DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Page Updated:- Sunday, 16 May, 2021.

LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

 

Notes of 1949

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 2 February, 1949.

WINGHAM BENCH GRANT LICENCE APPLICATIONS

The Annual Licensing Sessions for the Wingham Division were held at Canterbury on Thursday, Mr. T. G. Elphnston presiding.

Police reports showed:- In the Canterbury area one House to 313 persons, in the Dover area 262, Ramsgate area 197, and Folkestone area 217. Only one person had been charged with drunkenness.

The Chairman expressed satisfaction with the excellent reports and the bench complimented both the  licence-holders on the very good results - a very fine testimony to the benefits of free enterprise.

He understood that one person convicted of drunkenness was not a British subject.

There was no opposition to an application by Mr. W. J. Mason, for a full licence for the "Plough Inn," Hougham, which had been holding a beer and wine licence.

After evidence the Bench granted the application, it being stated that the agreed additional monopoly value was 650.

Similar full licences were granted to "Evenhill House," Littlebourne (monopoly value 575), and to Frederick W. Gambrell, of the "Prince of Wales," Woodnesborough, Ash, described as a roadhouse. he said that he had lived in the village since 1917 and houses had been built in the vicinity of the house since the war. He produced a petition from 128 customers. (Monopoly value  530).

Speaking of five similar applications which he was making, Mr. Elliot B. Allard said that Section 73 of the new Licensing Act virtually invited licensees to put their houses in order by making those applications, so removing the anomaly of some houses having full licences and others not. The idea was to help the interest in the tourist trade - and where was that more important than in Kent?

Mr. Allard then successfully appealed for full licences for G. S. brown, of the "Wheatsheaf," Cop Street, Ash (net monopoly value 425); for Albert Richards, of the "Black Pig," Staple (525); for A. P. Dewell, of the "Plough and Harrow," Tilmanstone (400); for George H. Cant, of the "Carriers Arms," St. Margaret's, hitherto the only non-fully licensed house in the village (425); and for Edwin W. Settersfield, of the "Palm Tree," Woodnesborough (500).

Additional wind licences were granted to Edward W. A. Marsh, the "Royal George," Waldershare; George F. Hurley, of the "Bell Inn," Shepherdswell; Charles J. Baker of the "SwanInn," Wickhambreaux; Stephen Dickens, of the "Carpenter's Arms," South Alkham, mrs. Saunders of the "Fox Inn," Temple Ewell, harry Hubbard of the "Hope Inn," Lydden; Alfred W. Claringbould of the "Wheatsheaf," Martin; Percy Richards, of the "Crooked Billet," Ash; John Oliver, of the "Palm Tree," Eythorne; Samual Whitehouse, of the "Butcher's Arms," Ashley, and George Pepper, of the "Rose," West Langdon.

Most of the above licensees produced petitions from customers. Mrs. Whitehouse who represented her husband, said he was 67, worked at the coal-face and did not like losing a shift. Mr. Pepper said that an attraction of his house was that the private bar was furnished with a complete suite of Louis XVI furniture, bought by his wife during the war.

Applications by Messrs. Vyes to sell spirits at their grocery stores at Shepherdswell and Eastry, were refused as in both cases, the magistrates considered there was already sufficient licences premises in the neighbourhood to meet the residents' needs.

Mr. S. Daniels, for Messrs. Vyes, said the granting of the licences would not only provide a delivery service for the villagers, but would be a much appreciated facility for housewives who did not wish to enter public houses.

Mr. William Salmon, licensee of the "Whitehall Inn," Shepherdswell told the Magistrates that he could meet, not only the demands of the residents of the village, but two other villages as well.

Evidence in support of the application at Eastry was given by Gen. Blaxland and Capt. Tordiff.

Mr. A. Smithers, appearing for the Wingham Licensed Victuallers' Association, pointed out that there were already five public houses in Eastry for a population of 1,500.

 

Sevenoaks Chronicle and Kentish Advertiser 11 February 1949.

Bouquet for the pubs of Tonbridge area.

TONBRIDGE magistrates consider that the licensed premises in their district are very well conducted and congratulated all concerned at the annual licensing sessions on Tuesday when Sir William Nottidge presided.

