DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, June, 2023.

Page Updated:- Saturday, 17 June, 2023.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1845

York Hotel

Latest 1852

Dover Road

Folkestone

 

Only open from between 1845 and 1852 as far as I am aware and eventually turned into a Prep School and eventually a Temperance Hotel that I believe was still in operation in 1912.

 

Maidstone Gazette 16 September 1845.

The new hotel near the railway station is now completed and opened for business, under the management of Mr. Paceman. It is called The York Hotel.

 

Dover Chronicle 29 November 1845.

Advertisement: Under the patronage of the principal inhabitants of Folkestone, Dover and Sandgate. Folkestone winter subscription balls.

The public are respectfully informed that a series of Winter subscription balls will be held at the York Hotel, Folkestone, on the second Thursdays in the months of December, January, and February.

Season tickets (to admit two) 21s., Single tickets – Gentlemen 7s., Ladies 5s., which may be had of Mr. Stock, Library, High Street, or at the York Hotel, Folkestone.

 

South Eastern Gazette, Tuesday 2 December 1845.

Maidstone Gazette 2 December 1845

Under the patronage of the principal inhabitants of Folkestone, Dover, and Sandgate.

Folkestone Winter Subscription Balls.

The public are respectfully informed that a series of Winter Subscription Balls will be given at the "York Hotel," Folkestone, on the 2nd Thursday of December, January, and February.

Season tickets (to admit 2) 21s.; single tickets, gentlemen 7s, ladies 5s.; which may be had of Mr. Stock, Library, High Street, or at
the "York Hotel," Folkestone.

The first ball will take place on Thursday, Dec 11th.

 

Maidstone Gazette 11 January 1848

The much talked of new street from the High Street to the Mill Lane has at last been commenced by pulling down the old Folkestone tavern, and clearing the garden grounds adjacent. We regret to hear that much opposition has been manifested, but the work will nevertheless be proceeded with as fast as the weather will permit, so that there will be no necessity for the ultimatum of our Boulogne contemporary, viz., “a lighted torch and a south-wester”.

Petty Sessions, Wednesday; Before Charles Golder, Mayor, Wm. Major and John Bateman Esqs.

Charles Stuart was brought up in custody of Matthew Pearson, charged by Mr. Thomas Susans, of the firm of Gosling and Susans, drapers and clothiers, with robbing them of a quantity of goods.

Thomas Susans deposed that from information he received from Mr. Smith, of the York Hotel, he was induced to call there and inspect the contents of two parcels, said to be left by the prisoner. He found the contents to be their property (having his own private mark thereon.) The parcels contained three waistcoats, four pairs of trousers, silk handkerchiefs, cap and oil-cloth cover, and two gross of butons; and were of the value of three guineas. The prisoner had been in their employ about three months.

Thomas Smith, landlord of the York Hotel, deposed that on the evening of the 12th December the prisoner came to the bar of his house, called for a glass of ale, and requested to be allowed permission to leave two parcels for a short time; he did not call again till the 25th December, when he stated that he had just arrived from Maidstone, for the express purpose of taking the parcels away. During the time they were in witness's possession the seals were broken by his children, which enabled him to observe the contents and the shop mark upon them. This aroused his suspicion, and he made up his mind to detain them, and having made an excuse to the prisoner that they had been sent away by mistake, he went to the shop of Messrs. Gosling and Susans, having heard that the prisoner was a shopman. He there saw the prisoner. On the 3rd the prisoner came again; he questioned him as to the contents of the parcels, when he said they were smuggled goods. This not satisfying him, he refused to deliver them up, but allowed the prisoner to depart. Upon his calling a third time he called him into a room and told him his suspicions, when he acknowledged that he had stolen them from his employers, and begged permission to take them back and replace them in the shop, which witness did not consent to, but gave information to Mr. Susans, which led to the prisoner's apprehension.

Matthew Pearson, police constable, deposed that he took the prisoner into custody, and received twp parcels from Mr. Smith, at the York Hotel, which he now produced.

The prisoner (who is a very young man and stated to be respectably connected) made no defence, and was committed to take his trial at the next Quarter Sessions for the Borough.

 

Canterbury Journal 13 January 1849.

The Borough Quarter Sessions were held on Monday before J.J. Lonsdale Esq., Recorder.

