DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, March, 2022.

Page Updated:- Thursday, 10 March, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1850

Perseverance Inn

Latest 1908

18-20 Dover Street

Folkestone

Former Perseverance 1927

Above photo, 1927, showing the pub where the bicycle stands, from Martin Easdown.

 

Folkestone Express, 13 May 1871.

Friday, March 12th: Before The Mayor and J. Tolputt Esq.

Ellen Smith, wife of John Smith, of Ashford, was charged with being drunk and using obscene language.

P.C. Hills deposed to taking the prisoner into custody for causing a disturbance outside the Perseverance beerhouse, Dover Street.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 3s. 6d. costs for each offence.

Eveline Horan, wife of James horan was charged with being drunk and resisting P.C. Hills in the execution of his duty.

P.C. Hills said about half past ten the previous day, when apprehending Mrs. Smith, the prisoner tried to pull her away. I told her to let the prisoner alone; she would not. By my instructions P.C. Swain took her in charge.

The Bench fined her 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days imprisonment.

Folkestone Express, 23 December 1871.

Advertisement:

MRS. ELIZABETH PEEL

DEALER IN RUSHES AND CANES FOR CHAIRS.

PERSEVERANCE INN, DOVER STREET, FOLKESTONE.

Begs to thank her friends and the public for the support received by her late husband, and trusts by strict attention to business to merit a continuance of the same.

N.B. ALL ORDERS FOR CHIMNEY SWEEPING WILL BE EXECUTED AS BEFORE.

 

Folkestone Chronicle, 1 February 1873.

Wednesday, January 29th: Before The Mayor and J. Tolputt Esq.

John Francis Russell applied for a temporary authority to sell beer to be consumed on the premises in a house in Dover Street, under a certificate granted to Elizabeth Peel. Application granted.

 

Folkestone Express, 1 February 1873.

Wednesday, January 29th: Before The Mayor and J. Tolputt Esq.

Temporary authority was granted to J. T. Russell as landlord of the Perseverance, he having married the landlady.

 

Folkestone Express, 30 August 1873.

Annual Licensing Meeting.

Wednesday, August 27th: Before The Mayor, J. Gambrill, J. Tolputt, and J. Clarke Esq.

The licensing committee met at ten o'clock for the purpose of taking into consideration the question of making any alteration in the hours for opening and closing public houses. Shortly after eleven o'clock the licensed victuallers present were called into Court, where the Clerk said the Bench would hear anything with reference to the alteration of the hours for the opening and closing.

The applications for beerhouses were then considered, all of which were granted. In the case of the Perseverance on The Stade it was stated by the landlord that he had expended 70 or 80 in enlarging the house, and Mr. Gambrill said the attention of the overseers should be called to the fact in order that the assessment might be raised.

 

Folkestone Chronicle, 20 November 1875.

Saturday, November 13th: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer, W.J. Jeffreason, T. Caister Esqs, and Gen. Armstrong.

John Thomas Russell, landlord of the Perseverance beerhouse, Dover Street, was charged with selling intoxicating liquors during prohibited hours on Sunday, the 7th inst.

Defendant pleaded guilty and was fined 5, and 8s. costs, the license not to be endorsed.

John Marsh, George Shrubsole, Joshua Pope, William Spearpoint jun., Richard Bourne, Henry Winter, Henry Herring, John Holness, William Spearpoint sen., and W. Wanstall were charged with being in the Perseverance during prohibited hours on Sunday, not being lodgers, servants, or travellers.

Fined 2s., and 8s. costs each.

 

Folkestone Express, 20 November 1875.

Saturday, November 13th: Before The Mayor, General Armstrong, T. Caister, R.W. Boarer and W.J. Jeffreason Esqs.

John Thomas Russell, landlord of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, was summoned for selling beer during prohibited hours on Sunday the 7th inst., and John Marsh, butcher, Henry White, butcher, James Pope, flyman, ---- Shrubsole, carter, ---- Herring, general dealer, John Holmes, flyman, Wm. Spearpoint jun., fisherman, Wm. Spearpoint sen., fisherman, Richard Bourne, fisherman, and William Wanston, blacksmith, were charged with being in the said house at unlawful hours.

Each of the defendants pleaded Guilty. Some amusement was created by the elder Spearpoint, when called upon to plead, saying “Thank you”.

The defendant Russell, in extenuation, said that the boats came in very late at night, and a boat's crew came in for refreshment and the door was left open.

P.C. Keeler said he went to defendant's house at twenty minutes to eight on Sunday morning, the 7th inst., and found the door open. He went in and saw the landlord behind the bar and the other defendants in front. He asked the landlord how it was, when he said he was very sorry, and hoped that witness would look over it.

In answer to the Bench, Superintendent Wilshere said he had received intimation of the trade carried on by the defendant Russell on Sunday morning, but as a rule the house was well conducted.

The Mayor, addressing Russell, said the Bench had it in their power to fine him 10, but taking into consideration the fact that it was his first conviction, they would fine him in the mitigated penalty of 5 and the costs. At the same time they wished to remind him that leaving his door open was a great temptation for men to go in. Addressing the other defendants, his Worship said that they were each liable to a heavy penalty, but considering the circumstances of the case the Bench would only fine them 2s. and 8s. costs each.

The money was paid in each instance.

 

Folkestone Express, 25 March 1876.

Tuesday, March 21st: Before The Mayor and Col. De Crespigny.

William Mellow, a seaman on board the Annie White collier, was charged with being drunk and using obscene language at the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, on the previous evening.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty.

John Russell, landlord of the Perseverance said that at about ten minutes to eleven o'clock the prisoner came into the house, but witness refused to draw him any beer. Upon that prisoner became very violent and he had to be given into custody.

P.C. Ovenden said he took the prisoner into custody, and he was so violent that the assistance of three other men had to be obtained to take him to the station.

The Bench fined the prisoner 5s. for being drunk, and 5s. for using obscene language, together with 3s. 6d. costs in each case. The money was paid by the mate of the ship to which prisoner belonged.

 

Folkestone Express, 19 July 1879.

Monday, July 14th: Before The Mayor, Captain Crowe, Alderman Hoad, M.J. Bell and J. Fitness Esqs.

Mary Ann Scamp, an old woman, pleaded Guilty to being drunk and refusing to quit licensed premises, the Perseverance Inn, on the 12th inst.

P.C. Bashford proved the charge, and the Bench inflicted a fine of 2s. 6d., costs 3s.6d., or in default seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone News, 1 May 1886.

Wednesday, April 28th:

Mrs. Russell, administratrix of her deceased husband, received the usual licence to carry on the business of the Perseverance Inn.

 

Folkestone Express, 22 December 1888.

Friday, December 13th: Before Colonel De Crespigny, Surgeon General Gilbourne, and Alderman Banks.

John Davidson was charged with stealing a woollen shawl, and a silver mounted walking stick, the property of some person unknown.

Sergeant Harman said he was in Dover Street about half past seven on Thursday evening, in plain clothes, and from a communication he received from Boat Inspector Brice, he watched the prisoner, who he saw come out of the Perseverance beerhouse with the shawl over his shoulders and the stick in his hand. He saw prisoner go into several shops and public houses, and at half past eight followed him into the Raglan at the top of Dover Street. He cautioned him and asked him where he got the shawl and stick from. He replied “The shawl belongs to me. It was my mother's. I didn't steal the stick. It belongs to some gentleman”. He took him to the police station and charged him on suspicion of stealing the articles, and detained him for enquiries to be made. Prisoner said he did not steal the stick; he only took it. There was a lot of flymen in the house at the time. He asked prisoner what house, and he said he would go back and show him, but witness declined to go. Prisoner was under the influence of drink, and made no reply at the station to the charge.

Superintendent Taylor asked for a remand in order that he might trace the owner of the stick, which had on the silver knob the initials “F.C.S.”

On Saturday the accused was again brought up, and there being no further evidence adduced, he was discharged.

 

Folkestone Express, 11 October 1890.

Monday, October 6th: Before Capt. W. Carter, Aldermen Dunk and Pledge, J. Fitness, S. Penfold, and E.T. Wards Esqs.

Thomas Clayton, a young man of decent appearance, was charged with stealing 18s. in silver and bronze, the property of Joseph Whiting, landlord of the Bricklayers' Arms.

Joseph Whiting said: I am landlord of the Bricklayers' Arms, in Fenchurch Street. Prisoner came to my house and slept there on Friday last. He was also there on Saturday about the house, sometimes in the kitchen and sometimes in the bar. He was there on Saturday evening. Just before, he said he was not going to stay as he had no money to pay for his bed. About seven o'clock he went out of the front door which leads to the bar. I left the bar about the same time as prisoner was leaving the bar and went to the back part of the house and left the bar unattended. When prisoner told me he had no money to pay for his bed he was in front of the bar. I was absent about a minute, and I went to the till to pay a girl for some fish, when I found I had been robbed. I had just before been to the till, and whatever had been taken was done between the time I was absent from the bar and my return. Prisoner could easily have got at the till by leaning over the counter. Prisoner came back and said he would pay for a bed, and for that of a friend. He went upstairs and I followed him, and saw him come back, and he paid me 1s. 6d. for his and another man's bed and for some beer. I missed from my till about 15s. in bronze and about four or five shillings in silver. I never mentioned my loss until I gave him in charge about nine o'clock. I told prisoner then that it looked very suspicious on his part, and gave him in custody. Prisoner said nothing. P.C. Swift said “You will have to come along with me” and he replied “All right”.

Cross-examined by the prisoner: You had money on Friday night and changed money on Saturday morning. The time you paid for the bed was about nine o'clock. On Saturday morning you might have spent about 6d. or 8d. You told me when you left to take charge of the parcel until you returned.

George Bean, landlord of the Perseverance, said prisoner went to his house on Saturday evening. He was alone. He called for a small soda. There were other people in the bar. He treated people in the bar to the amount of 2s., which he paid for in coppers. He saw he had 2s. 6d. in silver with the coppers.

Jane Tritton said prisoner came to the bar of the Royal George on Saturday evening. Two men went with him. He called for drinks for himself and companions, which he paid for in coppers, to the amount of one shilling. He asked her if she would mind coppers. She said she was short of them, and gave him 2s. 6d. in silver for that amount of coppers.

Stephen Hall deposed to prisoner treating him, and his having a large quantity of coppers in his possession.

P.C. Swift, who apprehended the prisoner, said he asked him “How long have you been in the bar?” He replied “Oh, I don't know. Anything wrong or anybody robbed?” He replied “Yes”. Prisoner said “What's the charge?” and he told him and prisoner answered “All right”. On searching him he found on him 5s. and a halfpenny in bronze, and 2s. 6d. and two sixpenny pieces in silver. He was charged before the Superintendent in his presence and he replied “All right. It is true”.

Prisoner said he did not remember saying that.

In reply to a question, the constable said he was sober.

Prisoner elected to be tried by the Bench, and said that he had been hopping, and the money he had about him was what he had been paid. He denied that he told prosecutor that he had no money.

The Chairman told prisoner that the Bench considered him Guilty. Tradesmen must be protected in their business. It was a gross theft. He would be sent to gaol for six weeks' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle, 6  December 1890.

Local News.

At the Police Court yesterday before Mr. Ward and Alderman Pledge, John Reilly, a tramp, was charged with breaking a square of glass at the Perseverance Inn, and doing damage to the extent of 5s. He was further charged with being drunk.

The landlord of the Perseverance (Mr. George Bean) proved the offence, and the prisoner was sentenced to seven days' hard labour for being drunk, and to a similar term of imprisonment for doing wilful damage.

 

Folkestone Chronicle, 17 October 1891.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, 12th October: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

A true bill was returned against James McCarthy, who was charged with having, on the 15th of last July, stolen from the dwelling house of Mary Campbell, Brockman Road, two dimity curtains, four valances, three pairs of linen sheets, and a number of towels, of the value of 5 12s.

Mr. L. Glyn prosecuted, and the prisoner, who pleaded Not Guilty, was not defended.

P.C. Walter Down was called and stated that on Wednesday, the 15th of July, about half past nine in the morning, he went to the Oddfellows Inn (sic), Radnor Street. He there saw the bundle produced. It contained the articles which were the subject of the present charge. Shortly after his arrival at the Oddfellows, the prisoner entered. He asked him if the bundle belonged to him. He said “Yes”. Witness asked him where he got them from, and he replied “I came by them honestly. I bought them at Folkestone”. He then asked the prisoner to take him to the place where he bought them, but he refused to. He told the prisoner he should take him to the police station on suspicion of having stolen the goods.

By the prisoner: Witness was called to the Oddfellows about half past nine, and about twenty minutes elapsed after he first saw the prisoner. He went to the station quietly and seemed to take it in good humour. He did not consider it necessary to handcuff prisoner. When he (prisoner) went into the Rendezvous, witness waited outside for him. He suggested that witness should go back to the Oddfellows and wait for the man who sold them.

The Recorder: Do I understand you allowed him to go and have a drink after you arrested him?

Witness: Yes, sir; he was determined to go.

The Recorder: A very obliging policeman, but it is fortunate for you there wasn't a back door.

Supt. Taylor said he remembered prisoner being brought to the station. Witness told him he had been brought there on suspicion of having stolen the goods. He said he was a dealer and had bought them. Witness asked him of whom, and he answered that he bought them at Folkestone, and had come by them honestly.

At the request of the prisoner Supt. Taylor produced a statement which the prisoner made after he had been committed for trial and also a letter which he wrote in prison. Nothing was known against him by the London Police and he could not have obtained information easily without the prisoner's help. There were no scratches on his face to indicate scratches by broken glass. He found that he was in company with a man in uniform on the Monday and Tuesday nights. Prisoner said the man belonged to the 17th Lancers. He had seen the Sergeant Major and had had the regiment paraded.

Henry Robus proved having purchased the articles at the sale of Mr. Owen, for Miss Campbell, on the 17th July. 1889. They were all marked “Owen”. He took them to 21, Brockman Road. He visited the house on the Sunday before the robbery. The goods were all right then.

Jane Davis said she was employed at the Oddfellows Inn. On the morning in question prisoner showed her the articles and asked her what she thought of his night's work. He gave her 13 towels to take to Mrs. Carter to sell for 2s. Mrs. Carter said she would see about it when she came down. Mrs. Carter was ill and could not attend that day.

Prisoner: What's the matter with her?

Witness: She's ill.

Prisoner: Yes, with the perjury! She committed gross perjury before the Magistrates. I shall prove it presently.

Mr. Glyn put in a certificate, and the witness Davis said she was suffering from dropsy and diseased kidneys.

Stephen Bailey, labourer, said he lodged at the Oddfellows. The prisoner also asked him what he thought of his night's work. He asked him to lend him twopence for a drink, and to buy a pair of sheets for 1s. He did not buy them.

Mr. Glyn then read the depositions of Mrs. Carter, which were given before the Magistrates. She stated that the prisoner slept at her house on Saturday, Sunday and Monday nights. He was absent on the Tuesday night and came home at seven o'clock on the morning of the 15th. At quarter to eight prisoner was in the scullery, and when he asked her to buy some towels she said “You didn't come by these things honestly and take them out of my house. Where did you get them from?” He said “Mind your own business”.

Edith Ralph, wife of the landlord of the Duke Of Edinburgh, stated that the prisoner brought some towels into the bar and she gave him 1s. 10d. for ten. When she found the name “Owen” on them she took them up to Supt. Taylor.

Jemima Davidson, of 6, South Street, stated that she bought two towels from prisoner for 3d.

This was the case for the prosecution, and prisoner called Charles William Young, Master of the Elham Union Workhouse. He stated that prisoner was admitted to the Workhouse Infirmary on the 24th of June and was discharged on the 13th of July (Monday). He was in bed the whole time, and was discharged at his own request.

Prisoner said that proved the perjury on the part of the witness Carter, who stated that he slept at the Oddfellows on the Saturday, Sunday and Monday, whereas he was not discharged from the Workhouse until the Monday.

George Bean, landlord of the Perseverance, was called on the prisoner's behalf, but did not put in an appearance.

Harry Stone, alias Lucas, stated that he saw prisoner in the Perseverance at half past twelve on Monday. He remained in his company until eleven at night. The next day he went into the Perseverance about the same time and saw the prisoner. In the afternoon they went to Cheriton to get a job for the prisoner. They went back to the Perseverance, and in the evening a man came in dressed in soldier's clothes. It was the uniform of the 17th Lancers. They all went out at eleven o'clock. He went with Supt. Taylor, but was unable to identify the soldier.

Prisoner then read a long statement. He said he had work to go to at Cheriton at five o'clock on the Wednesday morning, and as he was the worse for drink on Tuesday night, and fearing that he might overlay of he went to the Oddfellows, he slept under a bathing machine on the beach. He got to the White Lion, Cheriton, at five in the morning. His employer did not turn up and whilst he was waiting a soldier came up with the bundle of goods. They talked for some time. He said he was Captain Owen's servant, and that he was going abroad and had given him everything he did not want. He asked him (prisoner) if he knew where to sell them, and he said very likely Mrs. Carter would buy them. The soldier said he had another lot and if prisoner liked to take them to the Oddfellows he could have the middle man's profits and he would follow with the other bundle. He (prisoner) did not know they had been stolen and carried the bundle through the open streets, passing a large number of people on the way. Since he was arrested he had given every assistance to the police.

The jury found prisoner Not Guilty of stealing the goods, but Guilty on the second count of receiving them knowing them to have been stolen, and he was sentenced to three calendar months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express, 17 October 1891.

Quarter Sessions.

Monday, October 11th: Before John Charles Lewis Coward Esq.

James McCarthy, 29, described as an engine fitter, was indicted for stealing two dimity curtains, three pairs of linen sheets, and other articles, the property of Mary Campbell, and which articles were left in an unoccupied house in Brockman Road.

Mr. Glyn, instructed by Mr. Minter, prosecuted.

P.C. Down said on the 15th July he went to the Oddfellows Arms, in Radnor Street, and was there shown the bundle of things produced. He saw the prisoner come in and asked him if the bundle belonged to him. Prisoner said “Yes”, and added that he came by them honestly - he bought them in Folkestone. Witness asked him to go with him to the place where he bought them, and he said “No”. He then told prisoner he should take him to the station on a charge of stealing them.

By the prisoner: You took the matter lightly and good-humouredly, as though there was nothing in it. You went into the Rendezvous and had a drink while I stood outside.

The Recorder: Do I understand you allowed him to go into a public house and have a drink while you had him in charge? – He was determined to go, sir.

Supt. Taylor said he had a conversation with the prisoner at the police station. He asked him to account for the possession of the goods. He said “I bought them. I am a dealer”. He asked who he bought them of, and he did not say – he said he came by them honestly.

Prisoner asked for the statement he made before the Magistrates, and a letter he wrote from Canterbury to the Superintendent to be produced and read to the jury.

Supt. Taylor put in a long statement made by the prisoner after his committal, and the Recorder read it. It's purport was that he received the articles of a soldier belonging to the 17th Lancers, who, he said, was an officer's servant, and wanted to find a purchaser for them, and on his (prisoner's) suggestion he was allowed to carry the bundle to the Oddfellows. Next morning he sold some of the towels quite openly to get a drink. The Recorder also read a long letter written by the prisoner from Canterbury, in which he said he had been the landlord of a public house at Devonport. He married the landlady and they separated by mutual consent. His wife had allowed him upwards of a guinea a week. He had also received two small legacies, and had written stories for weekly journals, and had won money in newspaper prize competitions, so that he had no necessity to work.

In reply to the prisoner, Supt. Taylor said all the information he gave as to his antecedents was correct. The London police knew nothing. He found by enquiry that the prisoner was in company with a man in uniform two days previous to his arrest. There was no man in the 17th Lancers of the description given by the prisoner. There was no Capt. Owen in the 17th Lancers. Prisoner said a man named Stone or Lucas could identify the man, and he took Stone to the Hounslow Barracks, where the 17th Lancers had just arrived, but he could not identify anyone. The statement made by the prisoner about his wife was not true. She had not made him an allowance.

Henry Rebus proved purchasing the articles at a sale of Mr. Owen's goods in 1889, for Miss Mary Campbell. The articles were all marked “Owen”, and had lot tickets on them. He took them to a house belonging to Miss Campbell, 29, Brockman Road, and locked them up in a room. He saw the things safe as late at the 14th or 15th July of this year. He missed the things on the 19th. The storm sash of the window had been broken open, and the things were gone.

Jane Davis, wife of John Davis, a lodger at the Oddfellows Arms, said on Wednesday morning, the 15th July, she saw the prisoner, who asked her to go into the kitchen to see his night's work. She went, and untied the bundle. He gave her thirteen towels to take up to Mrs. Carter to sell for 2s. to get him a drink. She took them to Mrs. Carter, and brought them back. Mrs. Carter said she would see about them when she got up. She had seen Mrs. Carter that morning. She had been ill for a week and was unable to attend.

Prisoner: What is the matter with Mrs. Carter? – I don't know.

Prisoner: Perhaps she has got perjury the matter with her. I can prove she committed perjury before the Magistrates.

Witness said she had a doctor's certificate.

In answer to prisoner, witness said she lent him an open basket to take the towels out in. There were about 20 people in the house.

Prisoner caused some amusement by reading a list of the people who were in the house.

Stephen Bailey, another lodger at the Oddfellows, said the prisoner asked him to feel the weight of a bundle of linen. He then asked him to lend him 2d., or to give him 1s. for a pair of sheets. When Mrs. Carter came down she sent for a policeman.

Mr. Glyn put in the deposition of Lucy Carter, and told prisoner the doctor had been sent for, and when he arrived he would be allowed to put questions to him. The deposition stated that the prisoner lodged in her house on Saturday, Sunday and Monday, but was absent on Tuesday night. He returned early on Wednesday.

Edith Ralph, wife of the landlord of the Duke Of Edinburgh Inn, Tontine Street, said the prisoner went to her house with some towels in an open basket. He asked her to buy some, and she bought 10 for 1s. 10d. In the afternoon she examined them, and finding a name on them, she took them to the police station. Prisoner told her he got the towels honestly.

In answer to the Recorder, witness said she had not heard of the robbery before she took the towels to the Superintendent.

Jemima Davidson said she bought two towels of the prisoner in the Duke Of Edinburgh for 3d.

Prisoner called Charles William Young, Master of the Elham Union Workhouse, who stated that the prisoner was admitted to the infirmary on the 24th June and discharged on the 13th July.

Prisoner said that proved the perjury of the witness Carter, who was so ill she could not come.

Henry Stone, who said “Lucas” was his nickname, said he was a plasterer, residing at Folkestone. He saw the prisoner in the Perseverance on Monday from twelve o'clock until five or ten minutes to eleven, and on Tuesday from 12.30 until eleven. There was a man there in soldier's clothes on Tuesday night. His uniform was like that of the 17th Lancers. Prisoner said he should like to get work in the town, and they went together about eight o'clock onto the Pavilion Fields to see if they could get work. When they returned the soldier was still there, and they left about eleven.

In reply to Mr. Glyn, witness said he went to Hounslow, and saw the regiment paraded, but did not recognise the soldier among them.

Prisoner made a long statement, in which he attempted to show that he was innocent in “thought, word, or deed”. Had he been guilty, it was not likely he would have stayed in the town to be arrested.

Mr. Glyn, in his closing remarks to the jury, said that on his own statement the prisoner was a thief, because he said he received goods from a soldier and agreed to find a customer for them, instead of which he sold a portion of them and spent the money on drink.

The Recorder, in summing up, said they must all regret to see a man possessing the ability the prisoner had displayed standing in such a position. He commented on the statements of the prisoner, and compared them with the evidence, pointing out that there was proof that the prisoner was dealing with the goods very shortly after they were stolen.

The jury, without leaving the box, found the prisoner Guilty of receiving the goods knowing them to be stolen.

Superintendent Taylor produced a copy of the prisoner's discharge from the army and a letter he had received relating to that part of the prisoner's statement as to his keeping a public house. Nothing was known about him by the London police. The address he gave was that of a court which had been pulled down for improvements.

The Recorder said the jury had taken a merciful view of the case. Prisoner had been in prison three months, and he would be sentenced therefore to only three months' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle, 29 May 1897.

Saturday, May 22nd: Before The Mayor and Messrs. Lord, Fitness, Pledge, Vaughan, and Salter.

Thomas Smith, a boisterous character well known to the local police, who did not appear when his name was called, was summoned for refusing to quit licensed premises when ordered to do so, and with creating a disorderly scene and assaulting the landlord by kicking him severely. The latter charge was not, however, pressed.

