DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, September, 2022.

Page Updated:- Tuesday, 13 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1734

Dolphin

Latest 1870

Kingsbridge Street

Folkestone

 

Kentish Gazette 11 January 1842.

On Wednesday night last, a French fisherman by the name of Bull Norma. Going to his vessel fell from the harbour and broke his arm and jaw-bone, and received other serious bruises; he now lies at the Dolphin in a very bad state, but through the attention of Mr. Eastes, surgeon, it is hoped he will soon recover; he is an industrious man with a large family, and well-known on this coast. It is a great pity that the authorities of Folkestone Harbour do not lay down more ladders so that people might go on board their vessels with greater safety; there are but two accommodation ladders in the harbour, and they very much out of repair.

 

Southeastern Gazette 18 March 1856.

Local News.

Saturday: Before J. Kelcey and Wm. Major, Esq.

Thomas Dunn, landlord of the Dolphin Inn, was charged by Superintendent Steer with refusing to admit the police between 12 and 1 on Sunday morning last.—Fined 2s. 6d. and costs.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 13 September 1856.

Monday September 8th: - Special sessions were holden for the purpose of renewing licences, and granting new ones. Present, the Mayor, and G. Kennicott, S. Godden, W. Major, J. Kelcey, W. Bateman, S. Mackie, and J. Kinsford esqs.

The licences of 45 houses were renewed. The landlord of the Dolphin Inn not attending the licence was deferred.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 12 March 1864.

SHEEP STEALING

Wednesday March 9th: Before William Bateman, A.M. Leith and James Tolputt Esqs, and Captain Kennicott R.N.

John Down and William Baxter were brought up in custody, charged with stealing one sheep, the property of John Kingsnorth Esq., of Ingles Farm, Folkestone, on the 6th instant.

William Dunn, sworn, deposed he was bailiff to Mr. Kingsnorth at Ingles. On Saturday night last there were three hundred and thirty seven sheep in a field called Marvels, on the right hand side of the road from Folkestone to Sandgate, in Folkestone. A little before seven on Sunday morning witness's attention was called to the field. He found the entrails of a wether teg sheep near the hurdles, and near the plain house. He found the head of a sheep which had his master's ear marks on it. Knew from the marks on the ears, and a particular mark on the ears of this head, that the sheep belonged to his master, and that it was in the field the night before; knew there was a sheep missing from this field.

The prisoner Down had worked for Mr. Kingsnorth at harvest time for several years; the prisoner Baxter has been in the habit of coming to Mr. Kingsnorth's house. The carcass of the sheep now produced by Mr. Superintendent English is the carcass of the sheep found in Mr. Kingsnorth's field on Sunday morning; could swear that this is the carcass of the sheep lost.

William Martin, sworn, deposed he was Superintendent of police for this borough. Last evening, about 3 p.m., witness was in the Lower Sandgate Road in the company of Mr. English. They met the prisoner, Baxter, close to the gas house, carrying a basket. Witness stopped him and asked what he had in the basket; prisoner said he had some mutton; witness examined the basket and found it contained a leg of mutton and part of the skirt, and a few cabbages. Witness asked where he got the mutton from, and the prisoner said a man named Down gave it to him. Witness detained him, and Mr. English went up the Sandgate Road, and oresently came back with the prisoner Down. In his presence witness said to Baxter “You say this man gave you this mutton?”; Baxter said “Yes”; and Down said “Yes, I gave it to him for the cats”; they were taken to the station; the mutton is fresh and fit to eat.

Mr. George English, sworn, deposed he was Superintendent of the K.C.C. On Monday, the 7th inst., received information a sheep had been stolen from Ingles Farm, and accompanied Mr. Martin making enquiries respecting it. On Tuesday the 8th they watched Down, as they suspected him from going in the Sandgate Road towards Sandgate. When some distance on the road they saw Down go on to the beach, and in a short time he returned on to the path, running along by the beach to the prisoner Baxter. Down put something into Baxter's basket, and Baxter came out on to the road and walked some distance in front of the prisoner Down. Witness returned to Mr. Martin, at the lower end of the Leas, and went down the slopeway to the Lower Sandgate Road. Superintendent Martin apprehended Baxter and witness proceeded up the road in search of Down. When he found him he asked if his name was Down, and he said “Yes”. Witness then asked him where he slept on Friday night last; he replied “At Hythe”; witness then asked him where he slept on Saturday night and he said “On the beach, just over here”, Witness then told him he should apprehend him on suspicion of having stolen a sheep from Mr. Kingsnorth on Saturday night last; prisoner said “I know nothing about it”. Witness then took him back to Mr. Martin, who was waiting with Baxter. Witness corroborated Mr. Martin as to the conversation; he added that he picked it up on the beach, and gave it to Baxter. Witness then searched Down, and found a clasp knife in his possession, and a piece of rag. Witness said “Here's mutton fat on the knife”; Down said “No. That's bacon fat, I saw no mutton fat”. There was some blood on the piece of rag. The prisoners were then taken to the Folkestone station and locked up. Witness, with Superintendent Martin and Inspector Smith of the K.C.C., went to the place on the beach where they had previously seen the prisoner Down. They searched the beach, and witness saw Inspector Smith take out of the beach the slop frock produced, and part of the chine of a sheep, now produced, which was covered up with pebbles. This morning a further search was made in the cliffs and they found two fore-quarters of a sheep. This was found on the cliff in the furze just on this side of the turnpike gate, about halfway up the cliff. Witness produced the two fore-quarters identified by Mr. Dunn.

