DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, July, 2022.

Page Updated:- Tuesday, 19 July, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1705-

Chequers

Latest 1940

3 Seagate Street

Folkestone

Chequers, Folkestone

 

Any further information or indeed photographs would be appreciated. Please email me at the address below.

 

Chequers floor plan Chequers floor plan

 

The owners changed hands in 1859 after Thomas Walker sold off the Phoenix brewery to Leney's.

From the Kentish Gazette, October 4 – 7, 1758. Kindly sent from Alec Hasenson.

Sale of a Lugger at the Sign of the Chequer, Folkestone, 16th October.

 

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811.

General Sessions 29 April 1765.

Before John Hague (Mayor), Mr. John Jordan, Mr. William Pope, Mr. Thomas Baker, Mr. Thomas Rolfe, and Mr. John Baker.

Neat Ladd, James Francklyn, Chas. Hill, Thos. Wilton, Ambrose Dadd, Ric Boxer, Widow Jeffery, Widow Gittens, Ric Beear, Mary Gittens, and Joseph Trevillon were fined at this Session 3/4 each for having false measures in their houses, which fines were paid into the hands of the Overseers of the Poor.

Neat Ladd, George; James Francklyn, Rose; Charles Hill, White Hart; Thomas Wilton, no record; Ambrose Dadd, Chequers; Richard Boxer, Fishing Boat; Widow Jeffery, Royal George; Widow Gittens, North Foreland; Richard Beear, Three Compasses; Mary Gittens, Privateer; Joseph Trevillon, Crown.

 

From the Kentish Gazette, February 10-13, 1770. Kindly sent from Alec Hasenson.

Auction of Meadow land at the sign of the Chequer, in Folkestone, February 20, 1770.

 

From Kentish Gazette 29 July 1775.

Wednesday morning last, between the hours of six and seven o'clock, Mr. Ambrose Dadd, master of the "Chequer," at Folkestone, was found hanging in a passage in his house above stairs; it is supposed he had hung upwards of an hour. The cause of this rash action is unknown.

 

Kentish Gazette 23 February 1782.

Advertisement: Folkestone, Feb. 21, 1782: Cocking. On Tuesday next will be fought, at Mr. Joseph Taylor's, at the sign of the "Chequers," Folkestone, a Main of Cocks, between the gentlemen of Folkestone and the gentlemen of Dover. To show eleven cocks on each side, to fight for five guineas a battle and ten the odd. There will be a close pit, and a good ordinary on the table at one o'clock; and a pair of large cocks to be fought before dinner.

 

Kentish Gazette 10 February 1770.

Auction Notice.

To be sold by auction, at the sign of the Chequer, in Folkestone, on Tuesday, the 20th of this instant, February, about three o'clock in the afternoon:

Thw pieces of Meadow Land, known by the name of Joy's Land, containing by estimation four acres and a quarter, more or less, situate, lying and being in Folkestone aforesaid, at or near a certain place called Green Lane, and now or late in the occupation of Thomas Nickalls.

For further particulars enquire of Richard Elgar.

 

Kentish Gazette 26 July 1775.

Wednesday evening last, between the hours of six and seven o'clock, Mr. Ambrose Dadd, master of the Chequer, at Folkestone, was found hanging in a passage in his house above stairs; it is supposed that he had hung upwards of an hour. The cause of this rash action is unknown.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811.

General Sessions 26 June 1777.

Wm. Cressey, Benham Beecrot, Rob Martin and Mary Gittens, victuallers, were fined 6/8 apiece for having short measures in their custody.

Notes: William Cressey, Red Cow. Robert Martin, Chequers. Mary Gittens, Privateer.

 

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811.

General Sessions 4 March 1794.

Before Thomas Baker (Mayor), John Minter, Edward Andrews and John Castle.

The licence of the Chequers was transferred to Henry Prescott.

 

Kentish Gazette 13 October 1807.

Advertisement.

To be sold by Auction;

At the Chequer, Folkestone, the 28th day of October, at three o'clock in the afternoon (if not previously disposed of by private contract, of which notice will be given) – Arpinge Farm, with 130 acres of land, little more or less, in the parish of Newington, near Hythe, with immediate possession. The buildings are in complete repair, and the whole of the estate is exonerated from the land-tax.

N. B. Part of the purchase money may remain on mortgage, if required.

For further particulars apply to Mr. Joseph Sladen, of Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811.

General Sessions 25 April 1808.

Before Thomas Baker (Mayor), Joseph William Knight, John Castle, John Gill, John Bateman and James Major.

The following person was fined for having short measures in their possession, viz.:

Ric Prescott 1 pint 2/6.

 

From the Kentish Gazette, 13 April, 1847.

SAVOYARDS LAND AT FOLKESTONE:

On Friday evening at midnight the Princess Helena steamer landed 56 savoyard peasants at Folkestone in the most wretched state of filth and raggedness imaginable, we suppose to be employed as itinerant musicians and white-mice boys in London.

(Savoyards, were people from Savoy, an area shared between France, Italy and Switzerland,  and White Mice Boys were Italian boys being trafficked into London in an elaborate white slave trade, they performed tricks with trained monkeys and mice while their masters played the organ. Paul Skelton.)

The poor wretches were shivering with cold (it being a frosty night with a keen wind from the north), and in that state were kept for an hour in the harbour, the man in charge of them not being able to come to terms for a lodging for them, having only offered 4 shillings and 6d for that purpose.

However, the landlady of the "Checkers" kindly gave them a resting place in her stables on the straw, where the poor creatures were huddled together like swine. Many persons assembled the next morning to see them depart, who commiserated their unhappy condition. Surely something might be done to prevent these poor fellows leaving their sunny clime to endure a life of slavery, privation and misery in England; the object being not to employ them as labourers, but to excite charity from the benevolent for the benefit of their inhuman masters.”

 

Kentish Gazette, 13 April 1847.

Slavery in England.

On Friday evening at midnight, the Princess Helena steamer landed 56 Savoyard peasants at Folkestone, in the most wretched state of filth and raggedness imaginable, we suppose to be employed as itinerant musicians and white-mice boys in London. The poor wretches were shivering with cold (it being a frosty night, with a keen wind from the north), and in that state were kept for an hour in the harbour, the man in charge of them not being able to come to terms for a lodging for them, having only offered 4s. 6d. for that purpose. However, the landlady of the "Checkers" kindly gave them a resting-place in her stables on the straw, where the poor creatures were huddled together like swine. Many persons assembled the next morning to see them depart, who commiserated their unhappy condition. Surely something might be done to prevent these poor fellows leaving their sunny clime to endure a life of slavery, privation, and misery in England; the object being not to employ them as labourers, but to excite charity from the benevolent for the benefit of their inhuman masters.

 

Kentish Gazette 27 March 1849.

On the evening of the 14th instant, a man of respectable appearance entered the Chequers Tavern, and applied to the landlady, Mrs. Mercer, for a bed, which was provided for him. On the next morning, at about five o’clock, the landlord, on coming downstairs, observed the tap-room door move, and on going there he found a man, who asked the way to the yard; he shortly afterwards came indoors, and went upstairs, as was supposed, to bed. The landlord then went out, and about two hours afterwards someone touched the bedroom door where the landlady slept, when she called out, but received no answer. Being in the habit of going to bed very late, she did not get up early, and slept very soundly. However, at about half-past nine o’clock she heard someone walking tip-toe across her room, and on peeping to see who it was, she observed a man, who was found afterwards to be the lodger, in the act of taking her cash-hox (which contained a large sum of money). She jumped out of bed, seized him, and struck him a blow on the face, and continued to do so 'til he entered his bedroom. On his return, with his clothes on his arm, she armed herself with a bootjack, and belaboured him all the way downstairs into the street. There was no one else in the house but her aged mother. After his departure there was found in his room a very formidable housebreaking implement.

Note: The Mrs. Mercer mentioned is actually the daughter of the landlady, Sarah Pay.

 

Kentish Gazette 13 February 1855.

At the Petty Sessions on Wednesday, before S. Godden and James Kelcey Esqrs., the licence of the Chequers Inn was transferred from the executors of Sarah Pay to Henry Mercer, a son-in-law of deceased.

 

Kentish Gazette 12 April 1859.

Advertisement extract: Mr. Thomas Robinson is honoured with instructions from the Trustees of the late Thomas Walker Esq., to submit for sale by public auction at the "Ship Hotel," in Dover, on Tuesday, the 24th day of May, 1859, at twelve for one o'clock in the afternoon precisely the following valuable freehold and leasehold inns, public houses:

Lot 5: The old-established freehold inn, in the town of Folkestone, known as the "Chequers," with large yard, stabling, lofts &c. These premises stand on an an extensive area of ground, are contiguous to the harbour, possess two extensive frontages in the principal thoroughfares, and are now in the occupation of Mr. Henry Mercer.

For further particulars and to treat for the purchase, apply to the auctioneer, 18, Bench Street, or to Edward Knocker Esq., Solicitor, Castle Hill, Dover.

 

Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, Saturday 16 July 1859.

To let by tender.

The following public houses situate in and near Dover, Eastry, and Folkestone, viz:-

1. The "Bull Inn," Eastry.

2. The "Halfway House" and land, on the Dover and Canterbury Road.

3. The "Chequers," at Folkestone.

4. The "Chequers" and land, at West Hougham.

5. The "Red Lion," at Charlton.

6. The "Fox," in St James's Street.

7. The "Ordnance Arms," in Queen Street.

8. The "Cause is Altered," in Queen Street.

9. The "True Briton," on Commercial Quay.

10. The "Three Kings," in Union Street.

11. The "Fleur-de-Lis," in Council House Street.

12. The "Cinque Port Arms," in Clarence Place.

13. The "Red Lion" in St James's Street.

14. The "Dolphin," in Dolphin Lane.

The above houses are to be let as free houses, in consequence of the proprietors of the Dolphin Lane Brewery discontinuing that business.

The holdings of the present Tenants expire under notice to quit, as follows, viz:- No. 2, on the 6th January next, No. 3, on the 6th July, 1860, No. 10, at Lady Day next, No. 13, on the 23rd October next, No. 14, on the 6th April next, and reminder on the 11th October next.

Tenders must be sent into the offices of Mr. Edward Knocker, Castle Hill, Dover, on or before the 20th day of July next, marked on the cover "Tender."

Particular and Terms of hiring, with the forms of Tender, to be obtained on application to Mr. knocker, or Mr. Thomas Robinson, Estate Agent, Bench Street, Dover.

Tenders may be given for the whole together or separately. The Tenders will be accepted subject to the houses being sold on or before the 20th day of September next, and the proprietors do not bind themselves to accept the lowest or any tender.

N.B. The proprietors are open to treat for letting the Brewery, Malthouse, and Premises, in Dolphin Lane.

Edward Knocker. Castle Hill, Dover, June, 1859.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 17 December 1859.

Wednesday December 14th:- Before R.W. Boarer and James Tolputt esqs.

An application was made to transfer the licence of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, from Henry Mercer to Mary Goor. The necessary five days' notice not having been given, the transfer could not be completed until January next, but the magistrates' clerk intimated that applicant could obtain a magistrate's order for carrying on the business till the next sessions.

Note: This date differs from information in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Observer 29 August 1863.

Without A Home.

Thursday August 27th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N., and James Tolputt Esq.

George Peacock was brought up on a charge of sleeping in an outhouse and having no visible means of subsistence.

P.C. Ovenden about a quarter past one in the morning found him asleep in the water-closet of the Chequers Inn. He belonged to the town, but had no place of residence. Ovenden had not known him to work for a long time, but he loitered about and got odd jobs. In the winter he went into the Union House. No money was found on him, but he had an order for the Union. The Bench now admonished him and dismissed him.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 18 June 1864.

Tuesday June 14th:- Before the Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

John Wettingstall and John Knight were brought up in custody charged with stealing one gallon of beer, value 1s., from a cask, the property of Richard Checksfield.

Remanded till next day.

Note: Beer (bought from Gun Brewery), was on Checksfield's van, parked in the yard of the Chequers.

Wednesday June 15th:- Before the Mayor. R.W. Boarer and J. Kelcey Esqs.

John Wettingstall and John Knight were brought up under remand charged with stealing a gallon of beer from a cask on the 13th inst.

The prisoners pleaded Guilty under the Criminal Justice Act, and John Knight was committed for 7 days with hard labour, and John Wettingstall to 6 weeks' imprisonment with hard labour.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 18 June, 1864.

STEALING BEER

Tuesday June 14th:- Before the Mayor, James Kelcey and R.W, Boarer, Esqs.

John Whittingstall, 19, seaman, living at Charlotte Terrace, and John Knight, 21, shoemaker, living in Tontine Street, were charged with stealing a gallon of beer, the property of Richard Checksfield, Ashford.

Richard Checksfield said he was a carrier from Ashford to Folkestone. He had two casks of 4 gallons each of porter consigned to him in Folkestone to go to Ashford. He left them in his van last night about ten o'clock, in the "Chequers'" yard, when they were all right. Between two and three o'clock this morning the constable called him up, saying there were some persons in the van drinking the beer. He went and found nearly a gallon drawn. Saw the casks filled up with porter at "Mr. Tite's Brewery." The porter was about a shilling a gallon. The yard door was not locked at night; there was no gate to it.

P.C. Hills was on duty at the bottom of High Street about half past two. Seeing the van there he went, as usual, to see if any persons were there, and found the prisoners, drinking beer.

The bench sentenced Whittingstall to six weeks' hard labour, and Knight to seven days' imprisonment.

 

Note: The Brewery referred to is the "Gun Brewery." Jan Pedersen.

 

Folkestone Express 2 December 1876.

Tuesday, November 28th: Before Col. De Crespigny, J. Clark Esq., and Alderman Caister.

Eliza O'Leary was charged with assaulting Sarah Jordan on the 24th inst., whereby she went in bodily fear.

Sarah Jordan, whose face was dreadfully disfigured, deposed: I went into the Chequers to call my husband, and saw him there dancing with the prisoner. I told her not to dance with my husband as he had been drinking all day. Prisoner then struck me and I told her that she was the cause of my bonnet being torn. She used dreadful language, and said she would murder me.

The prisoner made a statement to the effect that Mrs. Jordan poked her in the chest with a knife, and if it had been a pen knife must have run into her. She said she could not give two black eyes like Mrs. Jordan's with one blow.

She was ordered to find a surety for 10 to keep the peace for three months.

 

Folkestone Express 28 April 1877.

Local News.

About half past seven o'clock on Friday morning, Captain Burtenshaw, a seaman who had been lodging at the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, was found hanging by the neck in his bedroom by a person who was sent to arouse him. He was suspended to a clothes hook by a neckerchief and was quite dead. The inquest will be held on Friday evening.

 

Southeastern Gazette 30 April 1877.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Town Hall on Friday evening, before J. Minter, Esq., coroner, on the body of John Burtenshaw, mariner, 58 years of age.

Deceased was master of the collier brig Clarence, and lodged with Mr. Richardson, at the Chequers Inn. According to the evidence of Richardson, the deceased retired to bed on Thursday night at about eleven o’clock, and appeared in his usual spirits; he was generally called to breakfast at eight and when witness went to his room on Friday morning, he saw him hanging to a peg; he called his brother and they immediately out him down. He had known deceased for a number of years, and saw no difference in his manner on the previous evening. He believed, however, that deceased had pecuniary embarrassments.

Dr. Mercer having given evidence as to the cause of death, the Coroner, in summing up, said there was no evidence to show that deceased was in an unsound state of mind, and a verdict according to the facts before them must be returned.

A verdict of felo de se was accordingly returned.

 

Folkestone Express 5 May 1877.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Town Hall on Friday evening last before J. Minter Esq., Coroner, on the body of John Burtonshaw, who had committed suicide by hanging.

