DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, July, 2022.

Page Updated:- Thursday, 21 July, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1862

East Cliff Tavern

Open 2019+

13-15 East Cliff

Folkestone

https://whatpub.com/east-cliff-tavern

East Cliff Tavern 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

East Cliff Tavern, Folkestone 2009 East Cliff Tavern, Folkestone 2009 East Cliff Tavern Sign, Folkestone 2009

Above photos by Paul Skelton, 27 June 2009.

East Cliff Tavern watercolour

Above watercolour by Stuart Gresswell, once licensee of "Guildhall" and "Raglan" kindly sent by Jan Pedersen.

 

Dating back to 1862 when the house was granted a "beer-on" licence, but only occupied number 13 at the time, and in 1879 the premises acquired the spirit licence after the local neighbourhood put up a petition saying the nearest fully licensed house was quite a walk away.

1885, after Joseph Saunders took the reigns, the pub was enlarged by purchasing next door at number 15, and converted the then living room into a smoking room. Canterbury brewer George Beer  took an interest in the pub during his time between 1885 and 1898 but eventually amalgamated with Faversham brewers Rigdens to become George beer and Rigden in 1922. 1949 saw them taken over by Fremlins and 1967 by Whitbread. Today 2010, the premises is a Freehouse, changing to that in 1989. Current licensee (2010) Richard Parks whose mother Violet Parks, one time licensee of the "Harbour Inn" married Horace Brickell, the longest reigning licensee of the house, to date.

The pub also has a sweet counter for local children as there are no longer any shops nearby that supply local children with such luxuries.

 

 

 

Folkestone Observer 11 September 1869.

Beerhouse License:

Wednesday, September 8th: Before Capt. Kennicott R.N., James Tolputt, A.M. Leith and W. Bateman Esqs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 23 August 1879.

License was granted to William Danes, East Cliff.

The Annual Licensing Session was held at the Town Hall on Wednesday, the magistrates on the Bench being Dr. Bateman (in the chair), Capt. Crowe, J. Jeffreason Esq., and Alds. Hoad and Caister.

East Cliff Tavern.

William Dane, of the East Cliff Tavern, applied for a spirit license.

Mr. Minter put in a memorial in favour of the license, signed by the whole of the neighbourhood. Applicant said the locality was a growing one, and that he had kept the house 17 years.

No opposition was offered, and the application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 23 August 1879.

Annual Licensing Session

Application For New License:

East Cliff TavernWednesday, August 20th: Before W. Bateman Esq., Aldermen Caister and Hoad, Captain Crowe, M. Bell, W.J. Jeffreason, and J. Clark Esqs.

William Dane, of the East Cliff Tavern, applied for a spirit license.

Mr. Minter said it was an application for a spirit license for the East Cliff Tavern, East Cliff, and he put in a memorial signed by the whole of the inhabitants of the neighbourhood.

Applicant said he had held a beer license for 17 years and the neighbourhood was growing very fast. There was no licensed house in the locality. His house contained about 12 rooms.

There was no opposition to the granting of the license.

The Bench retired to consider the application, and on their return the chairman announced that they had decided to grant the application for a spirit license for the East Cliff Tavern.

 

Southeastern Gazette 23 August 1879.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The annual licensing sessions were held at the Town Hall on Wednesday. There were several applications for new licences, but with one exception they were refused.

Mr Danes applied for a full licence to sell at his house on the East Cliff. He had been in occupation 17 years, and had only held a beer licence. There was no fully licensed house nearer than the Pavilion Shades in the Tram Road, and the neighbourhood had largely increased of late. The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Express 6 September 1879.

Wednesday, September 3rd: Before R.W. Boarer Esq., General Cannon, Captain Carter, W.J. Jeffreason and J. Clark Esqs.

The spirit license recently granted to the East Cliff Tavern was confirmed, the Magistrates being satisfied as to the value of the premises.

 

Holbein's Visitors' List 9 November 1887.

Local News.

On Monday last a very enjoyable evening was spent by the Club, held at the Tavern, East Cliff. The club, which is formed by the working men of East Cliff and neighbourhood, is for social intercourse and amusement. It's meetings are held every Tuesday evening, from 8 to 10.30. The first part of the evening is spent in discussing general subjects connected with the management of the town by the Town Council. The latter part of the evening the members form themselves into a Judge and Jury, and go through the form of trying one or more of the members for an imaginary crime, thereby making themselves competent to act, if required, in the more real capacity of jurymen. Monday's gathering, however, was of exceptional interest, it being the occasion of the Annual Dinner, which is given in honour of the Chairman. Mr. John Tracey, the Chairman, presided, and after justice had been done to the excellent fare provided by the host, Mr. J.S. Saunders, the usual toasts were honoured, and several excellent songs given by the members. The company enjoyed a very pleasant evening, and the thanks of all were given to Mr. and Mrs. Saunders for their endeavours to please.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 1 September 1888.

Wednesday, August 29th: Before The Mayor, W. Wightwick Esq., Major H.W. Poole, and Alderman J. Banks.

Annie Hart, a well dressed woman, was summoned for being drunk and disorderly at East Cliff on Thursday last.

P.C. Osborne deposed that he saw the defendant about 9.30 p.m. coming out of the East Cliff Tavern. She was very drunk and commenced to make use of bad language. There was a crowd of boys around her. He asked her to go home, and as she would not go witness took her to her own house. First saw her in her garden at eight o'clock. She was making a noise. Was positive she was drunk, and had received a complaint of her conduct.

A London barrister appeared for the defendant, and in defence stated that she was merely excited and not drunk.

William Hart, the defendant's husband, stated that he went home about six o'clock on Thursday evening. He saw his wife there. She was perfectly sober. She had been accustomed to fits of great excitement ever since he had known her. Witness left the house at nine o'clock, and up to that time she had not been out of doors or near any drink. He would swear it. Witness returned at twelve o'clock and found his wife in an excited state, but she was quite sober. Mrs. Brown came to the house, and in answer to witness, said some boys had been annoying his wife. His wife also complained to him of having been annoyed by boys.

As Mrs. Brown did not answer the summons to attend as a witness, the case was adjourned until Saturday for her attendance.

 

Folkestone Express 1 September 1888.

Wednesday, August 29th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Banks and H.W. Poole Esq.

Annie Hart was charged with being drunk and disorderly on East Cliff on the 20th August. Mr. Wallace, solicitor, appeared for defendant.

P.C. Osborn said he saw the defendant come out of the East Cliff Tavern on Thursday night about half past nine. She commenced to use bad language to some lads. She caused a crowd to assemble round her, and he went up and asked her to go away. She replied that she did not care for a policeman or anyone else. She should go home when she thought fit. He then took her into her own house, when she kicked and made a disturbance for half an hour. He had previously seen the defendant in her own garden. She was then drunk.

In reply to Mr. Wallace, witness said Mrs. Miller, a neighbour, made a complaint to him. He was quite sure the defendant was drunk as well as excited. She did not use any violence towards him. She was too drunk to do so.

William Hart, husband of the defendant, said he went home on Thursday evening at six o'clock. His wife was perfectly sober, but very much excited. She was liable to fits of excitement. He saw her again at midnight, and she was then perfectly sober. Mrs. Brown, a neighbour, was staying with his wife. She complained to him of boys having annoyed her. She was at work at home from six till nine. He left her at home at nine, perfectly sober.

Charlotte Brown was summoned to attend on behalf of the defendant, but she was not in the town, and the summons, it appeared, had not been brought to her notice.

The case was adjourned until Saturday.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 8 September 1888.

Saturday, September 1st: Before The Mayor, J. Banks Esq., Captain Crowe, Major H.W. Poole, and W. Wightwick Esq.

Annie Hart was brought up on remand charged with being drunk and disorderly at East Cliff on the 23rd August.

The defendant's defence on the last occasion was borne out by her husband, who stated that she had been “subjected to fits of excitement” ever since he had known her. She was excited on the night in question at six o'clock when he went home, and also when he left her at nine o'clock, but she was perfectly sober. At midnight he went home again. She was then excited, and complained of the annoyance of boys.

The statement of P.C. Osborne was to the effect that he found the defendant drunk near the East Cliff Tavern. As her language was not of the choicest character he was obliged to take her to her own house. She made no resistance as she was too drunk.

Charlotte Brown was called and deposed that she lived next door to the defendant. She was often excited. On the night in question the defendant's husband sent for her to look after the children and the lodgers. The defendant was very excited. Could not say she was drunk, as she was no judge of drunkenness. (Laughter) The defendant went out soon after nine, but she did not take the trouble to see where she went to.

Supt. Taylor said there seemed to be considerable doubt about the case. His case was practically closed, but if the Bench desired it he could call two witnesses.

Mr. Watts (barrister), who defended, objected, as the case for the prosecution was closed on Wednesday.

The Bench decided that it was not necessary to call them, the Mayor stating that they were inclined to believe the evidence of the constable, and the defendant would be fined 10s. and 12s. costs.

 

Folkestone Express 8 September 1888.

Saturday, September 1st: Before The Mayor, Alderman Banks, Captain Crowe, W. Wightwick and H.W. Poole Esqs.

Annie Hart appeared to an adjourned summons, charged with being drunk and disorderly on East Cliff. The defence was that the defendant was excited and not drunk. The charge was brought by P.C. Osborn, who repeated the evidence given by him on Wednesday.

Charlotte Brown, called by the defendant, said she lived at 49, East Cliff. Before being sworn she asked who was to pay her expenses – she was summoned and had to leave her work. She was told that the defendant would have to pay her. She said that at the request of Mr. Hart she stayed with Mrs. Hart, who was very excited. She did not see her have any drink, but could not say whether she had been drinking. She stayed with Mrs. Hart from half past nine till twelve. While she was in the house she heard a disturbance. Mrs. Hart was put in the house, and she kicked the door.

Mr. Wallace wished to put in a letter from the Rev. M. Woodward to show that the defendant was of a most excitable temperament.

Supt. Taylor said he had two independent witnesses who would give evidence, but Mr. Wallace strongly objected as the case for the prosecution was closed.

The Bench convicted the defendant and fined her 10s. and costs, or seven days'.

 

Holbein's Visitors' List 29 May 1889.

Inquest.

On Thursday evening there were rumours in the town that a horse had bolted down Sandgate Hill and had thrown out of a carriage two ladies, the wives of officers in the Carabiniers. Later in the evening it was stated that one of the ladies was dead, and unfortunately rumour was, in this case, speaking only too truly. But the facts of the case will best be conveyed to our readers by the reproduction of the evidence tendered before the Borough Coroner (J. Minter Esq.) at the inquest, which was held at the Town Hall on Saturday at three o'clock, “to enquire touching the death of Agnes Mary Green”.

The Jury having been sworn and having chosen Mr. Frederick Petts as foreman, the Coroner said that Dr. Charles Lewis, who was a witness, had a most important case to attend, and he (the Coroner), would go out of the ordinary course and take the evidence before the Jury viewed the body.