The magistrates ultimately discharged the prisoner Baxter, and remanded the prisoner Down till Saturday (this morning) at 11 a.m.

Mr. Martin stated he could prove where Baxter slept on Saturday night, and he did not intend to produce any further evidence against him.

Note: Baxter was a lodger at the Dolphin Inn.

 

Folkestone Observer 12 March 1864.

SHEEP STEALING

Wednesday March 9th:- Before W. Bateman, A.M. Leith, James Kelcey, James Tolputt Esqs., and Captain Kennicott R.N.

John Down, 43, labourer, and William Baxter, 45, labourer, were charged with stealing a sheep, the property of Mr. John Kingsnorth, on Saturday the 5th instant.

William Dunn, bailiff to Mr. Kingsnorth, deposed – There were 337 sheep in a field called Marvels on Saturday the 5th instant. On the day following my attention was drawn to them a little before seven o'clock. I found in the field by the hurdles the entrails of a sheep, and further on, by the Plain houses, the head, which had Mr. Kinsnorth's ear-marks, and I knew it by the marks to be the head of a sheep that was missing. The prisoner Downs has worked for Mr. Kingsnorth occasionally, and I know the prisoner Baxter from his selling ashes and my having paid him money occasionally. The skin produced is that of the sheep which was in the field on Saturday.

On the prisoners being asked if they had any question to ask this witness Downs replied “I found it on the beach yesterday, and that is all I know about it”.

Superintendent Martin was next sworn, and said: I am superintendent of the borough police. Yesterday, about 3 o'clock, I was in company with Superintendent Englis, Kent County Constabulary, in the Lower Sandgate Road, and met the prisoner Baxter close by the gas house, carrying the basket produced. I stopped him and asked what he had there; he told me “Some mutton”. I examined the basket and found it to contain a leg of mutton, a piece of the skirt, and a few cabbages. I asked him where he had got it from and he said a man named Downs had given it to him. I detained him and Superintendent English went up the Sandgate Road and presently returned with the prisoner Downs. In the presence of Downs I said to Baxter “You say this man gave you this mutton?”. His reply was “Yes”. Downs then said “Yes, I gave it to him for the cats”. The mutton was good – too good for cats.

The prisoner Baxter observed “It is all right what Mr. Martin has said”.

George English said: I am Superintendent of the K.C.C. On Monday the 7th instant I received information that a sheep had been stolen from the premises of Mr. Kingsnorth. I accompanied Superintendent Martin making enquiries respecting the missing sheep. On Tuesday the 8th instant, from enquiries made, we suspected the prisoner Downs and we watched him go along the Lower Sandgate Road, from Folkestone to Sandgate. When he got some distance on the road, he turned off the road, and I watched him go down on the beach. I was then on The Leas. He shortly after returned to the prisoner Baxter, who was on the footway, and put something into his basket. I could not see what at a distance. Baxter then came back into the road, and walked some distance in front of Downs. I returned to Superintendent Martin, who was at the corner of The Leas, and we went down the slope towards the road. When Superintendent Martin arrested Baxter I proceeded up the road in search of Downs, and met him a short distance up. I said “Is your name Downs?”. He said “Yes”. I said “Where did you sleep on Friday night last?”. He said “At Hythe”. I said “Where did you sleep on Saturday?”. He said “On the beach, just over there”. I then told him I should apprehend him on suspicion of stealing a sheep, the property of Mr. Kingsnorth on Saturday. He said “I don't know anything about it”. I took him back to where Superintendent Martin was with the prisoner Baxter, and Superintendent Martin said to Downs “This man said you gave him this mutton”. He at first denied knowing anything about it, and then said that he had picked it up on the beach. I searched the prisoner Downs, and found on him the clasp knife now produced, and a piece of rag. I said to him “Hello! There is mutton fat on it” (the knife). He said “No. That is bacon fat”. I replied that it was not bacon, but mutton fat. The rag had blood on it. I then conveyed both prisoners to the police station at Folkestone, and locked them up. I afterwards, in company with Superintendent Martin and Inspector Smith, made a search on the beach where I had seen the prisoner Downs previously. I saw Inspector Smith find the slop produced and part of a chine of mutton under some pebbles, buried about five inches deep. We afterwards found on the cliff the two fore-quarters produced. It was in the furze this side of the turnpike gate. The two fore-quarters produced are the same, and have been identified by the first witness.

Superintendent Martin applied for a remand, and stated that he had no intention of producing any further evidence against the prisoner Baxter, who, from enquiries made, he had ascertained to be asleep in bed, and not out of his house at the time the sheep was stolen, and in case of his discharge he would call him as witness against the prisoner Downs.

The bench decided on discharging the prisoner Baxter, and remanded Downs for further examination till Saturday (today).

Note: Baxter was a lodger at the Dolphin Inn.

 

Folkestone Observer 19 March 1864.

SHEEP STEALING

Saturday March 12th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N., A.M. Leith and James Tolputt Esqs.

John Down was brought up on remand, charged with stealing a sheep, the property of John Kingsnorth Esq.

Mr. Minter appeared for the prosecutor, and Mr. Wilks for the prisoner.

