, for an alleged infringement of the Licensing Act of 1921, and also against Christopher P. Binfield and George Avery for alleged consuming. He had received a letter from Messrs. Mowll and Mowll, Dover, who had been instructed to represent the licensee, requesting an adjournment for one week.

Inspector Pittock said the police had no objection, and the case was adjourned until Tuesday week.

 

Folkestone Herald 31 October 1925.

Tuesday, October 27th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Alderman A.E. Pepper, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Mr. L.G.A. Collins, Colonel P. Broome-Giles, and Miss A.M. Hunt.

Mrs. Annie Arthur, the licensee of the Star and Garter Inn, Richmond Street, was summoned for a breach of the Licensing Act. Christopher P. Binfield and George Avery were also summoned for a breach of the Act.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) said he had received a letter from Messrs. Mowll and Mowll, of Dover, stating that they had been instructed to represent the licensee, and that it would be impossible for them to appear on Tuesday. He asked for an adjournment for a week.

Inspector Pittock said the Chief Constable had no objection.

The Magistrates adjourned the case for a week.

 

Folkestone Express 7 November 1925.

Tuesday, November 3rd: Before Alderman Wood and other Magistrates.

Annie Arthur, of the Star and Garter beerhouse, was summoned for having, on the 19th October, supplied intoxicating liquor during prohibited hours.

Mr. Rutley Mowll defended, and pleaded Not Guilty, stating it was a question of time, and he was not quite sure that he would be able to satisfy the Magistrates that he (Mr. Mowll) was right as to the time. For the moment he would plead Not Guilty.

The Clerk: And hope for the best. (Laughter)

Sergt. Chaney said that at 10.15 p.m. on the 19th October he was in Harvey Street, with P.C. Whyman, and noticed several men in the public bar of the Star and Garter beerhouse. He opened the door and saw two men drinking from pint glasses He later ascertained that the glasses contained beer. The licensee was in the bar, and the daughter was calling “Time”. He drew their attention to the time, which was then 10.15. The clock in the bar gave the time as 10.17. He drew their attention to his time. Mrs. Arthur said “It is not so much as that by St. Michael's Church clock, the clock I am going by”. He told her he would report her for allowing intoxicating liquor to be consumed on the premises during prohibited hours, and she replied “It was served before ten o'clock. It is a shame; I think you might look over it this time”.

The Clerk: Did either of the men say anything?

Sergt. Chaney: Yes. Binfield said “It was bought and paid for before ten o'clock”.

By the Clerk: He would not describe the beer as freshly drawn.

The Clerk: Do you know anything about St. Michael's Church clock?

Sergt. Chaney: Yes. St. Michael's Church clock that night was seven minutes slow by the Town Hall, and it would be eight minutes past ten by St. Michael's Church clock when we entered the house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll: He did not hear Mrs. Arthur say she reckoned to keep her clock ten minutes fast. He pulled his watch out, and it was ten minutes past ten, and he said it was fifteen minutes past by the Town hall.

Mr. Mowll: Which was right, your watch, St. Michael's, or the Town Hall? Did you listen in for the time from Greenwich?

Sergt. Chaney: No. The Clock struck ten as I was going down High Street.

How do you know the Town Hall clock was right? – It is considered to be the correct time. I think it is put right every day.

Mr. Mowll said Mrs. Arthur had been residing in the public house for something like 32 years. Her husband had been dead for fourteen years, and she had had the responsibility of the house for the whole of that time. There was nothing against her whatever, except that there was a summons under D.O.R.A., which was so full of pitfalls for all of them that no-one could truthfully say they had not committed a breach against it. He understood Mrs. Arthur had one of those records which anyone might be proud of. Without discussing the question which of the time-pieces was correct, he was going to ask the Magistrates to consider the fact that customers were already leaving when the police went in, and the landlady's daughter was trying to get them out. He asked for the Magistrates to dismiss the case, because her good character justified them in regarding this as a trivial case.

The Clerk: Do you say this beer was actually served before ten o'clock?

