DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, July, 2023.

Page Updated:- Wednesday, 26 July, 2023.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1845

Oddfellows Inn

3 Jan 1925

34 Dover Street

Folkestone

Oddfellows Arms 1919 peace party

Above photo titled, 1919, Behind the Peace Party.

Oddfellows Inn

Above photo 1928, kindly sent by Gloria Suters, who says the photo is of her two uncles standing outside the pub.

 

Maidstone Gazette 18 January 1848

Petty Sessions, Friday; Before Charles Golder Esq., Mayor and Wm. Major Esq.

George Norman was charged with having broken a pane of glass, the property of George Keeler, beershop keeper. Ordered to pay 2s. 6d. damage and 7s. 6d. costs, and in default of payment was committed to Dover gaol for seven days.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 22 November 1862.

Friday November 21st:- Before W. Bateman esq., Capt. Kennicott R.N., James Tolputt and A.M. Leith esqs.

John Rossiter, collector of rags and bones, lodging at the Oddfellows Inn, Radnor Street, was brought before the bench, charged with stealing from off a clothes line in Mummery's Yard, a white gabardine, the property of Emily Tomsett, a laundress, residing in the yard. From information received by the police the prisoner was found by police constable Reynolds wearing the gabardine in Radnor Street. He was taken into custody, and the gabardine being identified by the prosecutrix, the prisoner was remanded till this day, to be brought up and tried under the Criminal Justice Act.

 

Folkestone Observer 4 January 1868.

Inquest At The Harvey Inn.

An inquest was held on Monday last before J. Minter Esq., coroner, on the body of Elizabeth Collin.

Thomas Collin, living at Broadstairs and proprietor of the bathing establishment there, identified the body of deceased as being that of his sister, Elizabeth Collin. She was 57 years of age, and lodged with Mrs. Finn, 12 Charlotte Terrace. He had been in monthly communication with his sister, and had received a letter from her on Christmas Day.

Elizabeth Impett, wife of Frederick Impett, sailor, living at 14, Charlotte Terrace, said that last Friday evening, between 8 and 9 o'clock, Mr. Harris, landlord of the Oddfellows, came to her door and said that he had heard a crash as if somebody had fallen at No. 12. Witness went to Mrs. Smith at No. 11 and got a key and opened the door, and saw deceased lying at the bottom of the stairs, her head under her right arm, which was resting on the wainscot. Witness called her husband, and he picked her up. She was bleeding from her right ear, her nose, and mouth. Washed her face with water and laid her in the room. When Mrs. Finn came home shortly after, witness left. When witness went into the house, no-one was there besides deceased.

Silvester Eastes, surgeon, said that on Friday evening last, between 9 and 10 o'clock, Mrs. Finn came to his house and told him that the person who lodged with her had just fallen downstairs. Went immediately, and found deceased lying on the floor of the front room downstairs. She was quite insensible, and could not be aroused. There was copious bleeding from the right ear, and she had all the symptoms usually produced by fracture of the base of the skull. The case was hopeless. Saw her again twice during the night, and two or three times the following morning. She continued in precisely the same state, quite unconscious, neither swallowing nor moving a voluntary muscle. She continued the same, and died a little before three on Saturday afternoon, from fracture of the skull, which no doubts was caused by the fall down stairs as described by the last witness.

Elizabeth Finn, widow, living at No. 12, Charlotte Terrace, said deceased lodged with her. On Friday evening she had been out for a walk with deceased, paying some bills, and they returned home about half past seven. Went out again a little before eight, at the request of deceased, to get something for supper, and left her is the house alone, upstairs. Returned about half past eight, and found deceased lying in the front room, and Mr. and Mrs. Impett with her. When she went upstairs she found the mat turned over, as if tripped against.

James Harris, landlord of the Oddfellows, Dover Street, said that at 8 o'clock on Friday evening he knocked twice at No. 12, Charlotte Terrace, with the supper beer which he was in the habit of taking there. After waiting two minutes he heard a heavy fall, as if a body was falling downstairs. Went to No. 14, and told Mrs. Impett that he thought someone had fallen. Mrs. Impett borrowed a latch key, and went in with her husband. He followed them in, and when they had put the body in the front room he left. Heard no cry with the fall.

The Coroner then summed up, and the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 4 January 1868.

FATAL ACCIDENT.

On Friday last, a maiden lady, named Elizabeth Collins, living with Mrs. Finn at 12, Charlotte Terrace, while left in the house alone, fell downstairs and never spoke afterwards, dying on Saturday afternoon. From the evidence given at the inquest, which was held on Monday at the "Harvey Inn" before John Minter Esq., borough coroner, it appears that Mrs. Finn and deceased had been out in the evening, and when they returned Mrs. Finn went out to get something for supper. While she was gone, Mr. Harris, landlord of the "Oddfellows Arms" (sic) came with the supper beer, and heard deceased fall downstairs, evidently in coming to take the beer, for the mat at the top was kicked up, as though she had tripped over it. Mr. Harris gave an alarm, and Mrs. Impett, living next door but one, went into the house and found deceased lying doubled up at the bottom of the stairs. Mr. Eastes, surgeon, attended her, but she remained insensible till she died. A verdict of “Accidental Death” was returned.

Note: Reporter confused the "Oddfellows Arms" with the "Oddfellows Inn," where Harris was landlord.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 10 April 1869.

Tuesday, April 6th: Before R.W. Boarer and J. Gambrill Esqs.

John Dale was charged with assaulting William Burvill in Dover Street on the 27th ult.

Mr. Till, from the office of Mr. Minter, appeared for defendant.

William Burvill, stone mason, living in Queen Street, said: On the evening of Saturday week, about twenty minutes past eleven, I was in Dover Street, and prisoner insulted me outside the "Oddfellows Inn." Defendant said “I've been waiting for you” and knocked me down into the middle of the road. I had not Spoken to him before for some weeks. I was sober. When I got up I said I would make him pay for it, and came to the police station.

Cross-examined: I was in the "Oddfellows" about ten minutes. I was not hurt very seriously.

Re-examined: There were altogether six or seven persons in the street. I don't know exactly.

William Swaine said he was with complainant on the evening of Saturday the 27th ult. when the assault took place. He saw defendant knock Burvill down without any provocation.

Cross-examined: I did not come out with a man named Stone.

William Stone was at the "Oddfellows" on the night in question with Burvill, defendant's brother, Swaine, and the landlord, Harris. On going into the street he saw defendant and complainant tussling, and complainant fell. He saw no blow struck.

Cross-examined: I did not say you made any disturbance in the house.

Francis Poole was going into Harris's on the night in question, and seeing several persons coming out in a hurry, watched them, and saw complainant fall, as though drunk. He saw no tussle or blow struck.

Cross-examined: I was the nearest person to you when you fell down.

The Bench considered the case proved, and fined prisoner 10s., and 13s. costs, or one month's hard labour.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 10 April 1869.

Tuesday, April 6th: Before R.W. Boarer and J. Gambrill Esqs.

John Delo and William Delo were summoned for assaulting William Burvill on the 27th ultimo.

The defendant John Delo did not appear.

William Burvill said: I am a mason, and live in Queen Street. On Saturday week, about ten minutes to eleven, I went to the Oddfellows Inn, Dover Street.

Stayed in the house about ten minutes, when I left and went into the street, where I saw the defendant William Delo standing a few yards from the house.

He said “I have been waiting for you”, or words to that effect, and hit me on the right side of my head, knocking me down in the road. Had not seen defendant previous to the assault for a few weeks. I was quite sober. I said “I will make you pay for this” and walked to the police station.

Mr. Till (clerk to Mr. Minter) then rose to cross-examine the witness.

Mr. Boarer: Are you an attorney, Sir?

Mr. Till: I am.

Mr. Boarer: Have you taken out your certificate?

Mr. Till: I have, sir.

Cross-examination: Was in the house about ten minutes. Did not have a squabble with the defendant; had not quarrelled at all. I was insulted in the bar of the public house by the defendant William Delo. A friend of mine was in the house with me. Did not hurt myself when I fell down. Did not hurt my limbs, but was able to get up and walk home.

By Mr. Bradley: There were several people in the street, but did not know who they were, When I got up I walked away as I did not wish any disturbance to take place.

William Swain said: I am a butcher, living in Dover Street. Burvill was in my shop a little after eleven on the night of Saturday week when I was asked by Burvill to have a glass of ale. We went down to the "Oddfellows," where we had not been more than ten minutes when Burvill was insulted by defendant. Burvill immediately left the house. I followed him out and soon afterwards saw him knocked down by the defendant. Burvill had not spoken to him previously. He hit him on the right side of the head, and knocked him into the middle of the street. He got up and I said “You had better come with me” and we went away.

Cross-examined: Did not see a man named Stone. Would swear he did not go out with Stone, as I do not know him. There was only one blow struck. The reason I did not protect my friend was that the blow came unexpectedly. Several persons followed us out of the public house.

William Stone said: I was in the public house with Burvill on the night of Saturday week. The defendants were there. Heard quarrelling going on between William Delo and Burvill. Burvill left the house with me and Swain.

Saw some tussling between Burvill and the defendant. Saw Burvill slip down, after which he got up and walked away.

By the plaintiff: When you came into the bar you began laughing at the defendant.

Francis Poole said: I was in Dover Street at a quarter past 11 on Saturday night week. Saw a few persons coming out of the "Oddfellows" public house. They came down opposite his house. Burvill fell down as if he was “tight”. Did not see anyone hit him. When he got up he walked away. Could not tell whether he was sober or not.

By the plaintiff: I was about four yards from you when you fell. I saw you fall.

Did not see anybody strike you. I fancied you were “tight”. I could not say positively.

By Mr. Gambrill: I did not see anybody close to Burvill when he fell. The defendant was between me and Burvill.

The Bench fined the defendant 10s, with the costs, 18s., or in default one month's imprisonment. The fine was paid.

 

Folkestone Express 10 April 1869.

Tuesday, April 6th: Before J. Gambrill and R.W. Boarer Esqs.

John Delo was summoned for committing an assault on William Burvill on the night of the 27th ult. Mr. F.J. Till, from Mr. Minter's office appeared for the defendant.

The plaintiff, being sworn, said: I am a mason and live in Dover Street. The assault complained of took place on Saturday week about twenty minutes past eleven o'clock in the evening in Dover Street, when the defendant assaulted me in the street. I went into the Oddfellows Arms (sic) to have a glass of beer. I had been there about ten minutes when the brother of the defendant came in and insulted me. I then went out and a few yards away from the house I met the defendant. He said “I have been waiting for you” and struck me on the right side of the head with his fist and knocked me down in the road. I had not seen him previously to speak to for some weeks. Some people then came along and said “That's not fair, two or three on one”. I was sober. I said “I will make you pay for this”, and walked to the police station, and from there home.

Cross-examined: I had been in the house about ten minutes. I was insulted in front of the bar. I had a witness with me there. I do not know how many more people there were in the street, as I walked off directly it was over.