George Bean, landlord of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, gave evidence to the effect that on the previous Tuesday evening Smith came into his house shortly before 6 o'clock. He was not then drunk, but was in such a state that witness refused to serve him, upon which he became violently abusive, refusing to leave the premises although witness ordered him to go several times. Witness then went round to eject him, when Smith seized him by the throat and struggled violently, kicking witness severely on the legs, and tearing his collar and necktie from his neck. A man named Russell, an upholsterer, seeing the fracas, assisted witness, who, having ejected the man, went in and bolted the door. Smith returned, and finding the door fast, dealt it repeated kicks, and also broke the window in the upper panel. The damage had cost 12s.

The Bench inflicted a fine of 20s., and costs, 10s., or 14 days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Express, 29 May 1897.

Saturday, May 22nd: Before The Mayor, J. Pledge, J. Fitness, J. Hoad, J. Holden and T.J. Vaughan Esqs.

Thomas Smith was summoned for refusing to quit a public house and with assaulting the landlord. He did not appear. Mr. Minter represented the prosecutor.

The landlord of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, said defendant entered his house on Tuesday evening at ten minutes to six. He had been in in the morning, and was ordered out. In the evening he was in such a state that he was refused anything to drink. He then became abusive, and was ordered out, but declined to go. Witness went round to put him out, and defendant seized him by the throat and said no-one could turn him out. He tore witness's clothing, and Mr. Russell, upholsterer, came over and helped to get the defendant out. The door was locked. He then “bashed the door” and broke a window, and did damage to the amount of 12s. There were two or three others in the bar at the time, but they did not interfere.

Fined 20s. and 10s. costs, or 14 days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Herald, 29 May 1897.

Police Court Notes.

On Saturday – the Mayor (Alderman Banks) presiding – a man named Thomas Smith was summoned for refusing to quit licensed premises, assaulting the landlord, and being disorderly.

The defendant did not appear, and the service of the summons being proved by P.S. Harman, the Bench decided to hear the case ex parte. Mr. Minter appeared for the complainant.

Mr. George Bean, landlord of the Perseverance public house, in Dover Street, said that defendant came into his house on Tuesday evening at about ten minutes to 6. He had been there in the morning, but was ordered out in consequence of his bad behaviour. He was not drunk, but had been drinking, and witness refused to supply him. He became very abusive, and witness ordered him out several times, but he refused to go. When witness tried to put him out, defendant seized him by the throat and struggled violently. He said neither witness nor any other man could put him out, and tore off witness's coat. At last witness got him out with the assistance of a neighbour named Russell. Then witness bolted the door, and the defendant tried to come in again and kicked the door several times. He also broke a window in the door, value about 12s. Two or three other people were in the bar when defendant was there.

The Bench fined defendant 20s., 10s. costs, or 14 days' imprisonment.

 

Folkestone Up To Date, 29 May 1897.

Hall Of Justice.

On Saturday Thomas Smith was fined 20s. and costs for refusing to quit the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street.

 

Folkestone Herald, 18 September 1897.

Police Court Report.

On Wednesday – the Mayor presiding – a transfer licence was granted to Mr. John Riddals, Perseverance, Dover Street, former tenant Mr. George Bean.

 

Folkestone Express, 2 October 1897.

Wednesday, September 29th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen J. Pledge, W.W. Salter and G. Spurgen, J. Fitness, T.J. Vaughan, and J. Holden Esqs.

Eliza Harvey was charged with being drunk and disorderly on the 21st inst. in Dover Street.

P.C. Burniston said that he saw defendant, who was very drunk, going in to the Perseverance Inn. He went in and told the landlord not to serve her. She came out and began using obscene language. He took her name and address.

The Magistrates' Clerk said that she was an old offender, but had not been charged for years.

The defendant, who did not appear, was fined 5s. and 10s. costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle, 11 February 1899.

Inquest.

In the Folkestone Town Hall on Tuesday an inquest was held by Mr. John Minter on the body of Charles Murphy, an able seaman, whose home was at Dover.

Patrick Dennis Newman, ordinary seaman, of the brig Cambois, of Folkestone (Captain Allenson), said he knew the deceased. The brig arrived from Shields into Folkestone with coals about a week ago. They were discharging on the pier at the bottom of the Tram Road. On Sunday night, between 6 and 7, Murphy left the ship to go ashore. He had had drink, but was “nearer sober than drunk”. He seemed a man of about 48 to 50 years of age, but was believed to be younger. He was single. Witness slept on board the ship, and did not see Murphy again till his body was picked up between 12 and 1 on Monday noon in the outer harbour, under the ship.

Albert Hart, of 35a, North Street, Folkestone, a young fisherman, said on Monday morning he was in the harbour at low tide in his boats, close to the Cambois, when he saw a man's leg sticking out from under the bottom of the boat. There was then just depth of water to cover the body. Witness went and told a man on the harbour pier, who called someone else, and the men went down and dragged the body out.

Dennis Murphy said deceased was his brother, and was 33 years of age. Their mother lived in Union Street, Dover, and that was deceased's home.

Chas. Joseph Venner said he lived at 35, Dover Street, Folkestone, and was a fisherman. He saw deceased in a public house in Dover Street on Sunday night at a quarter past nine. He was then quite sober. He was with him in the Perseverance Hotel, and he was perfectly sober in the public house, and also when he left it.

Captain Allenson said he began to discharge a week ago on the Tram Road, bow on, and had a platform of three boards as a gangway for passage to and from the pier and the boat at the bow. He paid Murphy his weekly wages on the Saturday night, telling him “not to make a fool of himself”, and then left him. There being no work on Sunday, and the Captain being a resident of Folkestone, he went to his family and left the men. On Sunday at five in the afternoon he visited the brig and found all right. The men were not there, except the cook, but he did not want them. His opinion was that Murphy, in passing along the planks to go on board, had fallen, at low water, to the bottom of the harbour and been killed in the fall, and that the ebbing tide had carried his body under the bottom of the brig.

Dr. Gilbert gave evidence as to having been called to see the body in a boat-house in the fishmarket on Wednesday afternoon. There was no mark of violence, but an abrasion on the right side of the forehead and nose which, in the doctor's opinion, had been produced by a fall. Death was from suffocation, after being stunned by the fall and dropping deep in the mud and water.

Captain Allenson, re-called, said along the fishmarket and harbour, where his brig was lying, the path at night was dangerous to the most careful and most sober man, as there were no lamps to light him on his way, and no chains to prevent him falling.

The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and added the rider that the South Eastern Company ought to place lamps to enable any man going on board a ship in the harbour at night to lessen his danger of falling over the pier.

 

Folkestone Express, 11 February 1899.

Inquest.

An inquest was held by the Borough Coroner (Mr. J. Minter) at the Town Hall on Tuesday afternoon, on Charles Murphy, whose body was picked up in the outer harbour between twelve and one on Monday.

Patrick Dennis Newman, ordinary seaman on the brig Cambois, of Folkestone (Captain Harrison), identified deceased as Charles Murphy, who was an able bodied seaman on the same vessel. The ship arrived from Shields with coal about a week or fortnight ago. They were discharging outside the Bridge now. Deceased sailed in the ship from Shields. On Sunday evening, between six and seven, he saw the deceased on the ship in his bunk in the forecastle house on deck asleep. He afterwards turned out and went ashore. He was not exactly sober, but could not be described as drunk. He was about 48 or 50 years of age. He was a single man, and his home was at Dover. He saw no more of deceased until he was picked up between twelve and one on Monday in the outer harbour. He was practically underneath the ship. Witness heard nothing during Sunday night.

Charles Joseph Venner, of 35, Dover Street, a fisherman, said he knew deceased well. He saw him in the Perseverance in Dover Street on Saturday evening between nine and half past. He was as sober as a judge then, “as sober as I am now”, added witness.

Albert Hart, a lad living at 35a, North Street, said on Monday morning between twelve and one he was walking in the harbour. The tide was going out. He saw a man's leg sticking out from beneath the ship Cambois The water was just covering deceased. It was high tide at six a.m. that morning. He told a man who was just going down the plank. He called the others, and they dragged deceased out.

Captain Harrison said he began to discharge a week ago. They were bow on to the tramway, and discharging into wagons, which carried the coal into trucks. If the ship laid alongside they would have to pay so much dues because the coal did not belong to the S.E.R. Company. He was on board on Sunday afternoon at five o'clock. He turned the men to at six o'clock, and deceased was not there, but that was a usual occurrence. They often had someone missing the first thing in the morning, and he did not think anything about it. The plank by which the crew went on board was by the port side. Witness's idea was that deceased fell and was killed by the fall.

Dr. J.W. Thornton Gilbert said on Monday about ten minutes past twelve he was called by the police and went to the Fish Market, and in a stable he saw the body of deceased, which he examined. He was dead, and in his (Witness's) opinion had been so for a matter of six or seven hours. There were no outward marks of violence on the body, but on the forehead and the right side of the nose there was an abrasion which might have been produced by a fall. Looking at the extent of the abrasion it was, in his opinion, caused by a fall. He could not make out any fracture of the skull, and in his judgement death was due to the fall, which had caused a concussion, followed by suffocation either by water or mud. He was covered with mud, and his pockets were full of mud. It was possible that he might have fallen face downwards into the mud, and so have been smothered.

Captain Harrison, re-called, said it was a very dangerous spot, and it took the most perfectly sober man in the world to go across to the ship in safety, because there was no light, and there were railway metals and trucks all about the place. A person had to be very careful indeed to cross safely.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”, but there was no evidence to show how caused, and added a rider that representations should be made to the South Eastern Railway Company to mitigate the danger which existed at the spot where the accident occurred by placing a lamp there.

 

Folkestone Herald, 11 February 1899.

Inquest.

On Tuesday afternoon the Borough Coroner (Mr. J. Minter) held an inquest at the Town Hall, touching the death of Charles Murphy, who was found in the Harbour on the previous day.

Patrick Dennis Newman deposed that he was a seaman and had no home. He was on board the brig Cambois, of Folkestone, Captain Harrison. The deceased, Charles Murphy, was an able seaman. The ship came from Shields, and arrived about a week or a fortnight ago. They were discharging now by the side of the bridge at the Tram Road. On Sunday night, between six and seven o'clock, witness saw him on board the ship, in his bunk. He turned out and left the ship, going ashore. He could not be called drunk; he was nearer sober than drunk. He was about 50 or 48, and his home was at Dover. Witness did not see any more of him till he was picked up. He was found between twelve and one o'clock, their dinner time. It was in the outer harbour, near the ship. Witness was not there at the time. Witness did not hear the least thing during Sunday night.

The jury, at this stage, proceeded to the Cemetery to view the body. On their return the following evidence was taken:-

Charles Joseph Venner, of Dover Street, fisherman, deposed that he knew deceased well. He saw him on the evening in question in the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street. Witness went at a quarter past nine, and the deceased was there. Deceased left at half past nine. He was sober. He never saw him afterwards.

Albert Hart, a fisher lad, of 35a, North Street, deposed that on the previous morning (Monday), between 12 and 1 o'clock, he was in the harbour, down by the ships. He was not in a boat. The tide was going out. He was close to the vessel Cambois. He saw a man's leg sticking out. (High tide was at six in the morning.) He told a man who was just going down the plank. The man put his boots on and told the others. They dragged the deceased out.

Charles Joseph Venner, on being re-called, said that the deceased was as sober as a judge when he went away at half past nine. He did not see him again. He did not say he would not have any more because he had to coal in the morning.

Deceased's brother said that his mother lived at Union Street, Dover. When he went on Monday morning and enquired where was “Rooney” (that was the nickname of his brother) there was no answer given. He thought deceased had gone ashore.

Captain Harrison, of the Cambois, deposed that the ship was bow on, with three deals from the bow to the tramway. Asked why they did not lie alongside, he said the cargo did not belong to the South Eastern Railway Company. Asked the difference, he said it was better for the ship. He was aboard on Sunday at five o'clock in the evening, and came ashore. He afterwards found the deceased missing, which was a common occurrence in the morning. Witness did not think anything about the matter. He had said “Don't make a stupid of yourself”, and he said he would not, but he did not turn up. They found the body on the starboard side – the right hand side.

The Coroner: My nautical education tells me that, Captain.

The witness added that, looking at the position where the body was found, his opinion was that the deceased fell on the ground and struck, killing himself. As the water went off, it floated him round the ship, no doubt.

Dr. James William Thornton Gilbert deposed that on the previous day, at about ten past twelve, he was called by the police, and went to the Fishmarket. In a stable he saw the body of deceased, which he examined. He was dead, and in witness's opinion, had been so for about six or seven hours. On the forehead and the right side of the nose there was a large abrasion, which might have been produced by a fall. Looking at its extent, he thought it was so produced. He could not make out any fracture of the skull. In his judgement the cause of death was concussion from a fall, and the man died possibly from suffocation.

The Captain said the deceased could go on board either by the one way or round the harbour through the gates. He could get across the bridge. There was a watchman on each side. There would be no light on the Royal George side from the gates up to the vessel. The only light would be the steamboat. It would take the most sober man to go along on a dark night in safety. It was a dangerous place. There were metals and railway trucks all around.

The Coroner having summed up, the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The foreman remarked that it was considered there ought to be some protection made, but the place was not a public thoroughfare.

The Coroner said it was a thoroughfare for all persons who came there, and were berthed there with their ships. He remarked on the difficulty of preventing accidents in harbours. To a landsman it looked very dangerous to see the men running up and down on the planks of the colliers. He would forward a representation if the jury desired him to do so.

The jury assented, and a representation will be made on the matter, probably with a view to having a lamp placed there.

 

Folkestone Up To Date, 11 February 1899.

Inquest.

An inquest was held last Tuesday afternoon before Mr. Minter, Borough Coroner, on the body of Charles Murphy, an able seaman, reported to be formerly of Dover.

Patrick Dennis Newman said: I am an ordinary seaman on board the brig Cambois (Captain Harrison), registered as of Folkestone. I have no regular home. I know the deceased, Charles Murphy. He was an able seaman. Our ship came from Shields with coal about a week ago. I cannot say precisely the date of her arrival. She lies near the Tram Road. The deceased was on board during the voyage from Shields. I saw him on board between six and seven on Sunday evening. He was then in his bunk in the forecastle house on deck. He afterwards turned out, and went on shore. You could not call him drunk at the time. I cannot say his exact age. He must have been 48 or getting near 50. I believe his home was at Dover. I did not see any more of him until he was picked up between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. yesterday, during our dinner hour. He was picked up in the harbour. I was not there at the time. I did not hear him doing anything on Sunday night. I identify the body as that of my shipmate, Charles Murphy. I said he belonged to Dover because his mother lives there.

Charles Joseph Venner said: I live at 35, Dover Street, and am a fisherman. I knew the deceased very well. I saw him on Sunday evening in the Perseverance public house in Dover Street. I went in at a quarter past nine, and the last he was seen was at half past nine, when he left. He was then as sober as I am now, as sober as a judge. That is all I know about him.

A. Hart, a youth, said: I live at 35a, North Street. I earn my living by fishing. Yesterday afternoon between 12 a.m. and 1 p.m. I was walking in the mud in the harbour, close to the Cambois, when I saw a man's legs sticking out from under the bottom of the brig. The water was just covering him.

Captain Harrison here stated that it was high tide at six o'clock in the morning.

Witness, continuing: I then went and told a man what I had seen, and he came and dragged the body out.

Dennis Murphy said: I do not know anything of this fatality. My brother was 33 years of age. My mother lives in Union Street, Dover.

Venner, re-called, said: When I saw the deceased in the Perseverance public house he said nothing about going to have a drink. He did not say “No, I shan't have any more, because I have got to go and have a drink”.

Dennis Murphy, re-called: I inquired of my brother about the deceased shortly previous to his death, as I wondered where he had gone, but could not find out. I thought he had gone on shore. At breakfast time I asked where he was, as I wondered why he had not turned up to give us a drink.

Captain Harrison said: The ship was not lying alongside, the object being to avoid the dues of the dock company. We began to discharge coals about a week ago on the main road. We discharged bow on, and had a platform of three boards as a gangway for passage to and from the pier. I paid Murphy on Saturday night, and did not think much of his absence on Monday morning, as similar absences are a constant occurrence. There was no work on Sunday. The body was found under the fore part of the ship. My opinion is that the deceased had fallen in passing along the planks to go on board. The deceased must have fallen at low water to the bottom of the harbour and been killed in the fall, and the ebbing tide had probably carried the body under the ship.

Dr. Gilbert said: Yesterday morning I saw the body in a stable at the Fishmarket. The deceased must have been dead six or seven hours. There were no outward signs of violence. But on the forehead there was an abrasion, which might have been produced by a fall. I could not make out whether there was any fracture of the skull. My opinion was that death took place from concussion of the brain from a fall into the mud. The deceased's clothes and pockets were covered with mud. He might have died from concussion of the brain, or from being smothered in the mud.

Captain Harrison, re-called, said: The deceased would have to come on board across the bridge, or over the railway, if no watchman stopped him. The watchmen are employed by the South Eastern Company. I have spoken to a watchman. He knew nothing about the matter; had not heard any row, or anything of the kind.

Mr. Chadwick, the Town Sergeant, said he also made inquiries, and discovered that the watchman knew nothing about the fatality.

Captain Harrison: There would be no light from the Royal George to my vessel. The soberest man might find it dangerous to come on board after dark. A man has to be very careful in coming on board.

The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, remarked that he did not know whether there was much reliable information to be gained from the evidence of the first witness. The other witnesses failed to throw much light upon the exact manner in which the deceased had met his death, but it appeared probable that he had had a fall in endeavouring to get on board. The testimony of Dr. Gilbert was to that effect, that the deceased had probably been drowned, or smothered in the mud of the harbour.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”, though there was no evidence to show the exact nature of the circumstances. Probably the deceased was either drowned or smothered in the mud. At the same time they thought that a representation should be made to the South Eastern as to the dangerous state of the approaches to a vessel lying in the position of the Cambois at the time of the fatality.

The Coroner said he thought it was probable that if representations were made to the South Eastern Railway Company, a lamp would be placed in the more dangerous part of the approach to vessels in the harbour. But he would point out that, in dealing with seafaring men, it was sometimes impossible to prevent accidents. That morning, as he passed the harbour, there were six or seven colliers discharging. To a landsman the practice of men running up and down planks with coals on their head seemed very dangerous, but to those personally engaged it was a matter of everyday life, and they would take no more notice of it than he would of going about the streets. Still it was dangerous. However, he would be glad to comply with the wish of the members of the jury, if they really thought that representations to the South Eastern Railway Company were necessary.

 

Folkestone Chronicle, 11 March 1899.

Local News.

Yesterday (Friday) at the Folkestone Borough Police Court, Messrs. Fitness, Pursey, Wightwick, and Herbert had before them two cases, which brought to the Court a large number of the public.

The second case was one in which a young Scotchman, David Thompson, was charged with being found on the premises, 18, Dover Street, early on Friday morning, with unlawful intent.

John Riddall, landlord of the Perseverance Inn, 18, Dover Street, said at 20 past one he was awakened by the police, who told him there was a man in the house. He went down and found the prisoner in the back kitchen in charge of the police. He found that the man had climbed over a wall at the back of the house. His house was peculiarly situated. There was no back way to it, as the back was at the side of the cliff. It was a remarkable old house, in that it was quite accurate to say of it “you had to go upstairs to get downstairs and had to go downstairs to go upstairs”. The kitchen was upstairs and had no window to it. To enable air and light to enter the doorway was left with a space at the top. Prisoner had gone up a flight of steps at the side of the cliff, climbed over a urinal, and afterwards over the doorway into the kitchen.

P.C. George Johnson said at 12.50 a.m. he heard a noise in the back part of Mr. Riddall's house, so he climbed up the steps and over the two doors and into the kitchen, and there found the prisoner lying on the table pretending to be asleep. Prisoner, when asked what he was there for, said “I'm here having a doss”. He called up the landlord, who said he didn't know the man. At the police station prisoner was searched and found to have on him 9d. in coppers, a chunk of bread, and two tins, one containing tea, and another sugar.

P.C. Sharp said he heard a noise, and saw a light of someone striking a match, and found prisoner climbing over the doors at the back of the Perseverance. He went in search of P.C. Johnson, with whom he entered the place.

Prisoner said he had come to the town to find work, and had a job to start on. He thought he was entering a urinal. He was seeking a rest, as the police had failed to get him a doss-house when he asked them. He wanted a place to sleep, and had no felonious intent. He really didn't know he was anywhere but in an outhouse.

Sentenced to seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Herald,  11 March 1899.

Folkestone Police Court.

Yesterday (Friday), David Thompson was charged with having been found in a dwelling house, Dover Street, being there for an unlawful purpose.

The landlord of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, deposed that about five minutes past one o'clock that morning he heard the bell ring, and he was told there was a man in the house. He went downstairs and found the defendant in the back kitchen in the charge of the police. The house was built in the side of the cliff, and the first floor was level with the ground at the back. Leading into the convenience was a door, six foot high, which was bolted. There was another door and a wall, also six feet high. It was left in that manner to give ventilation. The wall did not go up to the ceiling. The defendant must have climber over. He saw the defendant the previous evening in the bar, and watched him leave.

P.C. George W. Johnson deposed that about 12.50 a.m. that morning, in company with another constable, he went to the back of 18, Dover Street, The Perseverance. He climbed over two doors about six feet high, and saw the kitchen door open. P.C. Sharp had heard a noise up there previously. On looking in witness saw the defendant laying on a table. Witness caught hold of him and asked what he was doing there. He said “I come in here for a doss”. He could not have been asleep. There was some noise in getting over the doors. Witness brought defendant to the police station, and found 9 d. in money on him, some bread, and two tins. He had seen the man about 12 o'clock. The defendant had been drinking.

P.C. Sharp deposed that at 12.50 that morning he heard a noise at the rear of the Perseverance, as though someone was getting over the door. He saw a light at the back of the premises. He communicated with P.C. Johnson, who got over the doors. Defendant was found in the back kitchen, and the landlord was called. The man appeared to be asleep on the table.

Defendant said he had struck one match and could not see whether it was a closet or not. He had wanted the police to find him a lodging. He was very sorry he did anything wrong. He thought it was the only place where he could get until morning.

Seven days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Up To Date, 11 March 1899.

Friday, March 10th: Before J. Fitness Esq., Col. Hamilton, and W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

David Thompson was charged with being on licensed premises for an unlawful purpose.

The landlord of the Perseverance beerhouse said: Early this morning I was awoke by the police. On looking out of the window, I was informed that a man had got into the house. I went downstairs, and found the prisoner in the kitchen, in charge of the police.

Police Constable Johnson (26) deposed to finding the prisoner inside the prosecutor's house asleep. He woke him and asked him what he was doing there, and his reply was “I came in for a doss”. I brought him to the police station. I found 9d. in money, and some bread on him. He was not drunk, but had evidently been drinking.

Police Constable (24) said that hearing a noise at the back of the premises, he went to see what was the matter. He saw a light. He then communicated with Police Constable Johnson, and went inside the back premises, where he found the prisoner.

The prisoner was sentenced to 14 days' hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express, 11 May 1901.

Tuesday, May 7th: Before W. Wightwick, C.J. Pursey, W.G. Herbert, W. Salter, and G.I Swoffer Esqs., and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Edwin Morgan was granted a transfer of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street.

 

Folkestone Herald, 11 May 1901.

Tuesday, May 4th: Before Messrs. Wightwick, Swoffer, Pursey Herbert and Salter, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

The licence of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, was transferred to Edwin Morgan.

 

Folkestone Chronicle, 15 June 1901.

Wednesday, June 12th: Before Messrs. Hoad, Pursey, Wightwick, and Pledge, and Lieut. Col. Westropp.

The following licensing transfer was granted: Mr. Henry William Morgan takes over the Perseverance from Mr. Riddell.

 

Folkestone Express, 15 June 1901.

Wednesday, June 12th: Before J. Hoad, J. Pledge, C.J. Pursey, and W. Wightwick Esqs., and Lieut. Col. W.K. Westropp.

Henry Wm. Morgan was granted a transfer of the licence of the Railway Tap (sic) from Mr. Riddall, and some alterations to the interior were approved by the Bench. Mr. F. Hall represented the applicant.

 

Folkestone Express, 30 January 1904.

Wednesday, January 27th: Before Alderman Vaughan, and Lieut. Cols. Fynmore and Westropp.

William Spearpoint, a fisherman, was summoned for being found drunk on licensed premises. Defendant denied the charge.