Dr. Charles Lewis then deposed: I was called shortly before seven on Thursday evening to the residence of the deceased in Darnley Terrace, Sandgate, in consultation with Dr. Chubb, who was in attendance. I found the deceased insensible, and suffering from a fracture of the left side of the skull, about five or six inches in length. There was also a large wound near the right ear. The injuries were such as would be produced by a fall. I remained with deceased until her death. There was nothing that could possibly be done, and she died about 8.45.

The Jury then proceeded to Sandgate to view the body, and on their return to the Town Hall the following additional evidence was given.

William Barr: I am a groom in the employ of Mr. Dixon Green, who is a Lieutenant in the Carabiniers, and resides at 2, Chichester Villas, Sandgate. I identify the body which the jury have seen at that of my late mistress, Agnes Mary Green. On Thursday evening Mrs, Green, in company with the wife of Colonel Dennis, drove a mare in a dog cart to witness the Yeomanry sports in a field off Sandgate Road. Shortly after six o'clock we were returning; Mrs. Green was driving and I was on the back seat. Going down Sandgate Hill the whip was hanging over the reins and touched the mare, causing her to jump forward. I immediately jumped down, intending to get to the mare's head, but before I could do so she had bolted and was galloping down the hill. I followed as quickly as possible and saw the mare swerve to the offside as if she was intending to pull up at the house, which she evidently knew. When she saw the wall she shot out again, but the wheel of the cart caught the wall and Mrs. Green was thrown out. I saw her fall. The mare galloped on through Sandgate. When I reached the place where Mrs. Green was lying, I found her insensible, and with blood flowing freely from her head and face. Some other men carried her into the house, and I ran off for a doctor. Mrs. Green had been in the habit of riding and driving for a good while. The mare was half-bred. She would not stand a whip, but was otherwise quiet.

Sidney Saunders, landlord of the East Cliff Tavern, said: On Thursday evening I was going across the footpath from the Leas into Sandgate, when I saw a dog cart in which there were two ladies, with a groom on the back seat. They were going down the hill at a gentle trot, when suddenly the mare plunged, but I could not see from what cause. The groom jumped down and rushed to the horse's head, but the horse had galloped off before he could get to it. I went as fast as I could and saw the horse run over to the offside. The wheel of the cart caught the kerb, and the lady who had been driving was thrown against the wall. The lady was insensible and blood was flowing from her head and mouth. I lifted up her head, got a towel and some water, and washed her mouth out. Someone said that she lived a few doors below, and we then carried her into her house. Dr. Chubb was sent for and soon came.

Samuel Saunders, of the Belle Vue Tavern, and Joseph Whiting, of the Bricklayers' Arms, who were in company with the previous witness, having corroborated his evidence, the Coroner said he thought the jury would have no difficulty in coming to a decision.

A verdict was immediately returned of Accidental Death.

 

Folkestone Express 1 June 1889.

Inquest.

On Saturday afternoon an inquest was held at the Town Hall before J. Minter Esq., the Borough Coroner, on the body of Agnes Mary Green, who was killed on Thursday evening by being thrown from a dog cart.

Mr. Charles Lewis, surgeon, said: On Thursday evening, a little before seven o'clock, I was called to attend the deceased at her residence in Darnley Terrace, Sandgate, in consultation with Mr. Chubb, who was in attendance. I found her insensible, and suffering from a fracture of the left side of the skull some four or five inches in length. There was also a large wound near the right ear. She remained insensible until her death, about an hour and a half after I left. She died from injuries to her head, which were such as would be produced by a fall. There was nothing which could be done to save her. She was evidently sinking when I first saw her.

William Barr, a groom, in the employment of Mr. Dixon Green, lieutenant in the Carabiniers, stationed at Shorncliffe, and residing at 2, Chichester Villas, Sandgate, identified the body viewed by the jury as that of Agnes Mary Green, wife of Lieut. Green, and said on Thursday, in company with the wife of Col. Dennis, she drove a mare in a dog cart to the sports in Sandgate Road. I was in attendance and riding on the back seat. About ten minutes past six in the evening we were returning, and on driving down Sandgate Hill, the deceased being driving, she accidentally hit the mare with the whip, which caused the mare to jump forward. I jumped down to get the mare's head to steady her. Before I could get there the mare bolted and galloped down the hill. I followed, and saw the mare turn off, as if with the intention of pulling up at the house from which they started. She made for the wall on the off side. The mare saw the wall and shot out again. The cart collided against the kerb, and Mrs. Green was thrown out. I saw her fall between the wall and the wheel. The mare continued on through Sandgate, and on my arrival at the place where deceased laid on the path I noticed that she was insensible and blood was flowing very freely from her head and face. I ran off for the doctor, knowing I could not catch the mare. Deceased had been in the habit of riding and driving the mare for the past eight or nine months. It was half-bred, and would not stand the whip, otherwise she was quiet.

Sidney Saunders, a publican, living at East Cliff, said: On Thursday, the 23rd May, I, with others, was walking across the footpath leading into Sandgate Road, and saw a dog cart, in which were two ladies and a groom. The horse was going at a gentle trot. I saw it make a plunge forward, and the groom get off the back of the trap and rush towards the horse's head. Before he got up to it the horse had bolted. He then made a grasp at the trap, appeared to stumble, and the horse was gone. I ran as fast as I could. I saw the horse turn towards the kerb on the off side, and as the wheel caught the kerb, one of the ladies was pitched out against the wall. The horse went right away through Sandgate. I found deceased lying on the path, insensible, and blood flowing freely from the head and mouth. I lifted up her head, unfastened her bodice, and procured some water and washed her mouth. Someone came along and said the deceased lived a few doors off, and asked them to carry her indoors. They did so, and Dr. Chubb came. Samuel Saunders and Joseph Whiting were with me.

These two having given corroborative evidence, the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 21 June 1893.

Inquest.

On Saturday morning Mr. G. Blaskett, formerly fishmonger, died at the Victoria Hospital from self-inflicted injuries. The deceased was about 30 years of age, and according to the evidence of his wife had of late been morbidly brooding over another suicide which occurred some month or six weeks previously, when a young man who was on a visit cut his throat in a house next door to where he lived. Since then he had been continuously talking about him.

On Friday afternoon he went into the shop of Mr. Harris and asked him if he had a revolver to lend him, as he had a mad dog he wanted to kill. He afterwards visited the East Cliff Tavern and had a glass of beer, and left in apparently his usual health and spirits. Shortly after a gatekeeper on the South Eastern railway, named William Fleet, heard the report of a pistol, and on going in the direction of the sound found the deceased on the footpath moaning, and the revolver lying by his side.

P.C. Smoker conveyed the wounded man to the hospital, where he searched him and found on him the following note: “Goodbye, goodbye, dear Dot. I'm very sorry indeed, and can't expect you or anyone else to think much of me. G. Blaskett. Don't be cruel to Mamma”.

When admitted into the hospital he was, said Dr. Chambers, in a comatose condition. He plugged the wound, which was all he could do for him, and he remained unconscious, dying about half past nine.

The widow also said that he had appeared strange for some time.

The jury returned a verdict of suicide during temporary insanity.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 24 June 1893.

Inquest.

On Saturday afternoon the Deputy Coroner (Mr. G.W. Haines) held an inquest at the Town Hall, concerning the sad death of Mr. Geroge Edward Blaskett, who died at the Victoria Hospital the same morning from a self-inflicted pistol wound.

Joseph Sidney Saunders, the landlord of the East Cliff Tavern, was called as to the identity of the deceased, with whom he said he was well acquainted. The deceased was a fishmonger and poulterer and carried on business in Tontine Street. About half past four on Friday afternoon he called at his house, and was served by Mrs. Saunders with a glass of beer. He asked a gentleman in the smoking room – Mr. Norman – if he had a piece of notepaper. Mr. Norman gave him a piece, and also a lead pencil. He wrote something down, returned the pencil, put the paper in his pocket, drank up his beer, and left the house. Witness said “Good day, Blaskett”, and he replied “Good day, Saunders”. He seemed to be all right – about as usual. He was in very good spirits, but he had a peculiar look about the eyes; he always did have a peculiar stare. About a minute after he left the house he heard the report of a pistol, and when he went out he found him shot.

William Fleet, gate-keeper at the East Cliff railway crossing, said he heard the report of the pistol about 4.25. He went to the gardens, about 150 yards above the crossing, on the east side of the line. He saw deceased lying on his back in the footpath. He was groaning, and he rolled over on his side. He did not speak. A revolver was lying near him, and he picked it up because the people should not steal it. He sent a boy for Dr. Eastes, but he was out, and the deceased was taken to the hospital in a cab about half an hour after the occurrence.

Sidney Harris, son of Mr. Harris, tobacconist, South Street, said the deceased went into their shop between four and half past on Friday afternoon. He asked if Mr. Harris would lend him a revolver, as he had a mad dog and wanted to shoot it. Mr. Harris told him to get the revolver from his bedroom, and he did so and took it to his father, but he did not see him give it to Mr. Blaskett, nor did he notice if it were loaded.

P.C. James Smoker deposed that on Friday afternoon he was outside of Glasscock's, in the Dover Road, when he was informed by a ticket collector in the employ of the Railway Company that a man had shot himself. He proceeded to the spot, where he found a man with a wound in the head, and unconscious. He accompanied him to the hospital, and on searching his clothes he found two separate pieces of paper on him.

The Coroner here read the writing, as follows: “Goodbye, Dear Dot, Very sorry indeed. I can't expect you or anyone to think very much of me. G. Blaskett”. On the other piece of paper was written what the Coroner said looked to him like “Do not be cruel to mamma”.

Mr. William Francis Chambers, House Surgeon at the Victoria Hospital, said the deceased was admitted to the hospital a minute or two after five on Friday afternoon. He was comatose, and on examining him he found a wound under the lower part of the right ear, about three quarters of an inch in length. He probed for the bullet without success, and found that the bone inside the ear was greatly broken. He plugged the wound and had him taken into a ward upstairs. He remained unconscious until nine o'clock that morning, when he vomited and muttered something he could not understand. He expired about twenty five minutes past nine. He should say the bullet went slightly upwards, and the wound could have been self-inflicted. Death was caused by shock from laceration of the brain.

Mrs. Blaskett, widow of the deceased, said her husband was 36 years of age. He was at work in the shop all the morning, but he had appeared strange to her for some time. He went out about quarter past three.

The jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased shot himself whilst temporarily insane.

 

Folkestone Express 24 June 1893.

Inquest.

On Saturday afternoon an inquest was held at the Town Hall before Geo. W. Haines Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of George Blaskett, a poulterer, of Tontine Street, who shot himself on Friday afternoon and died on Saturday morning.

Joseph Sidney Saunders, landlord of the East Cliff Tavern, said he was well acquainted with the deceased. He saw him on Friday afternoon about half past four in his house, but did not see him go in. He had a glass of beer and went out. He did not say anything to witness, but he asked Mr. Norman, who was in the smoking room, if he could oblige him with a piece of notepaper. Mr. Norman gave him a piece and lent him a pencil. Deceased wrote something and returned the pencil, putting the paper in his pocket, and left. He appeared to be in very good spirits. He usually had a “stare” about the eyes. He subsequently heard the report of a pistol – not more than a minute after Blaskett had left.