William Swain was then called. He said: I am a butcher, and live at 62, Dover Street, and was with Mr. Burvill on the night in question. He came into my shop about ten minutes before this happened and asked me to go and have a glass of beer. I said I did not mind, and we went. The defendant's brother then came in and insulted Mr. Burvill, when he walked out of the door and I followed him out. We had only got a few yards when Burvill was knocked down by the defendant. I heard him say “I have been waiting for you”. Burvill had not spoken a word to him. He got up, and he and I walked away. Defendant hit him once on the right side of the head. I then said to plaintiff “You had better come away with me”.

Cross-examined: I did not see a man there named Stone. I did not come out of the house close behind him. There was only one blow struck; it came quite unexpectedly. Burvill was not drunk. The blow left no mark. I am certain I did not see William Stone. Some people followed me out, but I did not see anyone in front. A sailor came up at the time; I do not know who he was.

Mr. Till, on behalf of the defendant, said he was quite sure the Bench would find this was a very paltry case and they ought never to have been troubled with it. He had two witnesses to call who would prove this was merely a squabble.

William Stone was then sworn. He said: I was at the public house on the night in question, when I heard a quarrel between Burvill and William Delo. Mr. Burvill then left the house; Swain left behind; I slipped out before. I then saw John Delo and Burvill tussling together. I did not see any blows. Burvill then slipped down; he got up, I put his hat on and he walked away.

By the plaintiff: I did not see you come into the house. You were laughing and chaffing the defendant's brother. I did not see the beginning of this rumpus.

Francis Poole said: I was in Dover Street at quarter past eleven. I was going into the house in question for some beer. Just as I got to the door, I met a great many people coming out in a hurry, and I turned round to see what was up. I saw Burvill fall as if he was tight; I did not see anyone knock him down. I was about four yards from them; he got up and walked down the street.

By plaintiff: I was the nearest to you. I never saw anyone strike you. I fancied you were tight.

By Mr. Gambrill: I was on the path, and Burvill was on the path when he fell.

The Bench had no hesitation in saying an assault had been committed, and they fined the defendant 10s. and 13s. costs, or one month's imprisonment. The fine was paid.

 

From the Southeastern Gazette 12 April 1869.

Local News

At the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Tuesday, before R. W. Boarer and J. Gambrill Esqs., John Delo was summoned for an assault on William Burvill.

Mr. Till was for the defendant.

Plaintiff said he was a mason, and on Saturday week he went into the "Oddfellows Arms" (sic), Dover-street, at a few minutes past eleven in the evening, to have a glass of beer with a friend. While standing in front of the bar a brother of the defendant came in and insulted him, and he, not wishing to have a quarrel, left the house. After he got a few yards from the door the defendant came up and said, “I have been waiting for you,” and hit him on the right side of the head with his fist, knocking him down in the road. Witness had not seen him to speak to for some time previously. Some of the bystanders came along and recommended him to go away. Witness said he would make him pay for it, and left to go to the police station.

By M. Till: There was no squabble or quarrel at all with defendant. The brother followed him out of the house. He was not hurt severely by the blow or fall. William Swain, butcher, of Dover-street, corroborated.

Mr. Till, for the defendant, called two witnesses, who deposed that Delo and Burvill tussled together, and Burvill slipped down, and was not knocked down.

A fine of 10s., costs 13s. was inflicted; in default one month's hard labour.

 

Folkestone Express 14 September 1878.

Saturday, August 7th: Before The Mayor, Alderman Caister, and Captain Carter.

John Macpherson was charged with begging in Dover Street on Friday. P.C. Keeler said he saw the prisoner go into the "Oddfellows Arms" (sic) about eight o'clock, and beg of all who were in the bar.

Prisoner was sentenced to seven days hard labour.

 

From Holbein's Visitors' List 16 April 1890.

Inquest.

An inquest was held by the Borough Coroner (John Minter Esq.) on the body of Charles Tilley Adams, aged 35, landlord of the "Oddfellows Arms" (sic), Dover Street.

Frederick Adams, an attendant at the Exhibition, identified the body as that of his brother. Deceased had been at the "Oddfellows Arms" about seven years; he was married and had five children.

Previous to taking the "Oddfellows Arms," he was a steward on board the South Eastern Company's boats. Witness saw him alive on Sunday night at his house. He was then quite cheerful, and had always been in the best of spirits.

He was in comfortable circumstances and had a happy home. He was in the habit of getting up early in the morning to go for a walk on the pier – that was his constant walk. He could swim “like a fish”.

Witness' own idea was that he must have slipped over from the pier, and struck something in falling, which was the cause of his body floating so long. There were no external marks of violence on the body and deceased was not subject to fits.

Bartholomew Noonan, a navy pensioner, now employed as Harbour Porter, said he knew the deceased, and had seen him several times on the pier. Had seen him that morning about 7.10 when he was on the promenade near the station extension, going towards the pier. The deceased said “Good morning” to witness and his mate. Did not see anything strange in his manner. There was no boat coming into the harbour, but a small boat belonging to one of the steamers was going out. After doing a little work, which occupied him about ten minutes, witness saw something floating about six or seven yards from the end of the pier. On looking again, saw it was the body of a man, floating face downwards. He ran to get a boat hook, and also told the three men in the boat that there was a man in the water. They recovered the body and brought it ashore.

Henry Young, harbour boatman, said that at about 7.40 the previous witness sang out to him and his mate that there was a body at the end of the pier. They rowed to the place and got hold of the body with a boat hook. Witness, who was in the stern of the boat, then got hold of it with his hands, keeping the head up out of the water, and his mate rowed back to the pier as quickly as possible. The body was about 100 yards from the pier. It did not occur to them that it was possible to attempt to restore animation before reaching shore, but they were only a few minutes reaching the pier, and all the usual methods for restoring the apparently drowned were then employed, but without success.

Edward Morris, who was in the boat with last witness, having corroborated his evidence, Dr. Frederick Eastes said that he was called at eight o'clock to see the deceased. Had not found any external marks of violence on the body. He was not certain that the cause of death was drowning, because the body was found floating so soon after the man had been seen alive. There was froth coming from the mouth, which was one of the signs of drowning. There was no other external sign which would point to drowning or any other cause of death. The body of a person drowned did not usually rise to the surface for some days.

There were several things, such as fits, concussion of the brain, a blow received when falling, syncope, &c., which would cause the body to float. If any of those things happened the water would not be drawn into the lungs so much as in the struggles of a drowning person, and the body would be more likely to float.

The Coroner said he remembered holding an inquest on a gentleman who was thrown out of a boat by it's capsizing, and fell in the water face downwards, his head and body never going under water.

Dr. Eastes said that the best proof that death was by drowning would be the quantity of water found in the stomach, but he had not made a post mortem examination.

John Boorn (one of the jury) tendered himself as a witness. At 7.10 the deceased called at witness' house, the "Harbour Inn," and had two pennyworth of rum and a halfpennyworth of milk. He was perfectly sober and asked witness “how things were looking”. In reply to witness he said that things were pretty well, and that he had had a fair day on Sunday. Had known deceased a good many years, and on that morning he was as well as he had ever seen him. It was about 7.15 when he left, and he was all right then.

The Coroner said they had two questions to decide – what was the cause of death, and was it accidental or self-inflicted. It seemed to him that all the evidence pointed to accidental death by drowning, but as the doctor was not positive as to whether it was really a case of drowning they must word their verdict as they felt best.

The jury returned a verdict of Found Dead, and, at the suggestion of the Coroner, added the words “supposed through accidentally falling into the water”.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 19 April 1890.

Inquest.

The Folkestone Borough Coroner (J. Minter Esq.) held an inquest at the Town Hall on Wednesday evening on the body of Charles Tilley Adams, who was found dead in the sea off the Lighthouse Jetty at Folkestone on Monday morning.

The jury having viewed the body, Frederick Adams said he was turnstile keeper at the Exhibition Palace.

The deceased was his brother. He was 35 years of age. He identified the body which the jury had just viewed as that of his brother, Charles Tilley Adams. The deceased was the landlord of the "Oddfellows Arms" (sic), Dover Street. He had occupied the house seven years, and was married with five children.

Previous to taking the "Oddfellows Arms" he was Chief Steward in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company. He last saw him alive at his house on Sunday night at ten o'clock. The deceased was very cheerful. He was always cheerful, and witness had never seen him in a desponding condition. Deceased was in the habit of getting up early in the morning to take a walk on the pier. The deceased was a good swimmer. Witness was of opinion that he must have slipped over the side of the pier whilst watching the boats come round, and it was very probable that he struck something in falling.

By the Foreman: Deceased was not subject to fits.

Bartholomew Noonan, a harbour porter, stated that he knew the deceased, and had seen him several times walking on the pier. Witness saw him between five and ten minutes past seven that morning.

Witness was standing behind the Customs House. The deceased said “Good morning” as he passed. Did not notice anything strange in his manner. There was no boat going in the harbour. One went out about half an hour afterwards. Witness followed down on to the pier about ten minutes after the deceased and, happening to look over the head of the pier, observed the body of deceased floating in the water about six yards to the west of the pier (the Lighthouse Jetty). The body was floating head downwards. Witness saw one of the Company's little boats going out of the harbour, and they picked it up.

Henry Young deposed that he was a harbour boatman in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company. About twenty minutes to eight that morning he was going out of the harbour with a little boat to get the steamer alongside, when the last witness told him there was a body floating at the end of the pier. He rowed to the place and secured the body with a boathook. It was about 100 yards off the pier.

Edward Morris, another harbour boatman, said he was in company with Young when the body was recovered. It appeared to be quite dead. They moved the legs and arms when they got ashore, but there were no signs of life.

Dr. Frederick Eastes said he was called upon to see the deceased at eight o'clock that morning. Upon examining the body he found him to be dead. There were no marks of violence, but he was not certain that death resulted from drowning. There was froth in the mouth, which was one sign of drowning. There were no other signs of drowning, or death from any other cause. The body was floating, and that was one reason why he could not say positively that death resulted from drowning. A body did not generally rise to the surface for several days. There were several causes why the body might not sink. Apoplexy or a fit would cause it to float, or concussion of the brain from injuries received in falling. He had not held a post mortem examination.

John Boorn, a juryman, elected to give evidence. He said that the deceased called at the "Harbour Inn" at ten minutes past seven that morning. He had 2d. of rum and 1/2 d. of milk. He was quite sober, and asked witness how things were looking. Witness said “Very well. What sort of day did you have yesterday?” He replied “Very good”. He was in good spirits and left about quarter or twenty minutes past seven.

The Coroner, in summing up, said it was a very curious fact that the deceased's father, who was formerly Chief Steward on board the South Eastern boats, was drowned whilst bathing in East Wear Bay. He was also a splendid swimmer. He (the Coroner) believed the deceased's elder brother was drowned in Hong Kong whilst bathing.

The jury returned a verdict of Found Dead; the supposed cause being through drowning.