The jury having viewed the body, Thomas Burtonshaw was called, and said: I am son of the deceased, and identify the body as that of my father, John Burtonshaw, aged 59 years. He was a master mariner, and a widower. Deceased lodged at the Chequers Inn. I saw deceased in the street last night, but did not speak to him. I have no idea what was the cause of his committing this act. The last time I saw him to speak to was about two months ago. He was in a very irritable temper. As a rule, he is a mild tempered man.

William James Fitch said that he was a master mariner, lodging at the Chequers Inn with his brother, Henry John Richardson, the landlord. He had known the deceased for the last thirteen years, and had been daily in his company for the last three weeks, he having resided at the Chequers since he entered the harbour with the ship Clarence. Deceased was sitting in the bar parlour with him the previous evening. He went out several times, and at ten minutes to eleven he went to look at his ship, and returned in about five minutes afterwards, when he asked him for a candle, saying he should go to bed. Witness gave him one, and he wished him and three other lodgers who were in the bar goodnight. He was sober, and witness only saw him drink one glass of rum and water. He had generally called deceased down to breakfast, and that morning at ten minutes to eight he had opened the bedroom door for the purpose of calling him, and finding the deceased was not in bed he turned his head, and looking round the door, saw deceased hanging to a peg. He called his brother, saying “Here's Burtonshaw hung himself”, and his brother went upstairs and cut the body down. Deceased had hung himself by fastening a scarf round his neck and to a pef in the wall. His feet touched the ground, and he was dead. Witness and his brother placed the body on the bed where the jury viewed it. He had never complained of being in any difficulty. He had sailed with the deceased for three years, and had not noticed any difference in his conduct during the past three weeks.

Henry John Richardson, the landlord of the Chequers Inn, said: The deceased has made his home at the Chequers for the last nine months when he had been at Folkestone. I have seen him daily. I have known him since he was a little boy and have observed no difference in his manner since I have known him. I saw my brother give deceased a candle to go to bed. He bade us all goodnight, and seemed as cheerful as ever I have known him. He was sober. This morning my brother called to me and said “Harry, come up here. Jack's hung himself”. I went up and saw deceased hanging by his neck, around which a scarf was tied, and attached to a peg on the wall. Deceased's feet were touching the ground and his body was in a stooping position. He was dead. I cut the body down, and with my brother's assistance placed it on the bed. I have heard this morning that deceased was in money difficulties.

Dr. Richard Mercer, M.R.C.S., said: I was sent for this morning to the Chequers and found the deceased lying on the bed. There was a scarf round his neck which had been cut, and corresponding to the portion on the peg. There was a slight indentation on the neck, corresponding with the tightening of the scarf. I have examined the deceased, and there are no marks other than that on the neck. In my opinion his death was caused by strangulation. The deceased must have had the greatest difficulty to keep his feet from the floor when he hung himself.

The Coroner, in his charge to the jury, said there could be no doubt from the evidence adduced that the deceased hung himself, and assuming they were satisfied on that point the question for them to consider was as to the state of mind of deceased at the time he committed the act. If the jury were of opinion that the deceased was in an unsound state of mind they would return their verdict, but if on the other hand they were of opinion that the deceased was of a sane state of mind then deceased was responsible for the act he had committed. It was purely a question for the jury. Every man was presumed to be sane, and to possess a sufficient degree of reason to be responsible for his crimes until the contrary is proved. In many cases the evidence showed acts and conduct from which the jury might charitably infer temporary insanity, but he must confess that he was unable to point out to them anything in the evidence which would justify them in coming to that conclusion, except the hearsay evidence of Mr. Richardson as to the pecuniary embarrassments of the deceased, unless they were of opinion that the act itself was evidence of insanity. There can be no question that it was a case of determined suicide. They had viewed the position of the hook to which the scarf was attached, the height from the floor, the close proximity of the foot of the bed, and the ledge of the partition, and it was therefore impossible to avoid coming to the conclusion that the deceased could only have accomplished his end after the scarf had been placed round the hook by the most persistent determination. Again the evidence of the last two witnesses, Richardson and Fitch, who had known deceased for many years, showed that the deceased was sane and cheerful up to the time of his going to bed, and the last thing done by him opevious to going upstairs was to proceed to the Harbour to see that his ship was in safety. He was therefore unable to point out to the jury any portion of the evidence which should satisfy them that the deceased was insane at the time he hung himself. They must, however, determine the question, and if they were satisfied upon the evidence that the deceased was insane then their verdict would be to that effect, but if on the contrary then their verdict must be one of felo de se.

The jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of felo de se.

 

Folkestone Express 28 September 1878.

Wednesday, September 25th: Before J. Clark and W.J. Jeffreason Esqs., Alderman Caister and Captain Crowe.

Thomas Burns was charged by P.C. Knowles with being drunk and disorderly in Queen's Square on Tuesday.

The constable stated that he received information at the police station about half past ten in the morning that there was a disturbance in Queen's Square, and on going there he found nearly a thousand people assembled, and a lot of them fighting. The prisoner ran into the Chequers public house and hid himself in a back room, where he was taken into custody. He was drunk and had been fighting.

Prisoner denied that he was drunk and said that he was set upon by a lot of fishermen, and called a witness to prove it, but he did not help his cause, and Superintendent Wilshere having proved that he was so drunk that he could not be brought before the Magistrates on Tuesday, the prisoner was fined 5s. and 5s. 6d. costs, or seven days.

 

Folkestone Express 11 January 1879.

Monday, January 6th: Before R.W. Boarer Esq., and Captain Fletcher.

Walter Corfield and William Kemp, sailors, were charged with stealing 11 pairs of stockings, valued at 21s., the property of Mr. William Grimwood Brett, draper, of Tontine treet, on Saturday the 4th inst.

Prosecutor said he had eleven pairs of stockings hanging by his doorway on Saturday night. At a quarter past eight he missed them, and gave information to P.C. Hogben, who, about half past nine brought to him three pairs of stockings, produced, which he identified by the private mark in ink as his property. The value of the eleven pairs was 21s.

P.C. Hogben said he went to the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, about half past nine on Saturday night. He saw prisoner Corfield there, with others, and told him he should charge him with stealing eleven or twelve pairs of stockings from Mr. Brett's shop. He replied “I did not steal them. I bought them of a man in this room”. He took the prisoner into custody, and when they were in the street he felt in his pockets. In the pocket of his coat he found two pairs of stockings and an odd one. When searched at the police station he was wearing one stocking, which corresponded with the odd one found in prisoner's pocket. He afterwards found the other prisoner at the Chequers. He told him he should charge him with being concerned in stealing some stockings, and that he must go to the police station. He said he did not know anything about any stockings. He afterwards found four persons who had bought stockings of the prisoners. The prisoner had nothing on him when searched.

P.C. Swain said on Saturday evening he was on duty in South Street. He saw the prisoner Kemp come from the direction of the passage leading from Harbour Street. Corfield called out to him “Jack, don't run”. His suspicions were aroused, but he lost sight of the prisoners at the Paris Hotel. They had then apparently nothing on them.

George Poole, a mariner, said he went into the Chequers on Saturday night about half past eight. The two prisoners were there, and Corfield said he had some stockings to sell at 6d. per pair. He said his sister knitted them, and witness bought two pairs for a shilling. Prisoner said they were worth 18d. a pair. He afterwards bought one pair from Kemp for 4d., and resold them to Corfield for 8d. He gave up the two pairs he bought of Corfield to P.C. Hogben on Sunday night.

Richard Penny, also a mariner, said he was at the Chequers Inn on Saturday, and heard Corfield offer to sell some stockings at 6d. per pair. He bought two pairs for a shilling, and had given them up to P.C. Hogben on Sunday night.

Harry Spearpoint and George Spicer also proved buying stockings of the prisoners, and all of these Mr. Brett identified as his property.

Prisoners both pleaded Guilty. Corfield said he took the stockings because he wanted bread, and Kemp because he had had too much beer.

They were each sentenced to four months hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 26 March 1881.

Advertisement.

Chequers Inn, Folkestone.

To let, free for spirits. Barclay and Perkins Stout and Porter. Rent 30 per annum. Beds bring in 70 per annum. Cause of leaving – wife's illness. Immediate disposal. Incoming 160.

Apply J. Banks, Tontine Street, Folkestone.

 

Folkestone Express 29 April 1882.

Monday, April 24th: Before R.W. Boarer and M. Bell Esqs., and Captain Crowe.

George May was charged with being disorderly and refusing to quit license premises, and also with assaulting James Ivas Friend, the landlord of the Chequers Inn.

J.I. Friend, landlord of the Chequers, said that about three o'clock in the afternoon the prisoner went into his house with some men and women, and after he had served them with some beer they made a great noise and abused him. Witness ordered the prisoner to leave the house, but he refused to go. He took the beer away because they refused to leave, and the prisoner struck at him over the counter several times, but did not succeed. He next tried to get over the counter, and after several attempts he succeeded, and he then made a rush at witness, and they struggled in the bar for about ten minutes. After that the prisoner butted him with his head in the mouth, and loosened some of his teeth and cut his lips.

P.C. Bailey said he was sent for to the Chequers on Saturday, and he saw the prisoner standing there arguing with the complainant about a pot of beer, and the landlord then gave him in charge for assault and for refusing to quit.

The Bench fined the prisoner 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs for the first offence, and for the second offence 10s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or in default seven days' hard labour in each case.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 24 September 1887.

Thursday, September 22nd: Before Dr. Bateman, Alderman Caister, Major Penfold, J. Clark, J. Hoad and J. Fitness Esqs.

James Ive Friend, landlord of the Chequers Inn, Tram Road, was summoned for dealing with smuggled tobacco.

A Custom House Officer, of London, named Tifferton, said he searched the defendant's house, and asked him if he had any smuggled cigars or tobacco on his premises. He replied that he had not, but subsequently witness discovered that he had 2 lbs. 6 ozs., the single value and duty of which would be 15s. 6d. When questioned, defendant said he had bought it from a seaman, whose name he did not know. On behalf of the Customs Authorities witness asked that the Bench would inflict a penalty of treble the value and duty.

Prisoner asked the Magistrates to deal leniently with him, as it was his first offence.

Fined the single value and duty, with 2s. costs – 17s. 6d. in all.

 

Folkestone Express 9 June 1894.

Saturday, June 2nd: Before The Mayor, Alderman Banks, and W. Wightwick Esq.

Mr. Friend, of the Chequers Inn, made application for a duplicate licence, he having lost the original. Granted.

 

Folkestone Express 4 August 1894.

Transfer of Licence.

Wednesday, August 1st: Before J. Holden, J. Fitness and J. Pledge Esqs.

The licence of the Chequers was transferred to Mr. Kirby.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 23 May 1896.

Saturday, May 16th: Before Messrs. J. Holden, J. Pledge, T.J. Vaughan, and J. Fitness.

Mr. Haines applied that early opening licences be granted to three public houses. He said there was not a single one in the borough, and he thought when the Bench had heard the evidence they would be prepared to grant some, especially considering that they could at any time revoke them.

In the first case he applied on behalf of John Grigg, of the Ship Inn, The Stade, that he might open his house at 3 o'clock to accommodate the fishermen. There were some 68 or 70 boats that, by reason of the harbour being a tidal one, sometimes had to come in at hours when the public houses were not open, and were unable to obtain any kind of refreshment, although they had been for hours battling with the wind and the weather. They were not bona fide travellers, although they had been out to sea. In the mackerel and herring seasons there were boats from Newhaven, Shoreham, etc., put in and the applicant was knocked up, but for fear of offending the law he had great difficulty in finding out if the men were really travellers. He did not intend to keep open for the purpose of drinking, but simply to accommodate these men. Grigg had been two years in the house and had conducted it properly.

In the case of the other two applicants, they only wanted to open at 5 a.m. instead of 6.

Mr. Haines called Grigg, who bore out the statement.

Superintendent Taylor said he was not aware that anything had arisen recently that showed any need of an alteration. He presumed it was because of the remarks that were made the previous Saturday as to Dover, but at Dover there was a great vegetable market, and men came long distances from their houses to attend it. Mr. Haines' arguments were illogical, for he might as well argue that because there were no early opening licences in Folkestone, Dover did not require them. If this application was granted, the applicant would be able to keep open continuously from 3 a.m. to 11 p.m. If boats from Shoreham came in they could be served, and if the police prosecuted there would be a good defence, as they would be bona fide travellers.

The next application was by George Kirby, of the Chequers Inn, who desired to open at 5 a.m. to supply the workmen going to work at the Harbour, especially to the fruit boats.

The Chairman said they must decline all the applications, for if they granted one they would be obliged in justice to grant all. Mr. Haines had fought well, but had failed to show that the licences were needed.

 

Folkestone Express 23 May 1896.

Saturday, May 16th: Before J. Holden, J. Pledge, T.J. Vaughan, and J. Fitness Esqs.

Mr. Haines appeared before the Bench and made an application in respect of three exceptional licences for certain houses in the town. It will be remembered that a few days ago a publican was fined for opening his house a few minutes before six o'clock in the morning in order to supply the men who were going to work, and Mr. Mowll, who appeared for the defendant, expressed surprise that there were no early opening licences in Folkestone, there being no less than 33 in Dover. Mr. Haines said the Section under which he applied was 26 of the Licensing Act of 1872, which he read. The exception which he was about to ask the Bench to grant was in respect to three houses, and he pointed out that it was entirely in the discretion of the Bench. It was a matter entirely of evidence, and he thought the Magistrates would see that it was desirable to grant them. The matter was so much in their hands, that should they think proper at any time to revoke a licence so granted, they could make a revocation order.

The first case was that of Mr. J.G. Gregg, of the Ship Inn, and it was in respect of the fishing industry that the application was made. There were now 65 or 70 boats, and they could not come into the harbour at all times, as it was tidal. The boats went out at all hours of the day, and came in often at three or four in the morning, and the houses being closed, there was no means of the men getting refreshments if they required. As they resided in the town, they were not entitled to come under the definition of bona fide travellers. In the mackerel season 20 or 30 boats came in from other ports, and the crews often required refreshments from these houses. If the permission was granted, it was not intended to keep the house open, but merely to open when it was required. Mr. Gregg did not ask for the house to be allowed for the house to be open from one until three, but only from three till six. Mr. Haines then put in a memorial signed by the fishermen themselves to the number of 85, and said he had given notice of the application to Superintendent Taylor. There was nothing against Gregg, who had been two years in the house, and had conducted it in a proper manner.

Mr. Holden: You say there are two others.

Mr. Haines replied that there was only one application for an early opening licence, the others were different – applications to be allowed to open at five.

Mr. Bradley remarked that the memorial was in favour of what the Bench had no power to grant – a tidal licence. The signatures also were many of them in the same writing, and there were crosses to them.

Mr. Haines replied that many of the men could not write, and Mr. Gregg had permission to put their names, and they appended crosses.

John Galley Gregg was then called, and gave evidence as to his having been frequently asked to serve men at all hours of the night, and, under present circumstances, he had to go out and ascertain if their statements were correct. He said there were between 60 and 70 boats, and 250 fishermen. There were also a good many boats from other ports, and some of the crews stayed at his house.

Superintendent Taylor said there were no circumstances within his knowledge which rendered the licence necessary. It was a fact that there were no early opening licences in Folkestone, but there were in Dover, but the circumstances were very different. At Dover, market carts came in from the surrounding districts very early in the morning, and the drivers wanted refreshments. There were also at Dover large ships coming in, in addition to the fishermen. It might just as well be argued that no licences were wanted at Dover because there were none at Folkestone, as to argue that they were wanted at Folkestone because they had them at Dover. He urged that there was no necessity for the houses to be open, and it was very undesirable to make any change in the hours of opening.

Mr. Fitness: You have had no complaints from these fishermen that they cannot get what they want?

Mr. Haines said he believed in Dover there were something like 33.

Mr. Holden said he had sat on the Bench for many years, and he had never heard of a single case of hardship.

Mr. Haines said there was a memorial from the fishermen themselves.