P.C. Johnson said: At 7.15 p.m. on January 19th I was on duty in Dover Street, and saw the defendant staggering up the road. He was in a drunken condition, and entered the Perseverance Inn. I followed him and heard the landlady ask him to leave the premises. He remained inside several minutes, and then I entered and told him I should report him for being drunk on licensed premises. Defendant replied “Don't lock me up this time”. I saw the defendant ejected from several public houses previously.

Defendant said he was very sorry for what had happened. He was a teetotaller for four months previous to this, and had since signed the pledge.

Supt. Reeve proved 14 previous convictions.

A fine of 10s. and 9s. costs was inflicted.

 

Folkestone Herald, 30 January 1904.

Wednesday, January 27th: Before Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Westropp and Lieut. Colonel Fynmore.

William Spearpoint, for being drunk at the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, was fined 10s. and 9s. costs.

P.C. Johnson gave evidence.

 

Folkestone Express, 14 may 1904.

Monday, May 9th: Before Alderman Vaughan, Lieutenant Colonel Westropp, Lieutenant Colonel Fynmore, W. C. Carpenter, and J. Stainer Esqs.

Edward Parker and John Byrne, both belonging to the Royal Garrison Artillery, stationed at Dover, were charged with being drunk and disorderly in Dover Street the previous night.

P.C. Minter said about nine o'clock the previous night he was on duty in Dover Street, outside the Perseverance Inn. He heard Byrne demanding drink, but the landlord refused to serve him, and ordered him to leave. He, however, refused. Witness went inside and requested him to leave. He had to obtain assistance to get him outside, where he became so violent that he had to be taken to the police station. On the way Parker came up in a drunken condition and tried to release the other prisoner. With the assistance of P.C.s Kettle and Johnson Parker was taken to the police station.

Prisoners had nothing to say, both stating that they did not remember anything about it.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days' hard labour in default.

 

Folkestone Herald, 11 June 1904.

Monday, June 6th: Before Mr. J. Stainer, Lieut. Col. Westropp, and Mr. W. C. Carpenter.

Joseph Martin was charged with another man in being concerned in stealing a pair of boots.

George Punnett said he lived at No. 23, Radnor Street. He was in the Providence Inn on the day in question when prisoner and another man came into the bar, the latter carrying a parcel. The man who was carrying the parcel said “Who wants to buy a pair of soldiers' boots? They have only been worn once”. He (prisoner's companion) also said he had been to the pawn shop in order to pawn the boots, but it was closed. Prisoner said “They're a nice pair of boots; who'll give half a crown for them?” Witness caught hold of the boots and, putting one on, said “They just fit me. I'll have them”. He went out, and returned in a few minutes with the half crown. He handed it to prisoner, and he gave him (witness) the boots. Prisoner and the other man left the house together. On Friday, the 3rd inst., he saw the man who was with prisoner at the police station.

Mr. H. Warren said he was a boot salesman, carrying on business in Dover Street. He identified the boots by a private mark, T 4s. 11d., as his property. On Thursday a number of boots were hanging outside the shop, but he did not miss any until the police called.

Prisoner was remanded until Wednesday.

 

Wednesday, June 8th: Before Alderman W.  G. Herbert, Mr. E. T. Ward, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Mr. J. Stainer, and Mr. W. C. Carpenter.

Joseph Martin, a street artist, and George Smith were charged with being concerned in stealing a pair of boots from a shop in Dover Street, the property of Mr. Hy. Warren.

On being taken from the police station to the Court the prisoner Martin made an attempt to escape, but was overpowered by three constables. Immediately on being placed in the dock he took off one of his boots, with the intention apparently of hurling it at Inspector Lilley. A struggle followed, and the Chief Constable and Detective Burniston came to the assistance, the Inspector taking off Martin's other boot while the constables held him firmly. This done, prisoner became somewhat quieter, and the case was proceeded with.

The evidence of Stephen Punnett and Henry Warren, given at the hearing on Monday, was repeated.

Detective Sergeant Burniston stated that on Friday, the 3rd inst., he saw the prisoner Martin detained at the Dover police station. He said to him “I shall charge you with being concerned with a man named George Smith, now in custody at Folkestone, with stealing from outside a shop, No. 66, Dover Street, one pair of boots”. He cautioned him, and Martin said “I met the man at the Providence Inn, and sold the boots for him”. Witness took him to the Folkestone police station, and there charged him, but he made no reply. That (Wednesday) morning he charged the prisoners with being concerned together with stealing a pair of boots. Neither made any reply to the charge.

Smith repeated the story that he was in drink at the time, and did not know what he was doing.

Martin said “I received the money for them, but he (pointing to Smith) “pinched” them.

Both prisoners were sentenced to 14 days' hard labour.

 

LICENSEE LIST

PEEL William 1864-70

Last pub licensee had PEEL John 1870-72

PEEL Elizabeth 1872-73

RUSSELL John 1873-86 (age 38 in 1881Census)

RUSSELL Elizabeth 1886-88

BEAN George 1888-97 (age 34 in 1891Census)

RIDDALLS John 1897-1901 Next pub licensee had

MORGAN Harry 1904

TRACEY Robert 1904-06

Last pub licensee had RALPH Frederick 1906-08 From Duke Of Edinburgh

http://evenmoretales.blogspot.com/perseverance1.html

http://evenmoretales.blogspot.com/perseverance2.html

http://evenmoretales.blogspot.com/perseverance3.html

 

CensusCensus

 

The following has kindly been researched and sent by Jan Pedersen and is still to be formatted.

 

Perseverance, Dover Street c1850s – 1908

Licensees

William Peel 1864 1870
John Peel 1870 1872 From Blue Anchor
Elizabeth Peel 1872 1873
John Russell 1873 1886
Elizabeth Russell 1886 1888
George Bean 1888 1897
John Riddalls 1897 1901 To Princess Royal
Harry Morgan 1904 1904
Robert Tracey 1904 1906
Frederick Ralph 1906 1908 From Duke Of Edinburgh

Folkestone Express 13 May 1871

Friday, March 12th: Before The Mayor and J. Tolputt Esq.

Ellen Smith, wife of John Smith, of Ashford, was charged with being drunk and using obscene language.

P.C. Hills deposed to taking the prisoner into custody for causing a disturbance outside the Perseverance beerhouse, Dover Street.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 3s. 6d. costs for each offence.

Eveline Horan, wife of James horan was charged with being drunk and resisting P.C. Hills in the execution of his duty.

P.C. Hills said about half past ten the previous day, when apprehending Mrs. Smith, the prisoner tried to pull her away. I told her to let the prisoner alone; she would not. By my instructions P.C. Swain took her in charge.

The Bench fined her 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days imprisonment.

Folkestone Express 23 December 1871

Advertisement:

MRS. ELIZABETH PEEL

DEALER IN RUSHES AND CANES FOR CHAIRS

PERSEVERANCE INN, DOVER STREET, FOLKESTONE.

Begs to thank her friends and the public for the support received by her late husband, and trusts by strict attention to business to merit a continuance of the same.

N.B. ALL ORDERS FOR CHIMNEY SWEEPING WILL BE EXECUTED AS BEFORE

Folkestone Chronicle 1 February 1873

Wednesday, January 29th: Before The Mayor and J. Tolputt Esq.

John Francis Russell applied for a temporary authority to sell beer to be consumed on the premises in a house in Dover Street, under a certificate granted to Elizabeth Peel. Application granted.

Folkestone Express 1 February 1873

Wednesday, January 29th: Before The Mayor and J. Tolputt Esq.

Temporary authority was granted to J.T. Russell as landlord of the Perseverance, he having married the landlady.

Folkestone Express 30 August 1873

Wednesday, August 27th: Before The Mayor, J. Gambrill, J. Tolputt, and J. Clarke Esq.

Annual Licensing Meeting

The licensing committee met at ten o'clock for the purpose of taking into consideration the question of making any alteration in the hours for opening and closing public houses. Shortly after eleven o'clock the licensed victuallers present were called into Court, where the Clerk said the Bench would hear anything with reference to the alteration of the hours for the opening and closing.

The applications for beerhouses were then considered, all of which were granted. In the case of the Perseverance on The Stade it was stated by the landlord that he had expended 70 or 80 in enlarging the house, and Mr. Gambrill said the attention of the overseers should be called to the fact in order that the assessment might be raised.

Note: Why do they say this is in The Stade?

Folkestone Chronicle 20 November 1875

Saturday, November 13th: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer, W.J. Jeffreason, T. Caister Esqs, and Gen. Armstrong.

John Thomas Russell, landlord of the Perseverance beerhouse, Dover Street, was charged with selling intoxicating liquors during prohibited hours on Sunday, the 7th inst.

Defendant pleaded guilty and was fined 5, and 8s. costs, the license not to be endorsed.

John Marsh, George Shrubsole, Joshua Pope, William Spearpoint jun., Richard Bourne, Henry Winter, Henry Herring, John Holness, William Spearpoint sen., and W. Wanstall were charged with being in the Perseverance during prohibited hours on Sunday, not being lodgers, servants, or travellers.

Fined 2s., and 8s. costs each.

Folkestone Express 20 November 1875

Saturday, November 13th: Before The Mayor, General Armstrong, T. Caister, R.W. Boarer and W.J. Jeffreason Esqs.

John Thomas Russell, landlord of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, was summoned for selling beer during prohibited hours on Sunday the 7th inst., and John Marsh, butcher, Henry White, butcher, James Pope, flyman, ---- Shrubsole, carter, ---- Herring, general dealer, John Holmes, flyman, Wm. Spearpoint jun., fisherman, Wm. Spearpoint sen., fisherman, Richard Bourne, fisherman, and William Wanston, blacksmith, were charged with being in the said house at unlawful hours.

Each of the defendants pleaded Guilty. Some amusement was created by the elder Spearpoint, when called upon to plead, saying “Thank you”.

The defendant Russell, in extenuation, said that the boats came in very late at night, and a boat's crew came in for refreshment and the door was left open.

P.C. Keeler said he went to defendant's house at twenty minutes to eight on Sunday morning, the 7th inst., and found the door open. He went in and saw the landlord behind the bar and the other defendants in front. He asked the landlord how it was, when he said he was very sorry, and hoped that witness would look over it.

In answer to the Bench, Superintendent Wilshere said he had received intimation of the trade carried on by the defendant Russell on Sunday morning, but as a rule the house was well conducted.

The Mayor, addressing Russell, said the Bench had it in their power to fine him 10, but taking into consideration the fact that it was his first conviction, they would fine him in the mitigated penalty of 5 and the costs. At the same time they wished to remind him that leaving his door open was a great temptation for men to go in. Addressing the other defendants, his Worship said that they were each liable to a heavy penalty, but considering the circumstances of the case the Bench would only fine them 2s. and 8s. costs each.

The money was paid in each instance.

Folkestone Express 25 March 1876

Tuesday, March 21st: Before The Mayor and Col. De Crespigny.

William Mellow, a seaman on board the Annie White collier, was charged with being drunk and using obscene language at the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, on the previous evening.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty.

John Russell, landlord of the Perseverance said that at about ten minutes to eleven o'clock the prisoner came into the house, but witness refused to draw him any beer. Upon that prisoner became very violent and he had to be given into custody.

P.C. Ovenden said he took the prisoner into custody, and he was so violent that the assistance of three other men had to be obtained to take him to the station.

The Bench fined the prisoner 5s. for being drunk, and 5s. for using obscene language, together with 3s. 6d. costs in each case. The money was paid by the mate of the ship to which prisoner belonged.

Folkestone Express 19 July 1879

Monday, July 14th: Before The Mayor, Captain Crowe, Alderman Hoad, M.J. Bell and J. Fitness Esqs.

Mary Ann Scamp, an old woman, pleaded Guilty to being drunk and refusing to quit licensed premises, the Perseverance Inn, on the 12th inst.

P.C. Bashford proved the charge, and the Bench inflicted a fine of 2s. 6d., costs 3s.6d., or in default seven days' hard labour.

Folkestone News 1 May 1886

Wednesday, April 28th:

Mrs. Russell, administratrix of her deceased husband, received the usual licence to carry on the business of the Perseverance Inn.

Folkestone Express 22 December 1888

Friday, December 13th: Before Colonel De Crespigny, Surgeon General Gilbourne, and Alderman Banks.

John Davidson was charged with stealing a woollen shawl, and a silver mounted walking stick, the property of some person unknown.

Sergeant Harman said he was in Dover Street about half past seven on Thursday evening, in plain clothes, and from a communication he received from Boat Inspector Brice, he watched the prisoner, who he saw come out of the Perseverance beerhouse with the shawl over his shoulders and the stick in his hand. He saw prisoner go into several shops and public houses, and at half past eight followed him into the Raglan at the top of Dover Street. He cautioned him and asked him where he got the shawl and stick from. He replied “The shawl belongs to me. It was my mother's. I didn't steal the stick. It belongs to some gentleman”. He took him to the police station and charged him on suspicion of stealing the articles, and detained him for enquiries to be made. Prisoner said he did not steal the stick; he only took it. There was a lot of flymen in the house at the time. He asked prisoner what house, and he said he would go back and show him, but witness declined to go. Prisoner was under the influence of drink, and made no reply at the station to the charge.

Superintendent Taylor asked for a remand in order that he might trace the owner of the stick, which had on the silver knob the initials “F.C.S.”

On Saturday the accused was again brought up, and there being no further evidence adduced, he was discharged.

Folkestone Express 11 October 1890

Monday, October 6th: Before Capt. W. Carter, Aldermen Dunk and Pledge, J. Fitness, S. Penfold, and E.T. Wards Esqs.

Thomas Clayton, a young man of decent appearance, was charged with stealing 18s. in silver and bronze, the property of Joseph Whiting, landlord of the Bricklayers' Arms.

Joseph Whiting said: I am landlord of the Bricklayers' Arms, in Fenchurch Street. Prisoner came to my house and slept there on Friday last. He was also there on Saturday about the house, sometimes in the kitchen and sometimes in the bar. He was there on Saturday evening. Just before, he said he was not going to stay as he had no money to pay for his bed. About seven o'clock he went out of the front door which leads to the bar. I left the bar about the same time as prisoner was leaving the bar and went to the back part of the house and left the bar unattended. When prisoner told me he had no money to pay for his bed he was in front of the bar. I was absent about a minute, and I went to the till to pay a girl for some fish, when I found I had been robbed. I had just before been to the till, and whatever had been taken was done between the time I was absent from the bar and my return. Prisoner could easily have got at the till by leaning over the counter. Prisoner came back and said he would pay for a bed, and for that of a friend. He went upstairs and I followed him, and saw him come back, and he paid me 1s. 6d. for his and another man's bed and for some beer. I missed from my till about 15s. in bronze and about four or five shillings in silver. I never mentioned my loss until I gave him in charge about nine o'clock. I told prisoner then that it looked very suspicious on his part, and gave him in custody. Prisoner said nothing. P.C. Swift said “You will have to come along with me” and he replied “All right”.

Cross-examined by the prisoner: You had money on Friday night and changed money on Saturday morning. The time you paid for the bed was about nine o'clock. On Saturday morning you might have spent about 6d. or 8d. You told me when you left to take charge of the parcel until you returned.

George Bean, landlord of the Perseverance, said prisoner went to his house on Saturday evening. He was alone. He called for a small soda. There were other people in the bar. He treated people in the bar to the amount of 2s., which he paid for in coppers. He saw he had 2s. 6d. in silver with the coppers.

Jane Tritton said prisoner came to the bar of the Royal George on Saturday evening. Two men went with him. He called for drinks for himself and companions, which he paid for in coppers, to the amount of one shilling. He asked her if she would mind coppers. She said she was short of them, and gave him 2s. 6d. in silver for that amount of coppers.

Stephen Hall deposed to prisoner treating him, and his having a large quantity of coppers in his possession.

P.C. Swift, who apprehended the prisoner, said he asked him “How long have you been in the bar?” He replied “Oh, I don't know. Anything wrong or anybody robbed?” He replied “Yes”. Prisoner said “What's the charge?” and he told him and prisoner answered “All right”. On searching him he found on him 5s. and a halfpenny in bronze, and 2s. 6d. and two sixpenny pieces in silver. He was charged before the Superintendent in his presence and he replied “All right. It is true”.

Prisoner said he did not remember saying that.

In reply to a question, the constable said he was sober.

Prisoner elected to be tried by the Bench, and said that he had been hopping, and the money he had about him was what he had been paid. He denied that he told prosecutor that he had no money.

The Chairman told prisoner that the Bench considered him Guilty. Tradesmen must be protected in their business. It was a gross theft. He would be sent to gaol for six weeks' hard labour.

Folkestone Chronicle 6 December 1890

Local News

At the Police Court yesterday before Mr. Ward and Alderman Pledge, John Reilly, a tramp, was charged with breaking a square of glass at the Perseverance Inn, and doing damage to the extent of 5s. He was further charged with being drunk.

The landlord of the Perseverance (Mr. George Bean) proved the offence, and the prisoner was sentenced to seven days' hard labour for being drunk, and to a similar term of imprisonment for doing wilful damage.

Folkestone Chronicle 17 October 1891

Quarter Sessions

Monday, 12th October: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

A true bill was returned against James McCarthy, who was charged with having, on the 15th of last July, stolen from the dwelling house of Mary Campbell, Brockman Road, two dimity curtains, four valances, three pairs of linen sheets, and a number of towels, of the value of 5 12s.

Mr. L. Glyn prosecuted, and the prisoner, who pleaded Not Guilty, was not defended.

P.C. Walter Down was called and stated that on Wednesday, the 15th of July, about half past nine in the morning, he went to the Oddfellows Inn (sic), Radnor Street. He there saw the bundle produced. It contained the articles which were the subject of the present charge. Shortly after his arrival at the Oddfellows, the prisoner entered. He asked him if the bundle belonged to him. He said “Yes”. Witness asked him where he got them from, and he replied “I came by them honestly. I bought them at Folkestone”. He then asked the prisoner to take him to the place where he bought them, but he refused to. He told the prisoner he should take him to the police station on suspicion of having stolen the goods.

By the prisoner: Witness was called to the Oddfellows about half past nine, and about twenty minutes elapsed after he first saw the prisoner. He went to the station quietly and seemed to take it in good humour. He did not consider it necessary to handcuff prisoner. When he (prisoner) went into the Rendezvous, witness waited outside for him. He suggested that witness should go back to the Oddfellows and wait for the man who sold them.

The Recorder: Do I understand you allowed him to go and have a drink after you arrested him?

Witness: Yes, sir; he was determined to go.

The Recorder: A very obliging policeman, but it is fortunate for you there wasn't a back door.

Supt. Taylor said he remembered prisoner being brought to the station. Witness told him he had been brought there on suspicion of having stolen the goods. He said he was a dealer and had bought them. Witness asked him of whom, and he answered that he bought them at Folkestone, and had come by them honestly.

At the request of the prisoner Supt. Taylor produced a statement which the prisoner made after he had been committed for trial and also a letter which he wrote in prison. Nothing was known against him by the London Police and he could not have obtained information easily without the prisoner's help. There were no scratches on his face to indicate scratches by broken glass. He found that he was in company with a man in uniform on the Monday and Tuesday nights. Prisoner said the man belonged to the 17th Lancers. He had seen the Sergeant Major and had had the regiment paraded.

Henry Robus proved having purchased the articles at the sale of Mr. Owen, for Miss Campbell, on the 17th July. 1889. They were all marked “Owen”. He took them to 21, Brockman Road. He visited the house on the Sunday before the robbery. The goods were all right then.

Jane Davis said she was employed at the Oddfellows Inn. On the morning in question prisoner showed her the articles and asked her what she thought of his night's work. He gave her 13 towels to take to Mrs. Carter to sell for 2s. Mrs. Carter said she would see about it when she came down. Mrs. Carter was ill and could not attend that day.

Prisoner: What's the matter with her?

Witness: She's ill.

Prisoner: Yes, with the perjury! She committed gross perjury before the Magistrates. I shall prove it presently.

Mr. Glyn put in a certificate, and the witness Davis said she was suffering from dropsy and diseased kidneys.

Stephen Bailey, labourer, said he lodged at the Oddfellows. The prisoner also asked him what he thought of his night's work. He asked him to lend him twopence for a drink, and to buy a pair of sheets for 1s. He did not buy them.

Mr. Glyn then read the depositions of Mrs. Carter, which were given before the Magistrates. She stated that the prisoner slept at her house on Saturday, Sunday and Monday nights. He was absent on the Tuesday night and came home at seven o'clock on the morning of the 15th. At quarter to eight prisoner was in the scullery, and when he asked her to buy some towels she said “You didn't come by these things honestly and take them out of my house. Where did you get them from?” He said “Mind your own business”.

Edith Ralph, wife of the landlord of the Duke Of Edinburgh, stated that the prisoner brought some towels into the bar and she gave him 1s. 10d. for ten. When she found the name “Owen” on them she took them up to Supt. Taylor.

Jemima Davidson, of 6, South Street, stated that she bought two towels from prisoner for 3d.

This was the case for the prosecution, and prisoner called Charles William Young, Master of the Elham Union Workhouse. He stated that prisoner was admitted to the Workhouse Infirmary on the 24th of June and was discharged on the 13th of July (Monday). He was in bed the whole time, and was discharged at his own request.

Prisoner said that proved the perjury on the part of the witness Carter, who stated that he slept at the Oddfellows on the Saturday, Sunday and Monday, whereas he was not discharged from the Workhouse until the Monday.

George Bean, landlord of the Perseverance, was called on the prisoner's behalf, but did not put in an appearance.

Harry Stone, alias Lucas, stated that he saw prisoner in the Perseverance at half past twelve on Monday. He remained in his company until eleven at night. The next day he went into the Perseverance about the same time and saw the prisoner. In the afternoon they went to Cheriton to get a job for the prisoner. They went back to the Perseverance, and in the evening a man came in dressed in soldier's clothes. It was the uniform of the 17th Lancers. They all went out at eleven o'clock. He went with Supt. Taylor, but was unable to identify the soldier.

Prisoner then read a long statement. He said he had work to go to at Cheriton at five o'clock on the Wednesday morning, and as he was the worse for drink on Tuesday night, and fearing that he might overlay of he went to the Oddfellows, he slept under a bathing machine on the beach. He got to the White Lion, Cheriton, at five in the morning. His employer did not turn up and whilst he was waiting a soldier came up with the bundle of goods. They talked for some time. He said he was Captain Owen's servant, and that he was going abroad and had given him everything he did not want. He asked him (prisoner) if he knew where to sell them, and he said very likely Mrs. Carter would buy them. The soldier said he had another lot and if prisoner liked to take them to the Oddfellows he could have the middle man's profits and he would follow with the other bundle. He (prisoner) did not know they had been stolen and carried the bundle through the open streets, passing a large number of people on the way. Since he was arrested he had given every assistance to the police.

The jury found prisoner Not Guilty of stealing the goods, but Guilty on the second count of receiving them knowing them to have been stolen, and he was sentenced to three calendar months' hard labour.

Folkestone Express 17 October 1891

Quarter Sessions

Monday, October 11th: Before John Charles Lewis Coward Esq.

James McCarthy, 29, described as an engine fitter, was indicted for stealing two dimity curtains, three pairs of linen sheets, and other articles, the property of Mary Campbell, and which articles were left in an unoccupied house in Brockman Road.

Mr. Glyn, instructed by Mr. Minter, prosecuted.

P.C. Down said on the 15th July he went to the Oddfellows Arms, in Radnor Street, and was there shown the bundle of things produced. He saw the prisoner come in and asked him if the bundle belonged to him. Prisoner said “Yes”, and added that he came by them honestly - he bought them in Folkestone. Witness asked him to go with him to the place where he bought them, and he said “No”. He then told prisoner he should take him to the station on a charge of stealing them.

By the prisoner: You took the matter lightly and good-humouredly, as though there was nothing in it. You went into the Rendezvous and had a drink while I stood outside.

The Recorder: Do I understand you allowed him to go into a public house and have a drink while you had him in charge? – He was determined to go, sir.

Supt. Taylor said he had a conversation with the prisoner at the police station. He asked him to account for the possession of the goods. He said “I bought them. I am a dealer”. He asked who he bought them of, and he did not say – he said he came by them honestly.

Prisoner asked for the statement he made before the Magistrates, and a letter he wrote from Canterbury to the Superintendent to be produced and read to the jury.