James Griggs was indicted for stealing a basket of game from the railway station.

From the evidence of William Nairns, the prosecutor, it appeared that a basket of game was brought down to Folkestone by him, and was placed in the care of the omnibus driver, Laker. On arriving at the "York Hotel" the parcel was missed. The prisoner was close by with a fly when the basket was lost, and, with the contents, was subsequently found in his bedroom.

The prisoner, in his defence, stated that he found the basket in his omnibus, and that it did not contain anything; it was lying in his stable for three weeks, when he took it home.

Six months' hard labour.

 

Kentish Gazette 29 May, 1849.

York Hotel, Folkestone; To be sold by auction, by Mr. H. Bird, on Wednesday, June 6th, 1849; All the household furniture, bar and house fittings, at the "York Hotel," Dover Road, Folkestone.

The Bar and House Fittings comprise a six-motion spirit fountain, with oval spirit casks, pipes, and taps; an excellent four-motion beer engine with pipes and taps; bar counter and shelves, handsome slate chimney pieces, register stoves, two ranges, with ovens and boilers; valuable gas fittings, hall and door lamps, fine wire blinds, bells, &c.

The furniture comprises mahogany four-post, tent, and French bedsteads and hangings, bordered mattresses, feather beds, bolsters, and pillows, blankets, sheets, and counterpanes, mahogany double and single chests of drawers, Japanned wash and dressing tables, mahogany tray dressing glasses, bedroom carpets and chairs, handsome mahogany pedestal sideboard, mahogany telescope dining table (nearly new), mahogany dining and Pembroke tables, double and single-scroll couches, cane-seat end other chairs, handsome large Brussels carpet, 38ft. by 13ft-6in; Turkey ditto, 17ft. by 15ft.; Kidderminster ditto, druggets, hearth rugs, gloom fenders, sets of fire irons, cut decanters, spirit bottles, rummers, tumblers. ale and wine glasses, china and earthenware, the usual kitchen requisites, &c., &c.

As will be specified in catalogues, which may he had of the auctioneer, at his offices, Canterbury, and on the premises on the morning of sale, which will commence at eleven o’clock precisely.

 

Dover Chronicle 2 June 1849

York Hotel, Folkestone; To be sold by auction, by Mr. H. Bird, on Wednesday, June 6th, 1849; All the household furniture, bar and house fittings, at the York Hotel, Dover Road, Folkestone.

The Bar and House Fittings comprise a six-motion spirit fountain, with oval spirit casks, pipes, and taps; an excellent four-motion beer engine with pipes and taps; bar counter and shelves, handsome slate chimney pieces, register stoves, two ranges, with ovens and boilers; valuable gas fittings, hall and door lamps, fine wire blinds, bells, &c.

The furniture comprises mahogany four-post, tent, and French bedsteads and hangings, bordered mattresses, feather beds, bolsters, and pillows, blankets, sheets, and counterpanes, mahogany double and single chests of drawers, Japanned wash and dressing tables, mahogany tray dressing glasses, bedroom carpets and chairs, handsome mahogany pedestal sideboard, mahogany telescope dining table (nearly new), mahogany dining and Pembroke tables, double and single-scroll couches, cane-seat end other chairs, handsome large Brussels carpet, 38ft. by 13ft-6in; Turkey ditto, 17ft. by 15ft.; Kidderminster ditto. druggets, hearth rugs, gloom fenders, sets of fire irons, cut decanters, spirit bottles, rummers, tumblers. ale and wine glasses, china and earthenware, the usual kitchen requisites, &c., &c.

As will be specified in catalogues, which may he had of the auctioneer, at his offices, Canterbury, and on the premises on the morning of sale, which will commence at eleven o'clock precisely.

 

Dover Telegraph 2 June 1849

York Hotel, Folkestone; To be sold by auction, by Mr. H. Bird, on Wednesday, June 6th, 1849; All the household furniture, bar and house fittings, at the York Hotel, Dover Road, Folkestone.

The Bar and House Fittings comprise a six-motion spirit fountain, with oval spirit casks, pipes, and taps; an excellent four-motion beer engine with pipes and taps; bar counter and shelves, handsome slate chimney pieces, register stoves, two ranges, with ovens and boilers; valuable gas fittings, hall and door lamps, fine wire blinds, bells, &c.