The depositions of Mr. Dunn, bailiff to Mr. Kingsnorth, and of Mr. Martin, superintendent of the borough police, having been read over (reported in last week's Observer), Mr. Wilks cross-examined Superintendent Martin, who said he first received information of the robbery on Sunday morning. There had been a reward offered of twenty guineas. He had been into one house in that neighbourhood to search. He had looked over several fields. He had searched no out-houses. He first saw Baxter in the churchyard on Tuesday last, a little after two o'clock. Baxter said to him “I have some information to give”. Witness passed on, and Baxter spoke to Superintendent English. He watched Baxter from the churchyard down the Lower Sandgate Road, and along that road, and then saw Down in advance of Baxter. Witness was on the cliff by the churchyard, and Baxter and Down were on the Lower Sandgate Road. Down was walking along towards Sandgate toll gate and Baxter followed Down. Witness kept them in sight until they got to a garden in the occupation of a person named Vye, where he lost sight of them. In a very few minutes afterwards he saw Baxter come in advance of Down in the direction of Folkestone. Witness was present when the two fore-quarters of mutton were found. Witness did not know what Baxter had in his basket when he stopped him at the gas house.

George English, Superintendent K.C.C., received information on Monday the 7th instant of a sheep having been stolen from Ingles Farm, and he accompanied Superintendent Martin making enquiries respecting the sheep. On Tuesday he watched the prisoner Down going along the Lower Sandgate Road towards Sandgate, and from The Leas he saw Down go on to the beach, and in a short time he returned on to the path running along by the beach into a garden to Baxter. Down put something into Baxter's basket, and Baxter came out into the road, and walked toward Folkestone. Down followed him at a little distance. Witness went down the slope from the Leas with Superintendent Martin on to the Lower Sandgate Road. Superintendent Martin apprehended Baxter, and witness proceeded up the road in search of Down. On meeting him, he said to him “Is your name Down?”. He said “Yes”. Witness then said “Where did you sleep on Friday night last?”. He said “At Hythe”. Witness asked “Where did you sleep on Saturday night last?”. He replied “On the beach, just over there”. Witness then told him he should apprehend him on suspicion of having stolen a sheep from Mr. Kingsnorth's on Saturday night. He said “I don't know anything about it”. Witness then took him back to Superintendent Martin, who was waiting at the corner with Baxter. Mr. Martin said to Down “Baxter says you gave him this mutton”. At first Down said “I don't know anything about it” , and afterwards he said “I picked it up upon the beach, and gave it to Baxter”. Witness then searched Down and found a clasp knife in his possession, and a piece of rag, and he shouted “Hello! There is a piece of mutton fat on this knife”. Down said “No. That's bacon fat”. Witness said “No. It's mutton fat. The knife had som mutton fat on it”. There was some blood on the piece of rag. Witness took Down and Baxter to the Folkestone police station, and afterwards he accompanied Mr. Martin and Inspector Smith to the place on the beach where he had previously seen the prisoner Down, who had walked some distance on the beach to a groyne, where some boards were placed to stop the beach, and there he stooped, and took something from the beach. In company with Inspector Smith witness went to the same place on the beach on the same day. He saw Inspector Smith take out from the beach, about six inches under it, the slop produced, and a back of mutton wrapped in the slop. On the following morning witness accompanied Mr. Martin, Inspector Smith, and the witness Dunn, in further search of the mutton. From the furze bushes a little past the toll-gate on the Lower Sandgate Road, about half way up the cliff, he saw Inspector Smith take up two fore-quarters of mutton, and witness took up the piece of loose sheep's skin from the same place. The witness Dunn gave witness the sheep's head produced. He had seen Inspector Smith compare the leg of mutton found in Baxter's basket, the back bone found in the slop on the beach, the fore-quarters found on the cliff, the head picked up by the witness Dunn, and the foot, and they exactly corresponded, and were parts of one sheep.

Cross-examined by Mr. Wilks: He first saw Baxter in reference to this case in the churchyard, when with Superintendent Martin, a little after two o'clock on Tuesday. Witness could not recollect whether he spoke to Baxter first, or Baxter to him. He believed Baxter said something about going somewhere with a basket. He said Down had offered to give him a pot or two of beer to walk up the road with a basket. Witness said “Yes, well”. He understood from Baxter that he was going to fetch some part of a sheep for Down. It was under his directions that Baxter went up the Lower Sandgate Road. Baxter had no basket in the churchyard. He did not tell Baxter to get the basket. He told him if Down wanted to give him anything, to take it from him.

Inspector J.E. Smith confirmed the evidence of Superintendent English as to the finding portions of the sheep and added that close to where he found the mutton on the cliff there was a very plain footmark. He counted the number of nails in the heel of the footprint, and found four nails in the first row, two in the second, and one at the back. There were five rows of nails running up the boots – two on the outside running from the heel to the toe speck, and the other three running right up the sole to the toe. He saw a similar footmark near where the slop was found. There were the same number of rows of nails in the boots worn by the prisoner as there were in the footmarks on the cliff.

Cross-examined: He only saw that one footprint distinctly. He did not notice whether it was a right or left leg boot. There were tips on the toe and heel. He would not like to swear to the heel tip.

P.C. Swain deposed to knowing the prisoner for years, and to searching him in the "Radnor Inn" about a month ago, when he had on the slop frock now produced. The slop had a place under the right arm which he thought was a pocket. It was a place unsewn. The slop produced had that unsewn place. It had also two holes in the back. He saw his corduroy jacket plainly through those two holes when he searched him.