Supt. Taylor put in a long statement made by the prisoner after his committal, and the Recorder read it. It's purport was that he received the articles of a soldier belonging to the 17th Lancers, who, he said, was an officer's servant, and wanted to find a purchaser for them, and on his (prisoner's) suggestion he was allowed to carry the bundle to the Oddfellows. Next morning he sold some of the towels quite openly to get a drink. The Recorder also read a long letter written by the prisoner from Canterbury, in which he said he had been the landlord of a public house at Devonport. He married the landlady and they separated by mutual consent. His wife had allowed him upwards of a guinea a week. He had also received two small legacies, and had written stories for weekly journals, and had won money in newspaper prize competitions, so that he had no necessity to work.

In reply to the prisoner, Supt. Taylor said all the information he gave as to his antecedents was correct. The London police knew nothing. He found by enquiry that the prisoner was in company with a man in uniform two days previous to his arrest. There was no man in the 17th Lancers of the description given by the prisoner. There was no Capt. Owen in the 17th Lancers. Prisoner said a man named Stone or Lucas could identify the man, and he took Stone to the Hounslow Barracks, where the 17th Lancers had just arrived, but he could not identify anyone. The statement made by the prisoner about his wife was not true. She had not made him an allowance.

Henry Rebus proved purchasing the articles at a sale of Mr. Owen's goods in 1889, for Miss Mary Campbell. The articles were all marked “Owen”, and had lot tickets on them. He took them to a house belonging to Miss Campbell, 29, Brockman Road, and locked them up in a room. He saw the things safe as late at the 14th or 15th July of this year. He missed the things on the 19th. The storm sash of the window had been broken open, and the things were gone.

Jane Davis, wife of John Davis, a lodger at the Oddfellows Arms, said on Wednesday morning, the 15th July, she saw the prisoner, who asked her to go into the kitchen to see his night's work. She went, and untied the bundle. He gave her thirteen towels to take up to Mrs. Carter to sell for 2s. to get him a drink. She took them to Mrs. Carter, and brought them back. Mrs. Carter said she would see about them when she got up. She had seen Mrs. Carter that morning. She had been ill for a week and was unable to attend.

Prisoner: What is the matter with Mrs. Carter? – I don't know.

Prisoner: Perhaps she has got perjury the matter with her. I can prove she committed perjury before the Magistrates.

Witness said she had a doctor's certificate.

In answer to prisoner, witness said she lent him an open basket to take the towels out in. There were about 20 people in the house.

Prisoner caused some amusement by reading a list of the people who were in the house.

Stephen Bailey, another lodger at the Oddfellows, said the prisoner asked him to feel the weight of a bundle of linen. He then asked him to lend him 2d., or to give him 1s. for a pair of sheets. When Mrs. Carter came down she sent for a policeman.

Mr. Glyn put in the deposition of Lucy Carter, and told prisoner the doctor had been sent for, and when he arrived he would be allowed to put questions to him. The deposition stated that the prisoner lodged in her house on Saturday, Sunday and Monday, but was absent on Tuesday night. He returned early on Wednesday.

Edith Ralph, wife of the landlord of the Duke Of Edinburgh Inn, Tontine Street, said the prisoner went to her house with some towels in an open basket. He asked her to buy some, and she bought 10 for 1s. 10d. In the afternoon she examined them, and finding a name on them, she took them to the police station. Prisoner told her he got the towels honestly.

In answer to the Recorder, witness said she had not heard of the robbery before she took the towels to the Superintendent.

Jemima Davidson said she bought two towels of the prisoner in the Duke Of Edinburgh for 3d.

Prisoner called Charles William Young, Master of the Elham Union Workhouse, who stated that the prisoner was admitted to the infirmary on the 24th June and discharged on the 13th July.

Prisoner said that proved the perjury of the witness Carter, who was so ill she could not come.

Henry Stone, who said “Lucas” was his nickname, said he was a plasterer, residing at Folkestone. He saw the prisoner in the Perseverance on Monday from twelve o'clock until five or ten minutes to eleven, and on Tuesday from 12.30 until eleven. There was a man there in soldier's clothes on Tuesday night. His uniform was like that of the 17th Lancers. Prisoner said he should like to get work in the town, and they went together about eight o'clock oto the Pavilion Fields to see if they could get work. When they returned the soldier was still there, and they left about eleven.

In reply to Mr. Glyn, witness said he went to Hounslow, and saw the regiment paraded, but did not recognise the soldier among them.

Prisoner made a long statement, in which he attempted to show that he was innocent in “thought, word, or deed”. Had he been guilty, it was not likely he would have stayed in the town to be arrested.

Mr. Glyn, in his closing remarks to the jury, said that on his own statement the prisoner was a thief, because he said he received goods from a soldier and agreed to find a customer for them, instead of which he sold a portion of them and spent the money on drink.

The Recorder, in summing up, said they must all regret to see a man possessing the ability the prisoner had displayed standing in such a position. He commented on the statements of the prisoner, and compared them with the evidence, pointing out that there was proof that the prisoner was dealing with the goods very shortly after they were stolen.

The jury, without leaving the box, found the prisoner Guilty of receiving the goods knowing them to be stolen.

Superintendent Taylor produced a copy of the prisoner's discharge from the army and a letter he had received relating to that part of the prisoner's statement as to his keeping a public house. Nothing was known about him by the London police. The address he gave was that of a court which had been pulled down for improvements.

The Recorder said the jury had taken a merciful view of the case. Prisoner had been in prison three months, and he would be sentenced therefore to only three months' hard labour.

Folkestone Chronicle 29 May 1897

Saturday, May 22nd: Before The Mayor and Messrs. Lord, Fitness, Pledge, Vaughan, and Salter.

Thomas Smith, a boisterous character well known to the local police, who did not appear when his name was called, was summoned for refusing to quit licensed premises when ordered to do so, and with creating a disorderly scene and assaulting the landlord by kicking him severely. The latter charge was not, however, pressed.

George Bean, landlord of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, gave evidence to the effect that on the previous Tuesday evening Smith came into his house shortly before 6 o'clock. He was not then drunk, but was in such a state that witness refused to serve him, upon which he became violently abusive, refusing to leave the premises although witness ordered him to go several times. Witness then went round to eject him, when Smith seized him by the throat and struggled violently, kicking witness severely on the legs, and tearing his collar and necktie from his neck. A man named Russell, an upholsterer, seeing the fracas, assisted witness, who, having ejected the man, went in and bolted the door. Smith returned, and finding the door fast, dealt it repeated kicks, and also broke the window in the upper panel. The damage had cost 12s.

The Bench inflicted a fine of 20s., and costs, 10s., or 14 days' imprisonment.

Folkestone Express 29 May 1897

Saturday, May 22nd: Before The Mayor, J. Pledge, J. Fitness, J. Hoad, J. Holden and T.J. Vaughan Esqs.

Thomas Smith was summoned for refusing to quit a public house and with assaulting the landlord. He did not appear. Mr. Minter represented the prosecutor.

The landlord of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, said defendant entered his house on Tuesday evening at ten minutes to six. He had been in in the morning, and was ordered out. In the evening he was in such a state that he was refused anything to drink. He then became abusive, and was ordered out, but declined to go. Witness went round to put him out, and defendant seized him by the throat and said no-one could turn him out. He tore witness's clothing, and Mr. Russell, upholsterer, came over and helped to get the defendant out. The door was locked. He then “bashed the door” and broke a window, and did damage to the amount of 12s. There were two or three others in the bar at the time, but they did not interfere.

Fined 20s. and 10s. costs, or 14 days' imprisonment.

Folkestone Herald 29 May 1897

Police Court Notes

On Saturday – the Mayor (Alderman Banks) presiding – a man named Thomas Smith was summoned for refusing to quit licensed premises, assaulting the landlord, and being disorderly.

The defendant did not appear, and the service of the summons being proved by P.S. Harman, the Bench decided to hear the case ex parte. Mr. Minter appeared for the complainant.

Mr. George Bean, landlord of the Perseverance public house, in Dover Street, said that defendant came into his house on Tuesday evening at about ten minutes to 6. He had been there in the morning, but was ordered out in consequence of his bad behaviour. He was not drunk, but had been drinking, and witness refused to supply him. He became very abusive, and witness ordered him out several times, but he refused to go. When witness tried to put him out, defendant seized him by the throat and struggled violently. He said neither witness nor any other man could put him out, and tore off witness's coat. At last witness got him out with the assistance of a neighbour named Russell. Then witness bolted the door, and the defendant tried to come in again and kicked the door several times. He also broke a window in the door, value about 12s. Two or three other people were in the bar when defendant was there.

The Bench fined defendant 20s., 10s. costs, or 14 days' imprisonment.

Folkestone Up To Date 29 May 1897

Hall Of Justice

On Saturday Thomas Smith was fined 20s. and costs for refusing to quit the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street.

Folkestone Herald 18 September 1897

Police Court Report

On Wednesday – the Mayor presiding – transfer licence was granted to Mr. John Riddals, Perseverance, Dover Street, former tenant Mr. George Bean.

Folkestone Express 2 October 1897

Wednesday, September 29th: Before The Mayor, Aldermen J. Pledge, W.W. Salter and G. Spurgen, J. Fitness, T.J. Vaughan, and J. Holden Esqs.

Eliza Harvey was charged with being drunk and disorderly on the 21st inst. in Dover Street.

P.C. Burniston said that he saw defendant, who was very drunk, going in to the Perseverance Inn. He went in and told the landlord not to serve her. She came out and began using obscene language. He took her name and address.

The Magistrates' Clerk said that she was an old offender, but had not been charged for years.

The defendant, who did not appear, was fined 5s. and 10s. costs.

Folkestone Chronicle 11 February 1899

Inquest

In the Folkestone Town Hall on Tuesday an inquest was held by Mr. John Minter on the body of Charles Murphy, an able seaman, whose home was at Dover.

Patrick Dennis Newman, ordinary seaman, of the brig Cambois, of Folkestone (Captain Allenson), said he knew the deceased. The brig arrived from Shields into Folkestone with coals about a week ago. They were discharging on the pier at the bottom of the Tram Road. On Sunday night, between 6 and 7, Murphy left the ship to go ashore. He had had drink, but was “nearer sober than drunk”. He seemed a man of about 48 to 50 years of age, but was believed to be younger. He was single. Witness slept on board the ship, and did not see Murphy again till his body was picked up between 12 and 1 on Monday noon in the outer harbour, under the ship.

Albert Hart, of 35a, North Street, Folkestone, a young fisherman, said on Monday morning he was in the harbour at low tide in his boats, close to the Cambois, when he saw a man's leg sticking out from under the bottom of the boat. There was then just depth of water to cover the body. Witness went and told a man on the harbour pier, who called someone else, and the men went down and dragged the body out.

Dennis Murphy said deceased was his brother, and was 33 years of age. Their mother lived in Union Street, Dover, and that was deceased's home.

Chas. Joseph Venner said he lived at 35, Dover Street, Folkestone, and was a fisherman. He saw deceased in a public house in Dover Street on Sunday night at a quarter past nine. He was then quite sober. He was with him in the Perseverance Hotel, and he was perfectly sober in the public house, and also when he left it.

Captain Allenson said he began to discharge a week ago on the Tram Road, bow on, and had a platform of three boards as a gangway for passage to and from the pier and the boat at the bow. He paid Murphy his weekly wages on the Saturday night, telling him “not to make a fool of himself”, and then left him. There being no work on Sunday, and the Captain being a resident of Folkestone, he went to his family and left the men. On Sunday at five in the afternoon he visited the brig and found all right. The men were not there, except the cook, but he did not want them. His opinion was that Murphy, in passing along the planks to go on board, had fallen, at low water, to the bottom of the harbour and been killed in the fall, and that the ebbing tide had carried his body under the bottom of the brig.

Dr. Gilbert gave evidence as to having been called to see the body in a boat-house in the fishmarket on Wednesday afternoon. There was no mark of violence, but an abrasion on the right side of the forehead and nose which, in the doctor's opinion, had been produced by a fall. Death was from suffocation, after being stunned by the fall and dropping deep in the mud and water.

Captain Allenson, re-called, said along the fishmarket and harbour, where his brig was lying, the path at night was dangerous to the most careful and most sober man, as there were no lamps to light him on his way, and no chains to prevent him falling.

The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and added the rider that the South Eastern Company ought to place lamps to enable any man going on board a ship in the harbour at night to lessen his danger of falling over the pier.

Folkestone Express 11 February 1899

Inquest

An inquest was held by the Borough Coroner (Mr. J. Minter) at the Town Hall on Tuesday afternoon, on Charles Murphy, whose body was picked up in the outer harbour between twelve and one on Monday.

Patrick Dennis Newman, ordinary seaman on the brig Cambois, of Folkestone (Captain Harrison), identified deceased as Charles Murphy, who was an able bodied seaman on the same vessel. The ship arrived from Shields with coal about a week or fortnight ago. They were discharging outside the Bridge now. Deceased sailed in the ship from Shields. On Sunday evening, between six and seven, he saw the deceased on the ship in his bunk in the forecastle house on deck asleep. He afterwards turned out and went ashore. He was not exactly sober, but could not be described as drunk. He was about 48 or 50 years of age. He was a single man, and his home was at Dover. He saw no more of deceased until he was picked up between twelve and one on Monday in the outer harbour. He was practically underneath the ship. Witness heard nothing during Sunday night.

Charles Joseph Venner, of 35, Dover Street, a fisherman, said he knew deceased well. He saw him in the Perseverance in Dover Street on Saturday evening between nine and half past. He was as sober as a judge then, “as sober as I am now”, added witness.

Albert Hart, a lad living at 35a, North Street, said on Monday morning between twelve and one he was walking in the harbour. The tide was going out. He saw a man's leg sticking out from beneath the ship Cambois The water was just covering deceased. It was high tide at six a.m. that morning. He told a man who was just going down the plank. He called the others, and they dragged deceased out.

Captain Harrison said he began to discharge a week ago. They were bow on to the tramway, and discharging into wagons, which carried the coal into trucks. If the ship laid alongside they would have to pay so much dues because the coal did not belong to the S.E.R. Company. He was on board on Sunday afternoon at five o'clock. He turned the men to at six o'clock, and deceased was not there, but that was a usual occurrence. They often had someone missing the first thing in the morning, and he did not think anything about it. The plank by which the crew went on board was by the port side. Witness's idea was that deceased fell and was killed by the fall.

Dr. J.W. Thornton Gilbert said on Monday about ten minutes past twelve he was called by the police and went to the Fish Market, and in a stable he saw the body of deceased, which he examined. He was dead, and in his (Witness's) opinion had been so for a matter of six or seven hours. There were no outward marks of violence on the body, but on the forehead and the right side of the nose there was an abrasion which might have been produced by a fall. Looking at the extent of the abrasion it was, in his opinion, caused by a fall. He could not make out any fracture of the skull, and in his judgement death was due to the fall, which had caused a concussion, followed by suffocation either by water or mud. He was covered with mud, and his pockets were full of mud. It was possible that he might have fallen face downwards into the mud, and so have been smothered.

Captain Harrison, re-called, said it was a very dangerous spot, and it took the most perfectly sober man in the world to go across to the ship in safety, because there was no light, and there were railway metals and trucks all about the place. A persn had to be very careful indeed to cross safely.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”, but there was no evidence to show how caused, and added a rider that representations should be made to the South Eastern Railway Company to mitigate the danger which existed at the spot where the accident occurred by placing a lamp there.

Folkestone Herald 11 February 1899

Inquest

On Tuesday afternoon the Borough Coroner (Mr. J. Minter) held an inquest at the Town Hall, touching the death of Charles Murphy, who was found in the Harbour on the previous day.

Patrick Dennis Newman deposed that he was a seaman and had no home. He was on board the brig Cambois, of Folkestone, Captain Harrison. The deceased, Charles Murphy, was an able seaman. The ship came from Shields, and arrived about a week or a fortnight ago. They were discharging now by the side of the bridge at the Tram Road. On Sunday night, between six and seven o'clock, witness saw him on board the ship, in his bunk. He turned out and left the ship, going ashore. He could not be called drunk; he was nearer sober than drunk. He was about 50 or 48, and his home was at Dover. Witness did not see any more of him till he was picked up. He was found between twelve and one o'clock, their dinner time. It was in the outer harbour, near the ship. Witness was not there at the time. Witness did not hear the least thing during Sunday night.

The jury, at this stage, proceeded to the Cemetery to view the body. On their return the following evidence was taken:-

Charles Joseph Venner, of Dover Street, fisherman, deposed that he knew deceased well. He saw him on the evening in question in the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street. Witness went at a quarter past nine, and the deceased was there. Deceased left at half past nine. He was sober. He never saw him afterwards.

Albert Hart, a fisher lad, of 35a, North Street, deposed that on the previous morning (Monday), between 12 and 1 o'clock, he was in the harbour, down by the ships. He was not in a boat. The tide was going out. He was close to the vessel Cambois. He saw a man's leg sticking out. (High tide was at six in the morning.) He told a man who was just going down the plank. The man put his boots on and told the others. They dragged the deceased out.

Charles Joseph Venner, on being re-called, said that the deceased was as sober as a judge when he went away at half past nine. He did not see him again. He did not say he would not have any more because he had to coal in the morning.

Deceased's brother said that his mother lived at Union Street, Dover. When he went on Monday morning and enquired where was “Rooney” (that was the nickname of his brother) there was no answer given. He thought deceased had gone ashore.

Captain Harrison, of the Cambois, deposed that the ship was bow on, with three deals from the bow to the tramway. Asked why they did not lie alongside, he said the cargo did not belong to the South Eastern Railway Company. Asked the difference, he said it was better for the ship. He was aboard on Sunday at five o'clock in the evening, and came ashore. He afterwards found the deceased missing, which was a common occurrence in the morning. Witness did not think anything about the matter. He had said “Don't make a stupid of yourself”, and he said he would not, but he did not turn up. They found the body on the starboard side – the right hand side.

The Coroner: My nautical education tells me that, Captain.

The witness added that, looking at the position where the body was found, his opinion was that the deceased fell on the ground and struck, killing himself. As the water went off, it floated him round the ship, no doubt.

Dr. James William Thornton Gilbert deposed that on the previous day, at about ten past twelve, he was called by the police, and went to the Fishmarket. In a stable he saw the body of deceased, which he examined. He was dead, and in witness's opinion, had been so for about six or seven hours. On the forehead and the right side of the nose there was a large abrasion, which might have been produced by a fall. Looking at its extent, he thought it was so produced. He could not make out any fracture of the skull. In his judgement the cause of death was concussion from a fall, and the man died possibly from suffocation.

The Captain said the deceased could go on board either by the one way or round the harbour through the gates. He could get across the bridge. There was a watchman on each side. There would be no light on the Royal George side from the gates up to the vessel. The only light would be the steamboat. It would take the most sober man to go along on a dark night in safety. It was a dangerous place. There were metals and railway trucks all around.

The Coroner having summed up, the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The foreman remarked that it was considered there ought to be some protection made, but the place was not a public thoroughfare.

The Coroner said it was a thoroughfare for all persons who came there, and were berthed there with their ships. He remarked on the difficulty of preventing accidents in harbours. To a landsman it looked very dangerous to see the men running up and down on the planks of the colliers. He would forward a representation if the jury desired him to do so.

The jury assented, and a representation will be made on the matter, probably with a view to having a lamp placed there.

Folkestone Up To Date 11 February 1899

Inquest

An inquest was held last Tuesday afternoon before Mr. Minter, Borough Coroner, on the body of Charles Murphy, an able seaman, reported to be formerly of Dover.

Patrick Dennis Newman said: I am an ordinary seaman on board the brig Cambois (Captain Harrison), registered as of Folkestone. I have no regular home. I know the deceased, Charles Murphy. He was an able seaman. Our ship came from Shields with coal about a week ago. I cannot say precisely the date of her arrival. She lies near the Tram Road. The deceased was on board during the voyage from Shields. I saw him on board between six and seven on Sunday evening. He was then in his bunk in the forecastle house on deck. He afterwards turned out, and went on shore. You could not call him drunk at the time. I cannot say his exact age. He must have been 48 or getting near 50. I believe his home was at Dover. I did not see any more of him until he was picked up between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. yesterday, during our dinner hour. He was picked up in the harbour. I was not there at the time. I did not hear him doing anything on Sunday night. I identify the body as that of my shipmate, Charles Murphy. I said he belonged to Dover because his mother lives there.

Charles Joseph Venner said: I live at 35, Dover Street, and am a fisherman. I knew the deceased very well. I saw him on Sunday evening in the Perseverance public house in Dover Street. I went in at a quarter past nine, and the last he was seen was at half past nine, when he left. He was then as sober as I am now, as sober as a judge. That is all I know about him.

A. Hart, a youth, said: I live at 35a, North Street. I earn my living by fishing. Yesterday afternoon between 12 a.m. and 1 p.m. I was walking in the mud in the harbour, close to the Cambois, when I saw a man's legs sticking out from under the bottom of the brig. The water was just covering him.

Captain Harrison here stated that it was high tide at six o'clock in the morning.

Witness, continuing: I then went and told a man what I had seen, and he came and dragged the body out.

Dennis Murphy said: I do not know anything of this fatality. My brother was 33 years of age. My mother lives in Union Street, Dover.

Venner, re-called, said: When I saw the deceased in the Perseverance public house he said nothing about going to have a drink. He did not say “No, I shan't have any more, because I have got to go and have a drink”.

Dennis Murphy, re-called: I inquired of my brother about the deceased shortly previous to his death, as I wondered where he had gone, but could not find out. I thought he had gone on shore. At breakfast time I asked where he was, as I wondered why he had not turned up to give us a drink.

Captain Harrison said: The ship was not lying alongside, the object being to avoid the dues of the dock company. We began to discharge coals about a week ago on the main road. We discharged bow on, and had a platform of three boards as a gangway for passage to and from the pier. I paid Murphy on Saturday night, and did not think much of his absence on Monday morning, as similar absences are a constant occurrence. There was no work on Sunday. The body was found under the fore part of the ship. My opinion is that the deceased had fallen in passing along the planks to go on board. The deceased must have fallen at low water to the bottom of the harbour and been killed in the fall, and the ebbing tide had probably carried the body under the ship.

Dr. Gilbert said: Yesterday morning I saw the body in a stable at the Fishmarket. The deceased must have been dead six or seven hours. There were no outward signs of violence. But on the forehead there was an abrasion, which might have been produced by a fall. I could not make out whether there was any fracture of the skull. My opinion was that death took place from concussion of the brain from a fall into the mud. The deceased's clothes and pockets were covered with mud. He might have died from concussion of the brain, or from being smothered in the mud.

Captain Harrison, re-called, said: The deceased would have to come on board across the bridge, or over the railway, if no watchman stopped him. The watchmen are employed by the South Eastern Company. I have spoken to a watchman. He knew nothing about the matter; had not heard any row, or anything of the kind.

Mr. Chadwick, the Town Sergeant, said he also made inquiries, and discovered that the watchman knew nothing about the fatality.

Captain Harrison: There would be no light from the Royal George to my vessel. The soberest man might find it dangerous to come on board after dark. A man has to be very careful in coming on board.

The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, remarked that he did not know whether there was much reliable information to be gained from the evidence of the first witness. The other witnesses failed to throw much light upon the exact manner in which the deceased had met his death, but it appeared probable that he had had a fall in endeavouring to get on board. The testimony of Dr. Gilbert was to that effect, that the deceased had probably been drowned, or smothered in the mud of the harbour.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”, though there was no evidence to show the exact nature of the circumstances. Probably the deceased was either drowned or smothered in the mud. At the same time they thought that a representation should be made to the South Eastern as to the dangerous state of the approaches to a vessel lying in the position of the Cambois at the time of the fatality.

The Coroner said he thought it was probable that if representations were made to the South Eastern Railway Company, a lamp would be placed in the more dangerous part of the approach to vessels in the harbour. But he would point out that, in dealing with seafaring men, it was sometimes impossible to prevent accidents. That morning, as he passed the harbour, there were six or seven colliers discharging. To a landsman the practice of men running up and down planks with coals on their head seemed very dangerous, but to those personally engaged it was a matter of everyday life, and they would take no more notice of it than he would of going about the streets. Still it was dangerous. However, he would be glad to comply with the wish of the members of the jury, if they really thought that representations to the South Eastern Railway Company were necessary.

Folkestone Chronicle 11 March 1899

Local News

Yesterday (Friday) at the Folkestone Borough Police Court, Messrs. Fitness, Pursey, Wightwick, and Herbert had before them two cases, which brought to the Court a large number of the public.