 

From the Folkestone Express 19 April 1890.

Inquest.

An inquest was held on Monday before J. Minter Esq., Coroner, on the body of Charles Tilley Adams, landlord of the "Oddfellows Arms" (sic), Dover Street, who was found in the sea near the Pier, on the morning of the 14th inst.

Frederick Adams, cash-taker at the Exhibition, identified the body as that of his brother, his age being 35. He was a married man with five children. He had been landlord of the "Oddfellows Arms" seven years, and previous to that he was a steward in the S.E.R. Company's service. He last saw deceased at his house on  the previous night at ten o'clock. He was in the best of spirits, and had always been of a cheerful disposition. He was in comfortable circumstances, and had a happy home. He was in the habit of going for a walk early in the morning on the pier and harbour, that being his usual habit. Deceased could swim very well. He imagined that deceased was leaning over looking at the boat, when he slipped over, and swam about as long as he could, and was then drowned.

Batholomew Noonan, a harbour porter, said he knew the deceased by sight. He had seen him several times walking up and down the pier. He saw deceased that morning at about five minutes to seven. He was going towards the pier, and said “Good morning” to him. That was just by the gate leading from the beach to the pier. The boat would be going out of the harbour about twenty minutes later. About ten minutes after he went down on to the pier, and happening to look over into the sea, he saw a body floating about six or seven yards from the west end of the S.E.R. pier, face downwards in the water. He hailed a boat coming out of the harbour and told the occupants, who went and picked the body up.

Henry Young, harbour boatman, said about twenty minutes to eight that morning the last witness shouted to him and George Bates that there was a body floating in the water at the end of the pier. They rowed to it, and recovered the body and brought it ashore. The body was a few yards from the west pier.

Edward Morris, a mariner in the employ of the S.E.R. Company, said he rowed out with the last witness and brought the body ashore. When the body was brought up on to the pier they tried the usual means to produce artificial respiration, but without success.

Dr. F. Eastes said that morning at eight o'clock he was called to the pier to see the deceased. On examining the body he found him to be dead. He could find no external marks of violence. He was not certain that the cause of death was drowning, because of the body floating. There was froth in the mouth, which was one of the signs of drowning, and there was no other sign that would point to drowning or any other cause of death. The body was floating so soon after he was seen alive. A body did not rise for some days usually. A fit or injury would cause a body to float immediately after death.

John Boorn, a juryman, said that the deceased called at the Harbour Inn at about ten minutes past seven that morning. He had two pennyworth of rum and some milk. He was perfectly sober, quite cheerful, and in good spirits.

The jury returned a verdict of Found Dead, the supposed cause being drowning through accidentally falling into the sea.

 

From the Folkestone News 19 April 1890.

Inquest.

Mr. John Minter, Borough Coroner, held an inquest at the Town Hall on Monday evening, touching the death of Charles Tilley Adams, whose body was found floating off the pier head at Folkestone harbour on Monday morning.

The jury having been sworn, the following evidence was adduced:- Frederick Adams, living at 32, Dover Street, and employed by the Folkestone Pleasure Gardens Company said: The deceased was my brother. His age was 35. He was married, and has left a wife and five children. He was landlord of the "Oddfellows Arms" (sic), 34, Dover Street. The body now viewed by the jury I identify as my brother. On the body being found it was brought to 32, Dover Street. He has had the "Oddfellows" for seven years, and was previously the chief steward in the S.E.R. Company's boats. I last saw deceased alive on Sunday evening at 10 o'clock at his house. He was then in the best of spirits, and has always been cheerful. He was in comfortable circumstances, and had a happy home. He was, to my knowledge, in the habit of getting up early and taking his accustomed walk on the harbour. He could swim like a fish, to use a common saying, and my idea is that he fell over the pier head accidentally when watching the boat coming round from the harbour to the pier head. He was leaning over most likely where there are no chains, and lost his balance and fell over. He must have struck something in falling, and that accounts for him swimming so long on the water. There are no marks upon him.

Batholomew Noonan said: I am a Navy pensioner and harbour porter, and am working on the pier. I knew deceased by sight, and have seen him several times walking on the pier. I saw him this morning between five and ten minutes past seven. He was going through the gates at the entrance to the two stations, which leads to the beach, and went towards the promenade. He said “Good morning” to me and another man. He went in the direction of the pier, and I noticed nothing strange in his manner. There was no boat coming in. A boat would be coming out from the harbour about half an hour later. I went to the end of the pier about ten minutes after, and, looking over into the sea, saw something floating on the water about six or seven yards from the corner of the pier, to the west. I told the man at the engine, and afterwards found it was a body floating, with the face downwards. I told the man in a boat, and they went and picked him up.

Henry Young said: I am harbour boatman. This morning, about twenty minutes to eight, Noonan sung out to us that there was a woman or man afloat outside the harbour. I was in my boat with George Bates and we rowed out to the body, and got hold of it with a boat hook and brought it ashore. I did not see deceased on the pier that morning. The body was floating about a hundred yards off the west pier.

Edward Morris, mariner, in the employ of the S.E.R. Company, said: At half past seven I was with the last witness in the boat and we recovered the body. After we got him on the pier we tried to restore him, but found there was no life in him. I was in the stern of the boat and held the body up with the head out of the water. I did not know then who it was.

Dr. Fred. Eastes said: At eight o'clock I went to the pier to see the deceased. I found him dead, and on examining the body saw no external marks of violence. I cannot be certain that the cause of death was drowning, because the body was floating. There was one sign of drowning, froth from the mouth. No other sign could be found externally. In cases of drowning the body doesn't usually float on the surface of the water for some days. Other causes of death might be apoplexy, syncope, fits of different kinds, when the body would be kept from sinking, as the water would not be drawn into the lungs like it is in the struggles caused by drowning. If the jury desired, it could be decided whether deceased was drowned by seeing if there was water inside the body.

John Boorn, one of the jury, offered to give evidence, and the Coroner said he was entitled to do so. He said: About ten minutes past seven this morning the deceased called into the "Harbour Inn," and had two pennyworth of rum and a half pennyworth of milk. He was quite sober and asked how I was getting on. I asked him how he was; he said he was pretty well, and was going on the harbour for a walk. He was perfectly cheerful.

The Coroner summed up, and said it appeared to him that all the circumstances pointed to the fact that the deceased came by his death through an accident in the manner described by his brother. With regard to the doctor's evidence, he remembered the case of a man falling into the sea from a boat, when he was drowned although the body floated on the water till picked up. There was no evidence to show how the deceased in the present instance came into the water, and it was for the jury to say by their verdict how, in their opinion, death was caused.

After a short consultation the jury found a verdict of Found Dead.

The Coroner suggested that the jury were of opinion deceased was drowned, and that he came into the sea by an accident.

This was assented to by the jury.

The Coroner said it was a curious fatality in the family that the father of deceased was drowned in East Wear Bay while bathing, and the eldest son, he understood, was also drowned at Hong Kong.

 

From the Southeastern Gazette 22 April 1890.

Local News.

Shortly after seven o'clock on Monday morning a man named Charles Adams, landlord of the "Oddfellows' Arms" (sic), jumped into the sea from the end of the pier, and his body was not recovered until half an hour afterwards. Business difficulties, it is said, were the cause of the rash act. He leaves a widow and four young children.

 

Folkestone Express 3 May 1890.

Saturday, April 26th: Before The Mayor, Capt. Carter, Alderman Pledge and J. Clarke Esq.

The licence of the Oddfellows, Dover Street, was temporarily transferred to James Harris.

Note: This transfer does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Express 8 May 1890.

Tuesday, May 4th: Before The Mayor, General Cannon, and Alderman Sherwood.

George Morley was charged with refusing to quit the "Oddfellows Inn" on the 23rd ult., and also with being drunk and disorderly.

James Harris, landlord of the "Oddfellows," Dover Street, said on the 23rd April, between nine and ten o'clock at night, defendant went to his house and stood in front of the bar. He had one or two glasses of beer before witness discovered he was in such an excited state, and he then refused to draw him any more. Defendant then said he could demand it, and should leave the house when he chose. Witness requested him to leave and he refused. He then sent for a constable. P.C. Knowles, who went, had to use force to eject defendant from the house.

P.C. Knowles said after he had ejected the defendant he went up the steps and into the house again. He got him out a second time, when he was very abusive and threatened to “do for him”.

Defendant was fined 5s. and 9s. costs in each case, or 14 days' in default.

 

From the Folkestone Express 3 May 1890.

Saturday, April 26th: Before The Mayor, Capt. Carter, Alderman Pledge and J. Clarke Esq.

The licence of the Oddfellows, Dover Street, was temporarily transferred to James Harris.

Note: This transfer does not appear in More Bastions.

From the Folkestone Express 14 June 1890.

Wednesday, July 11th: before J. Clark, J. Hoad, J. Dunk, F. Boykett and E.T. Ward Esqs.

The licence of the Oddfellows Inn, Dover Street, was transferred to James Harris.

Note: This transfer does not appear in More Bastions.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 24 May 1894.

Inquest.

Mr. Haines, Deputy Coroner, held an inquest at the Town Hall on Monday evening, on the body of Henry Skelton, a Custom House Officer, residing at 34, Dover Street.

Mr. Frederick Adams, landlord of the Oddfellows Arms (sic), identified the body. He deposed that he had known the deceased as a friend and a customer for over two years, during which time he had borne a good character. He was a Custom House Officer. Adams further deposed that on Saturday last, at half past eight, deceased went into the Oddfellows Inn and had a glass of ale. He stayed half an hour, went out, and returned between 10 and 11. He was then perfectly sober, and had a glass of beer and porter, which he drank, and left at 10 minutes to 11, bidding Adams goodnight. In leaving the Oddfellows he had to go down some steps. About half an hour afterwards Adams was called to assist helping him up out of the street and to carry him into his house, next door to the Oddfellows.

Alfred Gaines, a labourer, deposed that he was in Dover Street at 11 o'clock on Saturday evening, about 12 yards from the Oddfellows Arms. He knew the deceased, and saw him fall backwards over the railings of the steps at 34, Dover Street. He fell on his head. Witness went to his assistance, and found him bleeding from the right temple and unconscious. In five minutes Adams and another man came to his assistance, and they carried deceased indoors and sent for a doctor.

F. Impett, shoemaker, of 44, East Cliff, corroborated the statement of the previous witness.

Mrs. Adams, wife of Horace Adams, residing at 34, Dover Street, deposed that deceased had lodged with her for a fortnight. He had a latch key, and could have let himself in. She was out herself when the accident happened. The deceased had never complained of having anything the matter with him.

Dr. Frederick Eastes deposed that he was called at 11.20 on Saturday night to see the deceased. He found him suffering from a contused wound on the head, which was bleeding. In his opinion the deceased was also intoxicated. He attended to the wound, and promised to see him again on the following morning. Before visiting him on the following morning, someone came to him and said the deceased was dying. When he arrived at the house he found him dead. Death was caused by fracture of the base of the skull.