Mr. Mowll: That is the contention.

The Chairman said that having regard to the excellent record of Mrs. Arthur, and the fact that there was a dispute about the time, the Magistrates unanimously agreed to dismiss the case.

Christopher Binfield and George Avery were summoned for consuming beer, and these summonses were also dismissed.

Alderman Wood: I advise you to keep your watches quite right in the future.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 November 1925.

Tuesday, November 3rd: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Alderman A.E. Pepper, Col. G.P. Owen, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, Mr. J.H. Blamey, Mr. W. Griffin, Colonel P. Broome-Giles, and Miss A.M. Hunt.

Annie Arthur, the licensee of the Star and Garter, Richmond Street, was summoned for having, on October 19th, supplied to Christopher Binfield and George Avery intoxicating liquor during prohibited hours. Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared for the defendant and pleaded Not Guilty.

Sergt. Chaney said at 10.15 p.m. on the 19th ult. he was in Harvey Street with P.C. Wyborn, when he noticed several men in the public bar of the Star and Garter beerhouse. On opening the door he saw two men, Christopher Binfield and George Avery, drinking from two pint glasses. Later he ascertained that it was beer that they were drinking. The defendant was behind the counter, and her daughter was in the bar calling time. He drew defendant's attention to the time, which was then 10.15. By the clock in the bar it was 10.17. Defendant said “It is not so much as that by St. Michael's Church clock. The time I am going by”. He told her she would be reported. She replied “It (the beer) was served before 10 o'clock. It is a shame. I think you might look over it this time”. Binfield said his beer was bought and paid for before 10 o'clock. Avery did not say anything.

By the Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew): The beer was not what one would call “freshly drawn”. St. Michael's Church clock that night was seven minutes slow by the Town Hall clock. Therefore it would be about eight minutes past ten by the St. Michael's Church clock.

Cross-examined, witness said his watch was not right that night. By his watch it was ten minutes past ten. It was fifteen past ten by the Town Hall clock.

Mr. Mowll: How do we know that was right? Do you listen in for Greenwich time? – No. As I went down High Street I heard the Town Hall clock striking ten.

How do you know the Town hall clock was right? – It is supposed to be Greenwich time. I think it is put right every day.

Mr. Mowll, addressing the Magistrates, said Mrs. Arthur had resided in this house for something like thirty two years. Her husband had been dead for some fourteen years and she had had the responsibility of that house for the whole of the time since. There was nothing against her except for a slight offence under D.O.R.A., which was so full of pitfalls for them all. That was not treated as a very serious matter. With that exception, the defendant had got one of those records of which anyone might well be proud. Mr. Mowll then referred to the many different times mentioned in the case and aske the Magistrates, considering all the facts, to dismiss the case. He did not ask them to find his client Not Guilty, but he thought her own good record justified them in regarding the case as a trivial one.

The Chairman said the case, having regard to the excellent record of the defendant, and all the circumstances, would be dismissed.

The Magistrates' Clerk: What about Binfield and Avery, who were found consuming?

The Chairman said the same course would be taken in regard to them.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 November 1925.

Felix.

“Look at the clock” quoth Winifred Pryce. This quotation from that wonderful book of rhymes “The Ingoldsby Legends” came almost instinctively to my mind as I read the report of certain proceedings in the local Police Court on one of the dull days of last week. A leading part was taken (against her will) by Widow Arthur, who holds the licence of a small public house known as the Star and Garter, in Harvey Street. Her late husband held the licence before her. It was all a matter of looking at the clock. There sat the justices serious of men, and the Magistrates' Clerk and the Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) were there also, each appearing to be weighed down with a sense of responsibility. There was also a big array of constables of all ranks present, and there sat the Widow Arthur (not merry at the time) to face this terrible charge, which practically amounted to not looking at a clock at the right time, or of looking at the wrong clock. Mr. Rutley Mowll championed the cause of the Harvey Street widow.