William Fleet, gatekeeper, living in a cottage at the crossing of the Tramway, at the bottom of East Cliff, said he heard the report of a pistol about five minutes past four. He ran to where the deceased was lying – about 150 yards from the gate, in a garden. Deceased did not speak. He was lying on his back, but afterwards turned over on to his side. Witness took charge of the revolver, and handed it to the Superintendent. Saunders then came up, and a boy was sent to Dr. Eastes, who was not at home, and deceased was taken to the hospital subsequently in a fly.

Sidney Harris, a lad living at 7, South Street, said he saw the deceased in his father's shop on Friday afternoon. He asked for his father, and witness told him he was laid up. He then asked if Mr. Harris would lend him a revolver, as he had a mad dog and wanted to shoot it. Witness went up to his father, who told him to get a revolver from the bedroom, and he did so and took it to his father, who was in the sitting room. Deceased went into the room and received the revolver, which he put in his pocket and walked away. The revolver produced was the same one. He could not say whether it was loaded when deceased took it away.

P.C. Smoker said he was near the Tram Road on Friday afternoon, and was told by a ticket collector on the South Eastern Railway that a man had shot himself. He went to the place indicated, and found deceased lying on his back in a footpath alongside of a garden on the other side of the tramway. Deceased was unconscious. Saunders handed him the revolver produced. One chamber was empty and five loaded. Deceased was taken to the hospital. He searched the deceased's clothing and found the two pieces of paper produced on him. On one piece was “Goodbye, Dot. Very sorry indeed. I can't expect you or anyone to think very much of me. G. Blaskett”, and on the other “Do not be cruel to Mamma”.

William Francis Chambers, House Surgeon at the Hospital, said the deceased was admitted to the hospital on Friday afternoon, a few minutes after five. He was comatose at the time. He found a wound near the right ear about of an inch long. There were a few small pieces of brain scattered over the ear. He probed for the bullet and found the bone greatly broken. He could not find the bullet. Nothing could be done for him and he plugged the wound and had him taken upstairs into a ward. He remained unconscious until about nine o'clock that morning, when he muttered something and vomited. About twenty five minutes past nine he died. He should say the bullet went slightly upward at at first, and then was deflected. He could not say what direction it took. He should say the wound was self-inflicted. Death was caused by shock from the laceration of the brain. He had not made a post mortem examination. There was no wound of exit. The wound was such as would be caused by a bullet of the size produced fired from a revolver.

Elizabeth Blaskett, widow of the deceased, said his age was 36. He was in the shop all Friday morning. He had not been well for a long time, and appeared strange since something which happened next door, and was always talking about a man cutting his throat. It had troubled him ever since. He went out about a quarter past three in the afternoon, and went towards the harbour. She saw nothing more of him until she heard he had shot himself.

The jury found that the deceased shot himself while suffering from temporary insanity.

 

Folkestone Express 1 June 1895.

Local News.

On Thursday James Oliver, a street singer, was charged with stealing 1s. 9d. from a till at the East Cliff Tavern. Joseph Sidney Saunders, the landlord, said he knew the prisoner by sight. He was in his house on Wednesday, and on Thursday about nine in the morning he went in and had a glass of ale. He was left alone in the bar for a few minutes, and in the meantime extracted the money from the till. The landlord accused him of robbing the till, and in his coat pocket he found 1s. 9d. Prisoner said “For God's sake, give me a chance. You may have sons of your own one day”. He was sentenced to a month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Visitors' List 5 June 1895.

Police Court Jottings.

On Thursday, before The Mayor, Mr. Alderman Banks, and Mr. Brooke, James Oliver, a labourer, who had the appearance of one who earned his livelihood by other means than by the sweat of his brow, was charged with robbing a till at the East Cliff Tavern that (Thursday) morning.

The facts stated the audacity of the prisoner and his speedy apprehension.

It appeared that on Wednesday afternoon the prisoner went to the East Cliff Tavern and called for a glass of beer, with which he was served by the landlord, Mr. Joseph S. Saunders. Having drunk his beer the prisoner left the premises, and called for another glass of beer shortly after nine o'clock on Thursday morning, and he was served with this also.

The prosecutor stated that he had to go into a room at the rear, and was absent from the bar for a short time. From something that his wife told him he returned to the bar, and saw the prisoner going towards the door, but he caught hold of him by the collar of his coat and said to him “Just give me the money you have taken out of my till”. The prisoner put his hand in the right hand pocket of his coat and said “There you are; it is only a few coppers. Give me a chance”. Witness took the coins, which amounted to 1s. 9d. in bronze. When he left the till, witness said there was about 2s. 6d. in bronze in it, and two sixpences, but after prisoner had taken the money out he only left 7d. and the sixpenny pieces.

Annie Bullen Saunders, the prosecutor's wife, stated that she was in the bar parlour that morning, when she heard the prisoner push back the till. She went to the bar, saw the prisoner leaving the inside, and saw him put his hand inside his coat pocket, while she “heard the coins rattle as they fell in”. She rushed to the door and kept it closed while she called for her husband.

By the Clerk: There was not a door on the counter, but the prisoner had to go through a room to get inside the bar.

Prisoner said he had been out of work for a long time, and was “hard up”. He also had had ”sundry glasses of beer” in the evening, and was not sober when he went to the tavern that morning.

The Clerk observed that it was not a question of being “in want”, for the prisoner had in his possession one shilling and a penny.

The Bench had no doubt that the prisoner went to the house for the purpose of robbery, and he just happened to have been caught in the act. He was sent to gaol for one month with hard labour.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 9 July 1898.

Saturday, July 2nd: Before Ald. Banks, J. Pledge, J. Fitness, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs.

License was transferred to Mr. Grigg, of the East Cliff Tavern.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 August 1898.

Wednesday, August 3rd: Before Messrs. J. Pledge, W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey.

Mr. Griggs was granted permission to sell at the East Cliff Tavern.

 

Folkestone Herald 6 August 1898.

Police Court Report.

On Wednesday licence was granted to Mr. Grigg, East Cliff Tavern.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 6 August 1898.

Wednesday, August 3rd: Before J. Pledge, W.C. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey esqs.

Transfer was sanctioned to Mr.ss Griggs, East Cliff Tavern.

 

Hythe Reporter 13 August 1898.

Folkestone Police Court.

At the sitting of the Bench of Magistrates last Wednesday, the following licence was transferred:

Mr. John Grigg was granted a transfer of the licence of the East Cliff Tavern.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 February 1904.

Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Alderman Herbert, Lieut. Cols. Fynmore, Westropp, and Hamilton, Messrs. C.J. Pursey and E.T. Ward.

The Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) read his annual report, which contained interesting figures with regard to drunkenness, etc. No person in Folkestone had yet been convicted a sufficient number of times to be placed on the “black list”. The Chief Constable objected to the renewal of the licence of the Swan Inn, Dover Road, and asked that the consideration of this licence might be deferred until the adjourned sessions.

The Chairman then read the Justices' Report, which stated that the number of licensed houses in Folkestone, and especially around the harbour, was out of all proportion to the population. The number of licences had not been reduced, owing to the fact that a Bill amending the Licensing Laws was shortly to be introduced in Parliament. Certain public houses – the Imperial Brewery Tap, the Hope, the East Cliff Tavern, the Victoria, the Lifeboat Inn, the Duke Of Edinburgh, and the Channel Inn had been inspected by the Justices, and recommendations with regard to their sanitary improvement and closing of back entries were made.

Mr. John Minter said that water had been laid on at the Channel Inn since the report on the bad state of the sanitary arrangements. Mr. Minter also suggested with regard to the Imperial Brewery Tap that a public bar should be made with an entrance from Mill Bay.

The Bench decided, however, that the orders made in the report should be adhered to.

Licences were then granted to the lessees of public houses and licensed premises.

 

Folkestone Express 13 February 1904.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

Wednesday, February 10th: Before W. Wightwick Esq., Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, and W.G. Herbert, E.T. Ward, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The following was the report of Supt. Reeve: Chief Constable's Office, Folkestone, 10th February, 1904. To the Chairman and Members of the Licensing Committee of the Borough of Folkestone. Gentlemen, I have the honour to report for your information that there are at present within your jurisdiction 139 premises licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquors, namely: Full licences 87; Beer on 11; Beer off 6; Beer and Spirits (dealers) 16; Grocers 12; Confectioners 3; Chemists 4; Total 139 – an average of one licence to every 220 persons, or one “on” licence to every 313. This is a decrease of one full licence as compared with last year's return, the licence of the Marquis Of Lorne having been refused at the adjourned meeting in March. Twenty of the licences have been transferred during the year, namely, 14 full licences, two beer on, two beer off, and two grocers. One beer off licence was transferred twice during the year. One licence holder has been convicted since the last annual meeting of committing drunkenness on his licensed premises. He has since transferred his licence and left the house. The alterations which the Justices at the adjourned meeting last year directed to be made to the Packet Boat, Castle, Tramway, Bricklayers' Arms, Granville, and Star Inns have all been carried out in a satisfactory manner, and none of the licensed houses are now used as common lodging houses. Ten occasional licences, and extensions of hours on 21 occasions, have been granted to licence holders during the year. There are 14 places licensed for music and dancing, and two for public billiard playing. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquors are sold are registered in accordance with the Licensing Act of 1902. For the year ending 31st December last year, 154 persons (131 males and 23 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness. 131 were convicted and 23 discharged. This is an increase of 65 persons proceeded against, and 51 convicted, as compared with 1902. The increase is chiefly due to the additional powers given to the police under the Licensing Act, 1902. Up to the present time no person within the Borough has been convicted the necessary number of times within the 12 months to be placed on the “black list” as provided by Section 6 of the Act of 1902. With very few exceptions the whole of the licensed houses have been conducted in a satisfactory manner. The only objection I have to make to the renewal of any of the present licences is that of the Swan Inn, Dover Road, and I would ask that the renewal of this licence be deferred until the adjourned meeting. I have the honour to be, gentlemen, your obedient servant, H. Reeve (Chief Constable).

The Chairman: I think, gentlemen, you will agree that the report of the Superintendent is a satisfactory one – in fact, I may say very satisfactory – for the whole year. With your permission I well read the report we now make to you. At the adjournment of the last general licensing meeting we stated that in our opinion the number of licences for the sale of intoxicating liquor then existing in the borough of Folkestone, especially in the part of the immediate neighbourhood of the Harbour, was out of all proportion to the population, and that we proposed between then and the general annual licensing meeting of this year to obtain information on various matters, to enable us to determine what reduction would be made in the number of licences. We invited the owners of licensed houses in the meantime to meet and agree among themselves for the voluntary surrender at this general meeting of a substantial number of licences in the borough, and to submit the result of their united action to the Licensing Justices for acceptance. Failing any satisfactory proposal for reduction by the owners, the Licensing Justices last year intimated that in the exercise of their discretionary powers they would at this year's meeting decide in a fair and equitable spirit what reduction should be made. But at the opening of Parliament last week it was announced in the King's speech that the Government intended to introduce in the House of Commons during the present session a Bill to amend the Licensing Laws. In view of this legislation we are of opinion we ought not, pending the passage of this Bill through Parliament, exercise the discretionary powers vested in us, and take measures for effecting a further reduction in the number of licences within the borough on the ground that certain licensed premises are not required for the public accommodation. We have recently inspected certain houses known as the Imperial Brewery Tap, the Hope, East Cliff Tavern, Victoria, Lifeboat, Duke Of Edinburgh, Railway Tavern, and Channel Inn.