The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

Folkestone 24 May 1894.

Inquest

Mr. Haines, Deputy Coroner, held an inquest at the Town Hall on Monday evening, on the body of Henry Skelton, a Custom House Officer, residing at 34, Dover Street.

Mr. Frederick Adams, landlord of the "Oddfellows Arms" (sic), identified the body. He deposed that he had known the deceased as a friend and a customer for over two years, during which time he had borne a good character. He was a Custom House Officer. Adams further deposed that on Saturday last, at half past eight, deceased went into the "Oddfellows Inn" and had a glass of ale. He stayed half an hour, went out, and returned between 10 and 11. He was then perfectly sober, and had a glass of beer and porter, which he drank, and left at 10 minutes to 11, bidding Adams goodnight. In leaving the "Oddfellows" he had to go down some steps. About half an hour afterwards Adams was called to assist helping him up out of the street and to carry him into his house, next door to the "Oddfellows."

Alfred Gaines, a labourer, deposed that he was in Dover Street at 11 o'clock on Saturday evening, about 12 yards from the "Oddfellows Arms." He knew the deceased, and saw him fall backwards over the railings of the steps at 34, Dover Street. He fell on his head. Witness went to his assistance, and found him bleeding from the right temple and unconscious. In five minutes Adams and another man came to his assistance, and they carried deceased indoors and sent for a doctor.

F. Impett, shoemaker, of 44, East Cliff, corroborated the statement of the previous witness.

Mrs. Adams, wife of Horace Adams, residing at 34, Dover Street, deposed that deceased had lodged with her for a fortnight. He had a latch key, and could have let himself in. She was out herself when the accident happened. The deceased had never complained of having anything the matter with him.

Dr. Frederick Eastes deposed that he was called at 11.20 on Saturday night to see the deceased. He found him suffering from a contused wound on the head, which was bleeding. In his opinion the deceased was also intoxicated. He attended to the wound, and promised to see him again on the following morning. Before visiting him on the following morning, someone came to him and said the deceased was dying. When he arrived at the house he found him dead. Death was caused by fracture of the base of the skull.

The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 26 May 1894.

Inquest

An inquest was held on Monday evening at the Town Hall before Mr. G.W. Haines (Deputy Coroner), on the body of Henry Skelton, aged 32, who accidentally met his death on the previous Saturday evening by falling down a flight of stone steps attached to a house in Dover Street. The following evidence was brought before the jury, of whom Mr. Alfred Howard was the foreman.

Mr. Frederick Adams identified the body of the deceased as that of a Custom House officer, who had been lodging at 32, Dover Street for the last fortnight or three weeks. On Saturday evening last the deceased came into the "Oddfellows Arms" (sic) about eight and stayed for half an hour. He returned between 10 and 11, and had a glass of beer and porter. He was sober, and had nothing else to drink during the time he remained there. He left about 10 minutes to 11. In about a quarter of an hour after, witness was called to render help, as the deceased had fallen down the steps which led to the door of his lodgings. He had known him for the last two years, and could find no fault with his habits.

Alfred Ganes, of 12, Saffron's Place, labourer, deposed that he was in Dover Street about 11 on the night in question, and saw the deceased fall over the rail on the top of the steps. He appeared to turn a complete somersault and fall straight on to his head. He picked him up, but the poor man was not conscious.

Frederick Hippett, 44, East Cliff, shoemaker, was with the previous witness, and gave a similar account of the accident.

Mrs. Jane Adams, wife of Mr. Horace Adams, fireman, 32, Dover Street, said the deceased lodged with them. She was out when the accident occurred, but the deceased could have got in as he had a latch key. She was at her brother-in-law's next door, and hearing the noise went out and opened the door for them to bring the deceased in. Eleven o'clock was late for him to be out.

Frederick Adams, re-called, said he found the deceased's latch key the next morning on the top step.

Dr. Fred Eastes stated that he was called in to see the deceased. He found him lying on the bed at 32, Dover Street, suffering from a contused wound on the right side of the head, which was bleeding. He was intoxicated. He dressed the wound and said he would see him in the morning. Next morning Mr. Adams came to tell him he thought he was dying, and on hurrying down he found he was dead. Judging from what he heard of his fall and the symptoms, he was of opinion deceased died from fracture of the base of the skull. Deceased spoke in a drunken manner and asked “What are you doing there?” three times. He should not think that was accounted for by the fall. He also struggled and smelt of liquor. Whether from the fall or drink he had not enough sense to know what they were doing for him.

In summing up, the Coroner said one would naturally have expected as a result of the fall the deceased would have talked incoherently. The doctor was not very emphatic in his assertion, and it would be for the jury to say whether they thought intoxication had contributed to the accident. If so, he was afraid it would be their duty to say so.

Mr. Adams said he wished to remark that the deceased smelling of drink might be explained by the fact that he had rubbed the deceased's lips with brandy to endeavour to restore consciousness. When he last saw him that evening he was quite right and capable, although he might have had a glass.

The doctor further added he was unable to judge as to the degree of the deceased's intoxication, but he quite agreed with the Coroner that some of the symptoms might have been caused by the fall.

Juryman Leckie: The struggling, for instance? – Yes, an injury to the brain would cause a great deal of struggling.

The jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of accidental death.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 20 December 1895.

Saturday, December 14th: Before The Mayor, Surgeon General Gilborne, and Messrs. W.G. Herbert and W. Wightwick.

Mr. Adams, of the "Oddfellows," Dover Street, was granted an extension for the first annual dinner of the “Sick and Dividend Society”.

 

From the Folkestone Express 21 December 1895.

Saturday, December 14th: Before The Mayor, Surgeon General Gilborne, W.G. Herbert, and W. Wightwick Esqs.

Mr. Adams, of the "Oddfellows," Dover Street, was granted an extension for the first annual dinner of the Sick and Dividend Society.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 16 May 1896.

Saturday, May 19h: Before The Mayor, Messrs. C.J. Pursey, W. Wighwick, and W.G. Herbert.

Frederick Adams was summoned for having his house open for the sale of drink during prohibited hours on 25th April. Mr. Martyn Mowll appeared for the defendant.

Sergt. Lilley stated that on Saturday, 25th April, in company with P.C. Reed, he watched the "Oddfellows" public house in Dover Street. At 5.35 he saw two men go to the side door opening into Saffron's Place, and one of them tried it. It was fastened. At twenty seven minutes to six he saw defendant come downstairs, and at twenty two minutes to six the two men who had tried the door went in. They stayed inside about a minute and a half, and then came out. Two other men went in. Witness and Reed afterwards entered, and found in the bar two men named Wade and White. Wade was drinking beer out of a glass, and White was served with a pint of beer by the landlord in witness's presence. After they were gone, the landlord said “I haven't got any excuse to offer, only the men came in for a pint before they went to work”.

Mr. Mowll, for the defence, put forward the plea that defendant, who had an excellent character, and had kept the house for several years without complaint, was misled by a clock which was a little fast. No doubt he had committed a technical offence, but he suggested that the justice of the case would be met by the summons being dismissed, merely on payment of the costs. Defendant would be more careful in future, and would in all probability come before the Licensing Committee at the proper time, and ask permission to open his house a little earlier, so that he would be able to serve men with some kind of refreshment before they went to their work.

Superintendent Taylor said there had been no case against the defendant before.

The Bench imposed a fine of 10s. and 9s. costs, treating it as a technical offence.

 

From the Folkestone Express 16 May 1896.

Saturday, May 9th: Before The Mayor, C.J. Pursey, W. Wightwick, and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

Frederick Adams was summoned for having his house open for the sale of drink during prohibited hours on the 25th April. Mr. Martyn Mowll appeared for the defendant.

Sergeant Lilley stated that on Saturday, 25th April, in company with P.C. Reed, he watched the "Oddfellows" public house, in Dover Street. At 5.45 he saw two men go to the side door, opening into Saffron's Place, and one of them tried it. It was fastened. At 27 minutes to six he saw defendant come downstairs, and at 22 minutes to six the two men, who had previously tried the door, went in. They had waited outside from the time they tried the door till they went in. Before they went in he heard one of the men say “He's about now”. They stayed inside about a minute and a half, and came out. Two other men then went in. He and Read then went in, and found in the bar two men named Wade and White. Wade was drinking beer out of a glass, and White was served with a pint of beer by the landlord in witness's presence. He said to the defendant “What is the meaning of these men being here?” He replied “What is the time, then?” Witness said “Twenty minutes to six”. There was a clock in the bar, and it pointed the time as ten minutes to six. After they were gone the landlord said “I haven't got any excuse to offer, only the men came in for a pint before they went to work”.

By Mr. Mowll: The actual time by the clock in the bar was not seven minutes to six. Adams did not say “It's pretty close work, Sergeant. My clock is seven minutes to six”. There are no houses in Folkestone with an early opening licence.

Mr. Mowll said there was no dispute as to the facts, but there was a little difference as to the actual time. The Bench knew the situation of the house, in the locality where there was a large number of working men, who often desired some refreshment before going to work for two hours. Defendant had an excellent character, and had kept the house for several years without any complaint. The defendant's clock might have been a little fast, but if there was a good fault a publican could have it was to keep his clock a little in advance of actual time, so as to ensure the closing of the house at eleven o'clock at night, when those offences were usually committed. He expressed surprise that there were no houses in Folkestone licensed to open before six o'clock for the accommodation of men going to work early in the morning. In Dover 33 houses had early opening licences, and 17 of them had a right to open at three o'clock, and 16 at five o'clock, and it was within his own knowledge that there were several publicans that did a very large trade in selling coffee to people before they went to work. In the ordinary course of things working men could not get refreshments in their own houses at that time in the morning, before they started for their work at six o'clock, and in cold weather to a man who was at all delicate it was a great comfort to him if he could get something before he began his day's work. No doubt the defendant had committed a technical offence, but he suggested the justice of the case by the summons being dismissed, merely on payment of the costs. Defendant would be very careful in future, and would in all probability come before the licensing committee at the proper time and ask permission to open his house a little earlier, so that he would be able to serve those men with some kind of refreshment before they went to their work.

Superintendent Taylor said there had been no case against the defendant before, but in consequence of complaints made to him he gave instructions for the house to be watched.

Mr. Mowll said there had been no complaint made to defendant. But he happened to have had some unpleasantness with a neighbour, and under those circumstances neighbours made themselves very officious.

The Bench imposed a fine of 10s. and 9s. costs, treating it as a technical offence.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 19 December 1896.

Saturday, December 12th: Before Mr. W. Wightwick, Mr. W.G. Herbert, and General Gwyn.

Mr. Adams, of the "Oddfellows Inn," Dover Street, applied for an extension on the occasion of the annual dinner of the Folkestone Sick and Dividend Society, which was granted.

 

From the Folkestone Express 19 December 1896.

Saturday, December 12th: Before W. Wightwick and W.G. Herbert Esqs., and General Gwyn.