The principal witness in support of the charge against the defendant was Sergt. Chaney, who declared that the time was 10.15. The Sergt. further declared in his evidence that the time by the clock in the bar was 10.17. Mrs. Arthur said the time was not so much as that, and that she went by St. Michael's Church clock. The Sergeant expressed the opinion that the clock in St. Michael's tower was seven minutes slow by the Town Hall. Then the Sergeant added that his watch stood at ten minutes past the hour. The widow's advocate asked a very pertinent question of the worthy Sergeant; “Which was right, your watch or the Town Hall? Did you listen in for the time at Greenwich?” The officer replied that he went by the Town Hall clock, which he thought was put right every day. The case was dismissed – a decision which no impartial person will call into question. Alderman Wood (one of the justices) advised those interested to keep their watches right in the future. And so I humbly agree. I say with Winifred Pryce “Look at the clock”.

Now let us come to grips, as the costermonger would say. Which clock? There are some people who “go off” directly they seek repose. There are others who do not, probably through indigestion or to the fact of being “light sleepers”. Such people hear the striking of the clocks by night as well as by day. The dear old Parish Church booms out the midnight hour right on the stroke, the Town Hall follows suit, one, two, three, or more minutes afterwards, the Gas Works also tinkles forth the fact that Time is passing perhaps a minute or two before or after any of the times here mentioned, St. Michael's, Radnor Park, and Christ Church following respectively in the same order before or behind. It is most confusing. Some of the clocks have a habit of refusing to go at all for weeks together. Through this cause people have lost trains; through this cause people have been too late to keep their appointments.

For many years past the public clocks of Folkestone have been a snare and delusion. I was present at a meeting of Hospital Governors on Tuesday, when the question arose informally as to the time. There was a mild query as to the precise time. One gentleman pulled his watch out, remarking “We are just on time”. The individual he was addressing differed, and said it wanted a couple of minutes to the half hour (the time of the meeting). Still another kindly gentleman opined that there ought not to be any question about time in these days. I agree. Let the whole of the public clocks (especially those of the striking order) be synchronised. This could be done for a trifle. It would save trouble, and if I might say it in a whisper, also save the use of a lot of non-classical words. At the Folkestone Herald office the clocks have been synchronised for years. It is up to the authorities to exert themselves and keep themselves abreast of science. The Post Office has a signal, I believe, from Greenwich every morning, and from the same source Father Time's flight is registered by wireless every night. Wake up.

 

Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, Saturday 13 February 1926.

On the 19th October, 1925, Annie Arthur, of the "Star and Garter" Public house, for supplying intoxicating liquor during non-permitted hours.

Case dismissed with a caution.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 March 1943.

Local News.

Mrs. Annie Arthur, licensee of the Star and Garter Inn, Harvey Street, until last week, when the licence was transferred to her daughter, Mrs. Binfield, has been directly connected with the licensing trade for 64 years. At the age of 13 she went to the Princess Royal, in South Street, to work with her future mother-in-law. She married the son, who in November, 1892, took over the licence of the Star and Garter. Her husband died in 1911, and the licence was then transferred to his widow. Mrs. Arthur, who is now 77, told the Folkestone and Hythe Herald that she would not have relinquished the licence of the Star and Garter but for the fact that her daughter had married, and she thought that the daughter should now take charge. Mrs. Arthur has three other daughters, each of whom is married. Her only son served in the Army in the last war, and was killed.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 April 1943.

Local News.

At Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday music licences for radio installations were granted in respect of the Foresters’ Arms and the Star and Garter.

Alderman R.G. Wood presided with Alderman J.W. Stainer, Mr. P. Fuller and Mr. P.V. Gurr.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 May 1945.

Obituary.

Mrs. Mary Ann Arthur, whose death at the Star and Garter Inn, Harvey Street, Folkestone, occurred last Friday, had been connected with the licensed trade for over 60 years.

A native of Dover, she was brought to Folkestone at an early age, and when only 13 was employed at a local hotel. Subsequently she held the licence of the Star and Garter for over 50 years, until two years ago, it was transferred to a married daughter.