The second case was one in which a young Scotchman, David Thompson, was charged with being found on the premises, 18, Dover Street, early on Friday morning, with unlawful intent.

John Riddall, landlord of the Perseverance Inn, 18, Dover Street, said at 20 past one he was awakened by the police, who told him there was a man in the house. He went down and found the prisoner in the back kitchen in charge of the police. He found that the man had climbed over a wall at the back of the house. His house was peculiarly situated. There was no back way to it, as the back was at the side of the cliff. It was a remarkable old house, in that it was quite accurate to say of it “you had to go upstairs to get downstairs and had to go downstairs to go upstairs”. The kitchen was upstairs and had no window to it. To enable air and light to enter the doorway was left with a space at the top. Prisoner had gone up a flight of steps at the side of the cliff, climbed over a urinal, and afterwards over the doorway into the kitchen.

P.C. George Johnson said at 12.50 a.m. he heard a noise in the back part of Mr. Riddall's house, so he climbed up the steps and over the two doors and into the kitchen, and there found the prisoner lying on the table pretending to be asleep. Prisoner, when asked what he was there for, said “I'm here having a doss”. He called up the landlord, who said he didn't know the man. At the police station prisoner was searched and found to have on him 9d. in coppers, a chunk of bread, and two tins, one containing tea, and another sugar.

P.C. Sharp said he heard a noise, and saw a light of someone striking a match, and found prisoner climbing over the doors at the back of the Perseverance. He went in search of P.C. Johnson, with whom he entered the place.

Prisoner said he had come to the town to find work, and had a job to start on. He thought he was entering a urinal. He was seeking a rest, as the police had failed to get him a doss-house when he asked them. He wanted a place to sleep, and had no felonious intent. He really didn't know he was anywhere but in an outhouse.

Sentenced to seven days' hard labour.

Folkestone Herald 11 March 1899

Folkestone Police Court

Yesterday (Friday) David Thompson was charged with having been found in a dwelling house, Dover Street, being there for an unlawful purpose.

The landlord of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, deposed that about five minutes past one o'clock that morning he heard the bell ring, and he was told there was a man in the house. He went downstairs and found the defendant in the back kitchen in the charge of the police. The house was built in the side of the cliff, and the first floor was level with the ground at the back. Leading into the convenience was a door, six foot high, which was bolted. There was another door and a wall, also six feet high. It was left in that manner to give ventilation. The wall did not go up to the ceiling. The defendant must have climber over. He saw the defendant the previous evening in the bar, and watched him leave.

P.C. George W. Johnson deposed that about 12.50 a.m. that morning, in company with another constable, he went to the back of 18, Dover Street, The Perseverance. He climbed over two doors about six feet high, and saw the kitchen door open. P.C. Sharp had heard a noise up there previously. On looking in witness saw the defendant laying on a table. Witness caught hold of him and asked what he was doing there. He said “I come in here for a doss”. He could not have been asleep. There was some noise in getting over the doors. Witness brought defendant to the police station, and found 9 d. in money on him, some bread, and two tins. He had seen the man about 12 o'clock. The defendant had been drinking.

P.C. Sharp deposed that at 12.50 that morning he heard a noise at the rear of the Perseverance, as though someone was getting over the door. He saw a light at the back of the premises. He communicated with P.C. Johnson, who got over the doors. Defendant was found in the back kitchen, and the landlord was called. The man appeared to be asleep on the table.

Defendant said he had struck one match and could not see whether it was a closet or not. He had wanted the police to find him a lodging. He was very sorry he did anything wrong. He thought it was the only place where he could get until morning.

Seven days' hard labour.

Folkestone Up To Date 11 March 1899

Friday, March 10th: Before J. Fitness Esq., Col. Hamilton, and W.G. Herbert, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

David Thompson was charged with being on licensed premises for an unlawful purpose.

The landlord of the Perseverance beerhouse said: Early this morning I was awoke by the police. On looking out of the window, I was informed that a man had got into the house. I went downstairs, and found the prisoner in the kitchen, in charge of the police.

Police Constable Johnson (26) deposed to finding the prisoner inside the prosecutor's house asleep. He woke him and asked him what he was doing there, and his reply was “I came in for a doss”. I brought him to the police station. I found 9d. in money, and some bread on him. He was not drunk, but had evidently been drinking.

Police Constable (24) said that hearing a noise at the back of the premises, he went to see what was the matter. He saw a light. He then communicated with Police Constable Johnson, and went inside the back premises, where he found the prisoner.

The prisoner was sentenced to 14 days' hard labour.

Folkestone Express 11 May 1901

Tuesday, May 7th: Before W. Wightwick, C.J. Pursey, W.G. Herbert, W. Salter, and G.I Swoffer Esqs., and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Edwin Morgan was granted a transfer of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street.

Folkestone Herald 11 May 1901

Tuesday, May 4th: Before Messrs. Wightwick, Swoffer, Pursey Herbert and Salter, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

The licence of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, was transferred to Edwin Morgan.

Folkestone Chronicle 15 June 1901

Wednesday, June 12th: Before Messrs. Hoad, Pursey, Wightwick, and Pledge, and Lieut. Col. Westropp.

The following licensing transfer was granted: Mr. Henry William Morgan takes over the Perseverance from Mr. Riddell

Folkestone Express 15 June 1901

Wednesday, June 12th: Before J. Hoad, J. Pledge, C.J. Pursey, and W. Wightwick Esqs., and Lieut. Col. W.K. Westropp.

Henry Wm. Morgan was granted a transfer of the licence of the Railway Tap (sic) from Mr. Riddall, and same alterations to the interior were approved by the Bench. Mr. F. Hall represented the applicant.

Folkestone Express 30 January 1904

Wednesday, January 27th: Before Alderman Vaughan, and Lieut. Cols. Fynmore and Westropp.

William Spearpoint, a fisherman, was summoned for being found drunk on licensed premises. Defendant denied the charge.

P.C. Johnson said: At 7.15 p.m. on January 19th I was on duty in Dover Street, and saw the defendant staggering up the road. He was in a drunken condition, and entered the Perseverance Inn. I followed him and heard the landlady ask him to leave the premises. He remained inside several minutes, and then I entered and told him I should report him for being drunk on licensed premises. Defendant replied “Don't lock me up this time”. I saw the defendant ejected from several public houses previously.

Defendant said he was very sorry for what had happened. He was a teetotaller for four months previous to this, and had since signed the pledge.

Supt. Reeve proved 14 previous convictions.

A fine of 10s. and 9s. costs was inflicted.

Folkestone Herald 30 January 1904

Wednesday, January 27th: Before Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Westropp and Lieut. Colonel Fynmore.

William Spearpoint, for being drunk at the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, was fined 10s. and 9s. costs.

P.C. Johnson gave evidence.

Folkestone Express 14 May 1904

Monday, May 9th: Before Alderman Vaughan, Lieutenant Colonel Westropp, Lieutenant Colonel Fynmore, W.C. Carpenter, and J. Stainer Esqs.

Edward Parker and John Byrne, both belonging to the Royal Garrison Artillery, stationed at Dover, were charged with being drunk and disorderly in Dover Street the previous night.

P.C. Minter said about nine o'clock the previous night he was on duty in Dover Street, outside the Perseverance Inn. He heard Byrne demanding drink, but the landlord refused to serve him, and ordered him to leave. He, however, refused. Witness went inside and requested him to leave. He had to obtain assistance to get him outside, where he became so violent that he had to be taken to the police station. On the way Parker came up in a drunken condition and tried to release the other prisoner. With the assistance of P.C.s Kettle and Johnson Parker was taken to the police station.

Prisoners had nothing to say, both stating that they did not remember anything about it.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days' hard labour in default.

Folkestone Chronicle 11 February 1905

Licensing Sessions

Wednesday, February 8th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and Mr. W.C. Carpenter.

There was the usual animated scene as the names of licensees were called out in alphabetical order, and the usual theatrical ring of the burly constables shouting “Get your money ready, please”.

The Chairman opened the Sessions by briefly saying “I will ask the Chief Constable to read his annual report”.

Chief Constable Reeve then read the following:- Chief Constable's Office, Folkestone, Feb. 8th, 1905. To the Chairman and Members of the Licensing Committee. Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 139 places licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquore, viz., full licences 87, beer (on) 11, beer (off) 6, beer and spirit dealers 16, grocers 12, chemists 4, confectioners 3. This gives an average (according to the Census of 1901) of one licence to 220 persons, or one on licence to every 313 persons.

Eighteen of the licences were transferred during the year, viz., 12 full licences, 3 beer on, and three spirit dealers. One full licence was transferred twice during the year.

The orders which were made at the last licensing meeting to close the back entrances to various licensed houses, and to make certain alterations to others, were complied with by the licensees.

Proceedings were taken by the police against three of those licence holders during the year, one for harbouring prostitutes, and two others for permitting drunkenness. The former only was convicted. He has since transferred his licence and left the house.

Two other licence holders were proceeded against by the Inland Revenue Authorities (six informations were laid against one defendant, and three against the other), and in each case a conviction followed, the defendants being fined 20s. and costs upon each summons.

For selling drink without a licence 8 persons were proceeded against by the Inland Revenue Authorities, and two by the police, in each case a conviction being recorded.

For drunkenness, 171 persons (143 males and 28 females) were proceeded against, 156 convicted, and 15 discharged. This is an increase of 17 persons proceeded against as compared with the previous year. One person was convicted of refusing to quit licensed premises when requested.

Six occasional licences and extension of hours on 42 occasions were granted to licence holders during the year.

There are 16 places licensed for music and dancing, and three for public billiard playing.

Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquors are sold are registered in accordance with the Licensing Act, 1902.

The general conduct of the licensed houses being in my opinion at present satisfactory, I have no objection to offer to the renewal of any of the present licences on the ground of misconduct.

I beg to point out that within the area formed by a line drawn from the Harbour through South Street, High Street, Rendezvous Street, Dover Road to the Raglan Hotel, thence over Radnor Bridge to the sea, there is a population approximately of 5,090, with 45 “on” licensed houses, giving a proportion of one licensed house to every 113 inhabitants. I would ask the Bench to exercise the powers given them by the Licensing Act, 1904, and refer the renewal of some of the licensed houses in this area to the County Licensing Committee for consideration, and payment of compensation should any of the renewals be refused.

The houses situate in this congested area which in my opinion should be first dealt with under the provisions of the Act are the following, viz.:- Victoria Inn, South Street, Duke Of Edinburgh, Tontine Street, Cinque Ports, Seagate Street, Providence Inn, Beach Street, Star Inn, Radnor Street, Perseverance Inn, Dover Street.

I would respectfully suggest that the consideration of the renewal of the licences of these houses be deferred until the Adjourned Licensing Meeting.

I am, gentlemen, your obedient servant. H. Reeve, Chief Constable.

The Chairman: The report just read by the Chief Constable is very satisfactory as to the general conduct of the houses, but we are sorry to see an increase of 17in the number of charges for drunkenness, and we hope that the licence holders will assist the police by doing all in theor power to prevent drunkenness, and a decrease in charges during the coming year. As a Licensing Bench we cannot close our eyes to the fact, as shown by Chief Constable Reeve's report that there are a very large number of licensed houses in one certain area, and as the legislature have taken steps to compensate licence holders for the loss of their licences, we have decided to adjourn the granting of the six licences mentioned in the Chief Constable's report, viz., The Victoria, Duke Of Edinburgh, Cinque Ports, Providence, Star and Perseverance. In the meantime notice of objection to the licences will be served, and the recommendations of the Justices will be considered by the Court of County Quarter Sessions (Canterbury), and if one or the whole of these houses are closed the owners will be compensated.

Folkestone Express 11 February 1905

Annual Licensing Sessions

Wednesday, February 8th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Colonel Hamilton, Colonel Fynmore, W.G. Herbert Esq., and W.C. Carpenter Esq.

The Chief Constable's report was read (see Chronicle for full report).

The Chairman said the report was of a most satisfactory nature. The Magistrates were pleased to fine there were no complaints against any of the houses. It was, however, an unfortunate thing that there was an increase in drunkenness during the year, and they hoped that the licence holders would, in the coming year, be still more careful in trying to help the Bench and the police as much as possible in keeping down drunkenness, so that next year they might have a better report from the Chief Constable. With regard to the houses the Chief Constable referred to in what he called the congested area, there was no question that there were too many public houses there. By the new Act they were empowered to report to the County Quarter Sessions those houses which they thought were not required in the borough. They would therefore direct the Chief Constable to serve notices of objection against those six houses – the Victoria Inn, the Duke of Edinburgh, the Cinque Ports, the Providence Inn, the Star, and the Perseverance – so that they might report to the Quarter Sessions that those houses were unnecessary in the borough. Of course, if the Quarter Sessions upheld their decision with regard to those houses, or any one of them, then the owner would be compensated. If the Chief Constable would kindly serve the notices, the licences would be dealt with at the next Sessions.

The adjourned meeting was fixed for Monday, March 6th.

Folkestone Herald 11 February 1905

Annual Licensing Sessions

Wednesday, February 8th: Before Mr. J. Pledge, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, and Mr. W.C. Carpenter.

The Chief Constable read his report (see Folkestone Chronicle for details).

The Chairman said that the report of the Chief Constable was very satisfactory, and the Licensing Bench were very pleased to find that there was no complaint against any licence holders. There was an unsatisfactory matter in connection with the report, and that was the increase in drunken persons during the year, but the Bench hoped that the licence holders would be more careful, and so try to help the Bench in the matter of keeping down drunkenness, so as to have a better report from the Chief Constable next year. With regard to those houses which had been reported upon, there was no question about it that in the congested district there was a large number of houses, viz., one to every 113 persons. By the new Act, the Bench were empowered to report to the County Quarter Sessions those houses which they thought were not required in the borough, and they would therefore direct the Chief Constable to serve notices of objection before the adjourned meeting against those six houses. The Bench would then report to the Quarter Sessions that, in their opinion, those houses were unnecessary in the borough. If Quarter Sessions upheld the decision of the Bench in regard to one or all of those houses, those houses would be compensated.

Folkestone Daily News 6 March 1905

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Monday, March 6th: Before Messrs. Ward, Pursey, Fynmore, Hamilton, and Carpenter.

The Perseverance

This is a beerhouse in Dover Street. Similar evidence was given as in the previous cases. There was no complaint against the house.

Mr. Avery, K.C., addressed the Bench at great length. He objected to the area, and said it was always possible to find clusters of houses in any neighbourhood, and the smaller circle you drew round them, it increased the number, while if you drew a larger circle it lessened the number in proportion. He went into the question at great length, and pointed out that he could not understand why the Perseverance in Dover Street should be selected, because the police had said that it was a well-conducted house, with no complaints against it, while the Welcome had been convicted last year for harbouring prostitutes, and this year for permitting drunkenness, besides which there were two previous convictions against it.

The Magistrates, however, decided to refer all the cases to Canterbury, granting a provisional licence in the meantime.

Folkestone Chronicle 11 March 1905

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Monday, March 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, W.C. Carpenter, C.J. Pursey, and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Six licences were objected to by the Chief Constable, acting under the instructions of the licensing authority. These were: The Victoria Inn, South Street, tenant Mr. Alfred Skinner; Mr. Minter representing the brewers, Messrs. Mackeson and Co.

The Cinque Ports Arms, tenant Samuel Robert Webster; Mr. W.R. Mowll for the brewers, Messrs. Leney and Co.

The Duke of Edinburgh, Mr. Ralph tenant; The Perseverance, tenant Robert Henry Tracey, and The Providence. The brewers, Messrs. Flint and Co., were in these three cases represented by Mr. Horace Avory, K.C., instructed by Messrs. Nicholson and Graham.

The Star, Radnor Street; In this, the last of the six houses objected to, Mr. Haines appeared for the brewers and the tenant.

In all six cases both brewers and tenants objected to their licences being taken away simply on the grounds of redundancy.

Mr. Avory's objections were practically the same as those which has been urged throughout the Kentish district, and were on all fours with the advocates' objections who represented the other houses.

Chief Constable Reeve did not in any single case object on the ground of misconduct on the part of the licensee, but purely on the grounds of redundancy.

Mr. Avory K.C. submitted that the congested area in which the six licences objected to was an unfair one. If the boundary on the map were extended a mile, then it would be found that the houses were spread over and serving a large population. It was not a suffcicient ground to take away a man's licence on the grounds of redundancy without comparing the threatened house with other houses. He seriously submitted that it was worthy of the Magistrates' consideration as to whether any practical result could follow a reference to Quarter Sessions of these cases. So many licences in Kent had already been referred to Quarter Sessions that he doubted whether sufficient funds would be available for compensation purposes. The result would be a deadlock when these cases came to be considered; the Quarter Sessions would either be obliged to hold their hands, or there would be a gross injustice by the reduction of compensation below the proper amount.

After a long hearing the whole of the six licences were sent back to Quarter Sessions for reference.

Folkestone Express 11 March 1905

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Monday, March 6th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, W.G. Herbert, W.C. Carpenter, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

The objection against the renewal of the licence of the Perseverance Inn to Mr. Robert Henry Tracey was next considered.

The Chief Constable said the house was an ante 1869 beer-house situate in Dover Street. The present tenant obtained a transfer of the licence on December 7th of last year. Messrs. Flint and Co. were the registered owners, and the rateable value was 27. Within a radius of 100 yards there were 17 other “on” licensed houses, within 150 yards there were 29, and within 200 yards there were 39. The accommodation for the public consisted of two compartments, or small bars, and a tap room. In 1902 plans were called for by the licensing justices, but no order for structural alterations was made. In his opinion the house was unnecessary for the requirements of the neighbourhood.

Cross-examined, witness said the Welcome, a fully licensed house, was only a very short distance away. Since February 8th, when the licence of the Welcome was renewed, there was a conviction for permitting drunkenness against that house. There were altogether four convictions against it.

Det. Sergt. Burniston said he considered the house unnecessary for the requirements of the neighbourhood. On February 15th the landlord told him he wished he had not speculated his money in the house, and on March 4th he also told him that he barely took enough money to pay expenses.

Mr. Tracey said he paid 179 altogether to go into the house. In the summer the house let to a good class of visitors. The amount of beer consumed depended on the fishing trade; sometimes it was four barrels a week, and sometimes only two. Since he had taken the house he had found that a public house was a nuisance and that a publican's life was intolerable. When he got out he would take no more public houses. He had been a mounted policeman, a soldier, and a gold prospector.

Mr. Alec Ward, a director of Messrs. Flint and Co., said during the year ending October, 1902, 341 barrels of beer were sold in the house. In 1903 there were 300, and in 1904, 266, or an average of five barrels a week.

Mr. Avory contended that the area marked on the map produced an unfair result. If they extended the boundary a mile further away from the cluster of houses they would find the houses were serving a large population of people. He submitted that it was worthy of the Magistrates' consideration whether any practical result could follow from a reference of those cases to the Quarter Sessions. He thought that the funda available for compensation would not be sufficient to meet the cases which had already been referred to the Quarter Sessions. The result would be there would be a deadlock when the question came to be considered. The Quarter Sessions would either be obliged to say they must hold their hands or they would be obliged to do what would be a gross injustice – reduce the compensation below what the proper amount should be.

The Chairman said the Magistrates thought they were bound to refer the case to the Quarter Sessions.

Folkestone Herald 11 March 1905

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Monday, March 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Councillor Fynmore, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Mr. W.C. Carpenter, and Mr. C.J. Pursey.

It will be remembered that at the February Sessions the Bench instructed the Chief Constable (Mr. H. Reeve) to oppose the renewal of six licences on the grounds that they were not required for the districts in which they were situated.

The case of the Perseverance, of which Mr. R.H. Tracey is the landlord, was next proceeded with. Mr. Avory also appeared for the owners in this case.

The Chief Constable said that this was an ante 1869 beerhouse. The present tenant made the fifth that had been in the house for twenty years. The house was on the right-hand side of Dover Street, opposite Fenchurch Street, and within 100 yards there were 17 other on-licensed houses, within 150 29 houses, and within 200 39 houses. At the Licensing Meeting in 1903 plans were called for, but no structural alterations had been made. The owners were Messrs. Flint and Co., and the rateable value was 27. The trade was very small, and the house was not necessary for the requirements of the neighbourhood.

Cross-examined: Assuming that five barrels per week were sold, he would call that a small trade. The house was a very short distance from the Welcome Inn, which was a fully licensed house. That house was not being opposed, though it had been the subject of a conviction since the last licensing meeting. There was one other conviction against the Welcome Inn last year against the owner. In 1879 and 1892 there were convictions. There was no opposition at present by the police to that house. There had been no conviction against the Perseverance during the tenancy of the present or past licensee.

Detective Sergeant Burniston considered the licence unnecessary. On the 15th February witness served the landlord with the notice. The licensee regretted that he had speculated his money on the house, and later said that he took only nearly enough to pay expenses.

Cross-examined by Mr. Avory: He would hardly think that the Welcome Inn was needed.

Mr. Robt. Henry Tracey, the tenant of the house, said that he took possession in November last, and paid altogether 179 to go into the house. In the summer the house was let to fairly good class visitors. To a great extent his beer trade depended on the fishing trade. Since he had taken the public house he had come to the conclusion that a public house was a nuisance to everyone. A publican's life was intolerable, and he would “lay that if he got outside of that he would take care not to go in another”. He had been a policeman in Bechuanaland, a soldier, and a prospector.

Cross-examined: Although he had been a gold miner, he had not found the public house a gold mine.

Mr. Alex Ward, a director of Messrs. Flint and Co., gave statistics as to the trade done, which showed that it fluctuated; the average of the last three years was being maintained.

Cross-examined: Messrs. Ash owned seventeen houses in the borough, whereas witness's firm only had seven.

Mr. Avery contended that the marking of an arbitrary area on a plan as had been done by the Chief Constable produced an unfair result, for the reason that in every town one spot could be divided out where there was a cluster of licensed houses. The Bench should not be guided by any line drawn upon a map, because in that way they would not give due consideration to the wants of the people who were outside that district. The Magistrates were not dealing with theoretical questions, but questions of practical politics, namely, as to whether any of the houses should be sent to Quarter Sessions for consideration. He submitted that it was worthy of consideration whether any practical result would follow from a reference of those cases to the Quarter Sessions for the county. He believed, from inquiry, that at the present moment it would be found that there had been referred to Quarter Sessions a number of houses far exceeding any possible strain which the compensation funds could be put to. In other words the compensation funds would not be sufficient for the number of cases which would require to be met. The result would be that a total deadlock would be produced at Quarter Sessions. It could not have been intended by the Legislature that those objections should be multiplied by an enormous number of houses being referred, all of which were to have a claim upon the compensation funds, when there were no funds, or the funds were not sufficient. Quarter Sessions would be obliged to say “We must hold our hands, for we cannot deal with any of the questions, or we shall be obliged to reduce the amounts below what they should be”. Counsel further argued that in the case of Raven v Southampton Justices it was laid down that it was not sufficient to produce a map which, when viewed, showed there were too many houses in any particular neighbourhood, but that there should be some grounds distinguishing it from other licensed houses in the neighbourhood which justified the taking away of that licence rather than the licences of other houses in that street or the adjoining street. He went on to compare the Perseverance and the Welcome Inn, houses practically together, where convictions had been recorded against one and not the other, and yet the Perseverance was opposed while the other was not.

The Bench decided to refer the case to Quarter Sessions.

Southeastern Gazette 14 March 1905


The adjourned licensing sessions for Folkestone were held on Monday, before E.T. Ward Esq. (in the chair).

Mr. Minter applied for the renewal of the Victoria Inn, South Street, on behalf of the owners, Messrs. Mackeson and Co., Ltd. The police objected on the grounds that the house was excessive. In that district there was one “on” licensed house to every 100 inhabitants. The Bench unanimously decided to refer the house to the Quarter Sessions, granting the tenant a provisional license in the meantime.

Mr. Mowll next applied on behalf of the owners, Messrs. Leney and Co., for the renewal of the Cinque Port Arms, held by Samuel Robert Webster. After hearing the evidence, the Bench came to a similar decision.

They also referred the following licenses to Quarter Sessions:—The Duke of Edinburgh, Messrs. Flint and Co., owners; the Providence Inn., Henry Green, licensee; the Perseverance Inn, Robert Henry Tracey, licensee; and the Star, held by Ticknor Else.

Folkestone Daily News 11 May 1905

Local News

We learn that the Compensation Committee at Canterbury appointed by the Quarter Sessions only intend to deal with 11 cases out of the 15 that were sent to them. There were six from Folkestone, five from Hythe, and four from Elham.