Mr. Adams was granted an hour's extension on the occasion of the annual dinner of the Sick Divident Society at the "Oddfellows Inn," Dover Street.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 26 June 1897.

Local News

At the Dover County Police Court on Thursday, John Woods, foreman of the men employed at the works near the Warren, Folkestone, appeared to answer a summons charging him with selling beer without a licence. Mr. F. Hall prosecuted, and Mr. M. Mowll defended.

P.S. Weller, K.C.C., said he visited the works on May 26th. By the aid of a pair of field glasses he saw a boy go to the defendant's hut and come away with four glass bottles, which he handed to some men working near. This was repeated several times. On the 27th witness saw defendant, who said the beer was paid for beforehand, and that it came from Mr. Adams, of the "Oddfellows Inn," Dover Street, Folkestone. He said he got a commission for storing the beer and collecting the money. A boy named Spratt said he did the fetching and carrying of the beer for the gang he was in from the foreman's hut. Every man paid in advance for a pint of beer a day, and could have more. Teetotallers had Kops Ale.

Mr. Mowll submitted that there had been no breach of the law. He called the defendant, who said he had 300 men under him, and at their request he got them some beer, they signing a book ordering it. They paid for it beforehand.

Frederick Adams, "Oddfellows Inn," Folkestone, said the beer was obtained from his brewers, and sent direct to the railway siding at the Warren.

The Bench convicted the defendant, and fined him 4 16s. 6d., including costs and solicitors' fees.

Mr. Mowll afterwards applied for and obtained a licence for Mr. Adams to sell beer at the works.

 

From the Folkestone Express 26 June 1897.

Local News

At the Dover Police Court on Thursday, John Woods, foreman of the men employed on the South Eastern works at the Warren, between Dover and Folkestone, was summoned for selling beer without a licence. Mr. F. Hall, of Folkestone, prosecuted, and Mr. M. Mowll defended.

Sergeant Weller, of the K.C.C., said that on the 26th May he went over to the works at the Warren, where there was a large number of men employed. They went to a spot looking down on the defendant's hut, and were about three hundred yards from it. With the aid of a pair of field glasses, about 2.50, they saw a lad named Spratt go to the defendant's hut, and leave shortly afterwards carrying four glass bottles. He took them across the line to a forge and handed them to some men working there. About 3 p.m. a man came across the line to defendant's hut, and he left shortly afterwards carrying a heavy wooden case. At 3.10 they saw the lad Spratt go to the hut again, carrying a bag on his arm, and when he left he had something in the bag. He went up the line to a gang of men working there, and they saw him take some bottles out of the bag and give them to the men. Four of the men put their hands into their pockets and handed the lad something, which he took, and after examining it, handed them something back. On the 27th witness saw the defendant and had some conversation with him. Defendant said he had not been selling beer without a licence, and that the men had paid for the beer beforehand, and he had a book which could prove it. He said further that the beer was obtained from Mr. Adams, of the "Oddfellows Arms" (sic), Dover Street, Folkestone, and that he obtained a small commission for storing the beer and collecting the money.

Alfred Spratt, a lad employed at the Warren works, gave evidence to the effect that he did the fetching and carrying for the gang, and it was part of his work to fetch beer for the men from the foreman's hut, and he did so in the ordinary course on the 26th of May. Every man was allowed a bottle of beer a day, and it was all paid for beforehand. If a man did not want his bottle, he could let any other man have it, but there was no more than one bottle per man issued. Teetotallers were supplied with Kop's ale.

Mr. Mowll, in defence, submitted that the action of the defendant was not a breach of the law. The defendant was a man of very high character, and was in charge of a large body of men whose hours of labour made it an almost necessity that they should be supplied with beer. For example, on some occasions they worked 46 hours at a stretch, and on others 36 hours. Mr. Woods had devised a means by which the men could be supplied with refreshments, and that was by having the liquor sent over from a fully licensed landlord in Folkestone. The defendant had dealt with a most difficult class of men in a very proper manner, consistent with sobriety, and it was to his credit that there had not been a single accident from any cause since he had been in charge of the works.

John Woods, the defendant, said he had had as many as 300 men under him at a time, and last October the men asked him to get them some beer. He told them that he would if they signed the book produced, and after that was done he ordered it from Mr. Adams.

Frederick Adams, the landlord of the "Oddfellows Inn," Folkestone, said that the order for the beer was executed by his brewer, and was sent by him direct to the siding at the Warren.

The Bench said that it was a very proper and important case to be brought before a Court. They were of opinion that it could not be placed in the same category as that of a restaurant keeper sending out for liquor for his customers, and therefore they had decided to convict. Defendant would be fined 4 16s. 6d., including costs and solicitor's fee.

Mr. Mowll afterwards applied for and obtained an occasional licence for Mr. Adams to sell at the works.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 11 December 1897.

Wednesday, December 8th: Before The Mayor, Messrs. J. Fitness, and W.G. Herbert.

Mr. Adams was accorded an extension of an hour at the Oddfellows Inn on the occasion of a public dinner.

 

From the Folkestone Express 11 December 1897.

Wednesday, December 8th: Before The Mayor, J. Fitness, and W.G. Herbert Esqs.

An hour's extension was granted to the "Oddfellows Arms" (sic) on the occasion of an annual dinner.

 

From the Folkestone Express 14 January 1899.

Saturday, January 7th: Before Alderman Banks, and W.G. Herbert and J. Fitness Esqs.

Mr. Adams applied for an hour's extension for an annual dinner at the "Oddfellows Inn," Dover Street. Granted.

 

From Folkestone 14 January 1899.

Local News

An extension of time was granted to Mr. Adams, of the "Oddfellows," Dover Street, for a dinner.

 

Folkestone Up To Date 14 January 1899.

Local News.

The tenancy of the Rose Hotel was transferred, and a temporary licence granted by the Magistrates on Saturday last. An extension of time was granted to Mr. Adams, of the Oddfellows, Dover Street, for a dinner.

The Magistrates were Mr. W.G. Herbert and Mr. John Fitness, while Alderman Banks occupied the chair, but it was not clear to the public whether he took part in the proceeding or not. He certainly did not vacate the chair. As regards Mr. Herbert, we have no remarks to make, but we always understood that licensing justices must neither be directly or indirectly connected with the liquor traffic, yet Alderman Banks's firm act as agents for many brewers and have a great deal to do with valuing and transferring tenancies of the same.

Mr. Fitness, we are informed, is the owner of two shops which have off licences for the sale of wine, spirits and beer, one being Makin's in Guildhall Street, and the other Messrs, Fisk's on the Sandgate Road.

We only thought that probably some others might think these gentlemen indirectly interested in the trade.

 

From the Folkestone Herald 3 June 1899.

Folkestone Police Court

On Saturday a fisherman named Richard Brice was fined 1 and 10s. costs for being drunk and disorderly.

P.C. Dunster deposed that on the 22nd, at nearly midnight, he found the defendant, who was very drunk, sitting on the doorstep of the "Oddfellows Inn," his clothes strewed about the street; he used bad language. The whole neighbourhood was disturbed.

The defendant was away at sea.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 16 December 1899.

Wednesday, December 13th: Before Alderman Banks, and Messrs. Wightwick, Herbert, and Pursey.

Frederick Adams' application to extend premises known as the "Oddfellows Inn," Dover Street, was granted.

 

From the Folkestone Express 16 December 1899.

Wednesday, December 13th: Before John Banks, W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

Mr. Adams was granted an occasional licence for a dinner of the Oddfellows Society.

Oddfellows Inn 1900s

 

From the Folkestone Express 30 June 1900.

Monday, June 25th: Before J. Fitness, W. Wightwick, W. Salter, and C.J. Pursey Esqs., and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.

Mr. H. Adams, who has for many years been a member of the Folkestone Fire Brigade, applied for a temporary licence for the "Oddfellows Inn," Dover Street. It was granted.

 

Fromk the Folkestone Express 15 September 1900.

Wednesday, September 12th: Before J. Fitness, J. Pledge, W. Wightwick, and J. Stainer Esqs.

Thomas Adams applied for a transfer of the licence of the "Oddfellows Arms" (sic), Dover Street. Mr. W. Charles James appeared for the applicant. The Bench granted it.

 

From the Folkestone Herald 15 September 1900.

Folkestone Police Court

On Monday, transfer was granted to the following: Mr. Horace Adams for the "Oddfellows."

 

From the Folkestone Express 15 December 1900.

Saturday, December 8th: Before J. Stainer Esq., and Lieut. Col. Westropp.

Mr. Adams, of the "Oddfellows Arms," Dover Street, was granted an extension of time on Friday, when the club will hold their annual dinner.

 

From the Folkestone Herald 15 December 1900.

Monday, December 10th: Before Messrs. Fitness, Swoffer, and Herbert, and Lieut. Colonel Hamilton.

An application was made by Mr. Adams, of the "Oddfellows Arms" (sic), for an extension of time for an hour on Friday, the 14th inst. Granted.

 

From the Folkestone Express 14 December 1901.

Wednesday, December 11th: Before W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs.

Mr. Adams, landlord of the "Oddfellows Inn," Dover Street, was granted an extension of time on the occasion of the annual dinner of the Oddfellows.

 

From the Folkestone Herald 11 April 1903.

Wednesday, April 8th: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, Lieut. Colonel Hamilton, G.I. Swoffer, and E.T. Ward.

James McLean was charged with deserting from the Scottish Rifles, at Dover. He pleaded Guilty.

Inspector Lilley stated that at 11.30 on Tuesday night he saw prisoner walking up Dover Street. He saw him go to the "Oddfellows public" house, where he stood knocking for some minutes, getting no answer.

As he had a military appearance about him he questioned him. In reply to his enquiries, prisoner said he came from Deal and Dover, at which latter place he had been working for a week. His name, he said, was William Wilson, and he described himself as a labourer. Asked if he was a soldier, he replied in the negative. Not being satisfied with his answers, the Inspector took him to the police station. Here prisoner said that last week he worked on the Pier at Dover, and lodged with a Mrs. Jackson in Roseberry Street, Dover. In communication with the Dover police, it was ascertained that this statement was false, as there was no such street in Dover. McLean then said he had worked at Winchester, but subsequently he told the Inspector not to trouble any further, admitting that he was a deserter from the Scottish Rifles.

Prisoner now had nothing to say.

An officer, who was in Court, said prisoner should have gone out with a draft to South Africa that morning.

Prisoner was handed over to an escort who were present in Court, and a reward of 1 was granted to Inspector Lilley for having effected the arrest.

 

Folkestone Daily News 26 February 1908.

Wednesday, February 26th: Before Messrs. Herbert, Swoffer, Leggett, Linton, Stainer, Carpenter, and Boyd.

The licence of the "Oddfellows" was transferred from Mr. Adams to Mr. A. Hartley.

 

From the Folkestone Herald 29 February 1908.