Cross examined: It was a common sort of a jacket in this part of the country. He was about two minutes with the prisoner at the time he searched him.

P.C. Ovenden saw the prisoner about the latter part of January or beginning of February with the slop on now produced. Identified it by the two holes in the back. He noticed him at the time because of a robbery that had taken place.

William Baxter, living at the "Dolphin Inn," in Kingsbridge Street, said that on Tuesday the 6th instant prisoner was in the Dolphin Inn nearly all day. Prisoner asked him if he wanted a walk. Witness asked “Where to?”. He said “Along as far as Mr. Vye's, and take a basket with you”. Witness said “What for?”. He said “To get some cabbage leaves for the rabbits”. Witness said he didn't mind about going. He went with a basket. Down went away before he did. When he got to the garden he went in, and looked around for Down, but he saw no person there, but he saw Down coming off the beach towards Sandgate, and he came up into the garden where witness was. Down took the basket, and opened it, and placed a bit of meat in it and said “If anyone asks what it is for, tell them it's for the cats. But it will make a very good fry, won't it?”. Witness said “I dare say it might”. He then pulled some leaves off, and put on the top of it, and told witness to go ahead. Witness came out of the garden, and prisoner came across after him, and shut the gate. Witness came steadily on the road and presently Mr. Martin put his hand on witness's shoulder. He found himself at last in the police cell with the prisoner Down, who said to him “Don't you fret; you won't get into much trouble”. Witness replied “I don't know that. Have you got any more left besides what Mr. Martin took from me?”. He said “There was a piece wrapped up in my slop close to the second jetty from Mr. Vye's garden. That isn't much; it is only the bones of the loin. Nobody can't find that”. Witness said “Where's the skin then? Have you buried it?”. He replied “No. That's in among the gorse over on the cliff”. Witness saw Down at Vye's on the Sunday and Monday previous to the Tuesday.

Cross-examined: It was half past one or two o'clock when Down asked him to get some cabbage leaves. He didn't know he was to fetch anything but cabbage leaves. It was at the garden he first knew of anything else, when the prisoner put the mutton into the basket. He saw Superintendent English after he had seen the prisoner at the public house and before he went to the garden. He told Superintendent English in the churchyard that he was going to fetch something, but he didn't know what it was, but he might have had some suspicion. He might have told Superintendent English it was part of a sheep he was going for. He told the Superintendent he had some suspicion. He said “Go on, and fetch whatever it is”. The Superintendents, English and Martin, said he should be all right enough. He was not surprised at being apprehended afterwards. Part of the arrangement between him and the Superintendent was that he was to be apprehended. The prisoner and he were shut up together. The Superintendents did not tell him to question the prisoner Down about the sheep. He dropped in with the Superintendents promiscuously in the churchyard. He never heard of the reward at that meeting. He had seen the bills offering a reward previous to that.

Re-examined by Mr. Minter: The first time he heard of being apprehended was when he was apprehended. He went through the churchyard on an errand for another person.

Thomas Morford, Sergeant at Mace, was formerly a butcher. He had compared the leg, backbone, two fore-quarters and head of a sheep. The fat on the skin would have been left on the leg if a butcher had killed the sheep.

This being the case against the prisoner, he reserved his defence, and the magistrates committed him for trial at the next borough Quarter Sessions.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 9 April 1864.

Quarter Sessions. Sheep Stealing.

Tuesday April 5th:- Before J.J. Lonsdale.

The Grand jury retired, and soon afterwards returned with a true bill against John Down, for felony.

The prisoner John Down, being placed in the dock, pleaded Not Guilty to an indictment for stealing on the 5th March last one sheep, the property of Mr. John Kingsnorth, of Ingles Farm, near Folkestone.

Mr. Minter appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. Lewis, of Dover, defended the prisoner.

William Dunn, examined by Mr. Minter, being sworn, deposed he was bailiff to Mr. John Kingsnorth, Ingles Farm, Folkestone. Remembered Saturday, the 5th March. On that evening there were 337 sheep in the fold, in a field called 2the Marvels”, near the Sandgate Road. Sunday morning, near the fold, found the entrails, a quantity of blood, and a little distance off, the head and other parts of a sheep, which he recognised as being that of one of the sheep which were in the fold the night before. Knew it by a mark under the ear, being the mark of Westenhanger Farm. On Monday morning counted the sheep, and found only 336.

Cross examined by Mr. Lewis – Have known prisoner a long time. Never heard anything against his character.

William Martin, sworn, deposed he was Superintendent of police for the borough of Folkestone. On Tuesday, 8th March, from information received, went down to the harbour, near the Paris Hotel; whilst there saw a man named Baxter in The Lower Sandgate Road. He had a basket with him, on searching which he found a leg of mutton, part of a skirt, and a few cabbages. Superintendent English and the prisoner Down came up while we were together. Baxter, on being asked where he had got the mutton, said Down had given it to him. The prisoner Down, hesitating a few moments, said he had picked it up on the beach and gave it to Baxter for the cats. Baxter was then in my custody. Witness identified a knife produced as being the one he saw Superintendent English take from the prisoner Down; it had some mutton fat on it, which prisoner said was bacon fat. Went next day with Superintendent English and Inspector Smith to the cliff near the toll gate in the Lower Sandgate Road, and in the gorse found two fore-quarters, part of the skin, and a foot of a sheep. The whole of the parts of the sheep produced have been in my custody ever since. Have compared the other parts with the leg found in Baxter's basket and have no doubt they formed part of the same carcass.