The six from Folkestone were The Providence, The Perseverance, The Cinque Ports, The Victoria, The Edinburgh Castle (sic), The Star.

The Committee have decided that there is no need to interfere with the Providence. The objection to that has been thrown without asking for further evidence. The other five will be dealt with shortly.

Folkestone Chronicle 13 May 1905

East Kent Licensing Authority

Lord Harris presided at the preliminary meeting of the East Kent Licensing Authority, held at the Sessions House, Canterbury, on Friday, when cases from Ramsgate, Folkestone, Hythe, and Elham were reported.

It was decided that the principal meeting to be held pursuant to the Licensing Rules, 1904, by the Compensation Authority for the East ent Area should be fixed to take place at the Sessions House, Longport, Canterbury, on the 26th May, at 10.15 a.m. At that meeting the Authority will be prepared to hear, with reference to the renewal of the licences of the following premises, all those persons to whom, under the Licensing Act, 1904, they are bound to give an opportunity of being heard: Victoria Inn, South Street, Folkestone; Star Inn, Radnor Street, Folkestone; Cinque Ports Arms, Seagate Street, Folkestone; Duke of Edinburgh, Tontine Street, Folkestone; Perseverance, Dover Street, Folkestone; Rose and Crown, High Street, Hythe; Old Portland, Market Square, Hythe; Walmer Castle, Adelaide Gardens, Ramsgate; Kent Inn, Camden Road, Ramsgate; Bricklayers Arms, King Street, Ramsgate; and Albert Inn, High Street, Ramsgate.

Folkestone Daily News 26 May 1905

East Kent Licensing Authority

At the Canterbury Quarter Sessions this morning, before Judge Selfe and the licensing Magistrates, the cases of renewing the licences of the Duke of Edinburgh in Tontine Street, the Victoria in South Street, the Star in Radnor Street, the Perseverance in Dover Street, and the Cinque Ports in Seagate Street came up for hearing.

Mr. Pitman, instructed by Mr. Bradley, appeared for the Folkestone Justices; Mr. Hohler appeared for the Star; Mr. Bodkin for Messrs. Flint and Sons and Messrs. Mackeson; Mr. G.W. Haines for the tenant of the Perseverance; and Mr. Mowll for the Cinque Ports.

Mr. Bodkin raised a point of law as to whether the justices had investigated the matter before remitting it to Quarter Sessions.

Sir L. Selfe, however, decided against him, and the cases were proceeded with on their merits.

Mr. H. Reeve, the Chief Constable, recapitulated his evidence given before the Folkestone Justices. He was severely cross-examined by Mr. Bodkin and Mr. Hohler, but they failed to shake his evidence.

Mr. Tiddy and Mr. Jones, of Tontine Street, gave evidence in favour of the Duke of Edinburgh.

The Magistrates retired to consider the matter, and on their return into court Sir W.L. Selfe announced that they had come to the decision to do away with the licences of the Star, the Victoria, the Cinque Ports, and the Duke of Edinburgh.

These houses will be closed as soon as the question of compensation is settled.

The Perseverance, in Dover Street, was not interfered with at present.

Folkestone Chronicle 27 May 1905

East Kent Licensing Authority

The principal meeting of the Compensation Authority for East Kent was held at the Sessions House, Canterbury, on Friday, before Judge Sir W.L. Selfe.

The Folkestone licensed houses under consideration were: Victoria Inn, South Street, licensee Alfred Skinner; Star and Garter (sic), Radnor Street, licensee Henry T.T. Else; Cinque Ports Arms, Seagate Street, licensee Samuel R. Webster; Duke of Edinburgh, Tontine Street, licensee Frederic Ralph; and the Perseverance, Dover Street, licensee Robert H. Tracy.

Mr. Bodkin and Mr. Hohler appeared for the brewers, Mr. Pittman for the Justices of Folkestone, Mr. Haines and Mr. Rutley Mowll for the tenants.

Mr. Pittman having opened the case for the Justices of Folkestone, formal evidence as to the trade done by the various houses and their general character was given by Chief Constable H. Reeve and Detective Sergt. Burniston.

Mr. Bodkin said there was nothing against the five houses except the statement of two police officers that the trade done in two of them was small. The Victoria had been held by Mr. Skinner for about six years, and was used for a particular class of trade. It is used by sailors, fishermen, and railway men. It had a good steady trade, which had been fairly maintained for the last few years.

As to the Perseverance, Mr. Tracy went in last November and paid 180 for it. He had done a fairly good trade, and if now the licence would be taken away the compensation would be very small, and although he had conducted it with perfect respectability, he would be fined the difference between 180 and the small quantum of compensation that the Committee could award. He would ask on what possible basis the Justices selected the house, when close by was the Welcome, against which a conviction was obtained this year and one last year?

As to the Duke of Edinburgh, where the tenant, Mr. Ralph, had been 14 years, and had maintained himself and was satisfied, although it was next door to a fully-licensed house, it attracted a different class of trade, and was of use to the locality.

Mr. G.L. Mackeson, Managing Director of Mackeson Limited, and Alfred Skinner, the tenant, gave evidence as to the Victoria,

Eventually a licence was granted in the case of the Perseverance, but refused in all the other Folkestone cases.

Southeastern Gazette 30 May 1905

East Kent Licensing Committee

The principal meeting of the East Kent Licensing Committee was held at the Sessions House, Canterbury, on Friday and Saturday. At the first day’s sitting, Judge Sir W. L. Selfe presided.

There were five applications from Folkestone, viz., in respect of the Victoria, the Perseverance, the Duke of Edinburgh, the Star, and the Cinque Port Arms. The licensees were represented by Mr. Bodkin, K.C., Mr. Hohler, Mr. Rutley Mowll and Mr. Haines, while Mr. Pitman appeared for the justices of Folkestone, and Detective Sergt. Bumiston having given evidence, Mr. Bodkin contended that the fact that compensation was now to be given did not affect the question, as to whether a license should be renewed or not, and the onus upon those who came there to prove that a license should be refused on the ground that it was not required was just as great as if they were acting last year instead of in the present year, and he thought it was necessary to bear this in mind because one heard in various quarters views expressed that now compensation was payable, these licensing cases might be got through in as short, and, if he might say so, as perfunctory a way as possible, without any enquiry of any sort, or careful attention given to the interests involved. Mr. Bodkin further argued that the primary duty of the Licensing Justices was that laid down in the Farnham case, viz., that they should personally select the houses which they deemed were not required, instead of leaving such selection to the discretion of the Chief Constable.
All the licenses were refused, with the exception of that of the Perseverance.

Folkestone Express 3 June 1905

East Kent Licensing

The Special Committee of Licensing Justices of East Kent considered on Friday, at the Canterbury Sessions Hall, five Folkestone licences which had been referred to them under the Licensing Act of 1904. The Chairman was Sir William Lucius Selfe. Mr. Pitman, barrister, appeared for the licensing justices, and Mr. H.C. Bodkin, barrister, for the owners of the Victoria (Messrs. Mackeson and Co.), the Perseverance and the Duke of Edinburgh (Messrs. Flint and Co.); Mr. Hohler for the owners of the Star (Messrs. Ash and Co.); Mr. G.W. Haines for the tenant of the Perseverance, and Mr. R. Mowll (Dover) for the owners of the Cinque Ports Arms (Messrs. Leney and Co.).

Mr. Pitman said that in 1903 the licensing justices announced their intention of exercising the power which they then had of reducing the number of licensed houses in the area of Folkestone, and especially in the neighbourhood of the Harbour district. In the beginning of 1904, in the King's Speech, there was mentioned a prospect of the present Licensing Act coming into force, and the justices determined therefore to hold their hand, and nothing was done in 1904. At the annual meeting that year, the Chief Constable gave notice that he intended to oppose the renewal of the five licensed houses which had been mentioned, and one other, the Providence. At the adjourned meeting the Chief Constable and the detective who assisted him in the enquiries made gave evidence, in which they stated that the area which the Chief Constable had marked off was a congested area, there being 915 houses for a population of 4,580. There were 46 on-licensed houses and 6 off-licensed houses, so there was rather more than one licence to every 100 of the population. He did not think that there could be any doubt that in such circumstances some reduction was necessary. The renewal authority recommended that the renewal of the six houses mentioned should be considered, but at a preliminary meeting it was decided that the Providence should not be proceeded against. He might mention that the Chief Constable, in selecting those houses for his opposition, was guided by the fact that they were the houses doing the least trade, and that he had selected in each case one out of a cluster of houses, and that which appeared the worst of each cluster.

Mr. H. Reeve, the Chief Constable, was the first witness, and he repeated his evidence given before the local licensing justices. As to the Perseverance, the tenant went in last year, having paid about 180 to go in. He could not say for certain what the trade was, and he had no complaint as to the conduct of the premises. No objection had been given to the renewal of the Welcome. He would not consider the Welcome, during the past few months, was a well-conducted house, and there had been two convictions against it in twelve months, though the tenants in each case were different people. The last conviction was since the licensing day. The present landlord of the Perseverance was a very respectable man.

Det. Sergt. Burniston also gave similar evidence to that given before the licensing justices.

Mr. Bodkin said he submitted under that particular jurisdiction precisely the same duty fell upon that tribunal as was upon the Court of Quarter Sessions in deciding whether or not the licences should be renewed. He submitted there must be as careful and as exhaustive an enquiry as to each house as there had been under the Licensing Act of 1868. Therefore it was necessary to say what the law was with regard to those cases, and whether there had been any difference of distinction made between the procedure under that Act to what there was under the earlier legislation. The chief case upon which one must rely as interpreting the duties of the Quarter Sessions was the well-known Farnham case. In that case there was a statement made by the Master of the Rolls which really gave the key to the whole position. The justices in that case formed themselves into a committee, or rather appointed a committee, and after an exhaustive enquiry made personally by themselves, they declined to select from the houses generally within their area any particular house which they might oppose prima facie before going round on their tour of inspection and trying to find out what was unnecessary for the requirements of the locality. What they did was described as the only possible and fair way of dealing with the question, which was just as difficult as it ever had been. Instead of giving a notice of objection to individual houses selected out of court, they gave notice of objection to every single house in the division. The Master of the Rolls then said that the justices were of the opinion that the only fair and satisfactory way of dealing with the question was to cause objections to be served on all the owners of licensed houses, so that the cases of all might be formally inquired into. That course gave the justices an opportunity of weighing the merits and acting judicially in the matter of which public houses should remain and which licences should be taken. That was the one course which might be taken, and it was a most authoritative statement. It was the statement which was made, and it seemed to him (the Master of the Rolls) the reasonable and proper course. That was a procedure which was described as a fair, reasonable, and satisfactory procedure. It was not adopted in that case; far from it. The procedure apparently had been to adopt the view of the Chief Constable, and to instruct him to serve notice of objection solely on houses which he had selected without giving any opportunity to the occupiers of such houses to show by way of comparison of their trade, accommodation, situation, state of repair, or matters of that kind, how discrimination should be made by the justices as to the houses to be retained and which ought to be referred to the Quarter Sessions. In not doing so, he submitted that the Folkestone Justices had not followed the proper legal course. They might have given just as easily instructions to the Chief Constable to serve notices on all the houses in the selected area. How was a Quarter Sessions sitting 20 or 100 miles away from a town to differentiate between those and other houses in a selected area? Before any decision was come to, it was essential that there should be an enquiry into the needs of the neighbourhood and the pros and cons of the other houses by the justices below.

The Chairman: I should certainly say that the course had been sanctioned by the King's Bench Division in the case The King v Tolhurst.

After further argument by Mr. Bodkin, the Chairman said it was suggested that the course in the Farnham way was a proper way, but not the only way. He ruled Mr. Bodkin's contention out, so far as he was concerned. The justices below had made a prima facie case out against the houses, and it was for them to answer the case.

Mr. Bodkin asked if the Committee would state a case upon that point.

The Chairman said they could not stay their hands on the possibility of an appeal.

Mr. Bodkin then addressed the Committee on behalf of the Perseverance, the Victoria, and the Duke of Edinburgh.

The Perseverance

Robert Henry Tracey next gave evidence with regard to the Perseverance. He said he had been a tenant of the house since November last. He paid 28 a year rent. He had been a prospector and a gold miner. He had been in the Mashonaland Mounted Police and the Cape Police during the war. He paid 179 to go into the house. That sum included fixtures and some furniture and stock. The trade was greatly improving every week, and it had gone up from two barrels to rather more than four barrels a week. He was now satisfied with the trade. He had made a living in the worst time of the year, and he was certain he would in the best time.

In reply to Mr. Haines, witness said his savings of ten years in South Africa had been put in the house.

Mr. Alexander Ward, a director of Messrs. Flint and Co., said the house was the freehold property of his company. The trade had been thoroughly good ever since he had known the house. It averaged eight barrels a week including bottled ales for the last four years.

The Chairman said he thought the witness had made a mistake with regard to barrelage, and witness, after working the figures out again, said he made the barrelage about six every week.

The Committee retired, and on their return the Chairman said he still held that the procedure of the justices below was in accordance with the law. The Committee had considered each case separately without regard to any of the other cases which had been heard, and they decided to refuse the renewal of the licences except that of the Perseverance, which they would renew.

Folkestone Herald 27 May 1905

East Kent Licensing Authority

Yesterday the Special Committee of Licensing Justices of East Kent, to whom the local authorities had referred the licences of five Folkestone houses, under the licensing Act of 1904, sat at the Canterbury Sessions Hall, and considered the reports which had been presented to them, as well as the reasons advanced in favour and against the renewal of the respective licences. Sir William Lucius Selfe was the Chairman of the Committee.

The houses in question were the Victoria, South Street, the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, the Star Inn, Radnor Street, the Duke of Edinburgh, Tontine Street, and the Cinque Port Arms, Seagate Street.

Mr. Pitkin, barrister, appeared for the Licensing Justices, Mr. H.C. Bodkin, barrister, for the owners of the Victoria, the Perseverance, and the Duke of Edinburgh (Messrs. Flint and Co.), Mr. Hohler was for the owners of the Star (Messrs. Ash and Co.), Mr. G.W. Haines represented the tenant of the Perseverance, and Mr. Rutley Mowll (Dover) appeared for the owners of the Cinque Ports Arms (Messrs. Leney and Co.).

Mr. Pitkin said that at the annual licensing meeting this year the Chief Constable gave notice that he intended to oppose the renewal of the five licences named, and one other, that of the Providence. The notices were served on the people who required notices under the Act, and at the adjourned meeting the Chief Constable and his Detective Sergeant gave evidence, while evidence was also called on behalf of the licensees of the houses. At that meeting it was proved that in the area which the Chief Constable had marked out on the map, namely, from South Street, up High Street, down Grace Hill, to the railway arches, and across to the sea, there were in all 916 houses to a population of 4,580. Of these 46 were on-licensed and 6 were off- licensed. That was one licence to rather more than every hundred of the population, and if that was so there could be no doubt that that was a case in which some reduction was necessary. The renewal authority were unanimous in referring the whole of the five licences under discussion. At the preliminary meeting it was decided that the case of the Providence should not be proceeded with. The Chief Constable would tell them that in selecting those five houses he was guided by the fact that the houses were those which were doing the least trade, and that he had selected in each case one out of a cluster of houses, and that which appeared to be the worst of each cluster.

Mr. Harry Reeve, the Chief Constable, repeated the figures as to population, etc. He said in the whole borough there was one on-licence to every 313 people. During the year 1904 there were 171 cases of drunkenness in the borough, and 94 of those arose within the specified area. Dealing with the Perseverance, in Dover Street, witness said that that was an ante 1869 beerhouse, and the registered owners were Messrs. Flint and Co., of Canterbury. The present holder of the licence was Robt. Tracey, who obtained it in December, 1904. In eight years there had been five tenants. The rateable value was 27 per annum. Within a radius of 100 yards there were 17 on-licensed houses, within 150 yards there 29 houses, and within 200 yards there were 39 houses. There seemed to him to be very little trade done at the house. He was past he house a few evenings ago, and saw one of the bars in total darkness, so that it did not appear that they were doing much trade.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bodkin: It was from the whole of the Licensing Justices that he received instructions. As to the Perseverance, the tenant went in last year, having paid about 180 to go in. He could not say for certain what the trade was, and he had no complaint at all as to the conduct of the premises. No objection had been given to the renewal of the Welcome. He would not consider that the Welcome, during the past few months, was a well-conducted house, and there had been two convictions against it in twelve months, though the tenants in each case were different people. The last conviction was since the last Licensing day. The present landlord of the Perseverance was a very respectable man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines: The last tenant of the Perseverance was a Mr. Morgan. He had been there for three years, and the previous tenant to that was a Mr. Riddalls, who had been there four years, as had a tenant before him. In the season the population greatly increased in Folkestone.

Detective Sergeant Burniston knew the Perseverance, and there a very small trade was done, the customers being principally fishermen. Tracey, the tenant, when he received the notice of objection, said that he wished he had not speculated his money in the house, and on a later date he said that he did not take sufficient money to pay the rent.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines: The tenant Tracey made his statement after he had been served with a notice.

Mr. Bodkin submitted that there was under that particular provision of the Act upon which the Committee sat, precisely the same powers as under the old conditions of appeal to Quarter Sessions. He would submit that there must be as careful and as exhaustive an enquiry in reference to the issue to each house as there ever had been under the Licensing Act of 1838. The chief case upon which one must rely in interpreting the duties of the Quarter Sessions was the well-known Farnham case, and in that case a statement was made by the Master of the Rolls, which really gave the key to the whole of the decisions. The Justices in that case formed themselves into a Committee, or appointed a Committee, and after an exhaustive enquiry, made personally by themselves, they declined to select from the houses generally within their area any particular houses which they might oppose prima facie before going round and making an inspection, and so finding out what they considered to be absolutely unnecessary for the requirements of the locality. What they did was decided as being the only possible and fair way of dealing with the question. Instead of giving notice of objection to individual cases selected out of Court, if he might so express it, they gave notice of objection to every single house in their area. What the Master of the Rolls said was “They (the Justices) were of opinion that the only fair and satisfactory way of dealing with the question was to cause objections to be served on all the owners of licensed houses, so that the cases of all of them might be formally inquired into, and for that purpose authority was given to the Justices' Clerk to object to such renewals on the general ground that the houses were not required, and also on the special grounds set out in that notice. That course gave everyone concerned their opportunity, and the Justices had the opportunity of weighing the merits and acting judicially in the matter of which public houses should remain and which licences should be taken. That is one course that might be taken, and it seems to me the reasonable and proper course”. That procedure had not been adopted in that case. It was very far from it. The procedure in this instance apparently had been to adopt the view of a particular official, the Chief Constable, and to instruct him to serve notices of objection solely on the houses which he had selected without giving any opportunity to the occupiers of such houses to show, by way of comparison of trade, accommodation, situation, the state of repair, and matters of that kind, how discrimination by the Justices should be made, and which should be referred to Quarter Sessions. In doing so, he submitted the Folkestone Justices had not followed the proper and legal course. They might have given just as easily instructions to the Chief Constable to serve notice on all houses in that selected area. How was a Quarter Sessions, sitting 50 or 100 miles away from a town, to distinguish between those and other houses in a selected area? A great many of the compensation authority would be absolutely ignorant of the locus in quo. Before any legal decision could be given in reference to any one property, in accordance with the procedure conducted by the Folkestone Justices, it was essential that there should be an enquiry into the needs of the neighbourhood. The case of Howard and King in Parliament was followed by the Raven and Southampton case, in which it was contended that the procedure adopted in the Farnham case was a reasonable one so that the course adopted by the Folkestone Justices was not equivalent.

The Chairman said that he would advise the Committee that the action of the Committee was sanctioned by an action in the King's Bench Division. For the purposes of that day they would not act under the decision of the King v Tolhurst. If the King's Bench had considered that the hearing in the Tolhurst case carried the case any further than the Raven case, they would no doubt have followed the decision in the Raven case.

Mr. Hohler said that he had acted for the Justices in that case, and they said that they had not only acted on the police evidence, but they had also acted upon their own local knowledge. The Lord Chief Justice, in his judgement, had referred to that.

The Chairman said the Tolhurst case had decided that the evidence must be sufficient to justify the Magistrates referring the matter to that Court.

Mr. Bodkin asked the Committee to state a case on that decision.

The Chairman: No, certainly not.

Mr. Bodkin said that he had no authority to say so, but he had every reason to believe that that decision was to be appealed against.

The Chairman replied that the Committee could not stay their hands on the possibility of an appeal to the Court of Appeal.

Mr. Bodkin then addressed the Committee on behalf of his clients, and he then called his evidences.

The Perseverance

Mr. Robert Henry Tracey, the landlord of the Perseverance, said the trade was improving every week. From two barrels his trade had come up to four barrels, as well as a bottled beer and stout trade. He had made a living in the worst time of the year, and he would like to have a chance of seeing what i was like. He had told the sergeant that he was sorry that he had invested in the business. That was when he was served with the notice of objection. The whole of his savings in South Africa were invested in the business.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pitkin: In the first week of his tenancy he sold four barrels, and then it went down to two.

Mr. Alexander Ward, Director of Messrs. Flint and Co., said he regarded the Perseverance as a house of very considerable value. Treating bottled beer as barrelage, the average sale of all kinds for the last four years had been eight barrels a week. The trade was greater in the summer than the winter. During the whole of the time the house was thoroughly well conducted. It was a principle of his company to select the best publicans, and he did not want a better than Mr. Tracey. They had never had any complaint against the structural alterations of the place.

Witness, in reply to the Chairman, corrected his statement, and said that the barrelage averaged six and not eight per week.

After retiring to consider their verdict, the Committee, through their Chairman, announced their decision. Sir William Selfe said that in the course of Mr. Bodkin's arguments on the question of law, it had been said that the procedure of the Justices below in referring the licences for the consideration of that Court was not in accordance with the law. He (the Chairman) expressed the opinion that it was. The Committee had considered each case separately, without regard to any of the other cases that had been heard, and they had decided to refuse the renewal of all the licences except that of the Perseverance, which they would renew.

Folkestone Daily News 28 February 1906

Wednesday, February 28th: Before Messrs. E.T. Ward, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, T. Ames, W.G. Herbert, and Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore.

The transfer of the licence of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, was granted from Mr. Terry to Mr. Frederick Ralph. The latter formerly held the licence of the Duke of Edinburgh, Tontine Street, which licence was suppressed last year.

The Chief Constable said he hoped the new tenant would conduct the house as well as the late tenant had done.

Folkestone Chronicle 3 March 1906

Wednesday, Fevruary 28th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lt. Col. Fynmore, Messrs. J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, C. Ames, and W. Linton.

Mr. Ben Twyman, brewer's agent, applied for the temporary transfer of the licence of the Perseverance, Dover Street, from Mr. Tracey to Fredk. Ralph, late of the Edinburgh Castle (sic), Tontine Street.

The application was granted.

Chief Constable Reeve said he hoped the house would be as well conducted by the new tenant as it was under the last.

Folkestone Express 3 March 1906

Wednesday, February 28th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and T. Ames, W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

The following licence was temporarily transferred: the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, from Mr. Tracey to Mr. F. Ralph (late of the Duke of Edinburgh, Tontine Street).

Folkestone Herald 3 March 1906

Wednesday, February 28th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, and Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, and T. Ames.

A special sessions for the transfer of ale house licences was held. The licence of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, was transferred to Mr. Fredk. Ralph, late of the Duke of Edinburgh, Tontine Street. The Chief Constable remarked that he hoped this house would be as well conducted under the new tenant as under the previous one.

Folkestone Daily News 11 April 1906

Wednesday, April 11th: Before Messrs. E.T. Ward, R.J. Linton, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Mr. Fred Ralph was given the transfer of the licence of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street. Mr. R.H. Tracey was the former holder of the licence.

Folkestone Chronicle 14 April 1906

On Wednesday morning, at the Borough Police Court, Mr. E.T. Ward presiding, the ordinary business was preceded by a special licensing sessions.

Mr. H. Tracey handed over his licence of the Perseverance, Dover Street, to Mr. F. Ralph, late of the Edinburgh Castle (sic).

Folkestone Express 14 April 1906

Wednesday, April 11th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and R.J. Linton Esq.

The following licence was transferred: The Perseverance, from Robert Henry Tracey to Frederick Ralph.

Folkestone Herald 14 April 1906

Wednesday, April 11th: Before The Mayor, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, Mr. E.T. Ward and Mr. R.J. Linton.

A special session for the transfer of alehouse licences was held. Application was made and granted as follows: The licence of the Perseverance to Fredk. Ralph.