Wednesday, February 26th: Before Mr. W.G. Herbert, Councillors G. Boyd and W.C. Carpenter, Major Leggett, Messrs. J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, and G.I. Swoffer.

The licence of the "Oddfellows Inn," Dover Street was transferred from Mr. Adams to Mr. Hartley.

 

From the Folkestone Express 29 February 1908.

Wednesday, February 26th: Before W.G. Herbert Esq., Major Leggett, J. Stainer, W.C. Carpenter, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, and G. Boyd Esqs.

The transfer of the licence of the "Oddfellows Inn," Dover Street, from Mr. Adams to Mr. Hartley (temporary authority having been granted) was confirmed.

 

From the Folkestone Daily News 2 March 1908.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 2nd: Before Messrs. Ward, Carpenter, Herbert, Leggett, Fynmore, Linton, Boyd, and Stainer.

The licence of the "Oddfellows Inn," which had been temporarily transferred to Mr. Hartley, was renewed without any opposition.

 

From the Folkestone Express 7 March 1908.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The adjourned Licensing Sessions for the Borough took place on Monday, when the licensing Justices on the Bench were E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Cols. Fynmore and Hamilton, and J. Stainer, W.G. Herbert, W.C. Carpenter, R.J. Linton and G. Boyd.

"Oddfellows Inn"

The licence of the "Oddfellows," Radnor Street (sic) was granted to Mr. Hartley, a temporary licence having been obtained.

 

From the Folkestone Herald 7 March 1908.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 2nd: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Councillor W.C. Carpenter, Councillor G. Boyd, Col. Fynmore, Col. Hamilton, Messrs, W.G. Herbert, and J. Stainer.

The adjourned Licensing Sessions for the Borough of Folkestone were held at the Town Hall on Monday morning, when the licences of three houses, the Railway Inn, Beach Street (Beer and Co.), the Eagle, High Street (Style and Winch), and the Bricklayers Arms, Fenchurch Street (Ash and Co.), were referred to the Compensation Authority for East Kent.

The Oddfellows Inn

Mr. Hartley, the new licensee of the Odfellows Inn, was granted a renewal of the licence, temporary authority in connection with which had already been granted him.

Oddfellows Inn 1910 - 1914.

 

From the Folkestone Express 27 May 1911.

Thursday, May 25th: Before W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer and R.J. Linton Esqs., and Major Leggett.

William Henry Farley, a sailor, was charged with being drunk and incapable. He pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Piddock said at 7.30 p.m. the previous day he was in Dover Street, when he saw the prisoner staggering from one side of the street to the other. He cautioned him and told him to go away. Prisoner said “All right”, but entered the "Oddfellows Inn," from which he was ejected. Prisoner was drunk, and narrowly escaped falling through a shop window. He then took him into custody.

P.S. Sales, who was on duty at the police station, said prisoner asked for a doctor, and Dr. Bateman attended and gave a certificate.

Fined 2s. 6d. and 5s. 6d. costs, or seven days'.

 

From the Folkestone Daily News 13 February 1913.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The Licensing Bench on Wednesday, February 12th, was constituted as follows: Messrs. Ward, Boyd, Leggett, Swoffer, Stainer, Herbert, Fynmore, Hamilton, and Linton.

The Chief Constable read his report (for which see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman said the report of the Chief Constable was very satisfactory, but the Bench were still of opinion that there were too many licensed houses in a certain portion of the town. Therefore a number would have their licences withheld until the adjourned sessions on the ground of redundancy. Formal opposition to the renewals would be served so that full enquiries could be made into the trade of these houses, with a view of referring some of them to the Compensation Authority.

The following were the licences which were held over: The Raglan, Dover Street; Oddfellows, Dover Street; Royal Oak, North Street; Isle of Cyprus, Bayle; Lord Nelson, Radnor Street; Lifeboat, North Street; Wellington, Beach Street.

 

From the Folkestone Express 15 February 1913.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

The Brewster Sessions were held on Wednesday morning. The Justices present were E.T. Ward Esq., Major Leggett, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, G. Boyd, G.I. Swoffer, R.J. Linton, and J. Stainer Esqs. Mr. Boyd and Mr. Stainer did not take part in the licensing business, not being on the committee.

The Chief Constable read his report as follows: Gentlemen, I have the honour to report that there are at present within your jurisdiction 119 places licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor by retail, viz., Full Licences 73, Beer On 7, Beer Off 6, Beer and Spirit Dealers Off 15, Grocers, etc. Off 9, Confectioners' Wine On 3, Chemists Wine Off 5. This gives an average, according to the Census of 1911, of one licence to every 281 persons, or one on licence to every 418 persons. As compared with the return submitted last year this is a decrease of two licences. At the general annual licensing meeting last year a new licence was granted for the sale of beer off the premises at Morehall, and two other off licences were discontinued.

At the last adjourned general annual licensing meeting the renewal of the licence of the Rendezvous Hotel was referred to the Compensation Committee on the ground of redundancy, and at the meeting of that Committee on the 7th August, 1912, the licence was refused, and after payment of compensation the house was closed for the sale of drink on the 28th December last.

During the past year fifteen of the licences have been transferred; one licence was transferred twice.

Six occasional licences have been granted for the sale of drink on premises not ordinarily licensed for such sale, and 34 extensions of the usual time of closing have been granted to licence holders on special occasions.

During the year ended 31st December last 85 persons (62 males and 23 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 64 were convicted and 21 discharged.

In the preceding year 54 males and 31 females were proceeded against, of whom 66 were convicted and 19 discharged.

The number convicted of drunkenness last year, viz., 46 males and 18 females, is, I find, the smallest number convicted in any year since 1896.

Of those proceeded against, 31 were residents of the Borough, 34 were persons of no fixed abode, 13 residents of other districts and seven were soldiers.

No conviction has been recorded against any licence holder during the past year. Proceedings were taken against the holder of an off licence for a breach of the closing regulations, but the case was dismissed.

Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is sold are registered in accordance with the Act of 1902.

There are 17 places licensed for music and dancing, eight for music only, and two for public billiard playing.

I have no complaint to make as to the conduct of any of the licensed houses, and offer no opposition to the renewal of any of the present licences on the ground of misconduct.

The Chairman said it was a very satisfactory report indeed, but they felt that there were still too many licensed houses, particularly in certain portions of the Borough, and the Justices would direct that a certain number of the applications for renewal should be deferred till the Adjourned Sessions, so that they might have evidence as to the trade those houses were doing, and decide whether any of them ought to be referred to the Compensation Authority.

The houses to be dealt with were seven in number, namely; the Raglan Tavern, the Oddfellows, the Royal Oak, the Isle of Cyprus, the Lord Nelson, the Lifeboat, and the Wellington.

With those exceptions the existing licences were granted.

 

From the Folkestone Herald 15 February 1913.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 12th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Lieut. Col. Hamilton, Major Leggett, Mr. W.G. Herbert, Mr. J. Stainer, and Mr. G. Boyd.

The Chief Constable presented his annual report (for which see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman remarked that the report was a very satisfactory one, but, in the opinion of the Bench, there were still too many public houses in certain portions of the town, and they would defer the renewal of certain of the licences to the adjourned sessions, so that they might have evidence as to what trade they were doing, and see if any of them were to be referred to the compensation authority.

The licensees of the Raglan Tavern, the Oddfellows, Dover Street, the Royal Oak, North Street, the Isle of Cyprus, the Lord Nelson, the Lifeboat, and the Wellington were called forward.

The Chairman said the renewal of the licences of those public houses would be deferred until the adjourned licensing sessions, and notice of opposition would be served in the meantime on the ground of redundancy. The Chief Constable would be directed to serve the notices.

The licences of all the other houses were then renewed.

 

From the Folkestone Daily News 10 March 1913.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Monday, March 10th: Before Messrs. Ward, Hamilton, Stainer, Herbert, Harrison, Morrison, Linton, Boyd, Stace, Jenner, and Giles.

There was again a large crowd in Court on Monday morning, when the fate of 7 licensed houses (referred for redundancy) hung in the balance.

At the commencement of the proceedings the Chief Constable said the Bench had to consider the seven licences adjourned from the annual sessions on the ground of redundancy. He invited the Bench to hear the evidence in regard to such houses separately and give a decision after hearing all the evidence.

The "Oddfellows," Dover Street.

Tenant, Mr. A. Hartley, brewers, Messrs. A. Leney.

The usual objections were offered by the Chief Constable, who said he considered the premises ill-adapted for the business. He had no doubt that a very considerable trade was done, but if the licence were taken away there would be no inconvenience whatever.

Mr. A. Hartley said he had held the licence of the house for the last five years; he was not tied for spirits.

Two clubs met at his house, he did a good trade, made a good living, and wished to keep on the licence.

Mr. A. Leney gave the average barrels sold as 6 per week, and said the house showed an increase.

The Bench retired at 4 p.m., and returned at 4.10, the Chairman announcing that the Lord Nelson and the Isle of Cyprus would be referred to Canterbury and the other five licences would be renewed.

 

Folkestone Express 15 March 1913.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

At the annual licensing sessions seven licences were deferred to the adjourned sessions, which were held at the Town Hall on Monday. The Magistrates on the Bench were E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col.

Hamilton, Alderman Jenner, and W.G. Herbert, J. Stainer, R.J. Linton, G. Boyd, W.J. Harrison, J.J. Giles, E.T. Morrison and A. Stace Esqs.

The Oddfellows

The next licence to be considered was that of the Oddfellows. Mr. Drake represented the owners, Messrs. Leney, and the licensee, Mr. A. Hartley.

The Chief Constable said Mr. Hartlet obtained the licence in 1908. The registered owners were Messrs. Leney and Co., Dover, and the rateable value of the house was 24. The house was situate in Dover Street at the corner of Saffron's Place. The front entrance in Dover Street was approached by five steps from the street, and it opened into a front bar. There was a side entrance from Saffron's Place, which opened into the lobby, from which there was a bar or taproom which overlooked the back yard. On the first floor, approached by stairs from the lobby or side bar, was a club room in front, 15ft. by 12ft., and another behind 11ft. by 10ft., with a moveable partition, so that the two rooms could be thrown into one. The living room of the licensee was in the basement. The entrance to it was by five steps down from Dover Street. There was a small enclosed yard at the back of the premises. That was approached by three steps down from the lobby or side bar. There was no other entrance to the yard, which was divided from the next door by a wall only five feet high. The nearest licensed house was the Granville, in Dover Street, 79 yards away. The rateable value of that was 19. The Chequers was 125 yards away, and it belonged to the same firm of brewers. The rateable value of that was 28. Next door to the Chequers was the South Foreland, with a rateable value of 72. There were eleven other on-licensed houses within a radius of 150 yards, and most of them did a similar class of trade to that house. He considered the premises to be ill-adapted for the business and it was an awkward place altogether. He had no doubt that a very fair trade was being done, but he felt that if the licence was taken away there would be ample accommodation elsewhere.