As to the East Cliff Tavern, there is a back entrance from a yard in the rear of the licensed premises to a public way, which renders it difficult for the police to have proper supervision over the business carried on upon the premises. We therefore direct that the holder of the licence shall, within fourteen days from this date, close the back entrance from the yard to the public way. We also object to a portion of the licensed premises being sub-let to lodgers.

 

Folkestone Daily News 20 June 1906.

Wednesday, June 20th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Leggett, and Pursey.

The licence of the East Cliff Tavern was transferred from Martin G. Griggs to E.F. Price.

 

Folkestone Express 23 June 1906.

Wednesday, June 20th: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Major Leggett, and C.J. Pursey Esq.

The Magistrates granted temporary authority to Martin Gray Price to sell at the East Cliff Tavern.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 June 1906.

Wednesday, June 20th: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. G.W. Pursey, and Major Leggett.

The licence of the East Cliff Tavern was temporarily transferred from John Grigg to Martin Price, who was instructed by the Justices to keep the back entrance closed.

 

Folkestone Daily News 11 July 1906.

Licence Transfer.

Before Messrs. Hamilton, Fynmore, and Linton.

The East Cliff Tavern from Mr. Griggs to Mr. Price.

 

Folkestone Express 14 July 1906.

Wednesday, July 11th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Alderman Vaughan, and R.J. Linton Esq.

This being the day fixed for the special licensing sessions, the following licence was transferred: The East Cliff Tavern, from Mr. J. Griggs to Mr. Price.

 

Folkestone Herald 14 July 1906.

Wednesday, July 11th: Before Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, and Mr. Linton.

Licence was transferred as follows: The East Cliff Tavern, from Mr. G.S. Grigg to Mr. Price.

 

Folkestone Daily News 15 May 1907.

Wednesday, May 15th:

Benjamin Mullett was summoned for obstructing the highway with a horse and carriage.

P.C. Prebble said at 12.35 p.m. on Tuesday, the 11th of May, he saw the horse and carriage standing near the East Cliff Tavern. He kept it under observation, and at 1 o'clock he went to defendant and asked him if he was in charge, and he replied “Yes”. Witness then told him he should report him for obstruction.

Defendant said he went in the East Cliff Tavern while the storm was on.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 9s. costs, or seven days'.

 

Folkestone Express 18 May 1907.

Wednesday, May 15th: Before Alderman Vaughan and Lieut. Colonel Hamilton.

Benjamin Mullett was summoned for causing an obstruction on East Cliff with a horse and carriage on May 7th.

P.C. Prebble said at 12.35 on May 7th he saw a horse and carriage standing in the road near the East Cliff Tavern. He kept it under observation until one o'clock. He then went into the East Cliff Tavern and found the defendant inside. He asked him if he was in charge of the horse and carriage, and he said he was.

Defendant said he was engaged, and he went into the passage of the tavern as it was raining and squally at the time.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 9s. costs.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 May 1907.

Wednesday, May 15th: Before Alderman T.J. Vaughan and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Benjamin Mullett pleaded Guilty to causing an obstruction with a horse and cart.

P.C. Prebble deposed that about 12.35 p.m. on Tuesday, 7th inst., he saw a horse and cab standing in the road near the East Cliff Tavern, East Cliff. Witness kept observation on it till one o'clock. He then went to the East Cliff Tavern, and found defendant inside. He asked him if he was in charge of the horse, and defendant said “Yes”.

Defendant said that he was engaged at the time.

The Chief Constable: In the public house?

P.C. Prebble said that defendant remained in the public house all the time he had the horse under observation.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 9s. costs, or seven days'. Defendant was allowed till today week to pay.

 

Folkestone Daily News 22 May 1907.

Wednesday, May 22nd: Before The Mayor, Messrs. Herbert, Pursey, Stainer, Boyd, Swoffer, and Leggett.

William Hall was summoned for being drunk on licensed premises, namely the East Cliff Tavern, on May the 7th. Defendant pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. Mercer appeared for defendant.

Inspector Lilley deposed: On Tuesday, the 7th inst., at 12.55 p.m. I saw P.C. Prebble in Radnor Bridge Road, and from a statement he made to me I kept the East Cliff Tavern under observation till 1.30. Then, in company with him and P.C. Johnson, I went into the house by the front door, where I saw defendant sitting in a chair with his back to the bar. From his appearance I came to the conclusion that he had had too much to drink. There was no-one behind the bar. I went through the passage and knocked, and the landlord's son came, and I asked him for his father. At that time the landlord came in. I went to the bar again and said to Hall “I think you have had too much to drink, and should advise you to get off the premises”. He rose partly from the chair, and said “Do you think so?” I replied “Yes”. He said “Then I don't”. I went outside, and in a minute or two he came out with his brother, followed by the landlord. He got into a hackney carriage, and said “You are a piece of ---- ,you are. You are a ---- rotter. I know you of old”. I said “I shall report you for being drunk on licensed premises”. He said “You can do what you ---- well like”, and continued to swear till the carriage drove away.

By Mr. Mercer: The police constables said nothing to defendant.

Where were the other constables? – They followed me.

And you did the talking? – Yes.

He made a sensible remark when you told him he had had enough? – Well, I should hardly call it sensible.

P.C. W. Prebble said: I saw the defendant in Dover Road at eleven in the morning, and had a conversation with him and his brother. Defendant was then under the influence of drink. I accompanied Inspector Lilley on the day in question. I kept the East Cliff Tavern under observation from 12.30 to 1. I saw defendant sitting in the bar with his back to the counter. Inspector Lilley called the landlord's attention to defendant's condition. The landlord said ”He has only had one glass here”. I then went outside, and shortly afterwards defendant came out and got into a trap that was waiting. While Inspector Lilley was talking to defendant's brother, defendant became very excited and said to Lilley “You are a ---- rotter. I don't care a ---- for all three of you”.

Mr. Mercer: Why didn't you lock him up? – There was no need of it; he was in a trap.

How far is it from the door of the house to the trap? – About three or four yards.

How many were in the bar? – Three or four, I believe.

Do you know their names? – No.

How long have you known the defendant? – A long time.

P.C. Johnson said: On the day in question I accompanied Inspector Lilley and P.C. Prebble to the East Cliff Tavern. I had previously seen defendant in the morning, and he was then in a drunken condition. Defendant was in the bar of the East Cliff Tavern, and was decidedly drunk.

Mr. Mercer: You saw him in Dover Road in the morning, didn't you? – Yes.

How was he then? – Drunk.

Defendant was sworn, and in reply to Mr. Mercer, said: I have lived in the town 25 years. On the day in question I went to see my brother, who had been left sole executor of my father's will. My brother refused to see me, and threatened to give me into custody. I did not see the other constable Johnson, but only Prebble. I afterwards went with my brother Frederick to the East Cliff Tavern, and we had a bottle of ale together. We sat down. My brother and I drank the ale. Inspector Lilley came in, and said “Are the Halls here?”, and my brother replied “Yes, they are both here”. I had ordered a cab to meet me there at 12.30. I didn't like the idea of being told by the Inspector that I was drunk, and I dare say I opened my mouth a little too wide. The same evening I went to Rugby to do some work.

The Chief Constable: Haven't you forgotten to tell the Bench about another visit you paid to a certain house that same morning? – I don't think so.

Try and refresh your memory. – Well, I might have done.

Did you go into Mr. Southall's? – Yes, I think I did.

And you went to your brother's house? – Yes.

How many drinks had you altogether? – One at my brother's and one at the East Cliff Tavern.

Didn't you have anything at Mr. Southall's? – No, I don't think so.

You are not quite sure? – Yes, I am certain.

Mr. Mercer, on behalf of the defendant, said it was a fact that defendant was very excitable on the day in question, and it was no doubt due to a mistake by the police that the defendant was summoned. He was labouring under very great excitement.

Frederick Hall deposed: I am the licensee of the Wheatsheaf Inn, and on the 6th May we buried my father. On that day we went to see my brother, who had been left sole legatee under my father's will. My brother refused to see us, and that made defendant very excited. I spoke to P.C. Prebble about the family trouble, and said we did not want any trouble. We afterwards went for a walk, and went to the East Cliff Tavern about 12.30. The police came there about 25 minutes after we got there. Lilley said to my brother “I think you have had enough”, and my brother replied “Well I don't, and rather than make any bother in the man's house, I'll walk out”. He did so.

The Chief Constable: No-one accused you of being drunk? – No.

Or anyone else? – No.

Do you think his excitement misled the police? – Yes, I do.

Did you go into Mr. Southall's during the morning? – No.

Are you sure? – Yes, I don't think we went there.

William Featherbe deposed: I was in the East Cliff Tavern on the day in question with the defendant. I was in his company about 20 minutes, and we sat together. We talked about the ship Adriatic, and he gave me the dimensions of her. He also told me about his family affairs. The police came through the passage, and Lilley accused the landlord of having the Halls drunk in his house. Defendant then walked out of the house and got into a carriage that was waiting.

Joseph Lock, a seaman, deposed: I was in the East Cliff Tavern on the 7th May. The defendant was also there, sitting about two feet away from me. He had a glass of ale, which he did not finish. The police came in, and one of them said “Is Hall in here?”, and the landlord said “Yes”. The constable then said “I shall report him for being drunk on licensed premises”. Hall then left the house and got into a carriage. He was not drunk.

This concluded the case, and the Magistrates then left the Bench to consider their decision. On returning, Mr. Herbert, as Chairman, said they had come to the conclusion that the charge had not been proved, and the case would therefore be dismissed.

The case against the landlord was withdrawn.

 

Folkestone Express 25 May 1907.

Wednesday, May 22nd: Before The Mayor, W.G. Herbert, C.J. Pursey, R.J. Linton, G. Boyd, J. Stainer, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

William Hall was summoned for being drunk on licensed premises (East Cliff Tavern) on May 7th. Defendant pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. R.M. Mercer appeared on defendant's behalf.

Inspector Lilley said on Tuesday, the 7th inst., at 12.55 noon, he saw P.C. Prebble in Radnor Bridge Road, and from a communication he made to him he kept the East Cliff Tavern under observation until a few minutes past one. Then, in company with P.C.s Prebble and Johnson, he went into the house. In the bar he saw defendant sitting, and from his appearance he came to the conclusion he had had too much to drink. There was no-one behind the bar. The landlord subsequently came in through the front door. Witness told defendant he thought he had had too much to drink, and advised him to get off the premises. Defendant said “Do you think so?” Witness replied “Yes”, and defendant said “Then I don't”. Witness went outside and defendant followed with his brother and the landlord. He got into a hackney carriage and used abusive language. Witness told defendant he should report him for being drunk on licensed premises. He had no doubt as to defendant's condition.