The furniture comprises mahogany four-post, tent, and French bedsteads and hangings, bordered mattresses, feather beds, bolsters, and pillows, blankets, sheets, and counterpanes, mahogany double and single chests of drawers, Japanned wash and dressing tables, mahogany tray dressing glasses, bedroom carpets and chairs, handsome mahogany pedestal sideboard, mahogany telescope dining table (nearly new), mahogany dining and Pembroke tables, double and single-scroll couches, cane-seat end other chairs, handsome large Brussels carpet, 38ft. by 13ft-6in; Turkey ditto, 17ft. by 15ft.; Kidderminster ditto. druggets, hearth rugs, gloom fenders, sets of fire irons, cut decanters, spirit bottles, rummers, tumblers. ale and wine glasses, china and earthenware, the usual kitchen requisites, &c., &c.

As will be specified in catalogues, which may he had of the auctioneer, at his offices, Canterbury, and on the premises on the morning of sale, which will commence at eleven o'clock precisely.

 

Maidstone Gazette 17 July 1849

Advertisement: Folkestone, Kent, to be sold by auction, at the "Pavilion Hotel," in Folkestone, on Saturday, July 28th, 1849, at three o'clock in the afternoon (by order of the mortgagee, under powers of sale), subject to such conditions as will be then and there produced:-

All that messuage or tenement, known by the name of the York Hotel, situate in the Dover Road, in the town of Folkestone.

The property is held under a lease from the Earl of Radnor and Viscount Folkestone for a term of 99 years, from the 24th day of June, 1844, subject to the annual rent of 11 5s., and to the covenants and agreements contained in such lease.

The premises are well situated, are very capacious, and are constructed with a view to being easily converted into two large and commodious family residences. Immediate possession of the property can be given.

To view the premises apply to the Auctioneer, and for further particulars to Mr. Chalk, or Messrs. Gravener and Sons, Solicitors, Dover, or to Messrs. Brockman and Watts, Solicitors, Folkestone.

July 12th, 1849

 

Dover Telegraph 21 July 1849

Advertisement: Folkestone, Kent, to be sold by auction, at the "Pavilion Hotel," in Folkestone, on Saturday, July 28th, 1849, at three o'clock in the afternoon (by order of the mortgagee, under powers of sale), subject to such conditions as will be then and there produced:-

All that messuage or tenement, known by the name of the "York Hotel," situate in the Dover Road, in the town of Folkestone.

The property is held under a lease from the Earl of Radnor and Viscount Folkestone for a term of 99 years, from the 24th day of June, 1844, subject to the annual rent of 11 5s., and to the covenants and agreements contained in such lease.

The premises are well situated, are very capacious, and are constructed with a view to being easily converted into two large and commodious family residences. Immediate possession of the property can be given.

To view the premises apply to the Auctioneer, and for further particulars to Mr. Chalk, or Messrs. Gravener and Sons, Solicitors, Dover, or to Messrs. Brockman and Watts, Solicitors, Folkestone.

July 12th, 1849

 

Kentish Gazette, 14 August 1849.

Public Sales.

July 28, at the "Pavilion Hotel," Folkestone, by Mr. M. M. Major; Freehold estate, Cheriton, near Folkestone, with 22 acres of arable and meadow land, sold for 1,520; freehold residence and acre of pasture land, in the Upper Sandgate-road, 1,800 (bought in); freehold messuages, Dover-road, 500 (bought in); freehold pasture land, two acres, near Dover-road, Folkestone, sold for 385, to Mr. John Jeffery, whose property it adjoins; the "York Hotel," Folkestone, put up at 800 (no bidders). — July 21, by Messrs. Farebrother and Co., at Garraway's: Freehold farm, called Clinch-street, Hoo, Kent, let for 300, knocked down at 8,400.

 

Canterbury Journal, 18 November 1849.

Charles Golder Esq. was re-elected Mayor on the 9th inst. The dinner took place at the "York Hotel," Dover Road, and was attended by sixty seven persons, being the largest number who have attended on a similar occasion in this town. The usual loyal and complimentary toasts were given and responded to, and the evening was spent with much good feeling and pleasure.

 

Dover Telegraph 1 February 1851.