Cross-examined, Mr. Reeve said the house was easy of police supervision. It had been conducted in a proper manner. There had been no complaint against the house. There had only been two transfers during the last thirteen years. The premises were ill-adapted for the business, and did not seem to be the class one would wish for a public house. The front bar was very stuffy.

Mr. Hartley said he had held the licence during the last five years. His average for the last three years for the spirit trade was 112 gallons. The Homing Pigeon Society and the Wednesday Social Club met at his house. He did a good trade and wanted to keep on the house. He was making a good living.

Mr. Leney said the average trade for beer during the last three years was 325 barrels. In 1912 the trade went up to 343 barrels from 325. It was, therefore, an increasing trade.

Mr. Drake, for the owners, contended that the two houses belonging to Messrs. Leney should not be sent to the compensation authority. His chief and only objection to that course being adopted was that both were doing a considerable trade, one over five barrels a week, and the other just on five barrels. If a licensee was doing five barrels a week, in addition to his spirits, it showed there was a necessity for the house in the district.

The Magistrates retired, and on their return the Chairman announced that the licence would be renewed.

 

From the Folkestone Herald 15 March 1913.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

The adjourned Annual Folkestone Licensing Sessions were held at the Police Court on Monday, when the licences of the seven houses deferred at the Annual General Sessions came up for hearing. Mr. E.T. Ward was in the chair, and he was supported by Mr. W.G. Herbert, Lieut. Colonel C.J. Hamilton, Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Mr. G. Boyd, Alderman C. Jenner, Captain Chamier, Mr. J.J. Giles, Councillor W.J. Harrison, Mr. E.T. Morrison and Councillor A. Stace.

The Oddfellows.

Mr. B.C. Drake represented the owners, Messrs. Leney and Co.

The Chief Constable stated that the present licensee of the house was Mr. A. Hartley, who obtained a transfer in 1908. The rateable value was 24, and the registered owners were Messrs. Leney and Co., Dover. The house was situated in Dover Street, at the corner of Saffrons Place. The front entrance in Dover Street was approached by five steps, which opened into the front bar. There was a side entrance from Saffrons Place, which opened into a lobby or side bar, and from this lobby there was a tap room overlooking the back yard. On the first floor, approached by stairs from the lobby, was a side bar or club room in front, 15ft. by 12ft., and another one behind 11ft 10ins. by 8ft. 10 ins., with a movable partition, so that they could be thrown into one room. The living room of the licensee was in the basement. The entrance to it from the passage was down five steps from Dover Street, near the front bar of the house. There was a small enclosed yard at the back of the premises, and a w.c. This was approached by three steps down from the lobby or side bar. There was no other entrance to the yard, which was divided from the next door by a wall only 5ft. high. The nearest license house was the Granville, in Dover Street, 79 yards away, and the rateable value of that house was 19. The Chequers was at the other end of Dover Street, 125 yards away, and belonged to the same firm of brewers. The rateable value of the Chequers was 28. Next door to the Chequers was the South Foreland, with a rateable value of 72. There were eleven other licensed houses within a radius of 150 yards, and most of them were doing a similar class trade. He considered the premises to be ill-adapted for the business; an awkward place altogether.

Cross-examined by Mr. Drake, witness stated that the house was easy to supervise by the police, and there had been only two transfers during the last twelve years.

Mr. Hartley stated that he had held the licence for five years, and his average spirit trade had been 112 gallons for the last three years. Two clubs were connected with the house, a pigeon society and a social club. He made a good living there.

Cross-examined by the Chief Constable, witness stated that the fact of his having been summoned for not paying his rates at different times was not due to bad trade. It was simply that he had neglected to pay them.

Mr. C. Leney stated that the average barrelage for the last three years had been 325 barrels, about 6 barrels per week. The trade was increasing. He had never heard anything about the structural difficulties before. The house came into their possession thirty years ago.

Mr. B.C. Drake briefly suggested to the Magistrates that these houses should not be sent to Canterbury Quarter Sessions. Both the houses were doing a considerable trade, and the tenants were making a fair living, showing that there was a necessity for the houses in the district.

The Magistrates retired for a period to consider their decisions. On their return the Chairman said that the Oddfellows licence was renewed.

Oddfellows Inn 1915 - 1919.

 

From the Folkestone Herald 13 February 1915.

Friday, February 12th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Mr. R.J. Linton, and Mr. J.J. Giles.

An application for the temporary transfer of the Oddfellows Inn, Dover Street, from Mr. Harper to Mr. Charles Marsh was granted.

 

From the Folkestone Express 27 November 1915.

Local News

At a sitting of the Folkestone Bench on Wednesday, before E.T. Ward Esq., and other Magistrates, Mr. Collar, on behalf of the owners, Messrs. Leney and Co., submitted plans of proposed alterations to the Oddfellows, Dover Street. These were passed by the majority of the Bench, Councillor G. Boyd voting against.

 

From the Folkestone Herald 27 November 1915.

Wednesday, November 24th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. R.J. Linton, Councillor G. Boyd, Councillor W.J. Harrison, Mr. E.T. Morrison, and Col. G.P. Owen.

The Bench passed plans for slight alterations of the Oddfellows Inn, Dover Street. Councillor G. Boyd voted against the application.

 

From the Folkestone Express 9 February 1924.

Annual Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Dr. W.J. Tyson, Miss Weston, Miss Hunt, the Rev. Epworth Thompson, Alderman Pepper, Col. Owen, Col. Broome-Giles, Messrs. G.I. Swoffer, G. Boyd, A. Stace, W. Hollands, E.T. Morrison, J.H. Blamey, and W.R. Boughton.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) presented his report as follows: I have the honour to report for your information that there are at present within your jurisdiction 114 premises licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquor, and taking the population of the Borough according to the last Census this gives an average of one licensed house to every 329 persons. The following are particulars of the licensed premises: Full licences 71; beer on 7; beer off 6; beer and spirit dealers 13; grocers, etc., off 6; confectioners wine on 3; chemists wine off 4; cider and sweets off 1; Total 114 (81 on and 33 off). Fifteen of the licences have been transferred during the year. Four occasional licences have been granted to licence holders to sell drink on special occasions elsewhere than on their licensed premises, and 60 extensions of hours have been granted to licence holders when dinners, etc., were being held on their licensed premises. In no case has any abuse of the privilege been reported. Six hotels and one restaurant have authority under Section 3 of the Licensing Act, 1921, to supply intoxicating liquor with meals for one hour after 10 p.m. on weekdays, viz.: Metropole Hotel, Grand Hotel, Majestic Hotel, Regina Hotel, Esplanade Hotel, Royal Pavilion Hotel, and Central Cafe. During the year ended 31st December, 1923, 26 persons (21 males and 5 females) were proceeded against for drunkenness; 16 were convicted and 10 discharged after being cautioned by the Bench. Of those proceeded against, 8 were residents of the Borough, 5 were soldiers, 10 were of no fixed abode, and 3 were non-residents. This is an increase of one as compared with the number proceeded against last year, when 25 persons (16 males and 9 females) were proceeded against, of whom 16 were convicted and 9 discharged. The permitted hours, as allowed by the Licensing Act, 1921, have been fixed by the Licensing Justices for the Borough of Folkestone as under: On weekdays from 10.30 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. On Sundays from 12 noon to 2 p.m. and from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Eleven clubs where intoxicating liquor is supplied are registered under the Act. All the licensed premises have been periodically visited at irregular intervals by my officers during the year to see that the same are being conducted in a satisfactory manner, and I am pleased to report that with few exceptions no adverse reports have been submitted to me. There are 28 premises licensed for music and dancing and one for public billiard playing. During the year two licensees have been proceeded against for breaches of the Intoxicating Liquor Laws, viz.: (1) 15 June 23 Henry William Cork, George the Third, Fenchurch Street, permitting intoxicating liquor to be consumed on his licensed premises during non-permitted hours; the case was withdrawn upon my application to the Bench. (2) 7 September 23 Alfred John Cope, Rose Hotel, Rendezvous Street, failing to have his name and expression of business for which the licence was granted affixed to the premises; fined 10s. On 20th October, 1923, Michael Ivory, of the Bouverie Hotel, Bouverie Road, was convicted and fined 1 at Newport, Isle of Wight, for consuming intoxicating liquor on licensed premises during restricted hours. I beg to report that in my opinion there is still a redundancy of licensed premises on the older portion of the Borough. Observation has been kept, and it would appear that very unequal trade is done between house and house in the same neighbourhood. Three houses, viz.: The Oddfellows, Dover Street, The  Belle Vue, St. John's Street, The Richmond Tavern, Richmond Street, according to reports received, are doing the least trade in the area referred to, and I have no hesitation in saying that they are redundant to the needs of the public, and I accordingly recommend that the licence of each house be referred back for your consideration at the adjourned meeting. I have to express my appreciation of the fairness and courtesy extended to me by the Bench during my first year of office, and also for the able assistance I have received from your Clerk, Mr. John Andrew.

The Chairman said they were especially pleased, it being the Chief Constable's first year there, that he was in a position to present such a good report. The members of the Licensing Authority were very gratified that the report was so good. They were of opinion that such a good report must point to the fact that the licence holders had been careful during the past year to see that the law had been carried out and adhered to on every possible occasion. Proceedings had only been taken against two licence holders, and they were reminded that in one instance the Chief constable withdrew the summonses, and in the other case the offence was of a technical nature. Then with regard to the cases of drunkenness, out of the 16 convictions only eight of them were residents of the Borough. When they considered the population of Folkestone and that Folkestone was a port, with a fishing quarter, and with a military district adjoining, the Magistrates thought it spoke well for the community. They knew the community of Folkestone was very sober, but it only required a few indiscreet persons to spoil their record. They were glad to know that those few indiscreet persons had exercised great discretion during the past year, and they hoped the number would not be increased during the present year. On behalf of the Bench he offered his congratulations to the licence holders and the general public, who had enabled the Chief Constable to present such an excellent report. The Justices had given full consideration to the question of the renewal of those houses specifically mentioned with regard to redundancy, and they had decided to put back the renewal of those licences for consideration at the adjourned meeting, and they directed the Chief Constable to cause opposition to their renewal. As proceedings were also pending against the Prince of Wales Inn for alleged breaches of the Licensing Act that licence would not be renewed, but would be put back to the adjourned meeting also. The question of the renewal of the licences of the Rose Hotel and the George the Third had also been considered, and they would be renewed that day. All the other licences would also be renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 February 1924.

Annual Licensing Sessions

Wednesday, February 6th: Before Alderman R.G. Wood, Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. A. Stace, Alderman A.E. Pepper, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, Mr. W.R. Boughton, Councillor W. Hollands, Colonel P. Broome-Giles, Miss A.M. Hunt, and Miss E.I. Weston.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) read his report (for details see Folkestone Express).