Cross-examined by Mr. Lewis – I got the loin of mutton from Inspector Smith on the 8th; it was wrapped in a slop. Did not have that slop when I went with Superintendent English when I went to the house of the prisoner's father. Saw Baxter in the churchyard on Monday morning. He said he had some information to give me. I left Baxter with Superintendent English, my attention being called to another person whom I wished to speak to on the subject of the robbery. I afterwards saw Baxter near the Paris Hotel. Did not tell Baxter he would be discharged, and promise him any reward. Never had any conversation with him before. Have known prisoner 6 or 7 years. Believe he has been employed on the beach lately pile-driving at the groynes.

Mr. George English, examined by Mr. Minter deposed that on the day named he was on the cliff overlooking the Lower Sandgate Road, and saw Down and Baxter going towards Sandgate. Down was some distance ahead of Baxter; knew Mr. Vye's garden; Down went through it on to the beach towards a jetty, stooped down and moved some of the beach with his hand; saw him take something up and put it under his smock; he then returned to the garden where Baxter was, and saw him put something into the basket. He then pulled some cabbage leaves and put them into the basket. Baxter then went towards Folkestone and the prisoner followed him. Witness also went towards the bottom of the Leas, and down the sloperaod to the Lower Sandgate Road; he kept the prisoner in sight all the way. When witness got to the bottom of the road he turned right towards Sandgate, and met Baxter, whom he passed, and then met the prisoner, stopped him, and asked if his name was Down. He said “Yes”, and after some further question witness told him he should apprehend him on suspicion of stealing a sheep belonging to Mr. Kingsnorth. Witness took him into custody, and he said he knew nothing about it. He then went towards where Mr. Martin was, who had Baxter in custody. Mr. Martin said “This man, Baxter, says you, Down, gave him this mutton”. Prisoner said “I know nothing about it”. Afterwards he said “I gave it to him for the cat”; some further conversation took place between them, when witness searched him, and found a knife on him with mutton fat on the blade. Witness, with Inspector Smith, then searched the beach and near where he saw the prisoner found the slop produced – afterwards identified by two witnesses as the prisoner's – in the beach with a joint of mutton in it. Next day made a further search and found the remainder of the carcass produced, in the cliff opposite the place where the slop was found.

Mr. Lewis cross-examined this witness at great length, but without shaking his testimony.

Inspector Smith of the K.C.C. deposed to going with the last witness to the Lower Sandgate Road and finding the remainder of the carcass.

Ingram Swain and Charles Ovenden, police constables, identified the slop as one worn on several occasions by the prisoner about the town.

Thomas Morford, town sergeant, deposed he was formerly a butcher; had fitted the different parts of the sheep produced, and they fitted exactly.

William Baxter, examined by Mr. Minter, deposed he was a labourer; knew the prisoner Down for some time; remembered the 5th March; saw the prisoner that day at the Dolphin Inn; asked witness if he could take a walk to Mr. Vye's garden to get some leaves for the rabbits. Down then left the house and witness went to the garden where he found no-one; prisoner soon after came up from the beach and took a piece of mutton from under his smock and put it into the basket; had told him if anyone asked where he got it he was to say it was for the cat, but it would make a very good fry; prisoner then pulled some cabbage leaves and put them on the top and told him to go ahead. Witness went slowly along the road till he met Supt. Martin, who took witness into custody and locked him up. Witness was put in the same cell with the prisoner and said to him “You have got into a little bit of trouble”; prisoner replied he had no cause to fear. Witness asked him if there was any more about, and he said the bones of the loin were in his slop in the beach and the skin was among the gorse.

Mr. Lewis severely cross-examined the witness but failed in eliciting from him that any reward had been promised him or that he had received anything from the police.

Re-examined by Mr. Minter – Had his suspicion excited and communicated with the police.

Mr. Lewis then made a forcible appeal to the jury on behalf of the prisoner, denouncing the means used to entrap his client by the police, and ended by asking them if they had any doubt, to give the prisoner the benefit of it.

The Recorder then went through the evidence very carefully, and the jury retired to consider their verdict; they were absent three hours, and returned into court whilst the next case was going on, a new jury having been empanelled to try it; they returned a verdict of Guilty, and the Recorder said he entirely concurred with the verdict. He therefore sentenced the prisoner to 3 years' penal servitude. He left the dock with a smile on his face.

 

Folkestone Observer 9 April 1864.

Quarter Sessions. Sheep Stealing.

Tuesday April 5th:- Before J.J. Lonsdale.

John Down, 43, labourer, was charged with stealing a sheep, the property of John Kingsnorth, on the 5th of March last. He pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr. Minter appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. Lewis, of Dover, for the prisoner.

Mr. Minter stated the case to the jury, and then called the following evidence.

William Dunn, bailiff at Mr. Kingsnorth's said: On Saturday the 5th of March there were 337 sheep in the fold. On Sunday morning, the 6th, I went to the field and found the entrails of a sheep. About four feet from the fold there was a quantity of blood, where a sheep had been stuck. About 20 rods off I found the head and heart and a part of the lungs of a sheep. The head which I found had two ear marks. There were no such peculiar marks on any sheep as that sheep. I had seen this sheep in the field about 5 o'clock on Saturday evening. I counted the sheep on Monday and found 336.