Supt. R. Sly reported that there were 126 licences and 20 clubs in the district with a population of 34,081 and that all premises had been well conducted. One non-resident had been convicted for being drunk and incapable and two local and one alien drivers for being drunk in charge of motor vehicles.

Reporting on those premises in the Tonbridge area but under Sevenoaks police supervision, Supt. O. Beslee said there were 38 licences with a population of 9,180. No person had been convicted of drunkenness during the year, and no licensee had been prosecuted.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 11 February, 1949.

TOO MANY PUBLIC HOUSES

An application by the Dover and District Victuallers' Association for all public houses in the town to open during the evening from 6.30 till 10.30 during the whole of the year instead of during the Summer, as at present, was refused by Dover Magistrates at the annual Licensing Sessions at the Town Hall on Monday.

The hours were fixed as follows:- From April 4th until October 29th, 6.30 to 10.30; and from then on from 6 to 10. The magistrates were: Mr. W. Hollis (Chairman), Mrs. Binge, and Messrs. G. D. Clark, J. R. Cairns, W. G. Jeffrey, C. W. Chitty, F. A. Holmes, H. A. Brazier, R. Newman, G. W. Blackburn, H. E. Russell, G. Golding, and D. Bradley.

Mr. P. A. G. Akington, appeared for the Association told the Bench that it was thought that the hours for which they were asking would work as well for the consumer as for the trade. It operated reasonably for the licensee, enabling him to have a longer break from the time he closed in the afternoon, and it operated reasonably for the consumer who was on shift work. It was common knowledge that there was very little business done in Dover public houses during the evenings up to 6.30, and when the hours were fixed from 6 o'clock it meant at least half-an-hour's wasted electric light and heating.

The annual report of Supt. H. A. Saddleton stated that owing to the reorganisation of the Kent County Constabulary there were now 149 licensed premises in the district, including, in the Borough, 118 fully licensed houses, 5 beer "on" licences, 8 "off" licences, 2 wine "on" licences and 11 shops where other goods were sold in addition to intoxicating liquor. In addition there were 5 fully licensed houses in the parishes of Ringwould and Kingsdown. The licenses of the Dovorian Restaurant and the "Grand Hotel" had not been applied for in 1948. The licence of the "Wheelwright's Arms," Bridge Street, was removed to Dryden Road, Buckland Valley Housing Estate, on March 1st, but 27 licensed premises were still closed as a result of enemy action during the war.

Licensees and Managers had generally conducted their business in a satisfactory manner. At regular periods during the year, 607 visits had been made to licensed premises, particular attention being given to the presence of young people on the premises. From observation kept, it appeared that licensees were carrying out the provisions of the Intoxicating Liquor (Sale to Persons Under Eighteen) Act, 1923. Five males had been convicted of drunkenness during the year, three of whom were residents, the other two being visitors to the district. There appeared to be a good supply of beer, but spirits were in limited supply. New clubs registered during the year were:- Dover Ex-Services Company Ltd., 579 Construction Squadron, R.E. (Cinque Ports) T.A., Dover and District C.W.S. Employees' General Sports and Social Club, and the Rover (Dover) Bowling Club. There were now 19 registered clubs in the Licensing District, including 2 in Kingsdown, with a total membership of 5,524. Sixteen licences had been transferred, and the following had been granted: 292 special orders of exemption (including 275 in respect of the Christmas period), 33 occasional licences, 3 music, singing and dancing licences, and 16 extensions of those licences. In addition, 8 plans for structural alterations had been approved.

the annual report of Supt. Greatorex, for the liberties of Dover, also referred to the re-organisation of the Kent Police District. Since the change, only the parish of Acol, situated in the "L" Division, came within the jurisdiction of the Dover Cinque Ports Licensing Division. There was no registered clubs, no drunkenness, and no cause for complaint.