Folkestone Daily News 5 February 1907

Annual Licensing Sessions

Tuesday, February 5th: Before Messrs. Ward, Hamilton, Linton, Fynmore, Herbert, Pursey, and Carpenter. Mr. Stainer, Mr. Wells, and Mr. Boyd, the two latter being the new Magistrates, occupied seats on the Bench, but did not adjudicate.

The Chief Constable read his report as to the number of houses and convictions, which showed a decrease last year. He recommended that the Bench should still continue to take advantage of the Act and refer some of the licences to the Compensation Committee at the Canterbury Quarter Sessions. He then went on to say that although he did not oppose the renewal of any licences on the ground of misconduct, there had been five convictions during the last year, and he had had to warn one licence holder against allowing betting and taking in slips. He also wished to caution all licence holders that these practices would not be allowed on any occasion, and after giving this public warning he should take steps to detect and prosecute for any such offences.

The Chairman, before commencing, stated that the Licensing Bench had visited a large number of houses, and they had seen in various places automatic machines, into which people put pennies, and in some instances got their penny back or a cigar, &c. The having of these machines was practically permitting gambling, and it had been decided that they were illegal. Every licence holder must understand that they were to be immediately removed, otherwise they would be prosecuted for having them. As regards the automatic musical boxes, gramophones, &c., if licensed victuallers had them on their premises, they were to be used in such a way as not to be a nuisance to the neighbourhood, and if complaints were made they would have to be removed.

The renewal licences for the Black Bull Hotel, the Railway Inn, the Chequers, Queen's Head, Channel Inn, Alexandra Tavern, Perseverance, and Railway Hotel at Shorncliffe, were adjourned till the 4th March, some on account of convictions, and some for the consideration of closing them under the Licensing Act. The other applications were granted, a full report of which will appear in our next issue.

Folkestone Express 9 February 1907
Annual Licensing Sessions

Wednesday, February 6th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., W.G. Herbert, R.J. Linton, C.J. Pursey and W.C. Carpenter Esqs., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

The Chief Constable read his report as follows:

Chief Constable's Office, Folkestone, 6th February, 1907.

Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 128 places licensed for the sale by retail of intoxicating liquors, viz.:- Full licences, 80; beer “on”, 9; beer “off”, 6; beer and spirit dealers, 14; grocers, 12; chemists, 4; confectioners, 3; total 128. This gives an average, according to the census of 1901, of one licence to every 239 persons, or one “on” licence to every 344 persons. This is a reduction of 8 licences as compared with the return presented to you last year, as the renewal of 3 “off” licences was not applied for at the last annual licensing meeting, and at the adjourned licensing meeting the renewal of one full licence was refused on the ground that the premises had been ill-conducted, and four other full licences were referred to the Compensation Committee for East Kent on the ground of redundancy. These four licences were subsequently refused by the Compensation Committee, and after payment of compensation, the premises were closed on 31st December last. Since the last annual licensing meeting 22 of the licences have been transferred, viz:- Full licences, 15; beer “on”, 5; off licences, 2; total 22. During the year three occasional licences have been granted by the justices for the sale of intoxicating liquors on premises not ordinarily licensed for such sale, and thirty extensions of the ordinary time of closing have been granted to licence holders when balls, dinners, etc., were being held on their premises. During the year ended 31st December last, 131 persons (106 males and 25 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness. 114 were convicted and 17 discharged. This, it is most satisfactory to find, is a decrease of no less than 52 persons proceeded against as compared with the preceding year, when 164 were convicted and 19 discharged. Six of the licence holders have been proceeded against, and five of them convicted, for the following offences: Selling adulterated whiskey, 1; permitting drunkenness, 1; delivering beer to a child in unsealed vessels, 2; supplying drink to a constable when on duty, 1; total, 5. In the latter case notice of appeal against the conviction has been given by the licensee. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is sold are registered in accordance with the Act of 1902. There are 16 places licensed for music and dancing, and two for public billiard playing. I offer no objection to the renewal of any of the present licences on the ground of misconduct, the houses generally having been conducted during the past year in a satisfactory manner, but on one occasion one of the licence holders was cautioned (as the evidence was insufficient to justify a prosecution) for receiving slips and money relating to betting, which practice he immediately discontinued, bit I desire to intimate to all the licence holders that if in future any such practice is allowed, or any illegal gaming whatever is permitted on their premises, I shall take such steps as may be necessary to detect and prosecute the offenders. I beg to submit a plan showing the situation of all “on” licensed premises within the congested area, which I have marked on the plan, and would respectfully suggest that the Committee again avail themselves of the powers given by the Licensing Act, 1904, and refer the renewal of some of the licences within this area to the Compensation Committee to deal with under the Act. Within this area there are 920 houses, with a population approximately of 4,600, with 37 “on” licensed houses and 8 other licences, giving a proportion of one licence to every 20 houses or every 102 persons, and one “on” licence to every 24 houses or every 124 persons. This number of licences I consider excessive for the requirements of the neighbourhood. I have received notices from eight persons of their intention to apply at these sessions for the following new licences, viz.,:- Full licence 1; beer off 1; cider and sweets off 1; wine off 3; music, etc., 2; total 8.

I am, Gentlemen, your obedient servant, H. Reeve, Chief Constable.

The Chairman said the report seemed to be highly satisfactory. The Magistrates were very pleased to see the diminution in the number of cases of drunkenness brought before the Bench. One point about the report he wanted to make a remark upon, and that was the prevalence of gaming in public houses. In several houses the Committee visited they saw automatic machines, in which customers placed pennies and pulled a trigger. Occasionally they got something out for their pennies. That was gaming. It had been decided to be illegal, and they warned all licence holders that they would be watched, and that the machines would not be allowed, and proceedings would be taken against the offending publicans, whose licences would be jeopardised next year. There was one other point of a similar nature with regard to musical instruments, which were reported to be a great nuisance. They warned all licence holders to be careful not to create a nuisance with those pianos and other instruments, which were now very common indeed in public houses.

The following houses were ordered to be opposed as not required: The Channel Inn, High Street; the Queen's Head, Beach Street; the Railway Tavern (sic), Beach Street; the Chequers, Seagate Street; and the Perseverance, Dover Street.

Adjourned: The Black Bull Hotel, the Alexandra Tavern, the Imperial Hotel, Black Bull Road, and the Railway Hotel, Coollinge.

Folkestone Herald 9 February 1907

Annual Licensing Sessions

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Major Leggett, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, and Messrs. R.J. Fynmore, R.J. Linton, and C.J. Pursey

The Chief Constable presented his annual report (for details see Folkestone Express report).

The Chairman: The report seems to be very satisfactory, and we are very glad to see the diminution in the number of cases of drunkenness brought before the Bench. One point about the report I should like to make a remark upon, and that is about gambling in public houses. In every house we have visited we saw automatic machines in which you put a penny, pulled a trigger, and occasionally you get something out, either your penny back, or a card for a cigar. That is gaming, and it has been decided as illegal, and we warn all licence holders who have these machines that they must be removed or otherwise proceedings will be taken against them for gaming, and their licences may be in jeopardy next year. There is another thing. In the same way, with regard to these musical instruments, which have been reported to the Bench as a great nuisance, we warn all the licence holders to be careful, and not create nuisances with these machines.

The licences of the Channel, High Street, the Queen's Head, Beach Street, the Railway Inn, Beach Street, the Chequers, Seagate Street, and the Perseverance, Dover Street, were not renewed, notice of opposition being given on the ground of redundancy.

The renewals of the licences of the Black Bull Hotel, Alexandra Tavern, Imperial, and Railway Hotel were all adjourned till the adjourned sessions for reasons not given

The Justices fixed the 4th March as the date of the adjourned licensing meeting.

Folkestone Daily News 4 March 1907

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Monday, March 4th: Before Messrs. Ward, Fynmore, Linton, Boyd, Herbert, Pursey, Carpenter, Leggett, and Hamilton.

There were seven licences to be considered: The Black Bull, Railway Tavern (sic), Railway Hotel, Perseverance, Chequers, Channel Inn, and Queen's Head.

Perseverance

In the case of the Perseverance, Messrs. Flint's representative, Mr. Balliscomb, informed the Bench that they should reserve their defence.

Folkestone Express 9 March 1907

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

The adjourned licensing sessions were held on Monday at the Police Court, when the principal business to be considered was whether or not the five licences should be referred to the East Kent Licensing Committee for compensation. The Licensing Justices on the Bench were E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, W.G. Herbert, C.J. Pursey, R.J. Linton and W.C. Carpenter Esqs., while other justices present were Major Leggett, Mr. G. Boyd, and Mr. J. Stainer.

The Chief Constable said the next business was to consider the opposition to five licences.

The Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, was next dealt with.

Mr. Battiscombe, the manager for the brewers, said they did not intend to fight the opposition that morning, but they would do so at the East Kent Licensing Sessions.

The Chief Constable said the licensee was Frederick Ralph, who obtained the transfer on April 12th, 1906. The registered owners were Messrs. Flint and Co., Canterbury. The rateable value of the house was 27. There were three entrances to the house in Dover Street. The accommodation consisted on one bar divided into two compartments – a tap room and public bar. The accommodation for the licensee was on the first floor. The urinal provided for the use of the public was up a flight of steps by the side of the house. Within a radius of 200 yards of this house there were thirty one other on licensed houses. The nearest licensed house was the Bricklayers Arms, in Fenchurch Street. The rateable value of that was 36, while that of the Perseverance Inn was only 27. It was an ante-1869 beerhouse. He frequently passed the house, and it appeared to him that only a small trade was done and it was unnecessary for the requirements of the neighbourhood.

Det. Sergt. Burniston said he knew the Perseverance Inn very well, and in his opinion it did a small trade, and was not required for the immediate neighbourhood.

The Justices decided to refer this house, and then adjourned for lunch.

Folkestone Herald 9 March 1907

Adjourned Licensing Sessions

Monday, March 4th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, Councillors W.C. Carpenter and G. Boyd, and Messrs. R.J. Fynmore, C.J. Pursey, R.J. Linton, and J. Stainer.

Perseverance Inn

Mr. Battiscomb (manager of Flint and Co., owners) said that he did not intend to bring any evidence in favour of the renewal of the licence of the Perseverance Inn before the Court that day, but would do so at the East Kent Quarter Sessions.

The Chief Constable described the house as being narrow. The accommodation for the licensee was on the first floor. Within a radius of 200 yards there were 31 other licensed houses, the nearest of which was the Bricklayers Arms, in Fenchurch Street. The rateable value of that was 36, while that of the Perseverance was 27. This was an ante-1869 beerhouse, and there appeared to be only a small trade done. He considered the licence unnecessary.

Detective Sergeant Burniston gave corroborative evidence, after which the Bench decided to refer the case.

Folkestone Daily News 12 July 1907

Local News

Our readers will remember that at the recent Folkestone Licensing Sessions the Justices decided to refer the licences of the Channel Inn, High Street, the Queen's Head, Beach Street, the Railway Inn, Beach Street, and the Perseverance, Dover Street, to the County Licensing Authority. At a meeting of this body on Thursday the question came up for consideration, and eventually it was decided to withdraw the licences of the Channel Inn, the Perseverance, and the Queen's Head. The licence of the Railway Inn was renewed. Compensation will, of course, be granted to the owners and tenants of the closed houses.

Folkestone Express 13 July 1907

Local News

At the Folkestone Licensing Sessions the Justices decided to refer four licences to the County Licensing Authority with a view to the houses being closed and compensation given.

The Committee held a meeting on Thursday, and decided to withdraw the licences from the Channel Inn, High Street; the Queen's Head, Beach Street; and the Perseverance, Dover Street. The fourth licence, that of the Railway Inn, Beach Street, was renewed. The owners and tenants of the others will be compensated.

Folkestone Herald 13 July 1907

Local News

Lord Harris presided at the principal meeting of the East Kent Compensation Authority at Canterbury on Thursday.

The Committee had referred to them twenty four houses, including four from Folkestone, viz., the Channel, High Street; the Railway Inn, Beach Street; the Perseverance, Dover Street; and the Queen's Head, Beach Street.

The Perseverance

Mr. Matthew was for the Justices, and Mr. Bodkin for the brewers.

Mr. Reeve said this was an ante 1869 beerhouse, with inferior accommodation, and did a low class trade. It was frequented by hawkers and fisherfolk.

In reply to Mr. Bodkin, witness said he should be surprised to hear that the present tenant did about four barrels a week. He did not know Mr. Ralph (the tenant) was the tenant of another house for fifteen years.

Mr. Bodkin said the two immediate rivals to this house had now disappeared, and it seemed that this one might well be let alone, especially as the trade had so greatly improved.

The tenant said he paid 114 12s. to go into the house. He was tenant of the Duke of Edinburgh until it was taken away by that Committee, and he then put the valuation money into the present house. When he went there it was doing about two and a half barrels, and he had increased this to four a week.

The Committee decided to renew the Railway Inn, but to refuse those of the Channel, Perseverance, and Queen's Head.

Folkestone Daily News 26 March 1908

Thursday, March 26th: Before Messrs. Banks, Boyd, and Stainer.

Daniel Cox was charged with being drunk and incapable yesterday.

Detective Sergeant Burniston said he saw the defendant at 1.20 yesterday in Dover Street. He was very drunk, and went down the street; in fact he had to feel his way down the street by the wall. Witness waited a few minutes, and saw the defendant go back into the Perseverance Inn. As he was not ejected, witness and P.C. Simpson went into the bar and saw the defendant sitting on a form, apparently holding himself up. Witness told the landlord about it. On the table was a pint glass with beer in it, but it seemed to have been recently drank from. He was taken into custody.

P.C. Simpson said at 1.25 p.m. yesterday he accompanied Burniston to the Perseverance Inn. He saw the prisoner at the table. He was drunk. On being told to stand up, witness found he was too drunk to take care of himself. By instructions witness brought him to the police station and charged him. On the way defendant had to be supported.

Prisoner had nothing to say, and was fined 5s. and 5s. 6d. costs, or seven days' hard labour.

He asked for time, but was refused.

Folkestone Herald 28 March 1908

Thursday, March 26th: Before Alderman Banks, Councillor G. Boyd, and Mr. J. Stainer.

Daniel Cox was charged with being drunk. He pleaded Not Guilty.

D.S. Burniston said that at 1.20 p.m. the previous day he saw the prisoner leave the Perseverance public house, Dover Street. He was so drunk that he had to support himself by the side of the house. Prisoner went back into the bar; witness kept observation, and saw he was not ejected, so he went to Beach Street, where he saw P.C. Simpson. He accompanied him back to the house, and saw prisoner in the public bar supporting himself with a table. He told prisoner to stand up, and found he was too drunk to take care of himself. On the table in front of him was a pint glass empty of beer, but with considerable froth in it. Prisoner was then charged and brought to the station.

P.C. Simpson corroborated.

Prisoner had nothing to say.

The Chief Constable said that accused was a hawker. He knew nothing against him.

Fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days'.

Folkestone Daily News 1 April 1908

Wednesday, April 1st: Before Messrs. Herbert, Stainer, Linton, and Boyd.

Frederick Ralph was charged with permitting drunkenness on his premises, viz., the Perseverance Inn, on Thursday, March 25th. Mr. Haines appeared for defendant.

Detective Sergeant Burniston deposed: I know the landlord. At 1.20 on the 25th March I was passing the premises, when I saw a man leave the public bar, whom I knew. His name is Daniel Cox. He was very drunk, and I watched him, and he walked down the street to some premises which led to a urinal. He was so drunk that he had to support himself by the side of the building. He did not go up the steps to the urinal, but committed a nuisance at the bottom. He then returned to the public bar of the Perseverance, again supporting himself by the side of the houses. I waited six or seven minutes and found he was not ejected, so I walked down Beach Street and saw P.C. Simpson, and together we went back to the public bar of the house, where I saw Cox seated, he being the only customer. The defendant was behind the counter. Cox was supporting himself by the table, on which stood an empty glass, containing froth, and appeared to have been recently drank from. I said to Mr. Ralph “Have you served this man with drink?”, and he replied “Yes, I served him with a pint which was paid for by the deputy of the Radnor Lodging House. Cox has been here half an hour, and I have been here all the morning”. I then told Cox to stand up, which he did, after some difficulty, and I then found that he was drunk and incapable of taking care of himself. I said to Ralph “You see this man's condition? I shall arrest him for being drunk on your premises and report you for permitting it”. Cox was then brought to the police station and charged with being drunk and incapable. Cox was brought before the Magistrates the following morning.

Mr. Haines: You say you know the defendant? – Yes.

He held a licence for 14 years at the Edinburgh? – Yes.

He has never had a conviction, has he? – Not to my knowledge.

You know the man Cox? – Yes.

Do you know he has been in South Africa? – I don't know.

Do you know he is very queer in the head sometimes? – No, I don't know.

You could have taken him into custody when you saw him outside, couldn't you? – He didn't fall down.

And so you waited till he got inside? – Yes.

You had a motive for that, I suppose? – Yes.

P.C. Simpson said he accompanied the previous witness to the Perseverance Inn on the day in question, and saw the man Cox sitting in the public bar, supporting himself by his hands on the table. The landlord was behind the counter. Witness heard Burniston ask the landlord if he had served Cox with any beer, and defendant replied “Yes, I served him with a pint of beer”. On Cox being told to stand up, witness could see that he was incapable of taking care of himself, so he was brought to the police station and charged with being drunk and incapable.

The Chief Constable: Was there anyone else in the bar at the time? – No.

The defendant then went into the witness box, and in reply to Mr. Haines, said: I was formerly the landlord of the Duke of Edinburgh for 14 years, but that house has been put back for consideration by the compensation authorities. I was not in the bar when the man Cox first came in. Three men came in afterwards, and one of them called for three pints of beer, one of which he handed to Cox. I did not serve him with any beer that morning, and did not see him go out, but saw him return. He did not appear drunk when he came, and I am satisfied he was not. He walked out with the police unassisted. I have never had a conviction against me, and if I had thought Cox was drunk I should not have served him. In my opinion he was sober.

The Chief Constable: Can you tell me the name of the deputy of the Radnor lodging house? – Morris

What time was Morris in your house? – Just after twelve.

Now, be careful, because I have a statement here from Morris. Was he in your house that morning? – Yes.

You say Cox was sober? – No, I didn't say he was sober; I said he was not drunk.

Mr. Bradley: You said he was sober.

The Chief Constable: Would you have served him if he had asked for more beer? – No.

Why not? – Because I didn't think he wanted any more.

But you say he was sober, so why wouldn't you serve him? – Because he didn't want any more beer.

Did you protest when Cox was taken into custody? – No.

Did you come to the police station? – No.

Why didn't you if you say Cox was not drunk? – Because I didn't think it was necessary.

Mr. Haines addressed the Bench on behalf of the defence, pointing out that it was necessary to prove that a landlord was cognisant of the state of a man when he was served with liquor. There was a conflict of evidence, because defendant said he did not agree with Burniston when asked if he knew the state of the man Cox. Defendant had never had a conviction against him for 14 years, and he asked the Bench to say that he did not know the state of the man when he was in the house, and dismiss the charge.

The Bench came to the conclusion that defendant was perfectly aware of the condition of the man Cox when he was in the house, and inflicted a fine of 40s. and 11s. costs.


Folkestone Express 4 April 1908

Wednesday, April 1st: Before W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton and G. Boyd Esqs.

Frederick Ralph, of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, was summoned for permitting drunkenness on his premises on March 25th. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for defendant, and pleaded Not Guilty.

Detective Sergeant Burniston said at about twenty past one on 25th March he was passing defendant's premises, when he saw a man whom he knew leave the public bar. His name was Daniel Cox. He was very drunk, and witness watched him. He walked down the street to the entrance which led to the urinal. He was so drunk that he had to support himself by the side of the building. He afterwards returned to the bar of the Perseverance beerhouse. Witness waited some six or seven minutes, and, seeing he was not ejected, walked into Beach Street, where he met P.C. Simpson, and they went back to the public house and entered the bar, where the man Cox was seated. Defendant was behind the bar counter. Cox was supporting himself by the table at which he was seated. In front of him stood an empty pint glass, which appeared to have been drunk from, containing a considerable quantity of froth. Witness asked defendant if he had served Cox with drink, and he replied “Yes, I served him with a pint, which was paid for by the deputy of the Radnor lodging house. Cox has been here half an hour, and I have been here all the morning”. Witness then told Cox to stand up, which he did with difficulty, and witness found he was drunk and incapable of taking care of himself. Witness pointed out to defendant Cox's condition, and said he should arrest him on his licensed premises and report defendant for permitting drunkenness. He replied “I agree with you. He is drunk”. Cox was the brought to the police station by P.C. Simpson and witness, and the charge was taken by Inspector Swift.

Cross-examined: Witness said defendant had previously been the licensee of the Duke of Edinburgh, and during the fourteen years he had been there, there had been no conviction against him to his knowledge. Defendant had been at the Perseverance about two years.

P.C. Simpson corroborated Detective Sergeant Burniston's statement. Cox was drunk.

Defendant then went into the witness box. He said he was formerly the tenant of the Duke of Edinburgh for 14 years. He had been at the Perseverance for two years, which had been referred for consideration. During the time Cox was in the bar three men came in, one of them being the deputy of the Radnor lodging house. He called for three glasses of beer, and gave Cox one. Prior to serving Cox with drink, in witness's opinion, Cox was sober. He was not assisted out of the bar by the police. He walked out. There had been no conviction against him (witness), and if he thought Cox was drunk he should have ordered him out.

Cross-examined: Cox was on the premises about half an hour. The other men remained there about five minutes. Witness did not protest against the police charging Cox on his premises. He did not say to Burniston that he agreed with him that Cox was drunk.

Mr. Haines having addressed the Bench, the Chairman said they were unanimously of the opinion that the case was proved. Defendant was liable to a fine of 10, but in consideration of the way in which he had conducted the house, and having held a licence for so long, he would be fined 40s. and 11s. costs.

Folkestone Herald 4 April 1908

Wednesday, April 1st: Before W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton and G. Boyd Esqs.

Frederick Ralph, landlord of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, was summoned for permitting drunkenness on his licensed premises. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for the defendant, who pleaded Not Guilty.

Detective Sergt. Burniston deposed that at 1.20 on Wednesday, 25th March, he was passing the Perseverance when he saw a man named Daniel Cox in the public bar. Cox was very drunk, and witness watched him. He came out and walked down the street to the end of the premises. He was so drunk that he had to support himself by the side of the building. He returned to the public bar of the Perseverance still supporting himself by the wall of the house. Witness waited six or seven minutes, and seeing that he was not ejected, he walked down to Beach Street. He saw P.C. Simpson, and they went back to the bar of the public house together. There he saw the man seated, defendant being behind the counter. Cox was supporting himself on the table. On the counter was an empty glass, which appeared to have been recently drunk from, as it contained a considerable quantity of froth. Witness said to the defendant “Have you served this man with drink?” He replied “Yes, I served him with a pint, which was paid for by the deputy of the Radnor lodging house. Cox has been here half an hour, and I have been here all the morning”. Witness then told Cox to stand up, which he did after some difficulty, and witness found then that he was drunk and incapable of taking care of himself. He said to defendant “You see this man's condition? I shall arrest him for being drunk and incapable on licensed premises, and report you for permitting drunkenness”. He replied “I agree with you; he is drunk”. Cox was then taken to the police station.

Cross-examined by Mr. Haines, witness said he knew the defendant. He previously had had the licence of the Duke of Edinburgh for about fourteen years, during which time he had no conviction against him. He also knew the man Cox. He did not know that he had been to South Africa and had something peculiar in his walk.

P.C. Simpson corroborated.

Defendant, being sworn, said that he had been formerly the tenant of the Duke of Edinburgh for fourteen years. He had been in the present house for two years. His house had been referred back. He knew the man Cox. When Cox came in witness was in the cellar. When he returned to the bar Cox was seated by the counter. After he was there three men came in, one of them being deputy of the Radnor lodging house. He gave Cox a glass of beer. Cox had no more in the house that morning. Witness did not see him go out, but he saw him come back and sit down. He had no difficulty in sitting down. From what witness saw of him prior to serving him with drink, he thought he was sober. When asked by the police to walk out, Cox did so without any assistance. During the whole 14 or 15 years witness held a licence he had not had a conviction. If he had thought Cox was drunk he would not have served him.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, witness said that he was certain that the deputy of the Radnor lodging house had been there. If Cox had asked for more drink he would have given it to him. He did not think that he was drunk.