Auction Extract: To be sold by auction, by Mr. David Godden, at the "York Hotel," in Folkestone, on Monday, the 24th day of February, 1851, at one o'clock in the afternoon.

Lot 9: A leasehold messuage or tenement, known by the name of the "York Hotel," and land, situate near the upper railway station, in the Dover Road, in the town of Folkestone, having a frontage of 75ft., and a depth of 79ft. The licence to this house is still kept on foot.

This lot is held under a lease from the Earl of Radnor and Viscount Folkestone for a term of 99 years from the 24th day of June, 1844, subject to the annual rent of 11 5s., and to the covenants and agreements contained in such lease.

This house is very capacious, and is built so, that by only putting up a partition through the middle, it would be converted into two large and commodious private family residences, or good lodging houses, having each 12 rooms.

The vendor will lend the whole of the purchase money on this lot to a responsible purchaser.

For further particulars and conditions of sale apply to the auctioneer, of at the office of Mr. Ralph Thos. Brockman, Solicitor, Folkestone.

 

Maidstone Gazette 4 February 1851.

Auction Extract:

To be sold by auction, by Mr. David Godden, at the York Hotel, in Folkestone, on Monday, the 24th day of February, 1851, at one o'clock in the afternoon.

Lot 9: A leasehold messuage or tenement, known by the name of the York Hotel, and land, situate near the upper railway station, in the Dover Road, in the town of Folkestone, having a frontage of 75ft., and a depth of 79ft. The licence to this house is still kept on foot.

This lot is held under a lease from the Earl of Radnor and Viscount Folkestone for a term of 99 years from the 24th day of June, 1844, subject to the annual rent of 11 5s., and to the covenants and agreements contained in such lease.

This house is very capacious, and is built so, that by only putting up a partition through the middle, it would be converted into two large and commodious private family residences, or good lodging houses, having each 12 rooms.

The vendor will lend the whole of the purchase money on this lot to a responsible purchaser.

For further particulars and conditions of sale apply to the auctioneer, of at the office of Mr. Ralph Thos. Brockman, Solicitor, Folkestone.

 

Dover Chronicle 19 May 1855.

Canterbury County Court, Wednesday, May 16th, before Charles Harwood Esq., judge.

Bird v Smith.

An action to recover 27 10s. for which a jury was empanelled. Mr. T.T. Delasaux appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. Towne for the defendant.

The facts, as explained by the plaintiff, were as follows: In June, 1849, the defendant kept the York Hotel, at Folkestone, and plaintiff was employed as auctioneer to sell the household furniture and effects of that establishment under a bill of sale given to Mr. G. Ash, brewer, of Canterbury, by Mrs. Hosking, mother-in-law of defendant, who had previously kept the hotel, and placed Smith therein as her representative. When the sale took place Mr. Terson, of Dover, (now deceased) applied to Mr. Bird, in company with Smith, to be accepted as the bidder for the fixtures, not for himself, but for Smith, which plaintiff agreed to, and various lots to the amount of 26 13s., were so purchased by Mr. Terson, and a table, at the price of 17s., was knocked down to Smith, making together the total of 27 10s. now sought to be recovered. No part of this purchase money was paid at the time of sale, nor since, but the defendant had many times promised to settle it, and he, plaintiff, had avoided proceedings until now, the debt being close on the time that limitation of statute might be pleaded. Plaintiff paid to Mr. Ash the amount for which the goods were sold, expecting to be repaid by Smith, who was left in possession of them.

Mr. Towne (in his endeavoure to shake the above statement by eliciting that plaintiff had in the year 1853 demanded the amount of the fixtures from the executors of Mr. Terson, which Mr. Bird admitted he had instructed his solicitor to do, in consequence of being unable to obtain payment of Mr. Smith, but always had held the latter liable, and who had always admitted his liability up to February last, at which period the defendant asserted that the goods were bought in for Mrs. Hoskins and not for himself, and he then offered to have the subject arbitrated upon. This latter proposition Smith had made to Mr. Leach, whom plaintiff had instructed to apply to him for settlement.

Mr. Leach was examined, but did not throw much light on the subject. He had known Mr. Bird apply several times to defendant for settlement, but at no time was it, to his recollection, stated what that settlement was to be.