Mr. W. Hollis (Chairman), in a brief review of the state of affairs in the licensed trade in the town, said that at the present moment there were 27 licences which could be reopened at any time, and it was a situation which the licensing justices did not like. The position was now that the brewers decided how many licences there would be in the town. It was a simple matter of arithmetic to discover that there was a licensed house for every 250 inhabitants. It was quite understandable  that there were many licensees in Dover who found difficulty in making a living from what he called legitimate trade, and when a licensee was driven from legitimate trade into other practices it was not to the good of the trade or the public. He wanted people to take an interest in those matters, because it would shortly be coming under review again, and it was only right that people should know everything about it. The justices had no jurisdiction to cause any licence to become redundant, and what was going to be the solution, in the interests of the public and the trade he did not know. he would like to say quite plainly and without prejudging any case, that no further licences would be granted in Dover. The Chairman concluded his remarks by saying that he had not the least doubt that licensees had conducted their business in the most satisfactory manner in which they could, although he was of the opinion that there were many more licences in the town than were necessary.

Mr. Wilfred Mowll applied for the renewal of all existing licences , and this was granted, as were the music, singing and dancing licences.

An application by Mr. Mowll for exemption from the normal licensing hours in respect of the Marine Station Refreshment Rooms was also granted, the condition being that the exemption applied to periods of one hour before the departure and one hour after the arrival of cross-channel boats.

The usual extra hour for suppertime was granted in respect of the "Royal Cafe," the "Shakespeare," Priory Station Refreshment Rooms, Capelli's Restaurant, and the "White Cliffs Hotel."

Applications for a new licence for the Refreshment Rooms, Eastern Docks, the re-grant of a term licence for the Refreshment Rooms, Ferry Dock, a full licence for the "White Cliffs Hotel," wine "off" licence, 68, Church Street, St. Peter's full licence, Prospect Restaurant, Broadstairs, spirits "off" licence, 13, High Street, St. Peter's, full licence "Carlton Hotel," Broadstairs, re-grant of term licence for the "Willmot Hotel," Broadstairs, together with applications for consent to alterations were adjourned to the adjourned licensing sessions at the Town Hall on March 7th. The adjourned sessions at Broadstairs were fixed for Feb. 23rd.

 

From the Dover Express, 11 February 1949.

WINGHAM BENCH GRANT LICENCE APPLICATIONS.

The annual Licensing Sessions for the Wingham Division were held at Canterbury on Thursday, Mr. T. G. Elphnston presiding.

Police reports showed:— In the Canterbury area one House to 313 persons, in the Dover area 262, Ramsgate area 197, and Folkestone area 217. Only one person had been charged with drunkenness.

The Chairman expressed satisfaction with the excellent reports and the Bench complimented both the Police and the licence-holders on the very good results—a very fine testimony to the benefits of free enterprise. He understood that the one person convicted of drunkenness was not a British subject.

The licence of the “Chequers,” Hougham, was transferred from James Moon to J. T. Ingram, and that of the Grove Perry Hotel from R. H. Salmon to Charles C. Bew.

There was no opposition to an application by Mr. W. J. Mason, for a full licence for the “Plough Inn,” Hougham, which had been holding a beer and wine licence.

After evidence, the Bench granted the application, it being stated that the agreed additional monopoly value was 650.

Similar full licences were granted to “Evenhill House,” Littlebourne (monopoly value 575). and to Frederick W. Gambrell, of the “Prince of Wales,” Woodnesborough, Ash, described as a roadhouse. He said that he had lived in the village since 1917 and houses had been built in the vicinity of the house since the war. He produced a petition from 128 customers. (Monopoly value 530).

Speaking of five similar applications which he was making, Mr. Elliot B. Allard said that Section 73 of the new Licensing Act virtually invited licensees to put their houses in order by making these applications, so removing the anomaly of some houses having full licences and others not. The idea was to help our interests in the tourist trade—and where was that more important then in Kent?

Mr. Allard then successfully appealed for full licences for G. S. Brown, of The “Wheatsheaf,” Cop Street, Ash (net monopoly value 425); for Albert Richards, of the “Black Pig” Staple (525); for A. P. Dewell, of the “Plough and Harrow,” Tilmanstone (400); for George H. Cant, of the “Carriers' Arms,” St. Margaret’s, hitherto the only non-fully licensed house in the village (425); and for Edwin W. Setterfieid, of the “Palm Tree,” Woodnesborough (500).