Mr. Haines, addressing the Bench, said that his client had had a great deal of worry. His boy had tried to take his life. And either he or his wife had been up to the hospital every day. On the day in question he had been down in a cellar, and being busily engaged he did not see Cox enter the house. He (Mr. Haines) did not suggest that Burniston and Simpson did not know when a man was drunk; but Burniston himself asked Cox to stand up, so that he had his doubts as to whether he was drunk or not. He therefore asked them to give him the benefit of the doubt. He also alluded to the fact that the defendant's house had been referred, and would in all probability be closed.

The Bench fined defendant 40s. and 11s. costs.

Folkestone Daily News 11 April 1908

Saturday, April 11th: Before Messrs. Fynmore and Wood.

Leslie Ralph was charged with attempting to commit suicide by cutting his throat.

William Morgan said he lived in Dover Street, and was a fishmonger. On the 17th February Mrs. Ralph came to him, and he went with her to the Perseverance, where he found defendant lying on the staircase and Mr. Ralph supporting him. Witness helped to carry him to the top of the stairs. Defendant had a large cut in the throat, and was only partially dressed. He did not speak. Three constables and a doctor came, and accused was attended to and taken to the hospital.

P.C. Ashby sais he was called to the Perseverance on the 17th February, and found the accused in charge of Morgan. Witness found a bloodstained razor in a back room, and also a letter.

The father said the letter was in his son's handwriting.

The house surgeon at the hospital said the cut had severed the larynx, and the wound was a very dangerous one. The defendant would have to wear a tube in his throat. He might be able to whisper, but would never be able to talk.

The defendant was then committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

Folkestone Express 18 April 1908

Saturday, April 11th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore and R.G. Wood Esq.

A pitiable sight was presented when a young man named Leslie Ralph was brought into Court on a charge of attempting to commit suicide by cutting his throat. He looked terribly ill, and was wearing a bandage round his throat. He made that peculiar noise in breathing which is common after tracheotomy has been performed. To make his condition even more pitiable was the fact that he had a wooden leg.

The Chief Constable mentioned that the doctor had informed him that the lad would never be able to speak again.

Henry Morgan, of 15a, Dover Street, said he was a fishmonger. The prisoner lived at home with his parents at the Perseverance Inn, opposite to his house. On Monday, February 17th, about half past five in the morning, Mrs. Ralph came to his house, and in consequence he accompanied her to the Perseverance. She went upstairs, and in the middle of the narrow staircase he found the prisoner lying on the stairs. His father was trying to get him up. He assisted his father to carry him up the stairs, and they placed him on the floor of the bedroom. He noticed that he had a long cut in his throat, which was bleeding very much. The defendant was dressed in his trousers and undervest, which were saturated with blood. He believed the prisoner was sensible, but he did not speak. He remained there for about a quarter of an hour, when P.C. Ashby came. Dr. Gilbert came ten minutes later and bandaged the throat. He was then removed to the Hospital. The prisoner did not speak during the whole time he was there.

P.C. Ashby said about 5.30 on the morning of February 17th he was called to the Perseverance public house, where he saw the prisoner. He was lying on the floor of the bedroom, and on examining him he found an extensive wound on the throat. Shortly afterwards Dr. Gilbert arrived. The prisoner had remained at the Victoria Hospital until that day. He traced the bloodstains from where he found the prisoner to a back room on the ground floor. On the floor there was a large quantity of blood, and by the side of it there was the razor produced. The handle of the razor was tied to the blade, and it was covered with blood. On the table close by he found the note produced. That morning he charged the prisoner with attempting suicide by cutting his throat. He made no reply.

Frederick Ralph, the landlord of the Perseverance, said the prisoner was his son, who lived at home with him. He was 19 years old last Christmas day. The razor belonged to another one of his sons. The prisoner was a tailor by trade. He had not noticed his son being depressed of late; in fact he had been most cheerful. The note produced was in his handwriting. It was addressed to his (prisoner's) mother, and in it prisoner stated that he could not speak, and all he was longing to do was to get to Ned. In conclusion he wrote “Goodbye to all. Leslie”.

DR. J.R. Kemp, house surgeon at the Hospital, said the prisoner was brought to that institution by the police. On examining him he found he was suffering from a deep wound in the throat. It extended right across and had gone through the larynx. He was in a collapsed condition owing to loss of blood and was unable to speak. The wound was sewn up, and Ralph remained under his treatment until that morning. The wound was a very dangerous one, and might have been inflicted with the razor produced. A considerable amount of force was necessary to inflict such a wound. As a result the prisoner would always have to wear a tracheotomy tube in his throat. He might be able to whisper, but he did not think he would ever be able to articulate properly again.

When asked if he understood the charge, Ralph nodded his head, and, in reply to the Clerk, whether he wished to call any witnesses or say anything, he shook his head in the negative.

The prisoner was eventually committed to take his trial at the Quarter Sessions, on April 22nd, bail being allowed, his father acting as surety for him.

Folkestone Herald 18 April 1908

Saturday, April 11th: Before Lieut. Colonel R.J. Fynmore and Councillor R.G. Wood.

Leslie Ralph, aged 19, a youth with a wooden leg, was charged with attempting to commit suicide by cutting his throat.

Henry Wm. Morgan, living at 15, Dover Street, said that he was a fishmonger. Prisoner lived at home with his parents. On Monday, 17th February, about 5.30 in the morning, Mrs. Ralph came across to his house, and from what she said witness accompanied her to the Perseverance. He went upstairs and found prisoner in the middle of the narrow staircase. He was lying on the stairs. Mr. Ralph was trying to get him up. Witness assisted his father to carry him to the top of the stairs. Witness laid him on the floor of the bedroom. He had a large cut in the throat, which was bleeding very much. He had only got his trousers and a very thin undervest on. They were saturated with blood. Witness believed he was sensible, but the lad did not attempt to speak. Witness stopped with him for another quarter of an hour, when P.C. Ashby came in. Dr. Gilbert arrived at about ten minutes later, and attended to him. He bandaged his throat, and accused was then removed to the Victoria Hospital. Prisoner did not speak during the whole time witness was there.

P.C. Ashby deposed that at bout 5.30 on the morning of the 17th February he was called to the Perseverance. He saw defendant there in charge of the last witness. He was lying on the floor of the bedroom. He had an extensive wound in the throat. On the floor there was a quantity of blood, and by the side a bloodstained razor. On the table close by he found the note (produced). Witness saw him that morning at the police station, and charged him with attempting to commit suicide by cutting his throat with a razor. He made no reply.

Frederick Ralph, landlord of the Perseverance Inn, Dover Street, said the prisoner was his eldest son and lived at home. He was a tailor by trade. He had always been very cheerful. Witness had not noticed that he had been depressed. The not produced was in his son's handwriting. In it the lad said that he was “longing to go to Ned”, and bade “goodbye to all”. It was signed “Leslie”.

Dr. J.R. Kemp said that defendant was brought by the police to the Victoria Hospital. He was suffering from a deep wound in the throat, which extended right across and had gone right through the larynx. He was in a very exhausted condition through loss of blood, and was unable to speak. He was put to bed, and the wound was sewn up. He remained under witness's treatment until that morning. The wound was a very dangerous one, and might have been inflicted by the razor, but a considerable amount of force would have been necessary. The result would be that he would have to wear a tube, and would only be able to whisper; he would not be able to articulate properly.

Prisoner, who did not make any statement, was committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions, to be held on the 22nd April, bail being allowed, his father becoming surety.

Folkestone Daily News 22 April 1908

Quarter Sessions

Wednesday, April 22nd: Before J. Lewis Coward Esq.

Leslie Ralph was charged with attempting to commit suicide. He pleaded Guilty.

Mr. Matthew prosecuted in this case, and said there was apparently no reason for committing the offence.

Edith Ralph, the mother of the prisoner, said her son had a written statement, but she was too broken-hearted to speak.

The statement set forth that the prisoner had suffered a great deal, and could not sleep.

Mr. Denne said the prisoner had been in his employ for about five years, and his conduct had been exemplary. He could offer no explanation, but when he was fit to work he should be pleased to take him again.

Mr. Kemp, in reply to the Recorder, said he was afraid the prisoner would always have to use a tube.

The father said he was willing to be bound over to see that his son was of good behaviour for one year. Both father and son were therefore bound over.

Folkestone Express 25 April 1908

Quarter Sessions

Wednesday, April 22nd: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Leslie Ralph, a tailor, was charged with unlawfully attempting to commit suicide by cutting himself with a razor, on 17th February. Prisoner, who looked much better than he did when he appeared before the Magistrates, pleaded Guilty.

Mr. Matthew, on behalf of the prosecution, said apparently, on the depositions at any rate, there was no explanation for the act of the prisoner. Prisoner had cut his throat with a razor, which had apparently robbed himself of the power of speech, as it was thought that he was not likely to speak again.

The Recorder: It seems to have been a very desperate attempt.

Mrs. Ralph, the mother of the prisoner, was called and asked why her son had made the attempt. She replied that she was too heartbroken to speak and that her son had two written statements for the Recorder.

Two statements were then handed to the Recorder, who read them. The first was written by the prisoner, in the course of which he said his sufferings at the time were beyond describing. He could get very little sleep, as he suffered greatly from constipation. He earnestly asked for forgiveness, as his father and mother were in great trouble. He had lost his leg, and he asked God to give him strength in his affliction, to gain prosperity. He publicly returned thanks to the Superintendent of the Police and the policemen who had been by his bed of suffering for so long, the doctor and nurses at the hospital, who had been so kind to him, and to the clergymen who had visited him. He also thanked his master, Mr. Denne, for his past kindness, and also Mr. Morgan, of 15, Dover Street, who kindly came to the assistance of his father and mother. He earnestly asked God forgiveness, and he again pleaded to him (the Recorder) for the greatest mercy. The second statement was from the father and mother, who appealed to the Recorder to be merciful to their afflicted son. They could not give the slightest idea why he had done it, because he was always so cheerful. In their heavy trials he tried to make home as happy as possible. His chief study was to try and prosper by his own industry. He never touched drink or smoked, never had an idle moment after his daily labour. He made his own clothes and those of his father and brother. He had suffered greatly from constipation. For the second time in two years their licensed house which they had occupied had been closed under the new Act. They had had fifteen children and had held a licence for sixteen years, as well as being ratepayers for twenty eight years.

Mr. Denne, a tailor, said the prisoner was an apprentice with him and had served five years. During that time he had had no cause to find fault with his behaviour. He had found him very cheerful, willing, and honest.

Mrs. Ralph informed the Recorder that her son lost his leg when he was nine years of age.

Mr. Denne said he did not know of any cause why Ralph should have done such a thing. He had never any cause to suspect he would do anything of the kind. The prisoner was not fit to work at the present, but when he was he would be pleased to have him back again.

The mother said, in reply to the Recorder, that one of the nurses told her her son would be able to do without the tube in his throat. His voice was also coming back.

Dr. Kemp said the wound was a very dangerous one, and it must have required great force. The razor cut clean through the larynx. The prisoner might recover his speech, but he thought he might always have to have the tube in his throat. He had heard from the burses that when in the hospital the prisoner expressed contrition for his act.

Mr. Denne, recalled, said at the time prisoner was earning 8/6 a week from him. He had advised him to look out for something better, where he might earn more money.

The lad's father expressed his willingness to be bound over as surety for his son's good behaviour. He further said he did not believe his son would do such a thing again.

The Recorder said the prisoner had pleaded Guilty to one of the worst attempts of suicide that had come before that Court. He did not believe he was in his right mind when he did it. It was a cruel and wicked thing to do. Had it not been for the appeals for mercy and his past good conduct he should have felt it his duty to send him to prison. He would take a merciful view of his conduct and he would be bound over to be of good behaviour for one year. His father would also be bound over on his behalf.

Folkestone Herald 25 April 1908

Quarter Sessions

Wednesday, April 22nd: Before J.C. Lewis Coward Esq.

Leslie Ralph was indicted for attempting to commit suicide by cutting his throat with a razor on the 17th February. He pleaded Guilty.

Mr. T. Matthew prosecuted on behalf of the Crown, and remarked that by his action the prisoner had, apparently, robbed himself of the power of speech, and it was a question whether he would ever be able to speak again.

Mrs. Edith Ralph, mother of the prisoner, was called, but said she was too broken-hearted to speak, and she put in a statement which she asked the Recorder to read. She also asked him to read one from her son.

Extracts from the letter were read by the Recorder, and in it the prisoner earnestly appealed for mercy, for at the time he committed the sin his sufferings were beyond description. He could not get much sleep at night. He earnestly asked for forgiveness. He knew that his father and mother were in great trouble owing to his having lost a leg, and he asked God to give him strength to gain the prosperity for which he had long been seeking. He wished publicly to thank Chief Constable Reeve, and the police who had watched by his bedside during the time he had been in the Victoria Hospital. Also he wished to thank the doctors, clergy, and those who had visited him, not forgetting his master, Mr. Denne, for the assistance he had given. He also wished to thank Mr. Morgan, of No. 15, Dover Street, who had kindly come to his assistance, and to that of his father and mother, who had tried so hard to pay their way and bring up the family in the right way. He also earnestly asked God's forgiveness, and again appealed to the Recorder for forgiveness.

In the second statement, the “broken-hearted father and mother” appealed for mercy. They could not give the slightest idea as to why the boy should have committed that act. He had always been so cheerful in the heaviest trials, trying to make the home happy. His chief study was to try and prosper by his own means. He had never drunk or smoked, nor did he ever have an idle moment, for in his spare time he was engaged in fretwork or music. He made his own clothes, and also tried to do his mother's and father's also. He could not understand why boys were ever dilatory or idle. The boy had suffered greatly from physical irregularity. They felt most keenly all the circumstances, and had to work hard in their old age to get an honest living. That was the second time in two years they were having to leave a licensed house in the congested area. The husband had been a licence holder in the town for 16 years, and had been a ratepayer for 28 years. He had had 15 in family, and never had one been a disgrace to the town in any way. The prisoner was just out of his apprenticeship, and his master, Mr. Denne, if in Court would speak on his behalf. They most humbly apologised for writing, but under all the circumstances they were too broken-hearted to speak.

Mr. W. Denne said that the lad had been apprenticed to him for five years, and in that time he had never had any cause to find any fault with him for his behaviour, and had always found him a very willing lad, of cheerful disposition, and honest. He could not explain what had caused him to attempt to take his own life, for he had always been very happy with witness. When he was well enough witness would be pleased to take him back.

Dr. J.R. Kemp, house surgeon at the Victoria Hospital, described the wound as a very dangerous one. It mus have required great force, for there were three glands cut. The lad might recover, but it was more likely that he would always have to wear a tube. He could ot say that for certain. Prisoner had expressed contrition for the offence to the nurses.

Mr. Denne, re-called, said that during his apprenticeship the boy had 8s. 6d. a week. He was getting on in life, and it was a question of bettering himself, and finding a better position. He had served his time, and witness had told him that he was worth more money, and as he was not in a position to give him more he advised him to seek a fresh place, although he did not wish to get rid of him until another opportunity presented itself. Prisoner was quite willing, and he was on the lookout for a situation.

The boy's father expressed his willingness to be bound over as a surety that he would be of good behaviour for a year. He had no idea as to what had led him to do that.

The Recorder: Now, Leslie Ralph, you have pleaded Guilty to one of the worst attempts of suicide that have ever come before the Court. I cannot believe you were in your right mind when you did it. It is a cruel and wicked thing to have done. If it had not been for the appeals made to me for mercy, I should have felt it my duty to have sent you to prison. It is one of the worst cases that have come before me. However, I will take a merciful view of your conduct, and will let you out. You will be bound over to be of good behaviour for one year If you misbehave in any way, and break the parole under which I put you, it will be a very serious matter if you come before me. This Court takes a very serious view of people who break parole when mercy is extended to them. You will be bound over to be of good behaviour for twelve months. Your father will have to be a surety also for your good behaviour.

Folkestone Daily News 2 February 1910

Wednesday, February 2nd: Before Messrs. Herbert, Stainer, Leggett, Swoffer, and Linton.

Edith Ralph was charged with attempting to commit suicide.

An assistant at Timothy White's Ltd. deposed to prisoner buying some spirits of salts, saying it was for cleaning closets. He pointed out to her that it was a poisonous substance. Ten minutes later she brought it back and said she wanted salts of lemon. He put it back in stock. She then told him she had taken some and fell down. With the assistance of a customer he administered an antidote of magnesia and chalk. There was no perceptible diminution of the quantity he sold her, but half a teaspoonful might have gone, which would not have produced fatal results. It would take half on ounce to kill anyone.

The justices consulted for some time and then dismissed the case, telling the accused that they knew she had had a lot of trouble, and advising her to go home to her husband.

(This poor woman was one of the first victims of the Licensing Act. She occupied a house in Tontine Street, which was closed, consequently their living was gone, and they have had a severe struggle. Not long since one of the sons attempted suicide and was bound over. It is certainly a case in which a little real philanthropy would not be thrown away. Ed.)

Folkestone Express 5 February 1910

Wednesday, February 2nd: Before Messrs. W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, and R.J. Linton, and Major Leggett.

Edith Ralph, a married woman, was charged with attempting to commit suicide.

Wm. Metcalf, managers to Messrs. Timothy White and Co., carrying on business as chemists at 71, Tontine Street, said prisoner came into the shop at about twenty minutes past three the previous afternoon. She asked for twopennyworth of salts of lemon, saying she wanted it for cleaning closets. Witness told her that salts of lemon was not the thing to clean closets with. Prisoner said it was a liquid, and she wanted either salts of lemon or spirits of salts. She satisfied him that it was for a legitimate use, and he served her with twopennyworth of spirits of salts in the eight ounce bottle produced. The bottle was filled, and after paying threepence she left the shop, after he had ascertained that she knew it was a poisonous substance. Within ten minutes prisoner returned. She handed the bottle back, and said it was not the stuff she wanted. She said it must be salts of lemon. Witness took the bottle away, the contents of which were not appreciably diminished. He put the contents into the bottle which he had previously taken it from, and he went back to call the woman to him. Prisoner walked the length of the shop, and then said “To tell you the truth, I have taken some of that”. Just as she said those words, witness caught her in the act of falling. He obtained the assistance of a customer, and they sat her down on a chair, and witness administered an antidote as quickly as possible. She did not vomit, and subsequently she recovered. A teaspoonful might have been taken out of the bottle. Assuming she had taken that amount it would make her ill. It would not prove fatal. An ounce would prove fatal. The prisoner had taken about half a drachm.

The Chairman, after a consultation with the Clerk, said they did not know whether prisoner really intended to take her life, but they hoped she did not. They knew she had had a great deal of trouble. He advised her to go home and be a sensible woman and not do such a foolish thing again. She was discharged.

Folkestone Herald 5 February 1910

Wednesday, February 2nd: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Major Leggett, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, J. Stainer, and R.J. Linton.

Edith Ralph was charged with attempting to commit suicide the previous day.

Wm. Metcalf, an assistant in the employ of Messrs. Timothy White and Co., of 71, Tontine Street, stated that the accused came to the shop at about 3.30 the previous day and asked for some salts of lemon – about 2d. worth. As it was a poisonous substance, he asked her what she wanted it for, and she replied that her husband wanted it for cleaning purposes. He told her that salts of lemon was not the thing to use for the purpose, and she then said it was some liquid she wanted – either salts of lemon or spirits of salts. She satisfied him that it was for a legitimate purpose, and he served her with twopennyworth of spirits of salts. She left the shop then, after he had ascertained that she knew it was a poisonous substance. She returned to the shop within ten minutes, and handed the bottle back, saying it was not the stuff she wanted. She said it must be salts of lemon. He then took the bottle away. The contents were not appreciably diminished in any way. He put the contents back in stock. He went back and called the woman to him. Before he could question her further she started to walk the length of the shop and said “To tell you the truth, I have taken some of that”. Just as she said those words he caught her in the act of falling. He obtained assistance from a customer present in the shop, and they sat her down in a chair. He administered an antidote as quickly as possible. He gave her magnesia and chalk. In about five or ten minutes she seemed to recover. She did not vomit, but a small quantity of the antidote came back into her mouth. She probably took about half a teaspoonful, which would make her feel ill. He scarcely thought that that amount would prove fatal. She probably took a quantity weighing half a drachm. An ounce might prove fatal.

The Chairman said prisoner had done a very foolish thing. Whether she had intended to take her life or not they did not know. They hoped she did not. The Bench knew she had had a good deal of trouble to try her. He asked her to go home and be a sensible woman, and not try any of those foolish actions again. She would be discharged.

Prisoner: Thank you. My trouble has overcome me.

Accused was then discharged.

Folkestone Herald 4 September 1920

Obituary

We regret to announce the death of Mrs. Edith Ralph, aged 62 years, which took place after a long illness, on August 28th, at the residence of her daughter, 1, London Street, Folkestone. Deceased will be remembered as being the licensee of the old Duke of Edinburgh Inn, in Tontine Street, before the licence of the house expired. The funeral took place on Wednesday.

Folkestone Express 20 May 1933

Obituary

We record, with deep regret, the death of Mr. Frederick Ralph, of Beaulieu, Bouverie Road West, Folkestone, who passed away suddenly at Manor Court Nursing Home on Saturday last, in his 80th year.

Mr. Ralph had been in bad health for a long time; indeed, he had not been able to leave his house for more than eight months, yet maintained his accustomed keen interest in affairs.

Mr. Ralph was born in 1854 opposite old Newgate Prison (now demolished), and he could remember the tolling of the Great Bell of St. Paul's when the Prince Consort died in 1861, and, as a boy, witnessed the last public execution which took place at Newgate in 1868 or 1869. After occupying various posts in London (he was for a few months in the Temple), he migrated to Hastings, where he met and married his wife, who predeceased him by exactly five years. At Hastings he became a member of the Royal Naval Volunteers, and in carrying out his duties as manager to Messrs. Norton and Townsend he personally supervised, when a heavy sea was running, the loading of the wines on board Lord Brassey's yacht “The Sunbeam”. From Hastings Mr. Ralph went to Maidstone, where he became proprietor of the Queen's Head Hotel. Here he organised the first regatta to be held on the Medway.

Leaving Maidstone, Mr. Ralph came to Folkestone over 50 years ago, and bought the Rose Hotel (now no more) in Rendezvous Street. The hotel was, in those days, the recognised rendezvous of the principal citizens; the large hotels further west were not built. As time went on his business interests in Folkestone developed steadily. He was closely associated with the formation of the Pleasure Gardens Theatre Company, and, at his death, he was the senior member of the Board. He was always happy to remember that the late Lord Radnor personally invited him to join the Directorate. He took the greatest interest in theatrical affairs and knew many stage celebrities. For a short time Mr. Ralph was connected with the Victoria Pier. For many years he was Chairman of the Queen's Hotel, resigning this position only recently owing to failing health. He formed the Folkestone Billposting Company, which developed branches at Dover and Hastings, this business being afterwards amalgamated with Messrs. Partington, Kent, Limited, of which company he was Chairman at the time of his death. He was also Chairman of the Burlington, and for some years was Chairman of the Grand, afterwards remaining as Director.

About 30 years ago, Mr. Ralph formed the Leas Pavilion Company and took a continuously active interest in this business to the last. He was for some years on the Board of the Folkestone Gas Company, and likewise held Directorships in Messrs. D. Baker and Co Ltd., and the Silver Spring Mineral Water Company.

Mr. Ralph was always keenly interested in sport, and in his younger days was a natural athlete, being, in particular, a lightweight boxer of considerable merit, while many will also recall his great skill as a billiards player.

As a businessman Mr. Ralph had foresight and courage. He took endless pains to make anything he was connected with a success, and was outstanding for his high standard of commercial probity. It would not be too much to say that he was far more concerned with other people's interests, if he felt responsible for them, than he was even for his own. However, his judgement was rarely at fault, and his business ventures were almost uniformly successful.

He was a man of very considerable personality, one with a finely developed sense of humour, and he had an amazing collection of anecdotes, with great powers as a mimic.

His greatest virtues were his sense of justice and his generosity. Throughout his long life he performed kindnesses both small and great, and it is no more than his due to say his passing will be widely regretted. He felt the death of his wife very keenly, and during the last few years he was sorely tried by his inability to lead as active a life as formerly. Nevertheless, his interest in affairs remained unimpaired to the last.

He leaves a son and daughter, Mr. F.H.M. Ralph and Miss Violet Ralph, to mourn their loss.

The funeral took place on Wednesday at the Cheriton Road Cemetery.

 

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