Mr. Fitness said they would take that for what it was worth.

Mr. Haines said the men were often out all night, and there were occasions when they were out all day. It showed what a law abiding community they were, as they had not used the houses at forbidden hours.

Superintendent Taylor said he could not go so far as that, as there had been prosecutions.

Mr. Fitness said after the statement of the Superintendent they could not in all conscience go against it.

Mr. Haines then called Henry George Kirby, of the Chequers, who was an applicant for permission to open at five.

Mr. Holden asked Mr. Haines if it did not occur to him that if the Bench granted those applications, they must grant the same to other applicants. If they took from one end of Radnor Street to the other, there were about 20 houses.

Mr. Haines answered that the others had not applied. The Bench would try every one on it's own basis.

Mr. Holden said in all justice they were bound to give it to one as well as another.

Mr. Haines agreed that it would be so, if they applied for it.

Mr. Bradley said the application did not come from the public, but from the publicans.

Supt. Taylor said it came from the brewers.

Mr. Haines said there was a large body of men who were employed by the South Eastern company at the Harbour.

Mr. Bradley: I am sure the South Eastern Company would not support the application.

Mr. Haines: The men support it.

Mr. Holden: You have made a very eloquent application, but the police are against you.

Mr. Haines: Of course I must bow to the decision of the Bench.

Mr. Holden: You see where we are. If we give it to one we should have to give to another.

Mr. Bradley: Mr. Haines has not satisfied you that the thing is either necessary or desirable.

Mr. Haines said he had a memorial signed by 130 workmen, many of them South Eastern Railway men, who had to go to work early in the morning to unload the fruit boats and so on. They could not get refreshments before they left their own homes.

The Bench decided not to grant the applications, although they complimented Mr. Haines on the manner in which he had made them.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 May 1896.

Police Court Record.

On Saturday Mr. Haines made an application in respect of an exemption order, required by the Licensing Act, for certain houses in the town. It was made under Section 36 of the Act. He said he believed that on licensed houses in the town had this early opening, and the Bench would see by the evidence put before them as to the desirability of it. If the Bench should grant this order they would be able to revoke it at any time.

The first application was from the landlord of the Ship Inn, on The Stade. This was made in respect of the fishermen and the fishing industry. They had 70 or 65 boats. These men, after being out fishing, could not always get into the harbour, and after being out all day they came in at about 3 o'clock in the morning, and there was no means of getting the refreshment they desired, as they did not come under the definition of bona fide travellers. Then again in the mackerel season boats came in from Newhaven and other ports, and the landlord had numerous applications in the early morning, and it was with great difficulty that he could exercise his discretion as to who those men were. It was not the landlord's intention to keep the place open for drinking every night, but only when a boat came in. He asked that from 3 to 6 in the morning he should be exempt from closing. He put in a memorial bearing 85 signatures, signed, he believed, by the men themselves, for what it was worth. If the Bench thought the hours too long, he asked them to limit the hours to a shorter period. He did not think the police had anything against the landlord of the house, Grigg, who had been there for two years. He asked the Bench to give the matter consideration, as it had regard to one of the only industries of this town.

Mr. Grigg stated that he was the licence holder of the Ship Inn. The fishing industry was something considerable in Folkestone. There were about 65 boats belonging to that part of the town, and about 250 fishermen. A good many boats came in from neighbouring ports during the mackerel season. During the year he had many of these boats' crews knocking him up for refreshment. If the Bench granted this application it was not his intention to keep the house open always, but only when knocked up.

Superintendent Taylor said that he was not aware of any circumstances that made this early opening desirable. Reference was made in a case the previous week that Dover had early opening houses, but in addition to the ordinary fishing interest, they had a number of large ships coming in there. With regard to ships coming in early in the morning from ports, he had no doubt that if a case of this description was brought before the Bench, it would be argued that those crews were bona fide travellers. He did not think early opening necessary. He had received no complaints from these men about not being able to obtain refreshment. The section Mr. Haines quoted said that early opening could be granted where it was necessary and desirable. It had not been desirable hitherto, and it did not seem to be now.

Mr. Haines said he had another application to make with respect to the Chequers Inn at the bottom of Dover Street. This was for an opening order from 5 to 6 in the morning. He put in a memorial supporting the early opening of this inn, containing 250 signatures. Several of them were S.E.R. men.

The Chairman of the Bench said he believed there were about 20 public houses in this part. If they gave the early opening order to one, the would have in justice to give it to all.

Mr. Haines said the others had not applied for it.

The Chairman said they would be sure to do so. The application was not granted.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 15 January 1898.

Saturday, January 8th: Before J. Fitness, W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert and H. Stock Esqs.

An hour's extension for an annual dinner was granted on the application of Mr. Kirby, of the Chequers Inn.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 21 January 1899.

Licence Transfer.

Wednesday, January 18th: Before Messrs. Willoughby Carter, Pledge, Vaughan and Holden.

The Chequers, Seagate Street, from Mr. Geo. Kirby to Captain John Wm. Dorrell.

 

Folkestone Express 21 January 1899.

Wednesday, January 18th: Before Capt. Carter, James Pledge, John Holden, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs.

Mr. John Dorrell applied for temporary authority to sell at the Chequers Inn, formerly held by Mr. Kirby. Granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 January 1899.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Wednesday last a temporary authority was granted to Mr. John Dorrell, The Chequers.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 21 January 1899.

Wednesday, January 18th: Before Captain Willoughby Carter, J. Pledge, J. Holden, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs.

The Chequers, Mr. Kirby's old house, was transferred to Mr. Wm. Dorrell.

 

Folkestone Express 11 March 1899.

Wednesday, March 8th: Before J. Fitness and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The licence of the Chequers, Seagate Street, was transferred to Mr. John Dorrell.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 March 1899.

Folkestone Police Court.

On Monday, transfer was granted Mr. Dorrell (Chequers).

 

Folkestone Up To Date 11 March 1899.

Friday, March 10th: Before J. Fitness Esq., Col. Hamilton, and W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The following licence was transferred:

The Chequers, Seagate Street, to Mr. John Dorrell.

 

Folkestone Daily News 20 June 1906.

Wednesday, June 20th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Leggett, and Pursey.

The licence of the Chequers Inn was transferred from J. Dorrell to Ernest Reeves.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 June 1906.

Wednesday, June 20th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. G.W. Pursey, and Major Leggett.

The licence of the Chequers Inn was temporarily transferred from John Dorrell to Ernest Reeves (sic).

 

Folkestone Daily News 11 July 1906.

Licence Transfer.

Before Messrs. Hamilton, Fynmore, and Linton.

The Chequers from J.C. Dorrell to E. Reeve.

 

Folkestone Express 14 July 1906.

Wednesday, July 11th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Alderman Vaughan, and R.J. Linton Esq.

This being the day fixed for the special licensing sessions, the following licence was transferred: The Chequers Inn, from Mr. J.G. Dorrell to Mr. E. Reeves.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 July 1906.

Wednesday, July 11th: Before Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and Mr. Linton.

Licence was transferred as follows: The Chequers Inn, from Mr. J.G. Dorrell to Mr. E. Reeve.

 

Folkestone Daily News 5 February 1907.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Tuesday, February 5th: Before Messrs. Ward, Hamilton, Linton, Fynmore, Herbert, Pursey, and Carpenter. Mr. Stainer, Mr. Wells, and Mr. Boyd, the two latter being the new Magistrates, occupied seats on the Bench, but did not adjudicate.

The Chief Constable read his report as to the number of houses and convictions, which showed a decrease last year. He recommended that the Bench should still continue to take advantage of the Act and refer some of the licences to the Compensation Committee at the Canterbury Quarter Sessions. He then went on to say that although he did not oppose the renewal of any licences on the ground of misconduct, there had been five convictions during the last year, and he had had to warn one licence holder against allowing betting and taking in slips. He also wished to caution all licence holders that these practices would not be allowed on any occasion, and after giving this public warning he should take steps to detect and prosecute for any such offences.

The Chairman, before commencing, stated that the Licensing Bench had visited a large number of houses, and they had seen in various places automatic machines, into which people put pennies, and in some instances got their penny back or a cigar, &c. The having of these machines was practically permitting gambling, and it had been decided that they were illegal. Every licence holder must understand that they were to be immediately removed, otherwise they would be prosecuted for having them. As regards oxes, gramophones, &c., if licensed victuallers had them on their premises, they were to be used in such a way as not to be a nuisance to the neighbourhood, and if complaints were made they would have to be removed.

The renewal licences for the Black Bull Hotel, the Railway Inn, the Chequers, Queen's Head, Channel Inn, Alexandra Tavern, Perseverance, and Railway Hotel at Shorncliffe, were adjourned till the 4th March, some on account of convictions, and some for the consideration of closing them under the Licensing Act. The other applications were granted, a full report of which will appear in our next issue.

 

Folkestone Express 9 February 1907.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, C.J. Pursey and W.C. Carpenter Esqs., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

The Chief Constable read his report as follows:

Chief Constable's Office, Folkestone, 6th February, 1907.

Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 128 places licensed for the sale by retail of intoxicating liquors, viz.:- Full licences, 80; beer “on”, 9; beer “off”, 6; beer and spirit dealers, 14; grocers, 12; chemists, 4; confectioners, 3; total 128. This gives an average, according to the census of 1901, of one licence to every 239 persons, or one “on” licence to every 344 persons. This is a reduction of 8 licences as compared with the return presented to you last year, as the renewal of 3 “off” licences was not applied for at the last annual licensing meeting, and at the adjourned licensing meeting the renewal of one full licence was refused on the ground that the premises had been ill-conducted, and four other full licences were referred to the Compensation Committee for East Kent on the ground of redundancy. These four licences were subsequently refused by the Compensation Committee, and after payment of compensation, the premises were closed on 31st December last. Since the last annual licensing meeting 22 of the licences have been transferred, viz:- Full licences, 15; beer “on”, 5; off licences, 2; total 22. During the year three occasional licences have been granted by the justices for the sale of intoxicating liquors on premises not ordinarily licensed for such sale, and thirty extensions of the ordinary time of closing have been granted to licence holders when balls, dinners, etc., were being held on their premises. During the year ended 31st December last, 131 persons (106 males and 25 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness. 114 were convicted and 17 discharged. This, it is most satisfactory to find, is a decrease of no less than 52 persons proceeded against as compared with the preceding year, when 164 were convicted and 19 discharged. Six of the licence holders have been proceeded against, and five of them convicted, for the following offences: Selling adulterated whiskey, 1; permitting drunkenness, 1; delivering beer to a child in unsealed vessels, 2; supplying drink to a constable when on duty, 1; total, 5. In the latter case notice of appeal against the conviction has been given by the licensee. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is sold are registered in accordance with the Act of 1902. There are 16 places licensed for music and dancing, and two for public billiard playing. I offer no objection to the renewal of any of the present licences on the ground of misconduct, the houses generally having been conducted during the past year in a satisfactory manner, but on one occasion one of the licence holders was cautioned (as the evidence was insufficient to justify a prosecution) for receiving slips and money relating to betting, which practice he immediately discontinued, bit I desire to intimate to all the licence holders that if in future any such practice is allowed, or any illegal gaming whatever is permitted on their premises, I shall take such steps as may be necessary to detect and prosecute the offenders. I beg to submit a plan showing the situation of all “on” licensed premises within the congested area, which I have marked on the plan, and would respectfully suggest that the Committee again avail themselves of the powers given by the Licensing Act, 1904, and refer the renewal of some of the licences within this area to the Compensation Committee to deal with under the Act. Within this area there are 920 houses, with a population approximately of 4,600, with 37 “on” licensed houses and 8 other licences, giving a proportion of one licence to every 20 houses or every 102 persons, and one “on” licence to every 24 houses or every 124 persons. This number of licences I consider excessive for the requirements of the neighbourhood. I have received notices from eight persons of their intention to apply at these sessions for the following new licences, viz.,:- Full licence 1; beer off 1; cider and sweets off 1; wine off 3; music, etc., 2; total 8.

I am, Gentlemen, your obedient servant, H. Reeve, Chief Constable.

The Chairman said the report seemed to be highly satisfactory. The Magistrates were very pleased to see the diminution in the number of cases of drunkenness brought before the Bench. One point about the report he wanted to make a remark upon, and that was the prevalence of gaming in public houses. In several houses the Committee visited they saw automatic machines, in which customers placed pennies and pulled a trigger. Occasionally they got something out for their pennies. That was gaming. It had been decided to be illegal, and they warned all licence holders that they would be watched, and that the machines would not be allowed, and proceedings would be taken against the offending publicans, whose licences would be jeopardised next year. There was one other point of a similar nature with regard to musical instruments, which were reported to be a great nuisance. They warned all licence holders to be careful not to create a nuisance with those pianos and other instruments, which were now very common indeed in public houses.

The following houses were ordered to be opposed as not required: The Channel Inn, High Street; the Queen's Head, Beach Street; the Railway Tavern (sic), Beach Street; the Chequers, Seagate Street; and the Perseverance, Dover Street.

Adjourned: The Black Bull Hotel, the Alexandra Tavern, the Imperial Hotel, Black Bull Road, and the Railway Hotel, Coollinge.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 February 1907.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Major Leggett, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, and Messrs. R.J. Fynmore, R.J. Linton, and C.J. Pursey.

The Chief Constable presented his annual report (for details see Folkestone Express report).

The Chairman: The report seems to be very satisfactory, and we are very glad to see the diminution in the number of cases of drunkenness brought before the Bench. One point about the report I should like to make a remark upon, and that is about gambling in public houses. In every house we have visited we saw automatic machines in which you put a penny, pulled a trigger, and occasionally you get something out, either your penny back, or a card for a cigar. That is gaming, and it has been decided as illegal, and we warn all licence holders who have these machines that they must be removed or otherwise proceedings will be taken against them for gaming, and their licences may be in jeopardy next year. There is another thing. In the same way, with regard to these musical instruments, which have been reported to the Bench as a great nuisance, we warn all the licence holders to be careful, and not create nuisances with these machines.

The licences of the Channel, High Street, the Queen's Head, Beach Street, the Railway Inn, Beach Street, the Chequers, Seagate Street, and the Perseverance, Dover Street, were not renewed, notice of opposition being given on the ground of redundancy.

The renewals of the licences of the Black Bull Hotel, Alexandra Tavern, Imperial, and Railway Hotel were all adjourned till the adjourned sessions for reasons not given.

The Justices fixed the 4th March as the date of the adjourned licensing meeting.

 

Folkestone Daily News 4 March 1907.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 4th: Before Messrs. Ward, Fynmore, Linton, Boyd, Herbert, Pursey, Carpenter, Leggett, and Hamilton.

There were seven licences to be considered: The Black Bull, Railway Tavern (sic), Railway Hotel, Perseverance, Chequers, Channel Inn, and Queen's Head.

The Chequers Inn.

Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared for the brewers, Messrs. Leney and Co., and also for the tenant.

The Chief Constable recited the facts, which were similar to the previous cases. Mr. Mowll admitted the notices, &c. There were 24 houses within a radius of 150 yards, and 30 houses within 300 yards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll: There was no complaint against the house, and there had been four tenants in 26 years.

Mr. Mowll asked to be allowed to put the trade figures in to the Bench without the same being made public. Other Benches of Magistrates had acceded to that request, and it had been adopted a few days since at the Augustine's Licensing Sessions.

Mr. De Wet supported the application.

The Bench would not accede.

Alfred Charles Leney, Chairman of Leney and Co. Ltd., deposed that the figures of the trade were as follows:- 1897, 283 barrels; 1898, 301 barrels; 1899, 324 barrels; 1900, 322 barrels; 1901, 323 barrels; 1902, 315 barrels; 1903, 326 barrels; 1904, 291 barrels; 1905, 281 barrels, and 1906, 272 barrels. They were the owners of the Cinque Ports Arms that was recently taken away from them.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: There was a falling off of 46 barrels per year. They owned five other houses. He thought there was a redundancy.