P.C. Prebble said on Tuesday, May 7th, about 11.15, he saw defendant in Dover Road with his brother. Witness had a conversation with both of them. Defendant was under the influence of drink. Later witness accompanied Inspector Lilley to the East Cliff Tavern. He had previously kept observation on the house from 12.35 to one o'clock. On entering the house witness saw defendant sitting in the bar. He heard Inspector Lilley call the landlord's attention to defendant's condition. He heard the landlord say that defendant had only had one glass of ale there. Witness then went outside, and shortly afterwards defendant came out and got into a Victoria that was waiting. While Inspector Lilley was talking to defendant's brother, defendant became very excited and used abusive language towards the Inspector. Defendant was drunk.

P.C. H. Johnson said on May 7th, shortly after eleven o'clock in the morning, he saw defendant and his brother in Dover Street. Witness did not speak to them. Defendant was under the influence of drink. About 1.15 the witness accompanied Inspector Lilley and P.C. Prebble to the East Cliff Tavern, where he saw defendant sitting in the public bar. In his other evidence witness corroborated the previous evidence.

Defendant then went into the witness box. He said he had lived in the town twenty five years and was a builder. His brother kept the Wheatsheaf. On May 7th he went to his brother's and had a glass of ale there. He had recently lost his father, and his youngest brother, Arthur, was left sole executor and beneficiary of the will. Witness and his brother Frederick went to the youngest brother's house in Dover Road. There was an argument, and witness's brother said he would give him in charge. Later witness and Frederick Hall went to the East Cliff Tavern, and Frederick Hall called for a bottle of ale. They each had a glass. Witness did not drink all of his ale. He had been in the bar about half an hour when the police came in. Witness admitted he lost his temper, but he was not drunk and did not like being told about it. He had never been drunk in his life. The same evening witness went to Rugby.

Cross-examined, witness said he was perfectly sober. When the constables came in he became excited.

Frederick Hall said he was the licensee of the Wheatsheaf. He had been in the trade six years. On May 6th he buried his father, and on May 7th witness, accompanied by defendant, went to see his youngest brother about the will. Defendant became excited when his brother said he would give him in charge. About a quarter to ten that morning defendant had a glass of ale at witness's house. At 12.30 they went into the East Cliff Tavern The police entered about twenty five minutes afterwards. Witness saw defendant walk to the cab, and he walked as straight as anyone.

William Edward Featherby, a ship's carpenter, said he was in the East Cliff Tavern on May 7th. He was in the bar at the same time defendant was. Witness entered into conversation with defendant, and his talk was quite rational. He was perfectly sober.

Joseph Lott, a seaman, who was in the East Cliff Tavern on the day in question, said he heard defendant talking to Featherby, and he was sober.

The Magistrates then retired, and on their return the Chairman said the Bench were unanimously of the opinion that the case must be dismissed. The police had acted perfectly fairly, but had mistaken excitement for drunkenness.

The summons against Martin G. Price, the landlord of the East Cliff Tavern, for permitting drunkenness, was withdrawn on the Chief Constable's application.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 May 1907.

Wednesday, May 22nd: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Messrs. R.J. Linton, C.J. Pursey, J. Stainer, and Councillor G. Boyd.

Wm. Hall was summoned for being drunk on licensed premises (the East Cliff Tavern). The Chief Constable prosecuted, and Mr. R.M. Mercer represented the landlord (Mr. M.G. Price). Defendant pleaded Not Guilty. All the witnesses were ordered to leave the Court until called upon.

Inspector Lilley deposed that on Tuesday, May 17th, at 12.55 noon, he saw P.C. Prebble in Radnor Bridge Road, and from a communication he made to witness, he kept the East Cliff Tavern, East Cliff, under observation till three minutes past one. Then, in company with P.C. Prebble and P.C. Johnson, he went into the house. In the front of the bar he saw defendant, sitting with his back to the bar, in a chair. From his appearance, witness came to the conclusion that he had had too much to drink. There was no-one behind the bar. Witness went through the passage to the entrance door behind the bar, and knocked. At that moment the landlord came in the front door from the street. Witness went back to the front bar again, and said to Hall “I think you have had too much to drink; I should advise you to get off the premises”. He rose partly up out of the chair, and said “Do you think so?” Witness replied “Yes”. He said “Then I don't”. Witness went outside, and in a minute or two defendant came out with his brother, followed by the landlord. He got into a waiting hackney carriage, and said “You are a nice lot of ---- you are. You are a ---- rotter; I know you of old”. Witness said “I shall report you for being drunk on licensed premises”. He said “You can do what you ---- well like”. He continued to swear until the carriage drove away. He had no doubt at all as to the defendant's condition; Hall was drunk.

Cross-examined by Mr. Mercer: The constables were not with him all the time in the house. They came in after him. He thought it was a proof of drunkenness for a man to say to three police officers “You can do what you like”.

P.C. Prebble deposed that on the 7th May, about 11.15 a.m., he saw defendant fall in the Dover Road. He was then with his brother. Witness had a conversation with both. Defendant at that time was very much under the influence of drink. Witness later accompanied Inspector Lilley to the East Cliff Tavern. He had been keeping observation on the house from 12.35 to one o'clock. Defendant did not enter the house during that time. On entering the public bar witness saw defendant sitting there with his back to the counter. He heard the landlord say to Inspector Lilley “He has only had one glass of ale here”. Witness then went outside. Shortly afterwards he saw defendant come out, and get into a Victoria which was waiting outside. While Inspector Lilley was talking to defendant's brother, who came out with defendant, defendant became very excited, and said to Inspector Lilley “I know you Inspector; you are a ---- rotter. I don't care a ---- for all three of you. Do as you like”. There was no doubt that defendant was drunk.

Cross-examined: He did not see any need to arrest the man. If he had been in the road instead of in the trap he would have done so. Defendant stepped into the Victoria without assistance.

P.C. H. Johnson also stated that defendant was drunk.

Cross-examined: He saw P.C. Prebble talking to defendant in the Dover Road. Witness was standing in the middle of the road, and could not hear what the conversation was about. He thought defendant was drunk at that time, because his face was flushed, and his voice was excited, and he was moving his hands about.

This concluded the case for the prosecution.

Defendant, on oath, said he had lived in the town about twenty five years, and was a builder. One of his brothers – Frederick – kept the Wheatsheaf Inn. On the 7th May he left home to go to his brother Fred's, and had one glass of ale there. He then went, in company with Frederick, to see his other brother, Arthur, who lived in the Dover Road. Witness's father had recently died, and Arthur was the sole executor and beneficiary under his will. He and his brother Frederick did not think that was right, and they were going round to see Arthur about it. Arthur would not see them, and told him (defendant) that if he did not leave his door he would give him in charge of a constable. He was very excited over the will, and had some conversation with P.C. Prebble about it. That was between 11.30 and 12. Witness then had a walk round, and afterwards went to the East Cliff Tavern with his brother Fred. There Frederick called for a bottle of ale, and defendant and his brother halved it. Each had one glass. The landlord supplied the bottle. Witness sat down when he went into the house. Defendant's brother took the ale and poured it out, handing defendant his, but he (defendant) “did not drink more than about a couple of inches”. He was talking to Mr. Featherbe about the new White Star liner when the constable entered. There were several other people in the bar at the time. Witness had been in there about twenty minutes or half an hour before the police entered. Inspector Lilley said “Are the Halls here?”, and witness's brother said “We are both here”. Witness got out of his chair and walked straight out, without staggering; nobody assisted him. He had ordered a cab to wait outside, and he got into it. Defendant did not like being accused of being drunk when he was not, so he lost his temper, and, he was afraid, opened his mouth a bit too wide. Witness had never been accused of drunkenness before. The same evening he went on to Rugby to some work he had to do there.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable: He did not think he and his brother Fred called at another house before going to see Arthur. He was pretty sure they did not.

The Chief Constable: May I refresh your memory. Did you not go to Mr. Southall's?

Witness (after hesitation): Perhaps we did. Yes we did. Continuing, he said that when the police officers entered the house, they accused nobody of being drunk. Outside they said they should report him. They did not accuse anybody else of being drunk. He did not know why they picked on him. The sight of the three policemen excited him, and frightened him. He thought he should get into trouble. Perhaps the policemen mistook his excitement over that and his family trouble for the effects of drink. He had only been in his brother's house before that morning. He had had one glass there, and one at the East Cliff. That was all he had had that morning. He did not think he had any at Mr. Southall's; he was certain of that.

Mr. Mercer then briefly addressed the Bench, drawing particular attention to the rational answers of defendant to Inspector Lilley in the bar. With regard to the evidence of P.C. Johnson as to defendant's condition in the Dover Road, he said it was simply ridiculous to say that, from the middle of the road, he was such an experienced man that he could tell from the defendant's gestures, colour, and tone of voice – although he could not hear what he was saying – that he was drunk. Nobody would hang a dog on such evidence. After referring to the fact that defendant had had family troubles with regard to the will, which had excited him, Mr. Mercer proceeded to call further witnesses.

Frederick Hall, brother of the defendant, said he was licensee of the Wheatsheaf Inn. On the 7th inst. witness and defendant went to see their younger brother about the will. When they got there Arthur said that if defendant did not go away he would give him in charge. That made defendant very excited. Defendant came into witness's licensed house at 10.15, and had a glass of ale only. Then they went out together. After they left Dover Road, they went over Radnor Bridge to the cliff for a walk, and then to the East Cliff Tavern. They got there about 12.30. The police came in about twenty five minutes later. Witness then corroborated defendant's evidence as to what took place then. His brother walked quite straight to the cab, and was perfectly sober.

Cross-examined: No-one accused witness of being drunk. He supposed that the excitement as to the family trouble misled the police to think that his brother was drunk. He had no recollection of himself and his brother going into Mr. Southall's.

Wm. Edward Featherbe, a ships' carpenter, said that he was in the East Cliff Tavern at the time in question. He was in defendant's company about twenty minutes, sitting by him. He talked to defendant about ship-building in Liverpool. The latter was giving witness dimensions of a new liner – the Adriatic. He was perfectly sober. Defendant was quoting figures as to the size of the ship, and spoke quite rationally. When the police entered Inspector Lilley accused the landlord of having “the Halls” drunk on the premises. Defendant walked out perfectly straight; there was no sign of staggering.

Joseph Lopp, seaman, said he was in the East Cliff Tavern at the time in question. He saw defendant and some other people there. He was sitting about two feet from defendant, who had a bottle of ale to drink, but did not drink a whole glassful. The talking was quiet, and there was no disturbance. Defendant was sober, and walked straight.

Cross-examined: Defendant was a little bit excited in the bar when the police came.