Mrs. Arthur, who was aged 79, was the widow of Mr. William Arthur, who died in 1911. She leaves four daughters. Her only son was killed in France during the last war. The funeral took place on Tuesday at the Cheriton Road Cemetery.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 March 1946.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

A number of applications were granted at the Folkestone adjourned annual licensing sessions at the Town Hall on Wednesday. The Mayor (Alderman W. Hollands) presided, with Mr. R.G. Wood and Alderman J.W. Stainer.

Mr. B.H. Bonniface, on behalf of Mrs. Dorothy Mabel Binfield, Star and Garter Inn, Harvey Street, Folkestone, applied for a wine licence fin respect of the premises. Mr. Bonniface said at present the premises were licensed to sell beer only. For 52 or 53years the licence had been held by a member of the Binfield family, which would show that the house was doing a fairly substantial trade. All through the war Mrs. Binfield and her husband kept the place open, and their cellars were always kept open for the use of anyone during air raid and shelling warnings. It had recently been found that there were requests for wine, perhaps from members of the younger generation and from friends of the older customers.

The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 January 1960.

Notice.

To: The Clerk to the Rating Authority for the Borough of Folkestone.

The Chief Constable of Kent,

The Clerk to the Justices for the Borough of Folkestone.

And to all whom it may concern,

I, Dorothy Mabel Binfield, of the “Star and Garter”, Harvey Street, Folkestone, Kent, Licensed Victualler, being the holder of a licence to sell by retail Beer and Wine for consumption on or off the premises known as the “Star and Garter”, in the Borough of Folkestone aforesaid, do hereby give notice that it is my intention to apply at the General Annual Licensing Meeting for the said Borough, to be held at the Town Hall in the said Borough, on Wednesday, the 10th day of February, 1960, at 11 a.m., for the grant to me of a Justices' Licence authorising me to apply for and hold an Excise Licence to sell by retail any intoxicating liquor for consumption on or off the premises known as the “Star and Garter”, in the Borough of Folkestone aforesaid, of which said premises Fremlins Ltd. are the owners and of whom I rent them.

Given under my hand this 18th day of January, 1960.

(Sgd.) Dorothy M. Binfield.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 February 1960.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Licences to sell spirits, in addition to beer and wine, were granted to the Star and Garter, Harvey Street, and the Prince of Wales, Guildhall Street.

Mr. Norman Franks, making the application on behalf of Mrs. D.M. Binfield, of the Star and Garter, said the licence had been in her family for the past 65 years.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 February 1962.

Local News.

It was not the usual Monday night. Chris and Dorrie were serving drinks, and the usual game of darts was in progress. The Star and Garter, Harvey Street, Folkestone, has a proud record for darts, and trophies line the walls, but players and regulars were unusually subdued.

Mr. and Mrs. Binfield., Chris and Dorrie, were retiring. Dorrie, who was born in that same building 61 years ago, and Chris, have “run the local” for nearly 22 years. Their retirement marks the end of a period of 68-69 years during which she inn has been run by a member of Dorrie’s family. The tradition goes still further back; before her father, Mr. Arthur, became landlord of the Star in about 1893, his people had tenanted the Princess Royal, down by the harbour. On the death of Mr. Arthur in 1911 Dorrie’s mother kept the Star going. Dorrie became the official licensee in 1943, but had been helping to run the, place since her father’s death. She and Chris, himself a Folkestone man, married in 1940 on a special licence in order that the house could stay open.

Best suits were in evidence as the regulars, many of whom had known Dorrie for 40 years, and some who even remembered her father, packed the bar on Monday to bid “au revoir”. But certainly not “farewell”, because Dorrie and Chris will no doubt make many visits to their old quarters. They are moving only to nearby Margaret Street.