Re-examined by Mr. Mowll: The house had been licensed 114 years.

Ernest Reeve deposed that he paid 187 to go in. He was making a good living. The spirit book showed 120 gallons per year, besides the beer sold since July, also 2,500 packets of cigarettes, 50 lbs. of tobacco, 1,800 cigars, 220 gallons of ginger beer, and 80 doz. minerals. He had a slate club attraction to the house, with ninety members, sixty actual members. He employed a barman, and had a difficulty to compete with the trade.

The house was open at six o'clock in the morning for the convenience of the public. The licence was 114 years old, and old licences should not be interfered with.

The Bench referred it to Canterbury.

 

Folkestone Express 9 March 1907.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The adjourned licensing sessions were held on Monday at the Police Court, when the principal business to be considered was whether or not the five licences should be referred to the East Kent Licensing Committee for compensation. The Licensing Justices on the Bench were E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, W.G. Herbert, C.J. Pursey, R.J. Linton and W.C. Carpenter Esqs., while other justices present were Major Leggett, Mr. G. Boyd, and Mr. J. Stainer.

The Chief Constable said the next business was to consider the opposition to five licences.

After the adjournment, the opposition to the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, was taken.

Mr. Mowll appeared on behalf of the tenant and landlord.

The Chief Constable put in the plan and figures of the congested area, and also the notice of objection to the licence on the ground that it was not needed for the requirements of the neighbourhood. Continuing, he said the present licensee was Ernest Reeves, who obtained the transfer on July 11th last. The registered owners were Messrs. Leney and Company, of Dover, and the rateable value was 28. It was next door to the South Foreland, the rateable value of which was 72. There were only four houses altogether in Seagate Street, one side of which was a blank wall, and two of those houses were fully licensed houses. The premises were old and low-pitched. Within a radius of 150 yards there were 24 other on licensed houses. Within 200 yards there were 30 licensed houses. The trade appeared to be chiefly with men employed on or about the Harbour. In his opinion the licence was unnecessary, and he considered there would be ample accommodation in the remaining houses.

Cross-examined, he said he had never had any complaints about the house at all. The present tenant was the fourth in twenty six years.

Det. Sergt. Burniston also gave it as his opinion that the licence was unnecessary for the requirements of the neighbourhood, and he did not think it would be any inconvenience to the present customers if that licence was taken away.

Mr. Mowll, who was supported by Mr. De Wet in his efforts, attempted to get the Magistrates to accept a written statement with respect to the trade done at the house, but the Magistrates held that it should be given in the same way as other evidence.

Alfred Charles Leney, the chairman of Messrs. Leney and Co., said the amount of beer, including bottled beer, supplied by his firm in 1897 was 283 barrels; in 1898, 304; in1899, 324; in 1900, 322; in 1901, 323; in 1902, 315; in 1903, 326; in 1904, 291; in 1905, 281; in 1906, 272, which gave an average of 304 barrels. He gave as his reason for the falling off in the trade during the past three years the general depression in the town.

Ernest Reeves, the licensee of the house, said he paid something like 187 to go into the house. He was making a very good living there. During the last year, according to the spirit book, 120 gallons of spirit were sold in the house. He had a considerable trade in cigarettes, having sold 2,500 packets. He had also sold 1,800 cigars, 50 lbs. of tobacco, 222 gallons of ginger beer, and 80 dozen of other minerals. He ran a slate club in connection with the house, and there were about sixty members.

Mr. Mowll made a strong appeal to the Justices to allow the licence, and gave as his reasons that the house had been in existence 114 years, and also the heavy call it would make on the compensation fund if it was refused.

The Justices, however, decided to refer the Chequers Inn to the Licensing Committee.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 March 1907.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 4th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Councillors W.C. Carpenter and G. Boyd, and Messrs. R.J. Fynmore, C.J. Pursey, R.J. Linton, and J. Stainer.

The Chequers.

The next case to be taken was that of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street. Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared for the owners and tenant.

The Chief Constable put in the notice, which said that the opposition was tendered on the ground that the house was not needed. The present licensee was Ernest Reeves, who obtained a transfer on the 11th July, 1906. The owners were Messrs. Leney and Co., Dover, and the rateable value was 28 a year. Seagate Street ran from the bottom of Dover Street to Beach Street. There were only four houses in Seagate Street, and they were on one side. Two of the four houses were fully licensed public houses, viz., the Chequers and the South Foreland. There were two entrances to the house in Seagate Street, one to a front bar and the other into a passage, which led into the tap room. There was also a right of way through the yard into Beach Street. The premises were old and low pitched. The rateable value of the house adjoining was 72. Witnin a radius of 150 yards there were 24 other on licensed houses, within 200 yards radius there were altogether 30 houses licensed. The trade appeared to be chiefly with men employed in and about the harbour. In his opinion the licence was unnecessary, as there would be ample accommodation in the remaining houses.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll: He had not had a word of complaint as to the conduct of the house. There had been four tenants in the last 26 years. The South Foreland had a similar class of customer to the Chequers, though it could accommodate both classes. He thought one house could do the trade of both houses. He did not know that there was a slate club at the house.

Detective Sergeant Burniston gave it as his opinion that the licence was unnecessary.

Mr. Mowll asked to be allowed to give the amount of trade for ten years to the Bench on paper. He did so because it was objectionable that a tenant should have to disclose the trade that he was doing. He had prepared a statement of barrelage, which Mr. Alfred Leney would be prepared to swear as correct.

Mr. De Wet, representing an opposition firm of brewers, supported the application of Mr. Mowll, declaring that he intended to make it in the next case.

The Bench, however, declined to accede to the request.

Mr. Alfred Charles Leney, Chairman of Messrs. Leney and Co., said the house was their property, and he supplied everything in the way of beers. In 1897 there were 283 barrels sold at this house; 1898, 304 barrels; 1899, 324 barrels; 1900, 322 barrels; 1901, 323 barrels; 1902, 315 barrels; 1903, 326 barrels; 1904, 291 barrels; 1905, 281 barrels; 1906, 272 barrels. That gave an average of 304 barrels, or nearly 6 barrels a week for ten years. Witness's firm were the owners of the house, the Cinque Ports Arms, next door, which was taken away because it was next door to the Chequers. (Laughter)

Cross-examined: According to the statement, there was a falling-off of 46 barrels in ten years. In the same time ten houses had been closed in that area. He thought there was a redundancy of houses in that district.

Re-examined: He considered the house one of the best in the neighbourhood. It was licensed 114 years back. If the licence was taken away the trade would not go to one of his other houses, as there were none very near.

Mr. Ernest Reeves, the licensee, said he paid 187 to go into the house. He depended entirely on the house for his living, which was a very good one. The trade in spirits for the house, as shown by the spirit book, was 120 gallons. He had sold 2,500 packets of cigarettes from July to February, and 1,800 cigars, as well as 50 lbs. of tobacco in the same period. He had also sold 220 gallons of ginger beer, and 80 dozen minerals. Mail boatmen and better class working men patronised his house. He made a rule of opening at 6 a.m. in order to supply men coming off duty. He had a slate club associated with the house, and there were 90 names.

Mr. Mowll: Don't 90 pay?

Witness: About 60 pay.

Mr. Mowll: I suppose the others are honorary members, then? (Laughter)

Witness, continuing, added that he had to employ a barman.

Mr. Mowll, addressing the Bench, said the house was doing the best trade of any house, the licence of which had been questioned, and with which he had anything to do.

The Bench decided to refer the case to the East Kent Committee.

 

Folkestone Express 26 September 1908.

Wednesday, September 23rd: Before Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and Mr. H.J. Wells.

The licence of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, was temporarily transferred from Mr. Reeves to Mr. Howlett.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 September 1908.

Wednesday, September 23rd: Before Alderman Spurgen, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, and Mr. H.G. Wells.

The licence of the Chequers Inn was transferred temporarily from Mr. Reeve to Mr. Howlett.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 December 1908.

Wednesday, December 2nd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, J. Stainer and G. Boyd.

The transfer of the licence of the Chequers Inn was granted.

 

Folkestone Daily News 9 February 1910.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 9th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Ward, Fynmore, Linton, Hamilton, Stainer, and Leggett.

The Chief Constable read his annual report (for details see Folkestone Express).

All the licences were renewed, except the Wellington, Chequers, and Rose Hotel. These were adjourned till the adjourned licensing sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 12 February 1910.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 9th: Before The Mayor, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Major Leggett, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Messrs. E.T. Ward, J. Stainer, and R.J. Linton.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) submitted his annual report as follows:- Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 125 premises for the sale by retail of intoxicating liquors, viz: Full licences, 76; beer “on”, 7; beer “off”, 6; beer and spirit dealers, 15; grocers, etc., 11; chemists, 7; confectioners, 3; total, 125.

This gives an average, according to the Census of 1901, of one licence to every 245 persons, or one “on” licence to every 369 persons.

There are two other houses licensed by the Inland Revenue for the sale of beer, wine and spirits off the premises, under the provisions of the Excise Acts, for which no Magistrates' certificate is required.

Since the last annual licensing meeting ten of the licences have been transferred.

Five occasional licences have been granted for the sale of drink on premises not ordinarily licensed for such sale, and 45 extensions of the usual time of closing have been granted to licence holders when balls, dinners, etc., were being held on their premises.

During the year ended 31st December last 93 persons (73 males and 20 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness. Ninety were convicted and three discharged.

This, I am pleased to report, is a decrease of 14 persons proceeded against as compared with the preceding year, and a decrease of 32 persons proceeded against when compared with 1907.

Of those proceeded against 38 were residents of the borough, 10 residents of other districts, 36 of no fixed abode, and 9 soldiers.

Since the last annual meeting two licence holders have been convicted, namely: One permitting gambling – fined 5 and costs; one permitting drunkenness – fined 40/- and costs. In the latter case notice of appeal against the conviction has been given, and will be dealt with by the Recorder at the next Quarter Sessions.

Fourteen clubs where intoxicating liquor is sold are registered in accordance with the Act of 1902. These clubs have a total membership of 3,063, an increase of three clubs and an increase of 1,261 members, as compared with 1903, the year in which clubs were first registered.

There are 17 places licensed for music and dancing, and three for public billiard playing.

I am pleased to report that with very few exceptions the licensed houses during the past year have been conducted in a satisfactory manner.

I have received notice of two applications to be made at these sessions to sell beer off the premises.

I am, gentlemen, your obedient servant.

The licences were then renewed, with the exception of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street (Walter Howlett), Rose Hotel, Rendezvous Street (Percy William John Hunt), and the Wellington (Charles William Copping Skinner), which were deferred to the adjourned licensing sessions on March 7th.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 February 1910.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 9th: Before The Mayor, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggett, Messrs. R.J. Linton, E.T. Ward, and J. Stainer.

The Chief Constable (Mr. Harry Reeve) presented his report. (For details see Folkestone Express)

The licences were then renewed, with the following exceptions, the consideration of which was referred to the Adjourned Licensing Sessions on March 7th next; The Chequers Inn, 3, Seagate Street; full licence; licensee Mr. Howlett; opposed by the Chief Constable on the ground of redundancy. The Wellington Tavern, 1, Beach Street; beer licence; licensee Mr. Skinner; opposed by the Chief Constable on the ground of redundancy.

The Rose Hotel, 24, Rendezvous Street, full licence, (licensee Mr. Hunt), was referred by the Bench to the adjourned sessions on account of the conviction recorded against the licensee during the year for permitting gaming on the premises.

 

Folkestone Daily News 7 March 1910.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 7th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Ward, Hamilton, Linton, Herbert, Stainer, Leggett, and Boyd.

The Chequers.

The Chief Constable asked that this house should be closed on the grounds of redundancy. The house was not needed for the public requirements. He produced the usual boundaries, figures and statistics.

Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared for the owners, Messrs. Leney and Co., of Dover. The tenant was a Mr. Howlett.

The Chief Constable instanced that out of 93 charges of drunkenness, 37 were in that neighbourhood. There were two clubs in the area, with a membership of 1,252. The licence had been refused by the Folkestone Licensing Bench in 1907, but was granted at the Quarter Sessions at Canterbury in April, 1907. There were no complaints as to the conduct of the house, which is well conducted.

Mr. Mowll addressed the Bench as to the value of the house, and said of the many similar cases in which he had been engaged he had never had one so well conducted or one so unnecessary to close. The trade had increased since 1907.

Walter Howlett, the tenant, deposed that he had been in the Chequers since December, 1908. The valuation was 123, which he paid himself. He was a retired sea captain, and did not want to go to sea any longer. He took the house to make a living. He had a family to keep, and it was his only means of livelihood. He did a good trade. Last year he did six barrels a week, 4 gallons of spirits per week, 156 lbs. of tobacco, 160 boxes of cigarettes (50 in a box), 30 boxes of cigars, 260 lbs. of cheese, besides biscuits and minerals. His customers were sailors and the labouring classes.

Cross-examined: He opened at 6 a.m. and closed at 11 p.m.

Mr. Alfred Leney deposed to being the chairman of the firm of Leney and Co. Ltd., the owners of the house. The trade of the house for 1903 was 327 barrels; 1904, 300; 1905, 280; 1906, 288; 1907, 188; 1908, 192; 1909, 299. This worked out at an average of five barrels per week, while it averaged six barrel per week for last year. It was a good house, and had not fluctuated since 1859, when his firm bought the house. There was a sick club of 80 members held there, which paid 6s. per week.

The licence was granted, with a recommendation to close the back entrance.

Comment.

Every fair minded citizen will commend the Folkestone Bench for their action in refusing to close the Chequers Inn, in Seagate Street. It is preposterous that property and people's livings should be jeopardised by these periodical attempts brought about by the fanatical temperance legislation of 1904.

Six houses have been closed in the neighbourhood, and compensation awarded, to which Messrs. Leney and Co., and their tenants have had to contribute. Probably in consequence of this closing the business of the Chequers Inn has increased, and yet there seems to be no security.

According to the proceedings this morning it seems that the good and respectable conduct of a house counts for nothing, and that the convenience of customers counts for nothing, for the harassing and persecution still goes on, while the unfortunate tenant may be living on tenterhooks, fearing ruin at any moment.

The Chequers Inn is practically an old landmark amongst houses in Folkestone, and has always been the resort of the better class sailors and fishermen in Folkestone. They have lodged there when in harbour, and the capacious rooms have been used for meetings, conferences, etc., for the last half century; in fact, there is no house in the whole area of its class that possesses such accommodation. Then why should these continuous attacks be made? Three years ago the proprietors had to incur all the cost and trouble of defending their property. Today the Bench, at which the Mayor presided, seemed to be actuated by fair minded common sense, and refused to close the house.

 

Folkestone Express 12 March 1910.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 7th: Before The Mayor, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Major Leggett, Messrs. E.T. Ward, W.G. Herbert, and R.J. Linton.

Three licences had been referred to the justices for consideration – the Rose Hotel, the Wellington public house, and the Chequers.

The Chequers Inn.

The next to be considered was the licence of the Chequers Inn, which is occupied by Mr. W. Howlett. Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared for the owners (Messrs. Leney and Co.) and Mr. Howlett.

Det. Sergt. Burniston gave evidence as to serving Mr. Howlett on February 18th with a notice of opposition to the licence on the ground that it was not needed for the requirements of the neighbourhood.