William Martin, superintendent of the borough police, said that having received some information, he went on Tuesday, the 8th of March, near to the Paris Hotel, and whilst there saw Baxter. He spoke to Baxter, and found a leg of mutton and a bit of skirt of mutton with a few cabbage leaves in his basket. Superintendent English and the prisoner then came up, and witness asked Baxter in the presence of Down where he got the mutton, to which he replied that he had it from Down. The prisoner hesitated for a second or two, and then said he picked it up on the beach and gave it to Baxter for the cats. At that time he had Baxter in custody. He saw Mr. English take a knife from Down, and observed mutton fat upon it. He afterwards went with Inspector Smith to the beach and found the backbone wrapped up in a slop. The next day they found among the gorse on the cliff near the turnpike, a foot and part of the carcass of the sheep, and two fore-quarters with a portion of the skin on them.

Cross-examined – Did not lead Baxter to think he would receive any reward for giving information.

William Baxter, living at the Dolphin said prisoner asked him to step along to Mr. Vye's garden for some cabbage leaves. He had some suspicion, and communicated with the police. When in the cell prisoner told him where the remainder of the sheep was.

Mr. Lewis addressed the jury for the prisoner, and the jury found him guilty. The Recorder then sentenced him to three years' penal servitude.

 

Folkestone Observer 28 September 1866.

John Vye, 17 or 18 years of age, employed in the Company's workshop, was found this afternoon hanging in the forecastle of the Lord Warden steamboat, on the slip for repairs. The suicide was committed during the dinner hour. We hear he has left a paper stating that he did the deed because permission was refused him to attend the races. There will be an inquest probably tomorrow.

Note: Vye was the son of the landlord of the Dolphin.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 29 September 1866.

Shocking Occurrence.

Yesterday afternoon a lad named Vye, aged 18, in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, committed suicide by hanging himself, under the following singular and painful circumstances, whilst in a fit of desponding temper, because his father and mother refused him their sanction to leave his work and go to the races. At one o'clock he signed his name to the pay sheet with the other men, and took his money in the usual way, nothing peculiar being observable about him. At ten minutes past two, only a few minutes after the men were re-admitted to the yard to their work, he was observed by one of them suspended by his neck-tie to a hook in the ceiling of the forecastle of the Lord Warden steamer, undergoing repair alongside the jetty by the workshops. He was immediately taken down, and a surgeon being sent for, a vein was opened in his neck, but life was found to be quite extinct. After his dinner he left home in a passion, saying it would be a long time before they saw him again. A leaf hastily torn from a memorandum book was found in the cabin, on which was roughly scrawled a few words stating his intention to hang himself, and that it was all his mother's fault; “he hoped God would pardon him all his wicked things, and that He should have him in Heaven with Him today”. An inquest will be held on the body this morning.

Note: Vye was the son of the landlord of the Dolphin.

 

Folkestone Observer 5 October 1866.

Coroner's Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Packet Boat inn on Saturday, by John Minter Esq., coroner, on the body of George Thomas Vye, who had hung himself in the Lord Warden steamboat, lying on the slip under repair. The jury, having inspected the body and place at which it was found, returned to the inn and heard the following evidence.

William L. Earnshaw, superintendent of the Company's workshops, identified the body as that of George Thomas Vye, who was a shipwright apprentice in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company. He had been in their employment about three years and a half. Saw him yesterday about ten minutes past one in witness's office in the shop. He was there to receive his weekly pay. Mr. Lyall paid him the money, 7s 6d, and witness took his signature. He then left. He had come to work again in the afternoon at two o'clock. If he had wanted a holiday he should have asked witness. He did not ask. About five minutes past two, saw two of the men running from the yard, and enquiring the cause, witness was told that George had hung himself in the forecastle of the Lord Warden. Went there immediately. Thomas Grayland had taken him down from where he was hanging and was passing him on deck. When they got up there Richard Cullen gave witness the paper produced.

“To whoever finds me – I have hung myself. It is my mother's doing. All I have to say is may the Lord pardon me my wicked doing, and take me in Heaven to him this day”.

Had never observed anything the matter with him before. He was a good buy, like the generality of boys. Had occasion to speak to him sometimes, but he never resented it.

Silvester Eastes, surgeon, said yesterday afternoon, at half past two o'clock, a man named Jenkins came to his surgery and told him a lad had hung himself at the Company's workshops. He immediately drove down, and on one of the benches in the Company's shop saw the body of deceased. Some of the men were chafing the limbs. They had loosened the ligature. On examining the body he found it presented the usual appearance of death caused by hanging – face pale, pupil of eye much dilated. There was a mark round the neck where the handkerchief had been tied. The body was warm, the limbs getting very cool. The action of the hear and lungs had entirely ceased, and deceased was dead. He opened the external jugular vein; there were a few drops of blood only escaped.