The Chairman said they had heard the report of the Chief Constable, and they were especially glad, it being his first year, for him to be in a position for him to present such a good report at this annual licensing meeting. He did not think it required many words from him, beyond saying that the members of the licensing authority were very grateful that the report was so good, and they were all of opinion that having such a good result must point to the fact that the licence holders had been careful during the past year to see that the law was carried out and adhered to on all possible occasions. Proceedings had only been taken against two licence holders, and they were reminded in one case that the Chief constable withdrew the summons, and the other case was of a technical nature. He thought they would agree with him that neither of these charges could have been of a serious nature. With regard to the convictions for drunkenness, they had heard that out of sixteen offenders only eight were residents of the borough.

When they considered the population of Folkestone and further that the town was a port, with a fishing  quarter, and had a military camp close at hand, to know that only eight of the offenders were residents spoke very well, he thought, for the community. (Hear, hear) The community as a whole was a very sober one in Folkestone. It only required a few indiscreet persons to spoil their record, and they were glad to know that those few indiscreet persons had exercised great discretion during the past twelve months, and they hoped that the number of offenders would not be increased during the coming year. They offered their congratulations to the licence holders and the general public, who had undoubtedly assisted the Chief Constable to present such an excellent report as they had had that morning. The Bench felt that the question of the renewal of the licences of the "Oddfellows Inn," the "Belle Vue," and the "Richmond Tavern" should have further consideration on the grounds of redundancy, and therefore they would put back the licensing of these houses to the adjourned sessions. They also directed the Chief Constable to give opposition to the renewals on the ground stated. The licence of the "Prince of Wales," against which proceedings were pending, would also be put back. The "Rose Hotel" and the "George" the Third Inn had also been considered, and in these cases the licences would be renewed that day. Therefore, with the exception of the three houses mentioned on the grounds of redundancy, and the one against which proceedings were pending, all the other licences would be renewed that day.

 

Friday, February 8th 1924.

Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and other Magistrates.

William Spearpoint was charged with being drunk on licensed premises. Inspector Pittock said at 8.30 on Thursday evening he was in the private bar of the "Oddfellows Inn," Dover Street, when defendant came in and asked for a drink. The landlord refused to serve him and requested him to leave. He followed defendant and told him to go home. He lost sight of the prisoner, and next saw him when in the Jubilee Inn, where he was seated facing the bar. He called for a drink, but before defendant could be served he had told him to leave the premises. He arrested him and took him to the police station. Prisoner, who said he was very sorry it had happened, was discharged. Mr. MacKay, the licensee of the Jubilee Inn, was called before the Magistrates, the Chairman saying that they had sent for him to caution him and others. Prisoner was drunk on his premises, and he ought to have seen that he was removed from there at once. It was his duty to do so. He should be more careful in the future. Mr. MacKay said that he did not have time to turn the prisoner out before Inspector Pittock came in.

 

Folkestone Express 1 March 1924.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 27th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson and other Magistrates.

The Magistrates considered the opposition of Mr. Beesley to the renewal of the licences of the "Oddfellows Inn," Dover Street, the "Richmond Tavern," and the "Belle Vue" on the ground of redundancy.

Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared in the cases of the "Oddfellows Inn" and the "Richmond Tavern," both of which are owned by Messrs. Leney and Co., of Dover, and the respective licensees, Mr. G. A. Woodley and Mr. A. Ingleton, and Mr. G. W. Haines appeared for Messrs. Mackeson and Co., the owners, and Mr. F. J. Taylor, the licensee, of the "Belle Vue Inn."

Evidence was given by Mr. Beesley and Inspector Pittock to the effect that the houses were unnecessary for the needs of the district, and the latter gave evidence as to the result of his observations regarding the trade done at the three houses compared with the other houses in the district. The Magistrates decided to renew the licence of the "Richmond Tavern," but referred the other two houses to the Compensation Authority at Canterbury.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 March 1924.

Adjourned Licensing Sessions.

Wednesday, February 27th: Before Dr. W.J. Tyson, Mr. G. Boyd, Mr. A. Stace, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Colonel G.P. Owen, Mr. E.T. Morrison, Mr. J. Blamey, the Rev. H. Epworth Thompson, and Miss A.M. Hunt.

The Chief Constable (Mr. A.S. Beesley) opposed the renewal of the licences of the "Oddfellows Inn," Dover Street, the "Richmond Tavern," Richmond Street, and the "Bellevue Hotel," St. John's Street on the ground of redundancy.

The "Oddfellows Inn."

The case of the "Oddfellows Inn" was taken first. Mr. Rutley Mowll appeared on behalf of the licensee. The Chief Constable, in the witness box, stated that he put in an ordnance survey map of the congested area. The population of the borough, according to the Census in 1921, was 37,511. There was one on licence to every 814 inhabitants, and there was one licence to every 329 persons. The west end of the borough was almost entirely residential. With the exception of four large hotels there were only twenty one on licences. This comprised half the area of the town and two fifths of the population of the town. In the congested area there were 854 houses, and the population was 4,270. There were twenty one on licences, and one on licence to every 135 persons and every thirty houses. The "Oddfellows Inn" was an old on fully licensed house, situated in Dover Street at the corner of Saffrons Place within the congested area. The present licensee was Mr. Clement Augustus Woodley, who obtained the transfer on July 4th, 1923. The two previous transfers were obtained in the years 1908 and 1915. The registered owners were Alfred Leney and Company (of Dover), and the annual value of the house was 24. The nearest licensed house was the Granville, in Dover Street, which was 79 yards away. The rateable value of this house was 24 10s., and within twenty yards was the Druids' Club, which had a membership of 914. There was also the George III, in Fenchurch Street, of a rateable value of 28; it was only 120 yards away. Then there was the Star and Garter beerhouse (rateable value 28), only 160 yards away. There were fourteen fully licensed houses and four on beerhouses within 200 yards of the house in question. From observation kept, the three houses named did a superior trade to the "Oddfellows," catering for a like class of customers. He considered that there was ample accommodation in the immediate neighbourhood for the public if this licence was not renewed. In his opinion the licence was unnecessary for the accommodation of the public. Cross-examined by Mr. Mowll, witness said the house was kept by an ex-policeman. He conducted the house admirably, and to the satisfaction of the police. It was a well kept house. The renewal of the licence was considered by the Magistrates in 1913, when it was also opposed on the grounds of redundancy. On that occasion the licence was renewed by the Magistrates. Inspector Pittock said he kept observation on the "Oddfellows Inn." He started doing so on the 19th January and he visited the house practically daily until February 22nd. He also visited other houses in the immediate vicinity. He had prepared a comparative table of the trade of the "Oddfellows" and the other houses. During seventeen visits to the "Oddfellows" the total number of customers was 45; at the Granville 173; at the George III 375; and at the Star and Garter 121. The average attendance was 2.6 at the "Oddfellows," at the Granville 13.3, George III 28.81, and the Star and Garter 7.5. With one exception, the visits were made in the evening. All the houses were in a working class locality. There had been a considerable fall in the number of customers to the house in question during the past eighteen months. On the 24th of January when he went to the house the licensee said “Hello. What are you after? This redundancy business?” He replied “I am just having a look round”. He then said “From what I can see about it this house could well be done without; there is very little trade being done now”. Witness said “I think your complaint is pretty general”. By Mr. Mowll: His visits were not carried out in uniform. George Parks Wood, a representative for A. Leney and Company, owners of the house, put in the trade as revealed by the books of his firm from the year 1912 to the present time. He was not able to give any figures with regard to the sale of spirits. The number of barrels of beer (36 gallons each) supplied in 1912 was 342, and in 1923 146. There had been a falling off in trade since the war. Mr. Mowll quoted figures denoting a gradual decrease in the amount of beer brewed in England and Wales since 1921. Mr. Wood said that his firm desired that the licence should be renewed. The Bench retired, and upon their return the Chairman said they had decided that the licence of the "Richmond Tavern" should be renewed, but with regard to the "Bellevue Hotel" and the "Oddfellows Inn," they would be referred to the compensation authorities. The licences of the "Oddfellows Inn" and the "Bellevue Hotel" were provisionally renewed.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 August 1924.

Local News.

The East Kent Compensation Authority, sitting at St. Augustines, Canterbury, on the 1st instant, had before them the question of the renewal of the licences of the "Oddfellows," Dover Street, and the "Bellevue Hotel," St. John's Street, Folkestone, refused by the local Justices on the ground of redundancy. Mr. W. A. Wardley, instructed by Mr. C. Rootes, appeared in support of the Justices' refusal to renew, and Mr. L. S. Fletcher, instructed by Mr. Geo. W. Haines, appeared in support of the renewal of the licence of the "Bellevue Hotel." In the result the Compensation Authority decided not to renew the licence, and as the owners of the "Oddfellows" did not contest the decision of the local Justices with regard to that house, both licences will cease to exist on payment of compensation in a few weeks' time.

 

From the Folkestone Express 22 November 1924.

Local News

A meeting of the East Kent Compensation Authority was held at the Sessions House, Longport Street, Canterbury, on Monday, to approve the awards agreed as regards houses which had been referred for compensation. Lord Fitzwalter was in the chair. The following were the awards: "Oddfellows," Dover Street, Folkestone, 1,525 - 1.314 1s. 1d. to Messrs. Alfred Leney and Co. Ltd., of Dover, and 210 18s. 11d. to Clement Augustus Woodley, the tenant; "Belle Vue Hotel," St. John's Street, Folkestone, 1,320 - 1,071 18s. 6d. to Messrs. Mackeson and Co. Ltd., and 248 1s. 6d. to Frederick John Taylor, the tenant.

 

Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald, 29 November 1924.

Compensation for extinguished licences.

A meeting of the East Kent Compensation Authority was held at the Sessions House, Longport Street, Canterbury on November 17th to approve the awards agreed as regards three houses which have been referred for compensation.

Lord FitzWalter presided and was supported by Messrs. W. A. Lochee, C. E. Bass, N. A. Poole, A.G. Iggulden, C. Igglesden, and A. H. Godfrey.

"Odd Fellows," Dover Street, Folkestone (publican's,) 1,525 - 1,314 1s. 1d. to Messrs. Alfred Leney and Co., Ltd., Dover, and 210 18s. and 11d. to Clement Augustus Woodley, the tenant.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

BEGENT William 1845-46

KEELER George 1846-50s Next pub licensee had Bagshaw's Directory 1847

Last pub licensee had EARLE Richard Earle 1850s

NEAL Hannah 1851+ (wife of LV age 40 in 1851Census)

HARRIS James 1864-84 Post Office Directory 1874Post Office Directory 1882

ADAMS Charles 1884-90 Post Office Directory 1891

HARRIS James 1890

ADAMS Annie 1890-93

ADAMS Frederick 1893-1900 Kelly's 1899

ADAMS Horace 1900-08 (age 42 in 1901Census) Post Office Directory 1903Kelly's 1903

HARTLEY Arthur 1908-15 Post Office Directory 1913

MARSH Charles 1915-23 Post Office Directory 1922

WOODLEY Clement 1923-3/Jan/25

 

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

 

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