Additional wine licences were granted to Edward W. A. Marsh, the “Royal George,” Waldershare; George P. Hurley, of the “Bell Inn,” Shepherdswell; Charles J. Baker, of the “Swan Inn,” Wickhambreaux; Stephen Dickens, of the “Carpenters’ Arms,” sonth Alkham; Mrs. Saunders of the “Fox Inn,” Temple Ewell; Harry Hubbard, of the “Hope Inn,” Lydden, Alfred W. Claringbould, of the “Wheatsheaf,” Martin; Percy Richards, of the “Crooked Billet ” Ash; John Oliver, of the “Palm Tree,” Eythorne, Samuel Whitehouse, of the “Butchers' Arms,” Ashley, and George Pepper, of the “Rose,” West Langdon.

Most of the above licensees produced petitions from customers. Mrs. Whitehouse, who represented her husband, said he was 67, worked at the coal-face and did not like losing a shift. Mr. Pepper said that an attraction of his house was that the private bar was furnished with a complete suite of Louis XVI furniture bought by his wife during the war.

Applications by Messrs. Vyes to sell spirits at their grocery stores at Shepherdswell and Eastry, were refused as in both cases, the Magistrates considered there was already sufficient licensed premises in the neighbourhood to meet the residents’ needs.

Mr. J. S. Daniels, for Messrs. Vyes, said the granting of the licences would not only provide a delivery service for the villagers, but would be a much appreciated facility for housewives who did not wish to enter public houses.

Mr. William Salmon, licensee of the “Whitehall Inn,” Shepherdswell, told the Magistrates that he could meet, not only the demands of the residents of the village, but two other villages as well.

Evidence in support of the application for the licensing at Eastry was given by Gen. Blaxland and Capt. Tordiff.

Mr. A. Smithers, appearing for the Wingham Licensed Victuallers’ Association, pointed out that there were already five public houses in Eastry for a population of 1,500.

 

From the Sevenoaks Chronicle and Kentish Advertiser, 11 February, 1949.

Bouquet for the pubs of Tonbridge area.

TONBRIDGE magistrates consider that the licensed premises in their district are very well conducted and congratulated all concerned at the annual licensing sessions on Tuesday when Sir William Nottidge presided.

Supt. R. Sly reported that there were 126 licences and 20 clubs in the district with a population of 34,081 and that all premises had been well conducted. One non-resident had been convicted for being drunk and incapable and two local and one alien drivers for being drunk in charge of motor vehicles.

Reporting on those premises in the Tonbridge area but under Sevenoaks police supervision. Supt. G. Beslee said there were 38 licences with a population of 9,180. No person had been convicted of drunkenness during the year, and no licensee had been prosecuted.

The Bench granted a full licence in respect of The "Pinnacles," Shipbourne-road, Tonbridge, and transferred it to Col. Blackiston.

APPLICATIONS.

No opposition was offered to applications for full licences made by Cecil Nelson Cheeseman, "Cardinal's Error," Tonbridge: Louis Taylor, "Old House at Home," Edenbridge; Noel Jempson, The "Plough," Hildenborough; Henry Sawyer, "Star and Garter," Golden Green; Alfred John William Young, "Red Cow," Tudeley; Albert John Clark, "Gardener’s Arms," Tonbridge; Arthur Alvin Leonard Barby, "Blacksmith's Arms," Hadlow; Cecil Roland Copplestone, "Wheelwright's Arms," Matfleld; Hubert Stanley Seal, "Wheatsheaf," Chiddingstone; Ernest William Ellen, "Railway Arms," Tonbridge; Frederick Pankhurst, "Prince of Wales," Hadlow; Cyril Frederick Horsfleld, "Man of Kent," Tonbridge; Edward William Vincent, "Halfway House," Brenchley; Percy Smith, "Forester’s Arms," Paddock Wood; Harold Henry Wicks, "Bat and Ball," Southborough; Albert Edward Stovold, "Ancient Druids," Tonbridge.

Wine licences were granted to Percy Walter Seal, "Brickmaker's Arms," Leigh; Arthur John Whyman, "Beehive," Southborough; Albert Abraham Wakefleld, "Elephant and Castle," Tonbridge; George Paige, "Swan Inn," Edenbridge.