Thomas Grayland, a shipwright in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, said that on Friday, a little after two, he was on board the Lord Warden steamship at work. Had occasion to go down to the forecastle to see about some bolts and the timber they were putting in, and saw the body hanging to the beam. Called Mr. Poole to his assistance. Deceased was hanging to a hammock hook. The necktie produced was tied round his neck and round the hammock hook. It was the necktie he usually wore. His feet were hanging clear of the beams about two inches. The flooring in the forecastle was taken up. Lifted deceased up and unhooked the handkerchief. On laying him down on the locker, some water ran out of his mouth. On unhooking the upper part of the necktie it became slack around deceased's neck, and the necktie was not therefore removed. Took the body into the workshop and the men commenced rubbing him. Found the paper produced by Mr. Earnshaw on a temporary locker about four feet from the body, with a wooden wedge to keep it in it's place. Deceased's slop, waistcoat, and cap were laid on a beam close to his feet. Had known him since a lad. Had never seen anything strange in his conduct. He was a very good boy. The soda bottle produced now was near his clothes.

Frederick Gower, riveter, in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, went to the Company's workshops on Friday afternoon at half past one. Went down into the cabin of the Lord Warden to his work. About twenty minutes to two deceased came down and commenced moving a piece of board. He caught sight of witness, and then took a ginger beer bottle from the bench. Thought deceased was moving the boarding for the purpose of going down below, and when he saw witness he took the bottle as an excuse and went on deck. Did not speak to him. Known deceased two or three months, but had seen nothing strange in his conduct.

John Vye, publican, said deceased was his son. Saw him yesterday. He came home at one and had his dinner. Witness was lying down in the tap room. Deceased came in and sat down on witness's usual seat, and witness said to him – “George” – (the witness was here overcome by his emotion and obliged to pause for some time). The evening before, deceased told his mother he was going to the races. She told him she thought he had better be looking after his business. His mother got up first, and as witness had hurt his back the day before he continued longer than usual in bed and called deceased to him and told him he should not go to the races. After dinner witness said to him “George, I have a word or two to say to you. You are now a lad 18 years of age, and not very forward in your business. It would be much better for you to attend to your work than want to go to all these little spurts that there are. You should not lose half an hour in your business until you get well accomplished in your trade, and then you can do as you please”. He made no reply. His mother then said “George, we have more trouble with you than with all the rest, and if you don't alter it we shall acquaint your grandfather with your goings on”. He got up directly afterwards, and took up his slop from the table and went out of the door saying “It will be some time before you see me again”. Witness and his wife thought no more of it than they had thought of other occasions. If he were playing with other children he would say just the same, but nothing had ever come of it. Deceased would be eighteen the 18th of next month. If the paper produced was in his handwriting it was very badly done.

The Coroner then told the jury that that was all the evidence necessary to be produced. It was for them to say whether deceased killed himself knowing what he was doing or whether deceased killed himself in a fit of temporary insanity not knowing what he was doing. He was eighteen years of age and the law says he was of the age of discretion. The witnesses all said that they had never seen anything strange in his conduct. It would seem from the evidence of the father that it was in consequence of what his mother had said to him that he committed the act. It would be for the jury to draw their own conclusions. Those of them who had seen the place that the body was found would know that there must have been some contrivance to accomplish the act, and the paper produced, Mr. Earnshaw said, was in deceased's handwriting. It was for the jury to take all the circumstances into consideration and to give their verdict, in which twelve of them must be agreed.

Mr. W. Pope, a juryman, said the paper had clearly been written by the deceased with a carpenter's pencil on a bench as he passed through the Company's shop on his way to the Lord Warden. He thought the verdict should be that he killed himself. He did not see how, having regard to the oath that had been taken, any other verdict could be given.

The Coroner said Mr. Pope must give the other jurors credit for being guided by as correct judgement as himself. The law said twelve jurors must agree, and as twelve of the jury agreed to a verdict of temporary insanity he must accept that verdict.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 6 October 1866.

Coroner's Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Packet Boat Inn, Folkestone, on Saturday morning, before J. Minter Esq. and a respectable jury, on the body of George Thomas Vye, aged 18, the son of a publican in the town, who was found hanging in the forecastle of the Lord Warden, one of the steamships belonging to the South Eastern Railway Company. The following evidence was adduced:-

William Lawrence Earnshaw said: I am superintendent of the workshops for the South Eastern Railway Company at Folkestone. I identify the body as being that of Thomas Vye, who was a shipwright apprentice in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company. He had been in the service about three and a half years. I saw the deceased about ten minutes past one on Friday, the 28th ult., in the office at my workshops. He came to receive his pay. Mr. Lyall paid him 7s 6d, his wages, and I took his signature. If he had wanted a holiday, he ought to have asked. He did not ask. About five minutes past two o'clock the same afternoon I saw two men running from the yard. I enquired the cause, and they said George had hung himself in the forecastle of the Lord Warden. I then proceeded there, and Thomas Grayling had just taken deceased down, and on passing him on deck Richard Cullen gave me the paper produced. I have never seen anything strange in deceased's conduct. A surgeon was sent for immediately. The paper produced is, I believe, in deceased's handwriting.

Silvester Eastes said: I am a surgeon, practicing at Folkestone. Yesterday afternoon, at half past two o'clock, a man named Jenkins came to my surgery, and told me that a lad had hung himself at the Company's shop. I saw the body of deceased. Some of the men were chafing the limbs. They had loosened the ligature. On examining the body I found it presented the usual appearance of death caused by hanging – face pale, pupil of eye much dilated. There was a mark round the neck where the handkerchief had been tied. The body was warm, the limbs getting very cool. The action of the heart and lungs had entirely ceased. I opened the external jugular vein; there were a few drops of blood only escaped.