Mr. Reeve, the Chief Constable, put in an ordnance plan on which he had marked out a congested area, shown by a blue line, which commenced at the Harbour, went up Bayle Steps, the Bayle Parade, across the top of High Street, along Dover Road to the Raglan Hotel, down Dover Street, and along Radnor Bridge Road to the sea. Within that area there were 813 houses, with a population approximately of 4,465 persons. Within the said area there were 31 “on” licensed houses, 27 of them being full licences and four beer houses. There were seven other licences, making a total of 38 premises licensed for the sale of drink within the area, which gave a proportion of one licence to every 23 houses, or every 117 persons, or one “on” licence to every 28 houses, or every 144 persons. For the borough at large there were 83 “on” licences, and 40 other licences, making a total of 123 premises licensed for the sale of liquor by retail, giving a proportion of one to every 249 persons, or one “on” licence to every 269 persons. That was according to the Census of 1901, when the population of the borough was given at 30,650. Within the congested area there were two registered clubs, with a total membership of 1,252. During the past year he found that out of 93 charges of drunkenness preferred before the Borough Justices, 37 of them arose within that small congested area. The ground of opposition to the Chequers was that the licence was not needed for the requirements of the neighbourhood. The house was situate in Seagate Street. The present licensee was Walter Howlett, who obtained a transfer of the licence on December 2nd, 1908. The registered owners were Messrs. Leney and Co., Dover. The rateable value of the house was 28. The licence was referred to the Compensation Committee on March 4th, 1907, but was renewed at the preliminary meeting of the Committee held on May 15th, 1907. The house was next door to the South Foreland. Seagate Street was a short street. The Chequers Inn had a right of way from the back of the house, by the side of a house into Harbour Street. There were only four houses in Seagate Street, all on one side of the road. Two of them were fully licensed houses, one being the Chequers, and the other the South Foreland. The Chequers was an old house and had two entrances from Seagate Street, one opening into a bar and the other into a passage which led right through the house to the back yard. Opening upon that passage on the left hand side were two rooms, one front and one back. The front was called the parlour and the other the club room. The two rooms were low-pitched and the back one, particularly, was dark. The South Foreland was rated at 72, and the Wellington beerhouse, at the back of the Chequers, was rated at 32. Within a radius of 100 yards there were nine other “on” licensed houses, and within 150 yards there were 18 other “on” licensed houses, and within 200 yards there were 24. The customers of the house were men employed chiefly in and about the Harbour. He had nothing to complain of with regard to the conduct of the house as he was satisfied the house was well conducted. He considered the licence unnecessary for the requirements of the neighbourhood, having regard to the number of houses, and he considered the house to be structurally inferior to the houses of that particular cluster.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll, the Chief Constable said that since 1907 there had been a reduction of six houses in the area. The changes of licensee since 1881 he did not regard as being out of the way at all. He regarded it as a good sign that there were not many changes. When the case was before the justices the trade was a decreasing one, but he thought it was a fair trade then. The landlord told him a sick and dividend club was held on the premises, which were kept very clean.

Mr. Mowll said he did not think he had ever had a case where licensed premises conducting such a trade as that had been seriously questioned. That house was brought before the Compensation Authority three years ago, and without a single word on the part of the advocates the licence was renewed. If the Magistrates were to schedule that house and send it up to the Quarter Sessions, he could not help thinking the Quarter Sessions would renew the licence. He thought they would be doing an injustice to the tenant if they were, for the time being, to earmark the house, because in such cases there was a sort of feeling that they did not like remaining on a sinking ship, so the customers went elsewhere. He asked the justices to renew the licence and to grant that man, who had conducted his house so well and met with so much commendation from the Superintendent, that he should be allowed to continue his trade there.

Mr. Howlett said he held the licence since September 25th, 1908. When he took the house the valuation came to 123, which he provided himself. He was formerly a master mariner. His living was wholly and solely dependent upon the house. He was doing a good trade. During the year 1909 the trade was just on six barrels a week. The spirit trade was nearly 4 gallons a week. He also did a little over 3lbs. of tobacco a week, and during the year sold 160 boxes (50 packets in a box) of cigarettes, 30 boxes of cigars, and just on 260 lbs. of cheese. He had kept a record of customers daily since February 14th, and the numbers were as follows:- 105, 207, 182, 206, 303, 345, 125 (a Sunday), 233, 211, 201, 245, 272, 343, 183, 225, 225, 217, 203, 247, 373, and 158 (a Sunday). They had also had about 70 in that morning. That was a bona fide list. He had not asked anyone to go into the house. As a rule working class people used his house, and the harbour people, ship owners and captains of ships went in.

Cross-examined, he did not think there would be sufficient houses in that neighbourhood on Friday and Saturday nights if his house was closed.

Mr. A.C. Leney said he was chairman of Messrs, Leney and Co., who were the owners of the house. He had got out a statement showing the trade of the house for the past seven years. In 1903 it was 327 barrels; 1904, 300; 1905, 280; 1906, 288; 1907, 188; 1908, 192; 1909, 294. That worked out for the seven years an average of over five barrels a week. Last year it was just under six barrels a week. From his experience he should say that was what the brewers would call a really good house. The house had not fluctuated much since it was originally purchased in 1859, except in 1907 and 1908, when the tenant was not applicable to the trade. They had a sick club, with a membership of about 80, in connection with the house. In the barrelage given they had included the bottle trade.

Cross-examined, Mr. Leney said they had four other houses in the congested area.

The Magistrates retired, and on their return the Mayor said they had decided to grant the application for the licence that year, but they had a strong feeling about the back entrance to the premises. If the proprietors could see their way to the Bench in that respect it would be a step in the right direction.

Mr. Mowll said the entrance was always closed at sunset, and he and Mr. Leney then conferred with the Magistrates on the subject.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 March 1910.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 7th: Before The Mayor, Lieut. Col. C.J. Hamilton, Major Leggett, Messrs. J. Stainer, W.G. Herbert, T. Ames, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd.

The Chequers Inn.

The granting of the Chequers Inn, 3, Seagate Street, had been referred to these adjourned sessions.

In giving the reasons for the opposition, the Chief Constable put in a scale map, showing what he described as the congested area. This was defined by a blue line commencing at the Harbour, proceeding up the Bayle Steps, along the Bayle Parade, the top of High Street, then to Dover Road to the Raglan Hotel corner, down Dover Street, and along Radnor Bridge Roat to the sea. He said that within that area there were 893 houses, with a population approximately of 4,465 persons. Within that area there were 31 on licensed houses; 27 full licences, and four for beer. There were seven other licences, making a total of 38 premises licensed for the sale of drink in the area. That gave a proportion of one licence to every 23 houses, or every 117 persons, or one on licence to every 28 houses, or every 144 persons. In the borough at large there were 83 on licences, and 40 other licences, a total of 123 premises licensed for the sale of liquor by retail, giving a proportion of one licence to every 249 persons, or one on licence to every 369 persons. That was according to the Census of 1901, when the population of the borough was given as 30,650. Within the congested area there were two registered clubs, with a total membership of 1,252. During the past year, 1909, he found that out of 93 charges of drunkenness preferred before the borough justices, 37 arose within the small congested area. The house in question was known as the Chequers Inn, situated in Seagate Street, and the ground of opposition was that it was not wanted for the requirements of the neighbourhood. The present licensee was Mr. Walter Howlett, who obtained a transfer on December 2nd, 1908. The registered owners were Messrs. Leney and Co., of Dover. The rateable value of the house was 28. This licence was referred to the Compensation Committee on March 5th, 1907, but was renewed at the preliminary meeting of the Committee on May 15th, 1907. The Chequers Inn had a right of way from the back of the house to Harbour Street. Seagate Street was a short street, running from Dover Street to Beach Street. There were only four houses in the street, all on one side, two of them being fully licensed public houses, one the Chequers, and the other the South Foreland, which was next door. The Chequers was an old house, and had two entrances from Seagate Street; one opened into the bar, and the other into a passage, which led right through the house into the back yard. Opening from that passage on the left hand side were two rooms, one front and one back; the front one was called the parlour, and the back the club room. Both these rooms were low-pitched, and the back room particularly was dark. The back yard extended down the side of the Wellington beerhouse, where there was a gate from the yard to the street. The adjoining house, the South Foreland, was rated at 72 a year; the Wellington beerhouse at the back was rated at 32. Within a radius of 100 yards of the Chequers there were nine other on-licensed houses; within a radius of 15o yards there were 18 other on licensed houses, and within a radius of 200 yards there were 24. The customers of the house were men employed chiefly in and about the Harbour. He had nothing to complain of in regard to the conduct of the house; indeed, he was satisfied that it was well conducted. He considered the licence to be unnecessary for the requirements of the neighbourhood, bearing in mind the number of houses remaining, and that The Chequers was structurally inferior to the other houses of this particular cluster.

In answer to Mr. Mowll, the Chief Constable said that the evidence he had just given was almost exactly similar to that which he gave when he opposed the grant of the licence in 1907, except that the number of licensed houses had altered. There had been a reduction in the number of these since he gave evidence on the matter in 1907.

Mr. Mowll: Yet this licence was renewed then?

The Chief Constable: It was renewed at the preliminary meeting of the Compensation Committee, and not on a consideration of its merits.

In answer to further questions from Mr. Mowll, Mr. Reeve admitted that the house had not often changed hands. It had as tenant from 1881 to 1894 a Mr. Friend, then for five years Mr. Kirby, then for seven years Mr. Dorrell, then for two years Mr. Reeves, and then for fifteen months to the present time Mr. Howlett. It was considered a good sign in a house if there were not many changes. He could not say what trade the house did, but in giving evidence in 1907 Mr. Leney said that the trade was a decreasing one. It was a very fair trade at that time. The landlord had told him that there was a sick and dividend club run at the house. The house was always kept very clean.

This concluded the case for the opposition.

In applying for the renewal of the licence, Mr. Mowll said after the terrible blow that fell upon him in the last case he felt he was entitled to ask for very special consideration in the case now before the Bench. In all his experience he had never before come across a case where licensed premises doing such a trade as this house had been seriously questioned. When the house was referred three years ago the Compensation Committee, without hearing a word from the advocates, renewed the licence. He should say that the reason they did that was because the house was doing such a large trade that if it were refused a licence it would swallow up a large sum of money at the disposal of the Committee. Presuming that the Compensation Committee had to deal with the case again, their valuer, Mr. Cobb, would be obliged to advise them that a very considerable sum would be wanted to take away the licence. Then, supposing that the licence was taken away, and the trade went to other houses in the neighbourhood, were the Magistrates going to say that they did not want any more houses in the neighbourhood refused licences? Possibly so, but supposing they were going to schedule another house in the neighbourhood next year they would have to pay for the trade over again. That was not what the Act of 1904 was intended to do; the Act of 1904 was intended to enable them to thin out the licensed houses, always taking the weakest. Again it was a poor test to say that because there were so many inhabited houses, and so many licensed houses in the district, therefore there were too many licensed houses for the locality. If they were dealing with a working class district they ought to remember that near the Harbour was where the great majority of the beer-drinking population desired to take their liquor. Therefore that district was not merely supplied with public houses for those who lived there, but for nearly the whole of the working class population of Folkestone. He thought that the way in which the house was conducted spoke for itself, and owing to the trade that was done, and the way the house was conducted, the licence ought to be renewed. He then proceeded to call evidence in support of his case.

Mr. Howlett said that he had been tenant of the premises since September 25th, 1908. When he took them over the valuation came to 123 odd, which he provided himself. He had been formerly a master mariner, and was now wholly and solely dependent on the house for his living. He had a wife, and a boy at school, and he helped to support a father-in-law. He was doing a good trade now. During 1909 the trade in beer was just on six barrels a week; the house was free for spirits, and the trade done in that amounted to nearly 4 gallons a week. He did a good trade in cheese, and odds and ends – in a year he sold 156 lbs. of tobacco, 160 boxes of 50 packets each of cigarettes, 30 boxes of cigars and 260 lbs. of cheese. He had kept a record of how his customers had been coming in. The number on a weekday varied from 250 to 350. As a rule the were working class people who used the house, harbour people, seamen, captains of vessels, and so on.

In answer to the Chief Constable, Mr. Howlett said that he opened his house at six o'clock in the morning, and kept it open till 11 p.m. He did not think that there would be sufficient houses in the neighbourhood to supply his customers if his house was closed.

Mr. Alfred Leney said that he was Chairman of Messrs. Leney and Co., owners of the Chequers. He produced a statement showing the trade for seven years past, as follows:- 1903, 327 barrels of beer; 1904, 300; 1905, 280; 1906, 288; 1907, 188 (the year the house was scheduled before); 1908, 192; 1909, 294. On the seven years average, the amount sold worked out at 5.82 barrels per week. Witness had been in the trade for 34 years, and considered that the house was doing a very good trade. His firm had purchased the house in 1859 with the brewery, and since then the trade had not been a fluctuating one, with the exception of 1907, when the tenant was unpopular. The back part of the premises used to be the brewery store. There was a sick club at the house, with a membership of about 80.

In answer to the Chief Constable, Mr. Leney said that in 1907 he told the Bench that he thought there were too many licensed houses in the neighbourhood, but he did not think that there were too many now. Six houses in the neighbourhood had been refused licences since then, but not one of those that were refused belonged to Messrs. Leney. His firm owned five other houses in what the Chief Constable described as the congested area.

The Bench then retired to consider the case. They were only absent for a few minutes, and on their return the Mayor said: The Bench have decided to grant the application for the licence this year, but they have a strong feeling about the existence of a back entrance to these premises, and if the proprietors could see their way to meet the Bench by closing it, it would be a step in the right direction.

Mr. Mowll said that the gate leading into Beach Street was closed at sunset, and only Mr. Leney's storeman, who lived on the adjoining premises, had a right of way there. He promised that the remarks of the Bench should be duly noted.

 

Folkestone Daily News 14 May 1910.

Saturday, May 14th: Before The Mayor, Colonel Fynmore, Ald, Penfold, and Ald, Vaughan.

Frederick Stephen Allen, known as “Badger”, was charged with stealing a till containing 10s. from the Chequers Inn on the 13th inst.

Walter Howlett, the landlord deposed to seeing accused at the Chequers at 6.15 a.m. He had two pints of beer and stayed two hours, when he left, and returned at 9.20. He entered the bar where witness was serving, and stayed twenty minutes, when he again left. From what witness heard, he examined the till produced, from which he missed about 18s. and a 2 franc piece.

Mrs. Howlett, wife of the previous witness, deposed to being in the bar when Allen came in, and served him with a pint of beer, for which he paid with a shilling. She gave him change from the till, and then went into the kitchen, leaving prisoner there alone. He left in about five minutes. No-one else had entered in the meantime. Soon afterwards another customer came in, whom she served, and she then missed the money and spoke to her husband, who came and examined the till.

Florence George, an assistant at Gosnold Bros., 56, Tontine Street, deposed to prisoner coming to the shop and buying three red handkerchiefs, for which he paid with a two shilling piece. He afterwards came back and bought three more, paying with a two shilling piece again.

Lilian Porter, manageress of the 6d. shop in Tontine Street, deposed to serving prisoner with a saucepan, for which he paid with a two shilling piece.

R.J. Gurr, butcher, in the employ of Barber and Co., deposed to Allen buying two breasts of mutton and two pounds of sausages for 2s. 9d., for which he paid with a two shilling piece and a shilling.

P.C. Waters deposed to arresting Allen, who, on being charged, replied that he knew nothing about it. On being searched 2s. 11d. was found on him and the 2 franc piece produced, which Mr. Howlett recognised. Prisoner said he had carried the 2 franc piece for two months.

He was committed to the Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Express 21 May 1910.

Saturday, May 14th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Frederick Stephen Allen, a labourer, was charged with stealing 18/- and one two franc piece from the till of the Chequers public house.