Mr. Robinson (appraiser) stated that he was engaged by Mr. Smith, in July, 1849, to value the fixtures, and jointly with Mr. Major he did so; they were purchased by Mr. Watts for 32, to whom the transfer was made, but not until Mrs. Hoskins had signed the agreement, which was deemed necessary from an understanding that she had a claim on them.

This closed the case for the plaintiff, when Mr. Towne at considerable length addressed the jury. He called the defendant, who stated that he carried on the business of the hotel for his mother-in-law, as her agent, at the time of the sale of the effects. Mr. Ash jun. said his father would give up the claim on the fixtures, rather than chance a law suit about them. They were then divided from the furniture, and sold separately, under arrangements made by Mr. Terson, on behalf of Mrs. Hopkins. The Pembroke tabe was also bought by Mr. Terson, which he (Mr. Terson) removed from the premises directly after the sale. No arrangement was ever made by him with Mr. Bird for payment for the fixtures, and until February last he had no idea that Mr. Bird had considered he had any claim on him for them. He always considered that the pecuniary matters spoken of by Mr. Bird alluded to the balance due to Mr. Ash from his mother (Mrs. Hoskins), which he had said he (defendant) would endeavour to get settled, and believed the sum due to Mr. Ash exceeded 100, including the 27 10s. now claimed. Defendant received the money for the fixtures sold in July, and passed the amount to Mrs. Hoskins.

Mr. Delasaux then replied, and the Judge went through the chief points of the evidence, observing that Mr. Bird had certainly done his business in a very loose manner in parting with his money to Mr. Ash before he had obtained payment for the things thus sold, and more especially so when it was shown that the ownership of them was of doubtful issue, and if, as it had been shown in the evidence, that Mrs. Hosking had power to convert those fixtures into money within a month of Mr. Ash's execution on them, it appeared as though Mr. Ash had been frightened out of them. Mr. Bird ought not to be a loser of the money, and should their verdict be against him, ne must get the amount back of Mr. Ash. With respect to the item of 17s. for the table, it did appear as if it was purchased at the auction by Smith, the clerk's book at the auction having his name inserted thereto, while the other articles were shown to be sold to Mr. Terson.

The jury retired for a short time, and returned a verdict in favour of the defendant, both as regarded the fixtures and the purchase of the table.

 

Southeastern Gazette 22 May 1855.

Canterbury County Court, Wednesday, May 16th, before Charles Harwood Esq., judge.

Bird v Smith, a Jury case.

The plaintiff is an auctioneer residing in the city, and the defendant is the keeper of an eating house just outside the city gates, in the parish of Westgate. The present action was brought to recover the sum of 27 10s., the price of certain fixtures and furniture alleged to have been sold to the defendant on the 5th June, 1849. Mr. Delasaux appeared on behalf of the plaintiff, and Mr. Towne for the defendant.

From the opening statement of Mr. Delasaux, it appeared that in the month of May, 1849, a Mrs. Hawkins, mother-in-law of the plaintiff (sic) kept the York Hotel at Folkestone, and being desirous of helping the defendant, she borrowed 200 of Mr. George Ash, giving him a bill of sale on the goods at the hotel as security. Smith went into the hotel, but it did not answer, and subsequently Ash put his bill of sale in force, but they found that a great portion of the goods had been removed, to the amount of 180. Previously to the sale the plaintiff saw Mr. Terson, an auctioneer, and the present defendant, when it was arranged that Terson should purchase certain fixtures for Smith, which he did to the amount of 27 10s., less 17s., the price of a table sold to the defendant himself. That was the sum now sought to be recovered, and for which repeated applications had been made for payment, but without effect. The sale took place in the month of June, 1849, and in the following month (July) the very same articles were valued to Mr. Watts by a Mr. Robinson and another, for 33 12s., and that sum was paid to the defendant, who gave a receipt in his own name for the amount. Various letter were put in and read, and Mr. Delasaux remarked that after waiting four years, in June, 1853, he (on behalf of the plaintiff) wrote to the executors of the late Mr. Terson about the account and, as he anticipated, received a reply to the effect that they had no knowledge whatever of the transaction.

