DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Strood, August, 2021.

Page Updated:- Sunday, 01 August, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1628-

Angel Hotel

Latest 2010

(Name to)

98 High Street / 2 North Street

Strood

https://whatpub.com/angel

Angel Inn 1899

Above photo circa 1899. The photograph was taken on the occasion of the demolition of the Turnpike Toll Gate which can be seen in the photograph. The Toll Gate was used to extract a toll for the use of Rochester Bridge which is further down the High Street.

Angel 1901

Caption says "The Proclamation of the Coronation of King Edward VII at Angel Corner, on the 9th July, 1901.

Angel 1907

Above photo, 1907, showing the "Angel" centre-right.

Angel postcard 1915

Above postcard, circa 1915.

Angel 1920

Above postcard, circa 1920, showing the "Angel" centre.

Angel 1920

Above postcard, circa 1920.

Awaiting reverse picture of Whitbread sign.

Angel card 1950

Above aluminium card issued 1950. Sign series 2 number 1.

Angel 2010

Above photo 29 June 2010, from www.Flickr.com by Ben Levick.

 

The Angel pub has had many names over the years, including The Sportsman. Now it is just another in the long list of former pubs.

This was mentioned in a book called the "History of Strood" by Henry Smetham, published 1899 who says there has been an inn bearing that name on the site for over 300 years. That takes it back before 1699, and Tradesmen's Token have been found here.

The Angel Inn is located at Angel Corner which is the junction of North Street and High Street, Strood. The current pub of the same name stands on exactly the same location.

The Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre has referenced a set of documents, that I haven't seen yet, and is part of the Watts Charity MSS, 1579-1972.

Reference is made as follows:-

1802 & 1894

T44. Premises in Strood [including messuages at Brompton Road, and The "Angel" and adjoining messuage] (2 docs.)

 

In July 2010 the pub was up for sale at 220,000 to become a shop and flats

 

From the the "History of Strood" by Henry Smetham, published 1899.

Burial 1628.

Mr. William Holt, Innkeeper at the "Angell," 4 August.

 

Kentish Gazette, Tuesday 1 May 1770.

To be sold by auction, by Mr. Francis Pyner, on Saturday the 19th day of May, 1770, at the "Mitre Inn," at Chatham, in Kent, between 3 and 5 in the afternoon, in separate lots.

Lot 1. A Valuable Leasehold Estate, situate opposite the "Mitre" aforesaid, in the occupation of Mr. Lock, Upholsterer, consisting of a substantial brick built house, and good old accustomed shop commodiously fitted up, and a Range of Warehouses; and also a Large Piece of Ground enclosed, adjoining the above, known by the Name of Fairfield, where Two Fairs are nearly kept. There are six long Ranges of Stalls in the same, with proper Stall Boards, Trestles, &c. and a Garden adjoining. There are upwards of 65 years unexpired, at the small ground rent of 42. The whole is esteemed worth, per Annum, 100.

Lot 2. One third part of one other leasehold Estate, consisting of Seven substantially built Messuages, in Fair Row and High Street; and also a Piece of Meadow Land behind the same; and likewise a Hop Ground in Listmas Lane, now let to several Tenants at, per Annum 69. 10s. There were 78 years and a half unexpired at Lady day last, ground Rent, per annum, 16.

Particulars, with conditions of sale, to be had at the "George and Bull" at Dartford; "White Hart" at Gravesend; "Angel" at Strood; "Crown" and "Kings Head," Rochester; "Golden Lion" at Brompton,; "Star" at Maidstone; "Green Dragon" at Rainham; "Bull" at Newington; "Rose" at Sittingbourne; "Ship" at Faversham; "King's Head," Canterbury; at the Place of Sale; and of the Broker, No. 37, Lombard Street, London.

N.B. To be viewed on Saturday, 12th of May, and till the sale, by applying to the several Tenants.

 

From the Maidstone Gazette and West Kent Courier, 11 September, 1827.

Tolls to let.

Notice is hereby given, that the tolls payable at the Tollgates near the "Angel Inn," in Strood, and on the New Road, leading from Rochester to Chatham Hill, in the county of Kent, will separately be let to farm, to the best bidders, for the term of 2 years, from the 30th day of November, 1827, at the house of Mr. William Wright, called the "Crown Inn," in Rochester, aforesaid, on Tuesday, 9th day of October next, between the hours of 11 in the forenoon and 1 in the afternoon.

No person will be permitted to advance less than 5 at each bidding, and whoever happens to be the best bidder, must, at the same time, give security with sufficient sureties to the satisfaction of the Commissioners of the said Tollgates for Payment of the Rent agreed for by Quarterly Payments in Advance. The highest bidders will be required to pay, at the time of the Letting, One Half part of the first quarters rent and the remainder before the said 30th day of November. The present Yearly Rent of the Tolls at Strood is 1,185, and of the Tolls at the New Road 195.

By order of the Commissioners Edward Twopeny, Clerk.

Rochester 3rd August. 1827.

 

From unknown paper 1839.

Death in Kent, 1839.

Feb. 11, at Greenstreet, Mr T H Sutton, formerly of the "Saracen’s Head," Ashford, and the "Angel Inn," Strood, aged 74.

 

From the Kentish Gazette, 24 January 1843.

Inquest.

On Friday an inquest was held at the "Angel Inn," Strood, before J. Lewis, esq., coroner, on view of the body of Daniel Town, a brewer’s man. It appeared from the evidence of a neighbour that deceased, while in the act of dressing on Friday morning, fell down and expired. A chemist attempted to bleed the deceased, but could only obtain a small quantity of blood, and now gave it as his opinion that the deceased had died from apoplexy.