Walter Howlett, landlord of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, said he knew the prisoner as a customer. He came to his house the previous evening at a quarter past six and he had some beer. Prisoner remained in the house about two hours, and he had two pints and a half of beer. He left about twenty minutes past eight, and returned an hour afterwards. He entered the bar at the front of the house, and there was only one other person in the bar at the time. Witness was in the kitchen, from which the bar door and a part of the bar were visible, and he saw the prisoner enter. His wife was in the bar. Prisoner remained in the bar about twenty minutes. He saw him go out, he leaving by the front door. About four or five minutes later his barman came to him and made a statement, and in consequence of what he said witness went behind the counter and examined two bowls in which he kept the money. The bowls were placed on a shelf behind the bar. They were in full view of anyone on the public side of the counter. The bowls contained seven shillings in silver and two shillings in bronze. At six o'clock that morning one of the bowls contained five shilling pieces and a two shilling piece. On the top of the bowl was a two franc piece, a French Republican coin. The other bowl contained ten sixpenny pieces and three shillings worth of bronze. Witness put in twelve shillings in silver and bronze prior to prisoner coming into the bar the second time, so that there was, as near as he could tell, 27/- altogether. Among the 12/- added were three two shilling pieces. Eighteen shillings in silver and bronze and the two franc piece were missing. The coin produced resembled the coin which he had missed, and which he had had for four or five months.

Eliza Ann Howlett, wife of the last witness, said about a quarter past nine the previous morning she saw the prisoner enter the bar. She served him with a pint of beer. Another man named Russell was in the bar at the time. Russell left about two or three minutes after prisoner came in. Prisoner paid for the beer and she gave him change. Russell had not left then. The two bowls were on the shelf behind the bar. At the time witness gave prisoner his change she noticed the two franc piece lying on the top of one of the bowls. After Russell had left she entered the kitchen, leaving the prisoner alone in the bar. About five minutes after she heard the door of the bar open, and getting up, she saw prisoner go out. During that five minutes no-one else had entered the bar or the house. About eight minutes after another man came into the bar and witness went into the bar and served him. On going to the till for the purpose of getting change she missed the two franc piece. She then went and spoke to her husband, who came and examined the contents of the bowl.

Jessie Florence George, an assistant in the employ of Messrs. Gosnold Bros., drapers, 56, Tontine Street, said she recognised the prisoner, who came to the shop the previous morning about ten o'clock. He purchased the three red handkerchiefs (produced) and he tendered a two shilling piece and received change. About five minutes after he returned to the shop and purchased three more of the handkerchiefs. He again tendered a two shilling piece and received change. The price of the handkerchiefs was 3d. each.

Lilian Porter, manageress of the domestic bazaar, 42, Tontine Street, said she recognised the prisoner, who came to the bazaar the previous morning about ten o'clock. He purchased the enamel stew pan (produced). He tendered a two shilling piece, and witness gave him change. The price of the article was 6d.

Richard Sidney Gurr, assistant in the employ of Messrs. Barter and Co., butchers, 33, Tontine Street, said he recognised the prisoner, who came to the shop the previous day about a quarter past ten. He purchased two breasts of mutton and two pounds of sausages, which came to 2/9. He paid for them with a two shilling piece and a shilling.

Inspector Lawrence said from information he received shortly after 11.30 the previous day he went to the Chequers Inn and examined the floor on the private side of the bar counter. On the mat were three footprints, apparently made by someone stepping over from the public side of the counter, which was covered with sawdust. There were also sawdust marks on the corner of the seat of the chair standing near the counter on the private side of the bar. The bowls were placed on a shelf six feet away from the inner edge of the bar counter. Later he went to 39, Peter Street, where prisoner was lodging, where he was handed a parcel containing two breasts of mutton, some sausages, and a stew pan. A quantity of potatoes were tied up in a new red handkerchief, which had been identified by Miss George.

P.C. Waters said the previous morning, about a quarter past eleven, he saw the prisoner in Dover Street. He stopped him and said “Where have you been, Allen?” Prisoner replied “Round about the town”. Witness then asked him if he had been in the Chequers that morning. Allen said “Yes. Two or three times”. While he was speaking to prisoner the witness Howlett came up, and said “That is the man who has stolen my money”. Witness asked Howlett what the amount was and he replied “About 14/-“. He then told Allen that he should take him to the police station and charge him with stealing the money. He replied “I know nothing about it”. Witness took prisoner to the police station and on searching him he found two two shilling pieces and eleven-pence in coppers, the silver two franc piece (produced), and three new pocket handkerchiefs. When he took the two franc piece from his pocket Howlett said “That is my two franc piece”. Prisoner did not make any reply. Witness then formally charged him, and in reply he said he had had that two franc piece for six months.

The Chief Constable said that completed the case for the prosecution, and if the Magistrates were satisfied that a prima facie case had been made out against the prisoner, he asked them to commit him to the next Quarter Sessions.

Prisoner, who had nothing to say, was then committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 May 1910.

Saturday, May 14th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Vaughan and Penfold, and Lieut. Colonel Fynmore.

Frederick Stephen Allen was charged with stealing money from the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street.

Walter Howlett, landlord of the Chequers Inn, said prisoner was a customer. He came into the house on the previous morning at about 6.15, and was served with some beer, remaining in the house about two hours. He left about 8.20, as near as witness could say, coming back in about an hour, and entering by the front door. There was one other man in the bar at the time. Witness himself was in the kitchen, but was able to see prisoner enter. Witness' wife was in charge of the bar at the time. Prisoner was in the bar about twenty minutes, after which witness saw him leave. He left by the same door as he had entered. About four or five minutes after he had left, witness's wife came to him, and from what she said witness went behind the counter of the bar, and looked into two bowls in which the money taken in the bar was kept. These bowls were in full view of everyone on the public side of the bar. There was only 9s. in both of them. He had put in 15s. overnight. The sum was made up of five shillings, a two shilling piece, ten sixpences, and three shillings worth of coppers. There was also a two franc piece, which was placed on top of the bowls. Witness estimated that he had taken 12s. that morning in the bar, most of which had, to his knowledge, been in two shilling pieces. He knew positively that there had been three taken. About 18s. in English money had therefore been stolen, and a twp franc piece of the French Republic.

Eliza Anne Howlett, wife of the previous witness, said that she was in the kitchen about 9.15 on the previous day, when she saw prisoner come into the bar. She served him with a pint of beer. A man named Russell was in the bar at the time, and she was talking to him. Prisoner paid her for the beer he had. Russell then left the bar. Witness noticed at the time she was serving prisoner that the two franc piece was on the bowl, and that there was a 3d. piece placed on it. She then left the bar and went into the kitchen. After she had been in the kitchen about five minutes, she heard prisoner go. There had not been anyone in the bar during the five minutes she had left it, excepting the prisoner. Seven or eight minutes after accused had left, witness went into the bar to serve another customer. She went to the bowls to give him some change, and missed the two franc piece and the 3d. piece with it. She went to the kitchen and told her husband.

Jessie Florence George, an assistant at Messrs. Gosnold Bros, 56, Tontine Street, said prisoner came to the shop about 10 o'clock on the previous morning. He bought three red pocket handkerchiefs (produced) paying for them with a two shilling piece. He came about five minutes afterwards and bought three more (produced), tendering another two shilling piece in payment. The three handkerchiefs were priced at 11d.

Lilian Porter, manageress at the Domestic Bazaar, 42, Tontine Street, said prisoner came to the shop about ten o'clock on the previous day and bought an enamel saucepan (produced), priced at 6d., handing her a two shilling piece in payment.

Richard Sidney Gurr, employed by Messrs. Bartter and Co., butchers, 33, Tontine Street, deposed that prisoner, who came to the shop about 10.15 on the previous morning, bought two breasts of mutton and two pounds of sausage meat (produced). The articles came to 2s. 9d. Prisoner tendered a two shilling piece and a shilling in payment.

Inspector Lawrence stated that he went to the Chequers Inn at about 11.30 on the previous morning. On a fibre mat behind the counter was the imprint of two feet in sawdust. Sawdust was used to cover the public portion of the bar. There was also the print of a foot on the edge of a chair, as if someone had stood on it to reach the two bowls. The space between the public and private portion of the bar was about six feet.

P.C. Waters said that he saw the prisoner in Dover Street at about 11.15 a.m. on the previous day. He asked him where he had been to that day. Prisoner replied “About the town”. While they were speaking Mr. Howlett came up and said “That is the man who stole my money”. Witness then told accused he would take him to the police station and charge him with stealing money from the Chequers Inn. Prisoner said “I don't know anything about it”. Witness took him to the station and searched him, finding three new red handkerchiefs, two separate shillings, 11d. in bronze, and a two franc piece. When asked to account for the possession of the foreign money he said he had had it for six months.

Prisoner was committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Daily News 2 July 1910.

Quarter Sessions.

Saturday, July 2nd: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Frederick Allen, known as “Badger”, was charged with stealing money from a till at the Chequers Inn early in the morning.

It will be remembered by our readers that the evidence given before the Magistrates showed that Allen went into the public house, purchased some beer, and in the absence of the landlady got over the counter and emptied the till. He was seen afterwards by the police spending money very freely.

There were several previous convictions against him, and the Recorder now asked Mr. Easton if he would take him under probation.

Mr. Easton promised to have a talk with the prisoner to see if he would consent to go into a home, and Allen was taken to the cells for that purpose.

On Mr. Easton's return he told the Recorder that he would be able to find Allen work on condition that he signed the pledge, and asked the Recorder to make that a condition when binding him over.

The Recorder then bound Allen over for twelve months.

 

Folkestone Express 9 July 1910.

Quarter Sessions.

Saturday, July 2nd: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Frederick Stephen Allen, 47, a labourer, was charged with stealing, on May 13th, 18/- in money and a French two franc piece, the property of Walter Howlett, of the Chequers Inn. Prisoner pleaded Guilty to stealing 11/-, and also to a previous conviction in April at the police court.

Mr. Weigall, who prosecuted, said they would accept the prisoner's plea. Allen went into the public house, and taking advantage of the momentary absence of the landlady from the bar, helped himself to the money, which was put inside a bowl in the bar.

The Chief Constable said he put in a certificate of conviction against the prisoner on April 8th of that year, to which he had pleaded Guilty. He was a Folkestonian, and there were several convictions against him. The first was in 1881, when he received twelve strokes as a boy for stealing. Then in 1882 he received one month for stealing; in 1889 for being drunk in charge of a horse; on January 5th, 1891, at the Quarter Sessions, six months' hard labour for stealing rabbits; July 14th, 1894, at the Quarter Sessions, another six months for stealing; June, 1895, at Maidstone Assizes, 12 months for an attempted unnatural offence; 6th July, 1896, at Margate, two consecutive terms of three months for stealing. He kept out of trouble until that year, when on the 8th April he was convicted summarily for stealing a bag of coalite. For fourteen years he kept out of prison and ran very straight. He got married, settled down, and went on with no complaints about him at all. His wife died about eighteen months ago and he then seemed to have taken to the drink. He had one situation for upwards of three years and his master gave him a very good character.

Allen had nothing to say.

Mr. Easton, the Police Court Missionary, said he would try to do something for the prisoner, and the Recorder then asked Mr. Easton to see Allen in the cells.

On their return into Court, Mr. Easton said he thought it was possible to get the man work in the town, and Allen had promised to sign the pledge and not touch any more drink.

The Recorder then bound the prisoner over to be of good behaviour for twelve months under Mr. Easton's supervision, expressing the hope that he would not see Allen there again, and that he was not doing wrong in that instance.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 July 1910.

Quarter Sessions.

Saturday, July 2nd: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Frederick Stephen Allen, aged 47 years, a labourer, was indicted for, on the 13th May, 1910, at Folkestone, feloniously stealing the sum of 18s. in money, and one two franc piece of the French Republic, the monies of Walter Howlett.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty to stealing 11s., and also admitted being convicted for felony at Folkestone Petty Sessions in April last.

Mr. Weigall, who prosecuted, said that the prisoner went into a public house kept by Mr. Walter Howlett, and known as the Chequers Inn, on the morning of May 13th. He had a pint of beer, and sat there about two hours. He then went away for a short time, and returned again in about twenty minutes. Taking advantage of the momentary absence of the landlady, he took the money that was put out in a bowl for the purpose of giving change. To do that he had to climb over the bar, but the money was in his view vefore. He then proceeded with the money to make several purchases of necessaries. He was arrested with the balance in his possession, and said that he knew nothing about the theft.

The Chief Constable, in the witness box, said that the prisoner was a Folkestone man, and there were several previous convictions against him. The first was on November 1st, 1881, when he received twelve strokes with the birch as a boy for stealing. In 1882 he was sentenced for stealing; in 1889 for being drunk in charge of a horse; in 1891 he was sentenced at the Folkestone Quarter Sessions to six months' imprisonment for stealing; in 1894, at the Folkestone Quarter Sessions, six months' imprisonment for stealing glaziers' diamonds; in 1895 at Maidstone Assizes for an attempted unnatural offence; and in 1896 at Margate for stealing. Then he kept out of trouble till April of this year, when he was convicted summarily at the Folkestone Police Court for stealing a bag of coalite. He ran very straight, therefore, for fourteen years. He was away from the town for some time. He came back again, and married and settled down, and went on without any complaints. He lost his wife about 18 months ago and seemed to take to drink after that. He had one situation at Folkestone for upwards of three years, and his employer gave him a very good character till he took to drink after the loss of his wife.

The prisoner said that he had nothing to say.

The Recorder: I remember giving you a tremendous lecture when you were here some sixteen years ago. Time flies so quickly.

He then called the Police Court Missionary (Mr. W.L. Easton) forward, and asked him if he could do anything for the prisoner.

Mr. Easton said that he would try if the man was willing, and the prisoner was accordingly taken below for Mr. Easton to have a talk with him. Later on he was brought up again, and Mr. Easton said that he thought that it would be possible to get the prisoner into a home for a short time. He said that he had had a good character for five years and would sign a paper to give up the drink. He (Mr. Easton) suggested that if the prisoner was bound over, a condition should be made that he gave up the drink.

The Recorder agreed with this course, and desired the landlord of the Chequers Inn (Mr. Howlett) to stand forward.

In answer to the questions of the Recorder, Mr. Howlett said that he had known the prisoner as a customer. Witness himself had only been in the house about two years. He had known the prisoner as a customer for about twelve months. He kept the bowl of money containing the change in full view of his customers.

The Recorder: The sooner you put it in some other place the better. No prudent people leave their money lying about.

Addressing the prisoner, he said: I am going to take a lenient view of this case. I hope I shall not be wrong. It appears that you did try and pull yourself together some years ago. You are only 47 years of age, and there is still time for you to retrieve.. I am going to let you out on probation, and bind you over to be of good behaviour under Mr. Easton's charge for a year. The condition is that you give up the drink. Are you willing to do that?

Prisoner: Yes, sir.

The Recorder: That being so, you can step out of the dock, and I hope I shall not see your face here again.

There was slight applause in Court at this announcement, but it was, of course, at once suppressed.

 

Folkestone Express 8 October 1910.

Wednesday, October 5th: Before W.G. Herbert, G.I. Swoffer, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton and G. Boyd Esqs., and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Mr. Mowll said he had an application to make in regard to the Chequers public house. They might remember that the application for the renewal of the licence was before the licensing Bench this year, and the licence was then renewed, as the house was doing a very considerable trade. But the Chairman (Mr. Ward) made some reference to the back entrance. He (Mr. Mowll) rather thought the feeling was that possibly persons might go into that office, which was no part of the premises at all. The matter was then thought to be one which should be carefully considered by the owners of the premises, and they were now in the position to submit for the Magistrates' approval plans with the proposal that there should be an iron gateway from the urinal to the corner of the stable, which it was proposed to close every evening at six o'clock, and Messrs. Leney, the owners, proposed to keep the key of that themselves, and to send a man to close the gate every night and open it in the morning. It was necessary to have that back way.

Mr. Leney said on Sunday the gate would only be open during opening hours.

The Magistrates approved the plans.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 October 1910.

Wednesday, October 5th: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd.