The Magistrates then retired to consider their verdict, and, returning after a brief absence, the Chairman said that the Bench were unanimously of the opinion that the case must be dismissed. They considered that the police had acted perfectly fairly, but mistook excitement for drink.

There was slight applause in the Court at this decision.

The Chief Constable then asked permission to withdraw the summons against the landlord for permitting drunkenness, and he was allowed to do so.

 

Folkestone Express 17 April 1915.

Local News.

It is with much regret that we announce the death of Mrs. B.B. Price, wife of Mr. Price, the licensee of the East Cliff Tavern. The sad event took place on Saturday, after a very painful illness. The funeral took place on Wednesday at the Cemetery.

 

Folkestone Herald 17 April 1915.

Obituary.

We regret to record the death of Mrs. Bertha Beatrice Price, the wife of Mr. M.G. Price, of the East Cliff Tavern, East Cliff, which occurred, after a long illness, on Saturday last.

The deceased lady was highly respected by a large circle of friends, as evidenced by the attendance at the funeral, which took place on Wednesday.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 July 1916.

Felix.

Everybody or nearly everybody appears to be doing something voluntarily in regard to the wounded. From unexpected quarters little items come to hand to tell this tale. For instance, at that well-conducted establishment, the East Cliff Tavern, a box is handed round every Sunday morning, the coins fall into it readily from all hands, khaki and navy boys being excluded. Proud is Mr. Mark Price, the genial landlord, when the box is full: our friend does the thing properly. On the last occasion he asked Mr. Robert Stokes to open the box, which was found to contain 2 7s. 11d. Our friend Bob, as he is familiarly known, proceeded to the shop of Mr. Pain, the well-known tobacconist, of Dover Street, and there purchased 1 lb. of Navy Cut and 1 lb. of Capstan tobacco, also twelve boxes of Player's cigarettes for the sum mentioned above. Thus a noce parcel was sent to the Royal Victoria Hospital for the benefit of our wounded heroes. This is perhaps a comparatively small matter, but it goes to show that the working men of Folkestone, who enjoy their glass of Kentish sherry in moderation, do not forget their duty towards the boys. I hope Mr. Mark Price, who on more than one occasion has shown that his heart is in the right place, will continue his good work, and that he will be shortly compelled to call on our friend Bob to again count the coins, with the result that a further supply of “the finest herb under Heaven” may be sent to the Hospital. Now, if every licensed place in Folkestone possessed a box after this manner, what good might be done!

 

Folkestone Express 19 October 1918.

Friday, October 11th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Col. Owen, Messrs. Collins, Blamey, and Griffin.

The licence of the East Cliff Tavern was temporarily transferred to Mrs. M. Price from her husband, Mr. M.G. Price, who has been called to the Colours.

 

Folkestone Express 16 November 1918.

Local News.

At a special licensing sessions at the Police Court on Wednesday the following licence was transferred: The East Cliff Tavern, from Mr. M.E. Price, who is in the Navy, to his wife.

 

Folkestone Express 16 August 1919.

Wednesday, August 13th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Col. Owen, Councillor Stace, Rev. Epworth Thompson, and Mr. Swoffer.

The following transfer of licence was granted: the East Cliff Tavern, from Mrs. Price to Mr. M. Price.

Plans for alterations to the East Cliff Tavern were submitted and approved.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 January 1920.

Local News.

We regret to announce the death of Mr. Sidney (Sid) Saunders, of the Fountain Hotel, Seabrook. Deceased, who was widely known, went out on Tuesday night on business and did not return. The next morning the deceased was found in a small greenhouse, having passed away suddenly in the night. His death was due to natural causes. Much sympathy is expressed with the family. The late Mr. Saunders came to Folkestone many years ago as a carpenter, and was formerly proprietor of the East Cliff Tavern. He subsequently became proprietor of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, the Railway Bell Hotel, Folkestone, and the Fountain, Seabrook.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 January 1926.

Local News.

At the East Cliff Tavern on Monday about seventy customers and friends sat down to a capital supper prepared by Mr. and Mrs. Mark Price. Subsequently a pleasant programme of music was gone through, the chair being taken by Mr. L. Field. Amongst those who contributed to the programme were Messrs. Baba Pantry, Horace Brickell, George Allen and Herbert Robertson. A hearty vote of thanks was accorded to Mr. and Mrs. Price. A collection raised a handsome sum for Dr. Barnardo's Homes.

Obituary.

We regret the death, at the Swan Inn, Dover Road, of Mrs. Annie Buller Saunders, at the age of sixty years. Deceased was the widow of the late Mr. “Sid” Saunders, who was successively landlord of the Railway Bell Hotel, Folkestone; the White Lion, Cheriton; East Cliff Tavern, and the Fountain Hotel, Seabrook. Her happy and cheerful disposition endeared her to all. To do a good and deserving turn to others afforded her real joy. To her only child, Mrs. Herbert, the wife of Mr. S. Herbert, of the Swan Inn, sincere sympathy is extended.

The funeral took place at the Cemetery.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 October 1926.

Canterbury County Court.

Saturday, September 25th: Before Judge Terrell.

Messrs. George Beer and Rigden Ltd. sued Martin Grey Price, the tenant of the East Cliff Tavern, Folkestone, for 2 16s. 10., balance of an account. There was a counterclaim by the tenant against the brewers for 33 5s. for alleged overcharges at the rate of 5s. per barrel of beer, from October, 1925, until August, 1926. Mr. R.F. Fletcher, barrister, appeared for the plaintiffs, and Mr. S. Lamb, barrister, was for the defendant.

Mr. Fletcher said that was an action by Messrs. George Beer and Rigden for goods sold and delivered to the defendant, who was the tenant of one of their houses. It was a remitted action. The original amount of the claim was 119 8s. 6d. The writ was issued on the 28th April for beer supplied in March and April, and the case came before the Master in the High Court. A sum of 86 11s. 8d. was paid by the defendant, who admitted liability for that amount, but contested liability of the balance, and he said he had paid 30 on account. It was quite true he had paid 30 in April by cheque, which cheque had been promptly dishonoured. Upon those facts the Master made an order on June 20th for the payment of a further sum of 30, and the balance of 2 11s. 10d. The position today was that the plaintiffs had recovered the whole of their account except the 2 16s. 10d., and that was the amount with which His Honour had to deal that day, together with the counterclaim of 33 10s. He did not intend to worry His Honour about the small sum of 2 16s. 10d., and he would leave it to his learned friend to prove his counterclaim.

Mr. Lamb: I thought my learned friend would take that course as he does not want to put his client in the box, while he wants me to put mine in. Continuing, Mr. Lamb said that his client, Mr. Martin Price, was the tenant of the East Cliff Tavern, Folkestone, which was one of the plaintiffs' houses, and had been there since 1919. Up to October, 1925, the plaintiffs had been in the habit of supplying the defendant with draught beers at what he would call the current market price, but from the 2nd of October they started to add 5s. a barrel to the price, and the 2 16s. 10d. was what the extra charge of 5s. per barrel amounted to out of the sum of 119 odd which the plaintiffs were seeking to recover. The position therefore was this: that the 2 16s. 10d, which his friend had now at the last moment abandoned, was the whole gist of the matter. Defendant was refusing to pay that because he said that amount was the extra charge of 5s. a barrel made upon him in March and April. The counterclaim began in October, 1925, and went on until April of the present year, and for that period they were claiming in respect of overcharges a sum of 33 5s., omitting the sum of 2 16s. 10d., which was the substance of dispute in the claim. Therefore the position now was that the plaintiffs were abandoning their claim to the overcharge for March and April, but he claimed that the principal involved was the same in both cases of overcharges.

Replying to His Honour on points of law, Mr. Lamb stated that the agreement entered into by the plaintiffs and defendant in 1919 was that the brewers were to supply goods at current prices in the district, and they had to prove they were justified in making an extra charge.

His Honour: The agreement means reasonable prices, which are the current prices in the district.

Mr. Lamb said that up to October, 1925, Mr. Price was supplied with draught beers at the same price as the other houses in Folkestone. There were three other houses in Folkestone owned by these brewers, and the whole of the tenants were in Court that day, and their evidence would be that they were supplied with draught beers at a price which was 5s. a barrel less than was charged to the defendant. Theirs was the current price of the district and a reasonable price.

His Honour: You say that up to October, 1925, they did not charge that extra 5s., and it is for them to justify that extra charge?

Mr. Lamb: Yes, but owing to the course they have taken the onus is on me for the moment. This is really a question of principle.

His Honour stated that once he had settled the question of principle he would hand the matter over to the Registrar as a matter of accounts.

Mr. Fletcher: The Registrar will not be troubled, Your Honour, if my friend establishes his principle.

His Honour (to Mr. Lamb): But between the 2nd of October, 1925, and the 1st of April, 1926, you apparently paid the excess charge. How can you get it back now?

Mr. Lamb: I say we paid it under protest.

His Honour: That is of no avail whatever.

Mr. Lamb: I claim them back as damages. I say they committed breach of contract for which I claim damages.

His Honour: Can you pay an excess price and then get it back by way of damages? You are claiming damages because you paid too much. How can they be responsible for that?

Mr. Lamb: Because they forced us into it, and committed a breach of their contract.

His Honour: They charged you a certain sum, and you paid it.

Mr. Lamb: They said “If you don't pay pay us that price, we shall not supply you with beer”.

His Honour: If they did that, you could get your beer elsewhere.

Mr. Lamb: I am complaining of their refusal to supply me with beer at the contract price.

His Honour: What damages can you claim for that?

Mr. Lamb: It is made up by the extra 5s. a barrel they charged.

His Honour: That is not damages, because you could have gone elsewhere. If you had gone elsewhere and got it at a price 5s. less than they charged you would have suffered no damage. The fact is you have gone on paying the 5s. extra which they charged. Judge Terrell quoted cases, and told Mr. Lamb he had better look into them. He could have gone into the market and bought cheaper, and would not then have suffered any damage.

Mr. Lamb: The answer to that is that I could not have got these beers anywhere else. Other brewers do not brew George Beer and Rigden's beers.

His Honour: But you could have got other and the same class of beers.

Mr. Lamb: But why should I do it? I have a contract with Beer and Rigden.

His Honour: Supposing they had said “We won't supply you with beer at all”. You would have gone and bought it elsewhere. What would have been your damages? Supposing you could have said “Beer and Rigden's beers are a higher class than other beers, and my custom fell off because I could not supply Beer and Rigden's beers”, then you might get damages if you could establish that. If a brewer of a house said he was not going to supply his beer at the market price, and charges you more, then you have the right to go elsewhere.

Mr. Lamb: There is a penalty clause in the agreement.

His Honour: But they could not claim that at all in such a case.

Mr. Price, on oath, stated that he first went into the house twenty years ago. The agreement produced was entered into when the amalgamation of the brewers (Beer and Rigden) took place, and the terms were identical with those in his previous agreement. Up to the 2nd of October last he was being supplied with draught beer at a certain price, but after that date he was charged an additional 5s. per barrel. As a result of that, up to August last year they had overcharged him to the amount of his counterclaim.