Verdict, "Died from apoplexy."

 

From the Kentish Gazette, 31 October 1848.

THE MURDER AT STROOD. (Click for Details.)

APPREHENSION OF A SUSPECTED PARTY.

On Monday evening the adjourned inquest respecting the death of Mary Abbott, who, there cannot exist the slightest doubt, has been murdered, and whose body was found in the Fair-field, at Strood, was resumed at the "Angel Inn," before Mr. Lewis, coroner, assisted by the Deputy Coroner. Since the adjournment, Superintendent Tuff has been most active in endeavouring to obtain a clue to the parties implicated in this diabolical affair, and at length felt justified in apprehending Maria M'Gill, wife of the fisherman who, it will be remembered, first called attention to the body of the unfortunate deceased, and she was accordingly, at that officer’s request, brought into the inquest room, where she remained during the examination of the witnesses. Notwithstanding the search made to discover two shawls worn by deceased, neither of them has been found. A search warrant had been put in execution by Superintendent Tuff at the house of a son of M'Gill, at Gravesend, as it was known that he had been at Strood on the night of the murder, but nothing was found belonging to deceased. Previous to taking Mrs M’Gill into custody she was called upon to produce a female traced to her house on Saturday, but this she declined doing; hence, with other facts which will be gleaned from the evidence, the cause of her apprehension.

Mary Hill, a young woman living at Strood, opposite to M’Gill’s house, said that on Saturday, the 7th inst. whilst standing at M’Gill's door at about five o’clock in the afternoon, she saw a female crossing the road towards the door. Witness said to Mrs. M’Gill, who at the time was sweeping her room, "Do you know this person." Mrs. M’Gill replied "Yes;" and speaking to the female, said, "Come in mate," or "Come in, my dear," witness could not say which. She came in, and witness saw her lay a shawl which she had on her arm down on a table. Witness could not remember what description of shawl it was. She likewise noticed that she wore a shawl, a victorine, and had a black lace fall thrown over her bonnet. Witness then went away. She appeared to walk into Mrs. M’Giil’s house as if she knew her. Shortly afterwards whilst witness was talking to Mrs. Stokes, a neighbour, she saw Mrs. M’Gill go to the "Old George" public-house, and return with a pint of beer. Witness had seen deceased, but could not say whether it was the person she had seen enter M’Gill’s house. A few days afterwards, witness asked Mrs. M'Gill who it was she had seen at her house on Saturday when she went for the porter, to which she replied, that it was a young woman from Brompton whom she knew, but she did not have any of the porter to drink, and stayed there no time.

After some further evidence it was agreed to adjourn the inquiry again for a week. Mrs. M’Gill was conveyed in custody to the station-house. She protested her innocence, and begged hard not to be locked up, saying she had a large family at home; but in this the Coroner declined to interfere.

 

From the South Eastern Gazette, 6 December 1853.

Smashing.

The three men, Frederick Holland, William Chattling and Charles Buarklet, who had been remanded from Wednesday, charged with passing bad money, were again brought up on Saturday. The case occupied the magistrates till a late hour, but the facts were these. Buarklet, on the previous Friday, went into the shop of Mr. Davis, a tobacconist, for a small quantity of tobacco, giving a 5s. piece and receiving 4s. 8d. change. Immediately after it was discovered to be bad, and Mr. Davis followed him and demanded back the change, giving the prisoner the crown. On the following Monday he saw the three prisoners together, and suspecting they were engaged in their nefarious pursuits, followed them, giving Buarklet into custody, the other two taking to their heels at sight of the police. They were, however, chased, when they both ran through Strood, into the "Angel" public-house, and asking for the water-closet ran in, and immediately came out again, and were eventually captured by the officers in Frindsbury. On the closet being searched a purse containing seven bad crown-pieces was taken out. On being searched Chattling had 2 13s. 6d. and a bad florin on him; the other two prisoners had no coin whatever about them. All the crown pieces bore the date of 1819, and were well executed. Several witnesses from Maidstone were in attendance, two of whom, Mrs. Dunk and Mrs. Dungey, identified Buarklet as having made purchases at their shops the previous Saturday night, in each case tendering a bad 5s. piece and receiving the change. On Chattling was found a peculiar sixpence, which Mrs. Dungey identified as having given to him in change. The above evidence haring been deposed to, the prisoners were again remanded, to enable Mr. Prail to consult the Mint authorities.

 

LICENSEE LIST

HOLT William to Aug/1628

Last pub licensee had SUTTON Thomas Halk 1817-23

YOUNG Thomas 1828-32+ Pigot's Directory 1828-29Pigot's Directory 1832-34

YOUNG Johanna 1841+ (age 55 in 1841Census)

GOODRAM/GOODRHAN Mary 1851+ (age 33 in 1851Census)

CHAPMAN John 1855-61+

CHAMBERS John 1862-3/Sept/64 dec'd (age 62 in 1861Census)

MITCHELL Frederick 1874+

JEAL Robert 1881-82+ (age 45 in 1881Census)

FISKE Alfred 1891+ Next pub licensee had (age 49 in 1891Census)

GOLDSMITH George 1901+ (age 42 in 1901Census)

Last pub licensee had FRY Frederick George 1903+ (age 40 in 1903) Kelly's 1903

WEBB Robert 1911-38+ (age 30 in 1911Census)

Last pub licensee had DOUST Len & Clara 1953+

https://pubwiki.co.uk/AngelHotel.shtml

http://www.closedpubs.co.uk/angel.html

 

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-29

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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