Mr. Rutley Mowll said he wished to make an application in respect of the Chequers Inn. The renewal of the licence was before the Magistrates this year, and the licence was granted, it being shown that the house did a considerable trade, but the Chairman (Mr. Ward) made some reference to the back entrance. He rather thought that there was a feeling that possibly persons might go into the office at the back – which was not part of the licensed premises at all – after hours, and come out by the back way after licensing hours. At any rate, the matter was then considered, and the owners of the premises were now in a position to submit for their approval plans for this proposal, viz., that there should be an iron gateway from the urinal to the corner of the stable, which it was proposed to close every evening at six o'clock. Messrs. Leney, the owners, intended to keep the key of this, and to send a man to close the gave every night at 6 o'clock, and open it again in the morning. Mr. Mowll pointed out that it was necessary to have a backway owing to the construction of the building. He thought that this proposal met the situation.

The Magistrates agreed to the proposal on condition that the gate was shut during closing hours on Sunday.

This suggestion was agreed to by Messrs. Leney.

 

Folkestone Express 21 November 1914.

Monday, November 16th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Alderman Jenner, and Colonel Owen.

Charles William Bonney, a lance corporal in the Herts. Regiment, was charged with stealing a pigeon.

P.C. Holland said on Sunday evening, about 8.30, he was in Seagate Street, when he was called to a shop in Beach Street, kept by Mr. Fagg. He there saw the prisoner with the live pigeon buttoned under his coat. He asked him where he had got it from, and he said he saw it sitting in the street, and he picked it up. Mr. Howlett, the landlord of the Chequers Inn, was with him (witness) at the time, and identified the pigeon as his property, and gave the prisoner into his custody and charged him with stealing it. Prisoner, when told he would have to go to the police station on a charge of stealing the pigeon, said “I am quite willing. I saw it in the street, and picked it up”.

Walter Howlett, the landlord of the Chequers Inn, said the pigeon (produced) was his property, and he valued it at 2/-. He kept the pigeon in a big wooden box in the yard, which was closed after six o'clock in the evening. The box contained seven pigeons, and it was properly secured when he fed the pigeons about half past three or four o'clock in the afternoon. The pigeons could not have got out of the box. He was told at a quarter past eight that the pigeon run was open, and in consequence he went to Mr. Fagg's shop, where he saw the pigeon taken from the prisoner by the constable. Bonney had been in his house during the evening,, and had been in the front room and the passage leading to the yard.

William Howlett, aged 14, the son of the last witness, said he saw the prisoner in the house about 8.15 the previous evening. Bonney had been in the house about an hour and a quarter with others, and about a quarter past eight he noticed that the man had something in his breast under his tunic. Prisoner left the house. He (witness) spoke to his father, and they followed the man to Mr. Fagg's shop, where the pigeon was taken from him. Some pigeons had been stolen on Friday night, and the prisoner came into the house with the men who were then accused. Bonney had not anything under his tunic when he came into the house. The prisoner went out of the room three times in a quarter of an hour, and once went into the back yard about a quarter of an hour before he left the house. The other soldiers went in and out of the room. He could not see what was under the prisoner's tunic, which bulged out.

The Chairman said there was a strong suspicion in the case, but they would give prisoner the benefit of the doubt, and he would be discharged.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 November 1914.

Monday, November 16th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Alderman C. Jenner, and Col. G.P. Owen.

Charles William Bonney, a private in the Royal Herts. Regt., was charged with stealing a pigeon, the property of Mr. Howlett, the landlord of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street.

P.C. Holland said on Saturday night he was called to the fish shop in Beach Street kept by Mr. Fagg, where he saw the prisoner, who had a live pigeon in the front of his tunic. Witness asked him where he got it from, and he said he saw it in the street and picked it up. Mr. Howlett, who was present at the time, identified the bird as his property and witness took prisoner into custody. When charged he said “I found the bird in the street, and picked it up”. He was sober at the time.

Walter Howlett, the landlord of the Chequers Inn, said he identified the pigeon as his property, and valued it at 2s. He kept it with six others in a cage in the back yard, which was locked every evening from 6 p.m. The door of the cage was secured by nails and a piece of string. The birds were always kept there, and not let out. He secured them when he fed them in the afternoon. The pigeon could not have got out of the cage. From something his son told him, he missed the pigeon about 8.30 and proceeded to Mr. Fagg's fish shop, where he saw the prisoner with the pigeon, which the last witness took from him. Prisoner said he picked it up in the street. Witness looked at the pigeon's head and saw it was his. Accused had been in the Chequers Inn earlier in the evening. Prisoner had been in the front parlour, in the passage, and in the yard.

William Howlett, the son of the last witness, aged 14 years, said he saw the prisoner in the parlour of the house about 8.15 p.m. He had been there for about 1 hours with other soldiers. Prisoner had something under his tunic, but witness did not see what it was. Risoner left the house, and witness told his father, who followed him to Mr. Fagg's fish shop in Beach Street, where the bird was taken from prisoner. Witness saw him come into the house with other men, and he had nothing under his tunic then. Prisoner was in the parlour during the time he was in the house, and there were other soldiers there. He went out three or four times, and witness saw him go into the back yard. It was about 8.20 when witness saw him with something under his coat.

The Chairman said they were going to give prisoner the benefit of the doubt, and he would be discharged.

 

Folkestone Express 21 August 1915.

Obituary.

We regret to say that Mrs. Howlett, wife of Mr. W. Howlett, of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, Folkestone, passed away on August 11th at 28, Bloomsbury Rod, Ramsgate. The deceased, who was 50 years of age, had only been ill a few days, and the end came very suddenly. She had only been at Ramsgate two days prior to her death.

 

Folkestone Express 13 January 1917.

Local News.

Yesterday (Thursday) Mr. Walter Howlett, the landlord of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, was found lying dead on the floor of his bedroom. The deceased had been ill for some time.

 

Folkestone Express 10 February 1917.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 7th: Before E.T. Ward, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, G. Boyd, H. Kirke, and J.J. Giles Esqs., and the Rev. Epworth Thompson.

Mr. H. Reeve read his annual report as follows: Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are within your jurisdiction 115 places licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor by retail, viz; Full licences 71, Beer on 7. Beer off 5, Beer and spirit dealers 15, Grocers etc., off 7, Confectioners, wine, on 3. Chemists, wine, off 6, Total 115. This gives an average, according to the census of 1911, of one licence to every 291 persons, or one on licence to every 429 persons. This is the same number of licensed premises as were in existence last year.

At the adjourned licensing meeting, held on 6th March last, the licence of the Clarence Inn, Dover Road, was referred to the Compensation Committee on the ground of redundancy, and at the principal meeting of that Committee held at Canterbury on 21st June, the renewal of the licence was refused. The question as to the amount of compensation to be paid was referred to the Inland Revenue Authorities, and has not at present been determined, consequently a provisional renewal of the licence will be applied for. During the past year five of the licences have been transferred.

For the year ended 31st December last 55 persons (28 males and 27 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness, of whom 32 were convicted and 23 discharged without conviction. Of the persons proceeded against 17 were residents of the Borough, 9 members of the Naval and Military Forces, 13 persons of no fixed abode and 16 residents of other districts. In the preceding year 174 persons (109 males and 65 females) were proceeded against, of whom 129 were convicted and 45 discharged.

Proceedings have been taken during the year against 14 of the licence holders for various offences, 7 of whom were convicted and 7 dismissed. The following are the cases in which convictions have been recorded, viz; 9th March, the licensee of the Guildhall Hotel was fined 1 for a breach of the “No Treating” Order; 24th March, the licensee of the Mechanics Arms Inn was fined 1 for allowing a child under 14 years to be in the bar of his licensed premises; 23rd June, the licensee of the Chequers Inn was fined 1 for dispatching intoxicating liquor from his licensed premises without a licence; 30th June, the licensee of the Morehall Wine Stores was fined 1 for dispatching intoxicating liquor from his licensed premises without the same having been previously paid for; 30th June, the licensee of 27 Rendezvous Street (off licence) was fined 1 for a similar offence; 1st December, the licensee of the London and Paris Hotel was fined 5 for a breach of the No Treating Order; 1st December, the licensee of the Pavilion Shades was fined 5 for a similar offence.

Nine clubs where intoxicating liquor is supplied are registered under the Act. There are 16 places licensed for music and dancing, 7 for music only, and 1 for public billiard playing.

The Order of the Liquor Control Board which came into operation on 10th January last year, restricting the hours of sale and supply of intoxicating liquor to 4 hours each weekday and 4 hours on Sunday remains in force, and in my opinion is mainly the cause of the decrease in the cases of drunkenness recorded.

Under Regulation 10 of the Defence of the Realm Regulations, Orders have been made by the Competent Military Authority, and are still in force, closing 3 of the licensed houses to all members of H.M. Forces. The houses are the Jubilee Inn, Radnor Street, the Wonder Tavern, Beach Street, and the True Briton, Harbour Street.

The Chairman said with regard to the report the number of convictions was very satisfactory. Mr. Reeve said in his opinion that was due to the restricted hours. He (Mr. Ward) was sorry to see so many convictions of publicans – seven – which was a greater number than he remembered in any year. There was no doubt that publicans were faced with very great difficulties with so many restrictions placed upon them. He urged upon them the necessity of being very careful not to serve any wounded soldiers, or any soldiers waiting embarkation. There were very heavy penalties laid down for offences of such a nature – imprisonment for six weeks or 100 fine. He hoped all of them would be very careful. All the licences would be renewed with the exception of the seven against which convictions had been recorded, but those seven licences would be granted until the adjourned sessions in a month's time.

The Clerk (Mr. J. Andrew) said with regard to the premises licensed for music and dancing the Magistrates had made new regulations. In future no structural alterations should be made in the licensed premises, and no alterations should be made in the stage, gangways, passageway or exits without the previous approval of the justices, and such gangways should be kept free from chairs or other obstruction during the hours of public entertainment, and all performances should be of an unobjectionable character, and good order and decent behaviour should be kept and maintained on the premises during the hours of licence.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 February 1917.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. J.J. Giles, Mr. H. Kirke, and the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson.

The Chief Constable read his report (for details see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman said he was sorry to see so many convictions of publicans, the greatest number he had seen for years. No doubt the difficulties of publicans were great owing to abnormal times. He would advise them to be very careful not to serve wounded soldiers or those who were soldiers about to embark. In regard to the licences, they would all be renewed, with the exception of seven, which would be considered at the adjourned sessions on March 7th.

 

Folkestone Express 17 February 1917.

Local News.

The licence of the Chequers Inn was, on Tuesday, at the Folkestone Police Court, temporarily transferred from the late Mr. Howlett to Mr. Nash, who for some years was at the Pavilion Shades.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 February 1917.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Tuesday, Mr. G.I. Swoffer presiding, a temporary transfer of the licence of the Chequers, Seagate Street, was granted to Mr. W.H. Nash.

 

Folkestone Express 3 March 1917.

Local News.

On Wednesday the Chequers was transferred from the late Mr. Howlett to Mr. W. Nash.

 

Folkestone Express 10 March 1917.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The Folkestone adjourned licensing sessions were held on Wednesday, Mr. E.T. Ward presiding on the Bench, when the licences of the Guildhall, the Mechanics Arms, the London and Paris Hotel, the Chequers, the Pavilion Shades, the Morehall Wine Stores, and Finn's Store, Rendezvous Street, were renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 March 1917.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, March 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Mr. H. Kirke.

The licences of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, the Red Cow, Foord, and Royal Oak, North Street, were respectively transferred Mr. Bert Nash, Mr. W. Collard, and Mr. H.W. Baldock.

The Chairman, addressing the licensees, impressed upon them the great necessity of taking the greatest care in the conduct of their businesses, whilst at the same time acknowledging their difficulties.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 December 1917.

Obituary.

We regret to record the death, at the age of 48, of Mr. W.E. Nash, of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street. He had been in indifferent health for some time. For many years he was in the employ of the late Mr. James Peden, and was formerly landlord of the Pavilion Shades. Whilst living at Wootton he met with a severe accident, from the effects of which he never properly recovered. Possessed of a genial manner, he had a host of friends. The funeral took place at the Cemetery on Wednesday.

 

Folkestone Express 5 January 1918.

Local News.

On Wednesday at the Police Court, Mr. H. Dunn, a deep sea pilot, applied for the transfer of the licence of the Chequers from the late Mr. Nash to himself. Mr. Reeve, the Chief Constable, said Mr. Dunn had been on torpedoed vessels two or three times. Mr. Andrew said the applicant told him that the Germans could not sink him. The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 5 January 1918.

Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates on Wednesday authorised the transfer of the licence of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, from the widow of the late Berte Nash to Mr. Harry Dunn, a former Channel pilot.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 March 1918.

Local News.

A Herald representative, having occasion to interview Mr. Harry Dunn, the new proprietor of the Chequers Inn, in Seagate Street, noticed a remarkable painted fireplace of great width and depth in the bar of the old-fashioned hostelry. It had been painted over repeatedly, and from a cursory glance, one would think the structure to be of wood. So impressed was our representative with the appearance of the fireplace that he communicated at once with Mr. W.H. Elgar, a well-known antiquarian, whose sketches of old churches and buildings appear from time to time in the Herald. Mr. Elgar, accompanied by our representative, visited the Chequers, and at once pronounced the mantelpiece to be a fine Tudor specimen. It is of stone, and in moderately good preservation.

This mantelpiece has stood there unnoticed for some hundreds of years. Mr. Elgar in due course will make a further investigation. With its extraordinary oak beams (many encased) in low ceiled rooms, the Chequers is looked upon by its owner as one of the oldest buildings in “Old Folkestone”. It is an interesting fact that it was here in “pre-railway” days that the coaches started for and arrived from London. Skipper Dunn has come to anchor here after many years piloting in the Channel and other places. He has weathered many a storm, and is still bluff, hale and hearty. The discovery that the mantelpiece belongs to the Tudor period has delighted him immensely. The property belongs to Messrs. Leney and Co., of Dover.

 

Folkestone Express 26 November 1921.

Local News.

The licence of the Chequers Inn was on Wednesday, at the Police Court, transferred from Mr. Dunn to Mr. Scrivens.

 

Folkestone Express 18 March 1922.

Obituary.

The death took place somewhat suddenly on Wednesday of Mr. H. Dunn, who was until a short time ago the licensee of the Chequers Inn. He was for many years associated with sea life, and was captain of some of the coaling vessels which used Folkestone Harbour in years gone by. His demise will be greatly regretted by a large number of families.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 March 1922.

Felix.

A Folkestone notability passed away recently in the person of Mr. Harry Dunn. The deceased was a mariner, and his experiences on the briny, especially in the Channel, were many, varied, and in some cases, exciting. Our bluff and hale old friend at one time piloted vessels in and out of the harbour, and if any ships going up or down channel needed any assistance in this respect he was there with his knowledge of the tides and shoals associated with this narrow stretch of water. I don't know why, but he rejoiced in the nickname of “Shoemaker”, and he was generally known by that soubriquet. Subsequently deceased became skipper of a collier trading to and from this port. He “came to anchor” in his later days at the ancient Chequers Inn, near the harbour, which he recently relinquished through ill-health. Everyone who knew him had a good word for genial “Shoemaker”, a fearless sailor, whose life was full of incident.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 July 1926.

Saturday, July 10th: Before Alderman G. Spurgen, Colonel G.P. Owen, and Colonel P. Broome-Giles.

Lance Corporal Morris John Whelan, of the 11th Hussars, was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Dover Road. He was further charged with assaulting P.C. Simpson while in the execution of his duty. He pleaded Not Guilty to both charges. Trooper George Allen and Trooper Cyril Mace, of the 11th Hussars, were also charged with assaulting the police. They pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Simpson said he was on duty in uniform in Dover Street on Friday night, when he saw Whelan. Who was very drunk, enter the Chequers public house. He followed, and drew the landlord's attention to Whelan's condition. He prevented him from being served, and saw him ejected. Later in the evening, at 11.05, he saw Whelan in company with the other two prisoners, and four or five other soldiers in Dover Road. He was very drunk, and was shouting and using the most filthy language. The other soldiers were also very noisy. He went up to them and advised them to be quiet, and go to the camp. Whelan made some obscene remarks to him, challenged him to fight, and refused to go away. Witness took him into custody, and, with the assistance of P.C. Dickinson, commenced to bring him to the police station. He had gone about ten yards when Allen came up to him and caught hold of the back of his collar, and the other soldiers surrounded them. Allen hit him twice in the face with his fist. As a result he released his hold of Whelan, who broke away. After he was free Whelan raised his whip and struck him a blow on the face with the butt end, causing a considerable swelling. Whelan then ran down the street. Witness caught hold of Allen, closed with him, and with the assistance of Mr. Haslam and Mr. Lawrence, took him to the police station. He went to Guildhall Street, where he saw Whelan, whom he took back to the station, where he charged him. The accused made no reply. He then charged Allen, who said “You can't touch soldiers”.