Plaintiff deposed that in the month of June, 1849, he was employed by Mr. Ash to sell the furniture at the York Hotel, at Folkestone. Previous to the sale he saw the defendant and Mr. Terson, when the latter told him that he was going to purchase for Smith; the defendant also told him what Terson was going to do. Terson did purchase the fixtures and Smith bought a table. (The auction book was subsequently produced, which confirmed the plaintiff's statement). He had not been paid one farthing, but he had paid Ash the money for the fixtures as well as the other furniture sold. Had applied to the defendant for payment more than 100 times, and he had promised to do so more than 50, but had never kept his word. Defendant had also promised to obtain an acceptance for him from a Mrs. Avery, which plaintiff had agreed to take. Defendant had never denied his liability to pay the money. After waiting four years, plaintiff authorised Mr. Delasaux to apply to the executors of Mr. Terson for payment, but they denied their liability. The defendant distinctly told plaintiff that he would pay him, and so did Terson, and Ash's account also.

Cross-examined by Mr. Towne – Believed the fixtures belonged to Mrs. Hawkins, but the defendant lived at the York Hotel at the time. Did not know whose name was on the hotel door, or that Mrs. Hawkins was the landlady. Received a notice before the sale that the fixtures belonged to Mr. Brockman, and the defendant gave his man notice that he would have all the things removed. Mr. Delasaux and Mr. Geo. Ash were at the sale. Was never told, either by Mr. Ash or Mr Delasaux, not to continue the sale of the fixtures. Did not remember telling Mr. Delasaux to send the bill produced. Never heard from the defendant that he was acting as agent to Mrs. Hawkins. Defendant never expressed surprise at plaintiff's making the claim for payment on him, nor did he ever write to him to that effect. Never heard him deny his liability until very lately. A short time since defendant proposed to refer the matter to arbitration. At the time plaintiff authorised Mr. Delasaux to apply to the executors of Mr. Terson for payment, he considered that the money was due from the defendant.

Robert Leach deposed that he was clerk to Mr. Bird, at the sale in question. He called upon the defendant with the plaintiff, but never heard the latter make application for payment of the account.

John Robinson said he was employed by the defendant to appraise the fixtures at the York Hotel after the sale of Mr. Bird. Did so with Mr. Major. After the appraisement was made they had to go to the Half Way House to obtain the signature of Mrs. Hawkins. He paid the amount of the appraisement, 33 12s., to the defendant.

Cross-examined by Mr. Towne – Lived directly opposite the York Hotel, but could not say who was the landlady.

Mr. Towne then addressed the jury at some length on behalf of the defendant, remarked that it was one of the oddest cases ever brought before the jury Having animadverted on the conduct of the plaintiff, Mr. Towne proceeded to state his case, which was that the defendant merely acted as the agent of his mother-in-law, Mrs. Hawkins, throughout the whole transaction, and was therefore not liable for the present claim.

The defendant deposed that he was the agent of his mother-in-law, who was the tenant of the York Hotel, and the house was in her name. Before the sale there was a consultation between Mr. Delasaux, Mr. Ash, and witness, respecting the fixtures, which were claimed by a prior mortgage. Mr. Ash, at its conclusion, told witness that his father would give up his claim to the fixtures rather than have any trouble about them. Subsequently witness told the plaintiff to sell the fixtures for Mrs. Hawkins, which he did, Terson buying them in. He denied ever buying the table. Never had any demand for payment of the fixtures until February last, when witness wrote to plaintiff and expressed his surprise at the demand. Witness engaged Robinson to value the fixtures as agent to his mother-in-law. Never acted in any other way than as agent to his mother-in-law.

Cross-examined by Mr. Delasaux – Plaintiff had called upon him for settlement of Mr. Ash's account, but never for payment of the fixtures.

Mrs Smith corroborated the defendant's statement, and in addition said the money received by him for the fixtures was given to her, and she handed it to her mother.

The jury returned a verdict for the defendant on both points.

Petty Sessions, Monday; Before W. Major, John Kingsnorth, James Kelcey and G. Kennicott Esqs.

Myssen Peters was committed for trial to the next quarter sessions for stealing a cloak from the harbour railway station, the property of Alexander Oswald Esq. The butler, James Montgomery, identified the property as his master's.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

SMITH Thomas 1845-52 Bagshaw's Directory 1847 Became a Prep School, then re-opened as a Temperance Hotel

 

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

 

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