William Taylor Talbot, 20, Barden-road, Tonbridge, applied for an “off” licence for his premises that he might deliver liquor with groceries in outlying districts. Mr. D. Riley made the application and Mr. P. Miskin opposed on behalf of Messrs. George Prentis and Son, off-licence, High-street, Tonbridge, and Mr. G. S. Hall for the licensees of premises in the vicinity.

The magistrates granted the application.

Opposition to the granting of a full licence to Alexander Lovett, "Prince Albert," Tonbridge, was registered by Mr. P. Rendall, for Mr. W. J. Balch, licensee of the "Angel Hotel," Tonbridge, and of the owners, but the application was granted.

An application by Maurice William Brough, "Royal Oak," Tonbridge, was referred to the adjourned sessions on March 8, as was one by Frederick Ernest Perrin, "Rose and Crown," Hadlow.

The application of Mabel Emily Morgan, "Greyhound," Charcott, Leigh, was also adjourned for fresh notices to be served. Alfred Worster, "Bottle House," Penshurst, who asked for a full licence, had his application refused pending arrangements for re-building.

 

Thanet Advertiser, Friday 11 February 1949.

NEW LICENCES. RAMSGATE BREWSTER SESSIONS.

Seven new full licences were granted to local publicans when the annual licensing sessions were held at Ramsgate, on Friday.

The licences were in respect of the "White Swan," "Alexandra Arms," "South Eastern Tavern," "Flying Horse," "Chatham Arms," "Albert Inn" and "Southwood Tavern." Hitherto all the premises held a beer and wine on licence, and applications were made for licences covering the sale of spirits.

With the exception of the "Chatham Arms" and the "Southwood Tavern," all the applications were opposed by Mr. A. R. Young, representing other licensees in each vicinity concerned.

The main grounds of Mr. Young's objections were that whisky was in short supply and that additional licences would have the effect of reducing the quota received by those who already held licences.

Mr. Philip Bracher, who represented the "Flying Horse," "Chatham Arms" and "Albert Inn," said it was difficult to see why in the past, some licences were restricted to beer or beer and wine only. It seemed an anomaly in these days for that state of affairs to exist.

Refreshingly New Idea.

Mr. Young said he was representing clients whose personal livelihood was touched by the applications. He was not making an organised onslaught on new licences as such. In his experience of licensing sessions it was a "refreshingly new Idea" on the part of applicants to suggest to the bench that they should "tidy things up" by granting full licences. A licensee paid "x" pounds to the Government for a monopoly for selling spirits in his area and it was not fair to take away trade from him unless they were satisfied that he could not cope with what business there was.

There were four objectors to the application by Arthur Oliver Cavey for a beer off licence in respect of 48 Grange-road, where a wine and spirits off license was already held. The objections were rejected by the bench and the application granted.

Mr. James Hudson, of the "Australian Arms," was also granted a wine on licence, and all applications for renewals were approved by the Justices.

Other Applications.

Other applications granted included—transfers of the licences of the "King of Denmark" from Alfred P. W. Bowley to John Bowyer; the "Alma Inn" from John Bowyer to Archibald E. Wood; the "Royal Hotel" from Frederick S. Williams to Herbert J. Loverseed; the "Duke of York" from Henry G. Packer to Frank J. W. Turner; the "Rose and Crown" from the late Theophilus R. Bean to Mrs. Emily Bean.

Music and dancing licences— "Royal Oak Hotel," Granville House Ballroom and Regent Social Club (Belmont-street). Music licences—"Horse and Groom" and "White Horse Inn."

In his annual report to the Justices Supt. Greatorex stated that five males were proceeded against for drunkenness in 1948, compared with three in 1947 and six in 1948.

Excluding registered clubs there were 138 licensed premises in the borough, and according to the last census the population of the town was 34,422. There were thus 281 inhabitants to each licence.

Commenting on the report the chairman, Lieut. Col, E. E. Ogler, said the justices regretted that there had been slight increase in the cases of drunkenness, but they felt confident that Ramsgate compared favourably with other towns. The bench were lenient in granting extensions of hours and they were glad to know that their leniency had not been abused. They congratulated the police and the licensees on the way the premises were being run.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 4 March, 1949.