Thomas Grayling said: I am a shipwright in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company. On Friday, the 28th ultimo, a little before two o'clock, I went on board the Lord Warden steamship to work. I went down the forecastle to see about some bolts and saw the deceased hanging to the beam. I called Robert Poole to my assistance. The handkerchief now produced was tied round the deceased's neck and hung on to a hammock hook. The flooring was taken up and his feet were hanging about two inches clear of the beam. We lifted him up and the handkerchief came slack round the deceased's neck as soon as we unhooked him. We then took the body up into the workshop and the men commenced rubbing him. I found the piece of paper now produced on the locker with a wooden wedge to keep it in it's place. (Written in pencil on the paper was: “To whoever finds me. I have hung myself. It is my mother's doings. All I have to say is, may the Lord pardon me my wicked doings, and take me in Heaven with him this day”.) His waistcoat, slop, and cap were laid close to his feet on a beam. I have never seen anything strange in deceased's conduct.

Frederick Gower said: I am a riveter in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company. On Wednesday I went to the Company's workshops at half past one o'clock. Went into the after-cabin to my work. Whilst there, about ten minutes after I had gone down, the deceased came down and commenced moving a piece of board, and caught sight of me, and then took a ginger beer bottle as an excuse. He seemed to me as if he intended getting under the flooring. Deceased then went on deck. I have not known the deceased more than three months. I have not seen anything strange in his conduct.

John Vye said: I am a publican. The deceased is my son. He came home to dinner on Friday about one o'clock, and had his dinner. I was in the tap room and deceased came in. The evening before deceased told his mother he was going to the races. She told him he had better be looking after his business, and in the morning I called him to my bedside and told him he should not go to the races. When in the tap room yesterday I said “George, I've a word or two to say to you”. I said “You're a lad now eighteen years of age, and not being forward in your business it would be much better for you to attend to your work than to want to go and see these little sports that are”. I said “You should not lose half an hour in your business until you get well accomplished in your trade”. I then said “You can do as you please”. His mother said “George, we have more trouble with you than all the rest, and if you don't alter, I shall acquaint your grandfather”. He took his slop and jacket off the table, and said as he went out “It will be some time before I come in again”. Deceased was seventeen years and eleven months old.

The Coroner summed up and told the jury it was for them to decide whether it was a case of felo de se, or temporary insanity. After a consultation the jury returned a verdict that deceased hung himself while in a state of temporary insanity.

Mr. Pope, one of the jury, said he did not agree with the verdict, as in his opinion it was a case of felo de se. He asked the Coroner to read over the oath which the jury had taken at the commencement of the inquiry.

The Coroner told Mr. Pope he must give the eleven jurymen credit for honesty and record their verdict as they had given it.

 

Southeastern Gazette 9 October 1866.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at Folkestone, last week, on the body of George Thomas Vye, aged 18, the son of a publican in the town, who was found hanging in the forecastle of the Lord Warden, one of the steamships belonging to the South-Eastern Railway Company. A piece of paper was found near the body, with the following words written upon it in pencil:—“To whoever finds me. I have hung myself. It is my mother’s doings. All I have to say is, may the Lord pardon my wicked doings, and take me in Heaven with Him this day.” His waistcoat, slop, and cap were laid close to his feet on a beam. It appeared that his mother and father had prohibited him from going to the local races. The jury returned a verdict of “Temporary Insanity,” but one of them wished to return felo de se.

 

Folkestone Observer 23 May 1868.

Saturday, May 16th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N., W. Bateman and J. Tolputt Esqs.

James Williams was charged with being drunk and riotous in Harbour Street, and with using obscene language.

Police constable Swain deposed that on Saturday morning, shortly after 1 o'clock, he was on duty in the lower part of the town, and heard a great noise in Harbour Street. Found the prisoner near the Dolphin Inn, kicking and shouting at the top of his voice. He was very drunk; told him to keep quiet and get to his lodging, if not he would be locked up. Prisoner abused him. Witness then said he would take him to a place where he could lie down for the night if he would only go quietly, but he said with an oath he would not. Finding that the prisoner would not go away, he took him into custody, when he became very violent. The prisoner had been employed in the boiler-maker's shop of the South Eastern Company, but when he got into the state he was now in no-one would have him to lodge with them. Witness had frequently cautioned him. He was a nuisance to everyone on the tramway.

Prisoner was sorry and hoped the Bench would forgive him. He would not do it again. Fined 10s. 6d., including costs, or in default seven days' imprisonment. A friend of the prisoner's present promised to get the money in a short time, and the prisoner was locked up meanwhile.

 

Folkestone Express 9 January 1869.

Transfer of Licenses.

Wednesday, January 6th: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

The Dolphin from Mr. Packham to Mr. Ayliffe.

Note: Neither licensee listed as being here according to More Bastions.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

EMPTAGE Thomas Listed 1734-41 Bastions

Last pub licensee had DUNN Thomas 1841 Next pub licensee had (age 52 in 1841Census)

DUNN Thomas 1843-58 (age 64 in 1851Census) Bagshaw's Directory 1847Bastions

VYE John 1861+ (age 39 in 1861Census)

PACKHAM ???? to Jan/1869

AYCLIFFE ???? Jan/1869+

VYE John Baggs 1858-70 Next pub licensee had (age 39 in 1861Census) Bastions

 

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

TOP Valid CSS Valid XTHML

 

LINK to Even More Tales From The Tap Room