It was “service as usual’’ for this popular couple, who pulled the familiar pumps for drinks for their friends, until 9 o’clock, when Mr. T. Anderson, Chairman of the Star and Garter Darts Club, made a presentation. “I am sure everybody feels as sad as me that Chris and Dorrie are retiring, but I am saying “cheerio”, not “goodbye”, as we will be seeing them again this side of the bar”, Mr. Anderson said. He then presented Dorrie with an engraved wristlet watch, and Chris with a pocket watch, on behalf of all their friends.

Chris’s reply to the cries for “Speech” was that he had a cold, but Dorrie, holding a bouquet given by one of their many friends, smiling tearfully, replied on behalf of both of them. “We will both see you all, as no doubt we will be dropping in. Thank you all, very much”, she said.

Refreshments were served, and Chris and Dorrie carried on serving.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 September 1970.

Local News.

When the roof fell in on publican Kenneth Cardno's world he was surprised – but delighted. For down rained relics of a bygone age when gin was only 3s. (15p) a gallon, and the highlight of a family evening at home was a magic lantern show.

Mr. Cardno sat in the bar of his pub, the Star and Garter, in Folkestone’s Harvey Street, surrounded by his treasures, and explained how it happened. “The ceiling of our bedroom was raised after it fell in the First World War”, he said. “We left the windows open during a recent spell of bad weather and the high winds caused the ceiling to collapse. When they rebuilt the ceiling in 1918 they must have sealed off an old attic, which contained bills and other items – dating from 1885 – relating to the pub”. At first Ken did not realise what these were, and his wife, Anne, started to burn the musty old sack they were in, only realising how old the pieces of paper were when the sacking collapsed. The Cardnos have rescued some of these documents – among them a butcher's bill for four pounds of pork costing 2s. 11d (14p). One of the items rescued was a copy of the old Graphic magazine of 1891, with a front rover of an engraving showing the wreck of the Benvenue, off Sandgate in that year. Other finds include a set of hand-painted magic lantern slides, and a little-used version of one of the first types of primus lamps.

Mr. Cardno now plans to explore another attic which was covered up during renovations. To do so he will take a piece out of a neighbouring wall.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 February 1976.

Local News.

Rumours that Whitbread Fremlins were closing pubs throughout the Folkestone area because of financial problems were denied this week. Word got round that pubs were being forced to shut after three local houses closed, changed hands or were placed on the market within a matter of weeks.

It is now believed that the Raglan in Folkestone is being offered for sale as a free house, and that negotiations are in hand to open the former Fleur-de-Lis at Sandgate as a club. The Star and Garter, also in Folkestone, is now in temporary use as a social dub. But on Monday, although no official company statement was available, it was made clear that Whitbreads have no ulterior motive for these moves. Any recent closures or changes, it was said, were simply in line with the company’s normal procedures. “There is nothing particularly dramatic going on”, said one employee, who refused to be quoted as a company spokesman. “All brewers are gradually disposing of small houses, particularly those which are unsuitable for modernisation. This is really just a continuation of something that we've been doing since the turn of the century”. He added that the three Whitbread houses in question had all arrived on the market at the same time as “pure coincidence”. “Tenants have left or retired for various reasons and this is just a process that is going on all the time, anyway”, he said.

A spokesman for the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers' Association commented “We haven't been told anything officially, but what happens to these houses is entirely up to the brewery. I believe it is what is called rationalisation. If a place is uneconomical, then when it becomes vacant the brewers are going to sell it. After all, they, like a licensee, have to make a living”.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

MASKELL Philip Maskell 1862-74

HUGHES Alfred 1867

CHITTENDEN Thomas 1869

MASKELL P 1870

MASKELL Benjamin & STEPHENSON Thomas 1874

MASKELL Maria 1874-78

Last pub licensee had JACKSON Henry 1878-83 Next pub licensee had (age 42 in 1881Census)

DAINES Henry 1883-94

ARTHUR William 1894-1911

ARTHUR Annie 1911-43

BINFIELD Dorothy 1943-62

BURSTOW Raymond 1962-64

ORAM Walter 1964-68

CARDNO Kenneth 1968-75

 

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