In answer to Mr. Lamb, Mr. Price admitted that in April he gave a cheque to the brewers for 30 and he claimed it was met the same day. He could not say why it was dishonoured. He knew that the brewers' other houses in Folkestone were being supplied with beer since the 2nd of October at 5s. a barrel less than he was charged. He could not say why they had charged him more than their other tenants.

His Honour: Haven't you heard, or enquired? – They won't say. They gave me notice to quit some time back.

A letter was put in, written by Mr. Harris, representative of the brewers, dated September 16th, 1925, in which it said: The notice expired on 7th August last, and we shall be glad to hear from you when it is convenient to give up possession, as we cannot allow the matter to remain in abeyance any longer.

It was stated that the rent had been paid ever since 1925, and was all paid up.

His Honour: Then there is a new tenancy created?

Mr. Lamb said the tenant took up the position that he did not want to leave the house he had been in so long. They could not get him out under the Rent Restriction Act, and they were helpless. If they wanted to get him out, they had to cast round for some other means.

In cross-examination, Mr. Fletcher asked whether witness suggested that he knew no reason why the brewers should wish to get rid of him as a tenant.

Witness: I do not.

Mr. Fletcher: Then I shall have to put a question to you I should otherwise have refrained from putting. In the summer of last year were you suffering from a bad state of health? – I was.

And was that state of health connected with and brought about by excessive drinking? – It was, Sir, I am sorry to say, but it is a thing of the past now.

It was not a thing of the past when this notice to quit was running? – It was.

Notice was given to you on the 6th of May? – Yes.

Were you at that time recovering from an illness caused by excessive drinking? – Yes.

Do you know that on the 21st of May your solicitor wrote this: “My client has brought me your letter of the 6th inst., with notice enclosed. I am directed to point out he cannot give up possession at such short notice, owing to his recent illness, and the fact that he has not yet completely recovered”. There is an application for an extension to October. Do you still tell the Judge you know no reason why the brewers should wish you to terminate your tenancy? – Yes.

A tenant who is suffering from DTs is hardly a satisfactory tenant to the brewers, is he? – I had somebody there to take care of me.

Let me ask you one or two questions about your cheques. The beer supplied to you during March and April was supplied on credit? – It was, but the supply was not ordered by me, but was what they sent on.

From October last year to the end of March this year had your dealing been so unsatisfactory from a financial point of view that they refused to supply you except for cash on delivery? – Yes.

In fact, your cheques had been returned many times? – only three times; and I can say this, that they produced the cheque before the time.

Witness was asked about a cheque of his given in December, 1924, for 134 14s. 11d., which was returned three times, and he replied “It was met afterwards”.

Mr. Fletcher: Yes, on the threat of a writ addressed to your solicitors? – It was paid.

His Honour: It was dishonoured three times.

Witness: Why, before the cheques are met, should they telephone to the bank before the money is there? Can you tell me that?

Mr. Fletcher: Is it not a fact that your cheques were not returned on a number of occasions in 1925? – What do you call numbers?

Four, five, six, seven times. Now, Mr. Price, be careful. I suggest they have been returned 5, 6, or 7 times? – Yes, they have always been met afterwards.

Witness was questioned about the cheque for 30 mentioned in the High Court, which he gave and which was returned, and in connection with which he swore an affidavit on May 19th to the effect that he on April 21st paid the plaintiffs a cheque for 30, the receipt for which was in his solicitor's hands.

Witness said he did not know at the time that it had been returned.

His Honour: I expect he assumed the receipt was in his solicitor's hands, if he did not know the return of the cheque.

Mr. Fletcher asked witness if he was not given notice that the price of his beer was going to be increased, and he replied that he did not know until he got his bills. It came as a complete surprise to him.

Pressed upon the point, witness said he remembered he did not get notice of the fact, and that he also signed an order form, which showed the increased price upon it.

His Honour: You ordered the beer?

Witness: Yes, and paid for it before I saw it.

Mr. Fletcher: And all the beer in respect of which you are making your counterclaim was ordered, delivered, and paid for in the same way, was it not? – Yes.

Witness, replying to Mr. Fletcher, further admitted that when he could not get beer from his brewers he dealt with Messrs. Fremlin Bros.

Mr. Fletcher: And I believe you made a very good thing out of it? – Yes.

You got it cheaper than you could have done from Beer and Co.? – Yes.

Witness was next questioned about the number of special orders he sent necessitating deliveries very much oftener than it was the custom of the brewers to send to Folkestone, and he denied that it was the brewers' custom to send to their tied houses at Folkestone once a week. He admitted that during last February and March they had to deliver twelve times to him. He received a letter from the brewers on July 22nd, stating that he must place his orders at the regular times or they would have to charge him for the extra expenses of delivery.

In re-examination by Mr. Lamb, witness said he had been obliged to sell one consignment of beer before he could get another, and that was why the deliveries had been more frequent at his house. That had been going on since October. Since his illness he had taken no spirits at all.

Mr. Lamb said he had the tenants of the other three tied houses of Messrs. Beer and Rigden there, if there was any question as to the prices they paid.

Mr. Fletcher: I only challenged these things to make sure the tenant went into the witness box. The figures are admitted.

Mr. Lamb: Then that is my case.

Mr. Fletcher submitted that he had no case to answer, and said at the moment he should not call any evidence.

His Honour said he would have to consider the case and would reserve judgement.

 

Folkestone Express 20 November 1926.

Local News.

At the Canterbury County Court on Saturday, His Honour Judge Terrell, K.C., had before him again the adjourned action in which Messrs. George Beer and Rigden, Ltd., brewers, sued Martin Grey Price, of the East Cliff Tavern, Folkestone, one of their tenants, for 2 16s. 10d., balance of an account. There was a counter-claim by the tenant for 35 for alleged over-charges for beer.

Upon the case being called, Mr. L.F. Fletcher, for the plaintiffs, said that His Honour had appointed that day for hearing his friend Mr. Lamb and himself, argue upon certain points. It was an argument both Mr. Lamb and he had looked forward to with very great pleasure, and he was sure it would have been an extremely interesting one. But this had to give way to the interests of their client and Mr. Lamb and he, after a discussion on all the points, had arrived at a settlement which he thought was very satisfactory and honourable to both parties. The terms had been endorsed on their respective briefs, and in order that an opportunity might be given for carrying them out properly, he would suggest that His Honour should adjourn the case.

His Honour: Would it not be better if I gave a stay of all proceedings with leave to either party to apply again if necessary?

Mr. Fletcher agreed, and Mr. Lamb, on behalf of the defendant, concurred in Mr. Fletcher’s remarks. They regretted they would not have His Honour’s assistance in the circumstances in discussing the law of the case, especially as he was engaged in another case of an exactly similar nature, but involving a much larger sum.

His Honour: I may say I had written my judgment and gone very fully into the law and all cases dealt with upon the subject.

Mr. Fletcher: I wonder if we might be allowed to see it at some time, your Honour? It would prove most interesting to both Mr. Lamb and myself.

His Honour: I shall be very happy for you to do so.

His Honour then handed to Mr. Fletcher his considered and written judgment for counsels’ perusal.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 December 1926.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court yesterday, the licence of the East Cliff Tavern was transferred to Mr. Twigg, now licensee of the Packet Boat Inn, Radnor Street.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions in both cases.

 

Folkestone Express 18 December 1926.

Local News.

At the Police Court on Friday the licence of the East Cliff Tavern was transferred to Mr. Twigg, licensee of the Packet Boat in Radnor Street, of which he has held the licence for six years.

The Clerk said steps were being taken immediately to find a tenant of the Packet Boat.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions in both cases.

 

Folkestone Express 8 January 1927.

Wednesday, January 5th: Before Mr .G. I. Swoffer and other magistrates, the following licence was transferred: East Cliff Tavern, from Mr. Martin Grey Price to Mr. John W. Twigg.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 January 1927.

Wednesday, January 5th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. W.R. Boughton, and Colonel P. Broome-Giles.

The Magistrates granted the application for the full transfer of the licence of the East Cliff Tavern from Martin Grey Price to John W. Twigg.

After the application had been granted the outgoing licence holder said that he simply refused to have it done.

The Chairman: It is no good your objecting. The transfer is granted. The Magistrates cannot help themselves. I am sure they would like you to understand what the position is. You signed the notice for a transfer. Mr. Twigg got a protection order and you were present. You must fight it out with the brewers. The Magistrates cannot help you. They can do nothing at all.

Mr. Price: It was done so quick on me. I have a word to say, though. It was a dirty bit of business.

 

Folkestone Express 16 December 1939.

Local News.

Several summonses for offences against the Lighting Order were heard at the Folkestone Police Court on Friday.

John Twigg, East Cliff Tavern, Folkestone, was the last defendant.

P.C. Richardson said at 7.10 p.m. on the 2nd December he was on duty in East Cliff when he saw two lights shining from the defendant's premises. At one point the light was shining over the roadway for a distance of 20 feet. A man passing by read the names on some parcels which he was carrying. Defendant said he thought he could have a little light.

Defendant said it was very difficult for them, as they had a fence on either side. The light came from the bottle and jug department to show people the way.

A fine of 10/- was imposed.

 

Folkestone Express 11 May 1940.

Lighting Order.

There was a big reduction in the number of offenders against the lighting regulations during black-out hours at the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday, when there were only four summonses before the Mayor (Alderman G.A. Gurr), Alderman Mrs. E. Gore, Dr. F. Wolverson and Mr. S.B. Corser.

John Twigg, East Cliff Tavern, wrote asking that he might be excused attendance at the Court.

The War Reserve Constable, who proved the case, said he saw the light at 11 p.m. coming through the bottom portion of the glass panels of the door. Had the blinds been fully drawn the light would not have shone out on to the road and pavement.

Fined 10/-.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 May 1940.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday the following was fined for breaches of the black-out regulations: John Twigg, East Cliff Tavern, 10s.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 May 1943.

Local News.

Fusilier Clifford Wolfenden was remanded for a week by the Folkestone Magistrates yesterday on a charge of robbery with violence. It was alleged that he robbed Mrs. Ruby Brookwell of a handbag containing 3/- and other articles.

P. Sergt. Dolbear said about 9.50 the previous evening he was in the saloon bar of the East Cliff Tavern, off duty and in plain clothes, when he heard two distinct screams. With several soldiers who were also in the bar he investigated, and just as he was opening the door at the rear of saloon bar a soldier rushed past him, and through a passage way of the private part of the premises. Witness rushed back through the bar and out by the front door, where he saw the soldier being pursued by a Sergt. Chadwick, who caught the man at the top of East Cliff. The soldier was the defendant, who kept repeating “Please let me go, I didn't mean it”. Later he told defendant that he was a police officer and that he suspected him of having committed a serious offence. Wolfenden said “I am the man. I didn't mean it; won’t you please let me go?"

Defendant was sober, and he recognised him as having been in the bar before the occurrence.