Whelan denined hitting P.C. Simpson with a whip, stating that he had not got one.

P.C. Simpson said Whelan had a whip when arrested.

P.C. Dickinson said at 11.05 p.m. on Friday evening he was in Dover Road with P.C. Simpson, when he saw some soldiers, who were shouting and singing. Whelan was rolling about, shouting, and using filthy language. He was drunk. P.C. Simpson arrested Whelan, and Simpson walked on one side and witness on the other. Mace came up and struck him a violent blow behind the right ear with his whip.

Mace: It is a lie.

P.C. Dickinson, continuing, said he was quite sure it was Mace. The blow caused him to release his hold of Whelan. He immediately closed with Mace, and with the assistance of a civilian brought him to the police station. He charged Mace, who replied “I do not think so”. Later in the evening he saw Whelan in Guildhall Street, and he helped P.C. Simpson bring him to the police station.

Mr. Albert Haslam, Manager of the Cambrian Coaching Company, said he was in his office in Rendezvous Street on Friday evening, when he heard noises, and he went outside. He saw P.C.s Dickinson and Simpson with a soldier under arrest. There was a struggling and hostile crowd round them. Seeing the constables were in difficulty, he went back and called some of his staff to come to their assistance. Just previously to his getting up to them Allen went behind Simpson and struck him a most cowardly blow with his clenched fist. Allen then turned round towards his office. Two men attempted to stop him, but he knocked them both down. Allen got as far as the Rendezvous Restaurant, when two other civilians and witness caught him. He held him until P.C. Simpson came up and took Allen to the police station. Allen made plenty of threats when he was holding him as to what he would do when let go, but he made no suggestion that he was the wrong man.

Whelan said he did not strike P.C. Simpson with a whip, as he had not got one. When Simpson bustled him out of the Chequers public house he left the whip lying on the table. When arrested he was talking with his friends and two soldiers. Simpson came up and got hold of him, and a civilian with the policeman struck him in the face two or three times. That was why he struggled.

The Chairman: Do you mean Mr. Haslam struck you?

Whelan: No, it was not Mr. Haslam. Continuing, Whelan said if he had not been struck he would have gone to the station without struggling. He admitted he had had a good deal of beer, but he was not drunk.

Allen said he did not want to say anything.

An officer said all three prisoners had got good military characters. Whelan had just been promoted lance corporal, and the other two were officers' servants. There was no civil conviction against any of the prisoners.

Colonel Owen: I see Allen is in plain clothes. If a soldier is allowed out wearing plain clothes, that shows that his military character is good, doesn't it?

The Officer: Yes, sir.

The Chairman said Whelan would be fined 10s. for being drunk and disorderly, and 1 for assaulting the police. The other two prisoners would be fined 1 each. With regard to the remark passed by one of the prisoners that the police could not touch soldiers, he might say that the police had the same duty to perform with regard to soldiers as to the rest of the community. If it had not been for the prisoners' good characters, the Magistrates would have sent them to prison.

The Bench thanked Mr. Haslam for assisting the police.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) said he would like to associate himself with the Magistrates' remarks, and say how much help such as Mr. Haslam's was appreciated.

 

Folkestone Herald 12 November 1927.

Local News.

For committing damage to the extent of 5s. in the Chequers Hotel on October 30th, four Folkestone men, whose names were given as Harry Wise, Vernon Bridgood, Stephen Cook and Leslie Roach, were each fined 5s. and costs at the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday.

It was stated by the licensee, Mrs. Charlotte Scriven, that the men entered the house on the night of October 30th and went into the tap room. They asked for permission to play the piano, and she told them they did not allow it on Sunday. They did not reply, but when she entered the room ten minutes later she found that a gas bracket, a picture frame, and some darts and rings had been broken, the damage amounting to about 5s.

In fining the men 5s. each and costs of the damage, the Chairman, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, said as the offence was committed on licensed premises it was a very grave charge. The licensees had to keep law and order, and they might think themselves lucky they had got off with a fine as they had.

Note: No record of Charlotte Scriven in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 August 1930.

Obituary.

The death occurred, on Thursday of last week, of Mr. Walter Scrivens, of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street. Mr. Scrivens was for 30 years employed on the cross-Channel steamers.

The funeral took place at the Folkestone Cemetery on Tuesday.

 

Folkestone Express 30 August 1930.

Wednesday, August 27th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer and J.H. Blamey, and Col. G.P. Owen.

Mr. Bonniface applied on behalf of Mrs. Kent for a protection order in respect of the Chequers Inn. He said Mr. Scrivens, the holder of the licence, died on August 7th, and Mrs. Kent had applied for letters of administration. The protection order was granted to the applicant, who was the daughter of Mr. Scrivens.

Note: This does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 August 1930.

Local News.

Mrs. Kent, of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, made an application at the Folkestone Transfer Sessions for a protection order pending an application for the transfer of the licence.

Mr. B.H. Bonniface, representing Mrs. Kent, said Mrs. Kent was the administratrix of her father's estate. When everything was settled the matter would be dealt with in the usual way and an application made for the transfer of the licence.

The application was granted.

Note: This does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 11 October 1930.

Wednesday 8th October: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Miss A.M. Hunt, Mr. F. Seager, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, and Mr. W. Smith.

The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr. C. Rootes) said Mrs. Kent applied for the transfer of the licence of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street. There had been before the Bench already an application, which was granted, for a protection order to Mrs. Kent, who was administratrix of the late Mr. Walter Scrivens. In order to transfer the licence to Mr. Richard Williams, she had to have the transfer to herself as administratrix. Them Mr. Williams would make the application for the transfer to himself. It was a formal matter.

Chief Inspector Pittock said he had known the applicant ever since he had been in the Force. He knew of no reason why the licence should not be transferred.

The Magistrates granted the transfers.

Note: No record of Mrs. Kent in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 October 1930.

Wednesday, October 8th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Miss A.M. Hunt, Mr. F. Seager, and Mr. W. Smith.

Mrs. Florence Jane Kent applied for the transfer of the licence of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, Folkestone, from Walter Scrivens, deceased, to herself. She had been granted a protection order some time before.

At the same time, Richard Williams applied for the transfer of the licence from Mrs. Kent to himself.

The applications were granted.

Note: Mrs. Kent does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 19 March 1932.

Local News.

On Saturday the Brigade was called by telephone to a bottle store on the premises of Mr. R. Williams, a licensed victualler, of Seagate Street, at 4.45 p.m., to deal with an outbreak of fire in a loft. Six men with the aid of water from a hydrant and one chemical charge extinguished the flames, the only damage being to the floorboards and a number of bottles.

 

Folkestone Herald 19 March 1932.

Local News.

A bottle store attached to the Chequer Inn, Seagate Street. The licensed premises of Mr. R. Williams, was the scene of an outbreak of fire on Sunday afternoon, when damage to the extent of 5 was caused. Floor boards and the loft were burnt, and bottled beer was damaged. The Fire Brigade tender and six men turned out, and the outbreak was extinguished with water and one charge of chemicals. The cause is not known.

 

Folkestone Herald 27 August 1932.

Obituary.

We regret to record the death on August 29th, at 29, Mount Pleasant Road, of Mrs. Kirby, the wife of Mr. George Kirby.

Mrs. Kirby, who was 69 years of age, although not much in the public eye of later years, was well known in other days when her husband was the proprietor of the old coaching inn, The Chequers, Seagate Street, and the Royal George Hotel, Beach Street. Mrs. Kirby possessed a kindly heart and this was often well illustrated when in the cold and wintry days she thought of many an empty cupboard in the poorer quarters of the town. Indeed, she did much good by stealth. Much sympathy is accorded to the husband, who during the time of the Mayoralty of the late Alderman Daniel Baker, was a member of the Folkestone Town Council. Some years ago Mr. and Mrs. Kirby left Folkestone for London, but after residing there for a few years came back to Folkestone.

The funeral took place on August 12th at the Cheriton Road Cemetery.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 April 1933.

Bankruptcy.

The increased beer tax and unemployment at Folkestone Harbour were the chief causes to which, at the East Kent Bankruptcy Court, at Canterbury, on Tuesday, Richard Williams, formerly licensee of the Chequers Inn, Seagate Street, Folkestone, attributed his failure. His liabilities were scheduled at 346 2s., with assets estimated to produce 151 14s., leaving a deficiency of 194 8s.

In the course of his public examination by the Assistant Official Receiver (Mr. C.S. Foulsham), debtor said that for 25 years he was employed as a barman at various public houses in Folkestone. He began business on his own account in October, 1930, when he became tenant of the Chequers Inn. He paid a gross ingoing valuation of 184. His wife advanced him 200 to invest in the business, and he obtained other loans - 25 from his father, 30 from his sister, 20 from his son, and later 20 from his brother. All that money was put into the business, a deposit of 75 being paid to the brewers on going into the business. The loans formed the bulk of the unsecured creditors.

At first, continued debtor, he sold four barrels of beer a week, the average profit being 1 a barrel, so that, he agreed, he made a fair living. Later the trade fell off when the beer tax was increased, and there was unemployment at the harbour.

The Assistant Official Receiver said that from debtor's statement of affairs, there was in February, 1932, a deficiency of 134. Debtor explained that it had been gradually “creeping on”, and was solely due to trade depression.

The Assistant Official Receiver, quoting from the statement, showed that for the past twelve months the accounts revealed that the turnover was 1,221, on which there was a gross profit of 20 percent, or 244. His expenses were 124, leaving a net trading profit of 120. Against that his household expenses and personal expenses were 156, so that his deficiency was gradually increasing.

In reply to further questions, debtor said that in November, 1932, he suffered a loss through burglary, 15 being taken. He went to the police, but nothing accrued. On January 27th, 1933, he gave notice to the brewers of his intention to quit the premises. His wife then put in a writ for the 200 she had put into the business.

The Assistant Official Receiver commented that that seemed rather a drastic proceeding and enquired the reason. Debtor said they had a few words over the boys, and she said she was going to have her money before it was lost in the business. He then filed his petition. Debtor said he kept a cash book in which he recorded his takings and expenses, although not all of the latter.

The Registrar (Mr. F.M. Furley) pointed out that debtor had never had any capital of his own, so he was always insolvent to that extent.

Mr. Foulsham agreed, but said that apart from that debtor was doing fairly well in the business when he started.

Debtor attributed his failure to bad trade, due to unemployment and the increased tax on beer. Men could not afford to buy so much beer, and had not been earning enough to buy it. “Men who used to buy four or five pints a day are not now earning 3s. a week on the habour”, he added. He had not spent money on himself, and he had looked after the business. Debtor said part of the furniture had been bought out of money his wife saved from the housekeeping money. Some had been given her.

The Registrar: I don't suppose the furniture is worth much, is it?

The Assistant Official Receiver agreed, and said he did not want to carry the matter any further.

In reply to Mr. A.K. Mowll, his solicitor, debtor said his wife helped in the business. The 200 for which she issued the writ was money she had had invested in the Co-Operative Savings Bank, and drew out to put in the business. He agreed he was fortunate in his wife to the extent that she had saved money before he went into the business. There were 10 other houses within 150 yards of the Chequers Inn. He really depended on the labourers and fishermen at the harbour for his trade, and now there were very few employed, and others could not afford to buy beer.

In reply to the Registrar, debtor said when he took the house the times were brighter.

Mr. Mowll said his client did pretty well until the price of beer went up and trade went down. Then he was beaten.

The public examination was closed.

 

Folkestone Herald 16 March 1957.

Local News.

A plage hotel, with unique facilities for sea and sunbathing, will be provided at Sandgate, it was stated at the Folkestone adjourned annual Licensing Meeting on Wednesday.

The justices granted an application by the Holborn Trust, Ltd., for the removal of the licence of the demolished Chequers Inn, which stood in Seagate Street, to Beacholme Hotel, The Riviera, Sandgate.

Mr. Worthington Edridge, appearing for- the Holborn Trust, Ltd., owners of the freehold of the hotel, said application was made to the Licensing Planning Committee on May 3td, 1955, and their order was confirmed by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government on August 19th, 1955. In the original application to the Committee the plans showed that a garage would be converted into a bar. The owners of the property had since decided that it would be better if the bar was situated in the lounge, which was nearer to the sea and easier of access. Mr. Worthington Edridge said it was intended that there should be two bars, one a private bar and the other a lounge bar. “The object”, he continued, “is that it should become a plage hotel. The idea is to provide amenities for bathing and and sun bathing for visitors. The premises are ideally situated for that type of project. If this planning removal is granted, these premises will become something quite unique on this coast. As far as I know there is no hotel which provides a bar which leads straight on to a lawn, with immediate access from the lawn to the sea. That will be a great amenity to visitors to Folkestone”. Leading to the lawn was a terrace where it was proposed to serve drinks. There would also be ample parking and garaging facilities for cars. Mr Worthington Edridge said it was intended that the licence should be transferred to Mr. Richard James Butcher. It was purchased from Messrs. Alfred Leney and Co., who had no objection to the removal.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

KELLY Devereaux Listed 1717+ Bastions

PENNEY Mary Listed 1741+ Bastions

DADD/LADD Ambrose c1765-74 Bastions

BIRCH Mr 1774-75 Bastions

MARTIN Robert 1775-80 Bastions

TAYLOR Joseph 1780-90 Bastions

TAYLOR Josephine 1790-94 Bastions

Last pub licensee had PRESCOTT Henry 1794-97 Bastions

PRESCOTT Richard 1797-c1816+ Bastions

PAY William 1823-25 Pigot's Directory 1823Bastions

PAY Sarah 1825-59 (widow age 75 in 1851Census) Pigot's Directory 1828-29Pigot's Directory 1832-34Pigot's Directory 1839Pigot's Directory 1840Bagshaw's Directory 1847Melville's 1858Bastions

MERCER Henry 1859-60 Bastions

GOORD/GOOR Mrs Mary 1860-68 Post Office Directory 1862Bastions

RICHARDSON Henry John 1868-77 Post Office Directory 1874Bastions

JACKSON Harry Next pub licensee had 1877-78 Bastions

GOLDFINCH Henry 1878-80 Bastions

STANDARD William 1880-81 Bastions

FRIEND James Ive 1881-94 Post Office Directory 1882Post Office Directory 1891Bastions

WEATHERHEAD Fanny 1891 Census

KIRBY George 1894-99 Next pub licensee had Bastions

DORRELL John Gravland 1899-1906 Post Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903Bastions

REEVES James 1906-08 Bastions

HOWLETT Walter 1908-17 Post Office Directory 1913Bastions

NASH William 1917-18 Bastions

DUNN Henry 1918-Mar/21 dec'd Post Office Directory 1922Bastions

SCRIVENS Walter Nov/1921-30 Bastions

KENT Florence Jane 1930

WILLIAMS Richard 1930-33 Bastions

PRINCE Wm 1933-40 Kelly's 1934Post Office Directory 1938Bastions

 

Pigot's Directory 1823From the Pigot's Directory 1823

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-29

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

Pigot's Directory 1839From the Pigot's Directory 1839

Pigot's Directory 1840From the Pigot's Directory 1840

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Melville's 1858From Melville's Directory 1858

Post Office Directory 1862From the Post Office Directory 1862

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

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