Det. Constable Walsh said he saw defendant at the police station and afterwards went to 2, East Cliil Villas where he saw Mrs. Ruby Ellen Brookwell, who was in a nervous and distressed condition. There were two red marks on the front of her throat and the right side of her neck was slightly swollen. Her right heel was bleeding from a small cut wound and there were wet bloodstains in her right shoe.

The Magistrates remanded defendant for a week.

An application for legal aid was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 May 1943.

Local News.

A charge of robbery with violence against a young soldier was reduced to one of common assault when Fusilier Clifford Wolfenden again appeared before the Folkestone Magistrates yesterday. Wolfenden was fined 2.

At yesterday’s hearing Mr. T.T. Cropper appeared to prosecute, and Mr. B.H. Bonniface defended.

Alderman W. Hollands presided with Mr. P. Puller, Alderman N.O Baker, Capt. H.P. Keary and Dr. Esme Stuart.

Mrs. Ruby Ellen Brookwell. of East Cliff, Folkestone, an insurance agent, said on the evening of May 20th about 9.15 she went to the East Cliff Tavern with her mother. A number of soldiers were in the bar. Just before 10 o’clock she went to cloak room. She had just entered when she felt someone pushing the door. She remarked that it was occupied. Opening the door to come out she saw a soldier standing there. He grabbed her by the throat; he did nothing else. She struggled and fought to keep him out. She screamed and she heard a shuffle of someone coming out of the bar. She could not remember what happened to her handbag. All she knew afterwards was that she had not got it with her. The soldier ran away when he heard people coming.

Mrs. T.W. Stokes, East Cliff, Folkestone, said she was helping in the East Cliff Tavern on the night in question. During the evening she heard screams coming from the back and she next saw Mrs. Brookwell, who was very hysterical. Witness went to the cloak room and found there a lady’s handbag and a soldier’s cap. She handed the cap to P. Sgt. Dolbear.

L/Sgt. Eric Chadwick said on this evening while at the public house he heard screams and he ran outside. He saw Wolfenden leaving the cloak room. Defendant ran out into the road and witness gave chase, catching and detaining him. Defendant said he was sorry and would not do it again.

P. Sgt. Dolbear, who gave evidence at the previous hearing, said the soldier's cap bore defendant’s regimental number.

D. Const. Walsh said he had charged Wolfenden with common assault that day. He had replied “Nothing to say”.

Mr. Bonniface submitted that there was no evidence whatever on which defendant could be committed for trial on a charge of robbery with violence. There was no evidence that defendant attempted to rob Mrs. Brookwell of her handbag.

The Chairman said the Bench agreed that on that charge there was insufficient evidence and it would be dismissed.

Mr. Bonniface entered a plea of guilty to a charge of common assault. Defendant told him, he said, that he remembered nothing of what happened that night. On this night defendant had seven glasses of stout. He was a man of unblemished character. He had served three years with the Army.

Fining defendant 2, the Chairman said "Don’t do this sort of thing again”.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 October 1947.

Local News.

At the licensing transfer sessions on Wednesday the Justices approved the transfer of the licence of the East Cliff Tavern from John Worrell Twigg to John Alfred Fraser. The latter told the Magistrates he had been employed in the licensing trade for six months at the East Kent Arms, Folkestone, and previously at Cranbrook.

 

Folkestone Herald 10 January 1948.

Local News.

A well-known figure has been lost to Folkestone by the death of Mr. Mark Price, of 114, Guildhall Street, Folkestone, who passed away on New Year's Day after an illness of only four days. He was 72.

As a young man he was a member of the crews of many of the finest liners sailing to Australia, and one of his chief reminiscences was of being in port in South Africa when there was terrific rejoicing over the relief of Mafeking. At the close of his seafaring days he became mine host at the East Cliff Tavern, Folkestone, one of the busiest licensed houses in the town. He was a sportsman and in the days before motor cars were numerous he attracted much attention when he drove his smart stepping cob and trap through the town. He was an excellent shot and was frequently out with shooting parties, while another of his favourite sports was coursing on Romney Marsh. In those days he was certainly a man about town. After leaving the East Cliff Tavern he was engaged in different occupations and for some years was on the staff of the Queen’s Hotel. Subsequently he became the steward of the Rendezvous Club and was employed there at the time of his death. A widower, he was twice married. He leaves a family to mourn his loss.

The funeral took place on Tuesday, the first part of the service being conducted at Folkestone Parish Church.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 October 1956.

Local News.

Mr. G.C. Lucas, landlord of the East Cliff Tavern, Folkestone, was a railwayman for more than four decades, but it was as a young soldier that he first saw Folkestone and decided that he liked it. He revisited Folkestone less than a year ago, which explains why today he is licensee of one of the oldest inns in the town. He still liked Folkestone.

Mr. Lucas was a railwayman for 44 years. He joined the system as a boy clerk at Oxford, his home town, in 1906, and retired on pension in 1950. He finished as a liaison representative between the railway, the old Great Western line, and the large firms who used it for the transit of their merchandise. His area covered districts in five counties, Somerset, Dorset, Devon, Gloucester and Wiltshire.

In the First World War Mr. Lucas served in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry in France, Belgium and Italy. In the last War he was a Captain and Adjutant in the Clevedon (Somerset) and district Home Guard.

Mr. Lucas, a keen sportsman, regards bowls as his chief interest. For many years he played for Somerset on numerous greens in teh county and filled the position of “skip”. He is a member of the Wear Bay Bowls Club.

 

Folkestone Gazette 13 February 1963.

Local News.

Permits under the Betting and Gaming Act for amusements with prizes have been granted to the Martello Hotel, True Briton, Ship Inn, East Cliff Tavern, Raglan Hotel, Royal Pavilion Bars, Railway Tavern, and Royal Standard.

 

Folkestone Herald 4 July 1970.

Local News.

Over she goes.... 41 worth of pennies in a pile which took customers at the East Cliff Tavern, Folkestone, 14 months to build.

The huge pile was pushed over on Saturday by Lieutenant Commander Michael Clover, who is in charge of homes at Hawkinge, Dymchurch and Smeeth, where deprived children are given care. Commander Clover was formerly a child care officer at Southwark. The money from the pile of pennies was spent on an unsinkable dinghy and life-jackets for the children at Reinden Wood House, Hawkinge. There are 28 children at the Hawkinge home, which opened in July last year.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 August 1971.

Local News.

A giant cucumber, nearly two feet long, 10 inches in circumference, and weighing 5 pounds is really a succulent gift.

It was grown with a lot of loving care and attention by Mr. H. Roberts, a retired farmer, who lives in Canterbury Road, Folkestone. Mr. Roberts has only recently taken up gardening but, according to experts, is producing “superb crops”.

Mr. H. Brickell, of the East Cliff Tavern, Folkestone, a relative, of Mr. Roberts, was given the cucumber as a present.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 July 1988.

Local News.

Thirsty summer drinkers in Shepway will have to wait for all-day pub openings because of a Whitehall glitch. The Government has been forced to delay the controversial new licensing laws until September 1. This has been caused by a technical problem at the Home Office which means present “last orders” for another two months. Then pubs will be able to serve alcohol from 11a.m. to 11p.m. all week. But not all Shepway landlords reckon it will be worth the bother.

Horace Brickell from the East Cliff Tavern said “It’s a great idea for some pubs, but for the ones in restricted areas, like us, it’s not much good.

Where we are placed, it won’t make any difference and it will be a waste of time staying open”.

William Taylor, landlord of the Pullman Wine Bar and chairman of the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers Association, said "There is some confusion, but no-one is forced to stay open. They will be able to choose the hours that suit them.” Mr. Taylor said there were mixed feelings about the changes. “Pubs in busy areas are welcoming them but small, rural or out-of-the-way places are indifferent. Personally, I’m in favour. I think it will give flexibility to the licensee and the public. I don’t think it will cause more drunkenness because people only have a certain amount of money to spend each week. And I don’t mind the extra hours involved because we will get extra staff which will help the dole queue”.

Barry Chamberlain from the White Lion in Cheriton agrees. He said “I think it’s about time change was made. Pubs will become much more suitable for families, and will be more like restaurants. We will try to stay open all day. We are just about to redecorate the pub with the new freedom in mind”.

Michael Norris from the East Kent Arms told us “I’ve accepted that the new laws are coming, although I have mixed feelings about them. I think it’s a shame we are not being allowed to stay open later at night rather than all afternoon. Of course we will be making full use of the new hours and will try to serve food all day. It’s all right for us because we are so centrally placed”.

Eileen Lewis from The Guildhall in The Bayle summed up the feelings of most landlords when she said “If I’m making money, I’ll stay open”. She added “It’s all right for more central pubs, but I can’t see us staying open in winter. The brewery has asked us to give it a three-month trial period. Like other pubs, we’ll just have to feel our way when the change comes”.

 

From the https://www.kentlive.news By Lauren MacDougall, 21 December 2019.

The 33 pubs in Kent you have to drink at in 2020 according to CAMRA.

In total Kent has heaps of pubs listed in the guide and, while 33 of these are new entries, others have appeared in previous editions of the guide.

A total of 33 pubs from around Kent make up the new entries that feature in the 2020 edition of the Good Beer Guide.

The guide is produced annually by the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA), the independent guide to the best boozers in the UK that is researched by unpaid and independent volunteers nationwide.

Tom Stainer, CAMRA’s chief executive, said: “For nearly five decades, the Good Beer Guide has been a comprehensive guide to the UK’s breweries, their ales, and the best outlets to find them in across the country.

“What makes the Guide unique is that all the entries are compiled and vetted by a huge volunteer team, based around the country. We work hard to ensure that all areas of the country are covered and, unlike with some competitor titles, inclusion in this book is dependent only on merit, not on payment.

“The Good Beer Guide has always had an important role in acting as a barometer of the beer and pub industry. We believe information gleaned from the Guide is absolutely vital in the drive to save our pubs from closure and campaign for policies that better support pubs, local brewers and their customers.”

This pub is included in the 2020 list.

East Cliff Tavern, Folkestone.

East Cliff Tavern licensee 2019

What the guide says: "Friendly terraced back-street pub since 1862, in the same family since 1967, near a footpath across the disused railway line, a short walk from the harbour."

 

LICENSEE LIST

DANES William 1862-85 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

Last pub licensee had SAUNDERS Joseph Sidney 1885-98 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

Last pub licensee had GRIGG John Galley 1898-1906 Kelly's 1899Kelly's 1903Bastions

PRICE Martin Grey 1906-18 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

PRICE Mary Ann 1918-19 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

PRICE Martin Grey 1919-27 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

Last pub licensee had TWIGG John Worrell 1927-47 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyKelly's 1934Bastions

FRASER John 1947-52 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

MARTIN Edward 1952-56 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

LUCAS Gilbert 1956-67 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

BRICKELL Horace 1967-Jan/2004 dec'd More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyBastions

PARKS Richard 2004-2010+ Bastions

 

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyMore Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

TOP Valid CSS Valid XTHML

 

LINK to Even More Tales From The Tap Room