KENT LICENSEES MEET AT DOVER

At the annual meeting of the Kent County Federation of Licensed Victuallers' Association, at the "White Cliffs Hotel," Dover, on Thursday last week, Mr. G. J. Efford (Maidstone) was unanimously re-elected Chairman; Mr. T. J. Price (Folkestone) Vice-Chairman; Mr. J. Cockrill (Gillingham) Hon. Treasurer and Mr. W. G. Love (Ramsgate) Secretary.

Mr. L. Hawkins (Secretary of the Dover Association) welcomed the delegates from all parts of the county.

In presenting the Executive Committee report for 1948, Mr. Love said that the Committee regretted that they were not in a position to announce a better state of affairs for the retail trade. Overhead charges had mounted up, as the result of increased assessments, together with the Catering Wages Act, and the crippling taxation on commodities. The high prices prevalent to-day, placed many drinks beyond the pockets of the average customer, and had a most disastrous effect on the retailer.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 29 April, 1949.

DRUNK IN GARDENS

Joseph Douglass, aged 46, of Dour Street, described as a retired Army Officer, pleaded guilty at Dover Magistrates' Court on Monday, to being drunk and incapable in Maison Dieu Gardens at 1.45 p.m. on Saturday.

Inspector Piddock said P.C. Charlton found Douglass lying drunk in the Gardens beside a partly consumed bottle of gin. he was taken to the Police Station, and when charged at eight o'clock that evening asked, "is that where I was?"

Defendant told the Magistrates he suffered from nerves.

The Chairman, Mr. W. Hollis, said the bench had given the matter deep consideration, and in view of the fact that defendant suffered from nerves, had decided to dismiss the case under the First Offenders' Act.

 

From the Sunderland Echo, Saturday, 4 June, 1949.

Kentish Inns.

The latest addition to 'the Whitbread library' is a handsomely-produced slim volume of 60- odd pages on Inns of Kent, published at 5s. It is beautifully illustrated, with a number of pictures in colour. Kent is a favourite county, and to judge by this book it is fortunate in the character and variety of its Inns. There are houses which are scarcely changed since the Canterbury Pilgrims made those journeys which Chaucer described, and others where tales of long-dead smugglers are still told.

 

Dover Express, Friday 17 June 1949.

Lost pubs.

Memories of Dover public houses no longer in existence, will be revived for some of the older generation by a framed pamphlet entitled "Crookshank's Dream of Public Houses in Dover," which came to light this week when a Dover solicitor was going through old papers in his office.

Thought to be about 80 years old, Crookshank's Dream introduces in short story form the names of 48 public houses, among them "Dover Castle," the "Grand Sultan," the "Crusader," the "Mail Packet," the "Two Brewers," the "Milestone," the "Green Dragon," the "Trinity Pilot," the "Comet," the "Brussels," and the "Victoria."

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 5 August, 1949.

WHY THE PUBS CLOSED EARLY

Many who knew that Dover publicans had been granted a half-hour extension of opening hours for Bank Holiday were surprised to find the public houses closing at the normal time, 10.30 p.m. on Monday.

The reason was that the licensees had withdrawn their application following refusal of Dover Magistrates on Friday, to reverse their decision not to allow the extra half hour for Saturday as well.

Making the application for a reconsideration, Mr. P. A. G. Aldington said he would draw attention to the fact that the Entertainments Committee were using their endeavours to welcome visitors from overseas as well as the British Isles and Dover was in competition with Deal and Folkestone and Thanet, and, in the absence of any Police objection he asked the Bench to review the result of the previous application and grant the extension for Saturday as well as Monday.

Insp. Grigg said he was instructed to leave the matter entirely to the Bench. The Police had no real objection.

After the Magistrates had retired to consider the application, the Chairman (Mr. C. W. Chitty) announced that they had decided not to vary the previous decision.

“My instructions,” Mr. Aldington then stated, “are to withdraw the application altogether – that is for the Saturday and the Monday. The reason, I think I ought to tell you, is that the licensees feel that to grant a half-hour's extension on one day is not justifiable from their point of view.”

The Chairman said that the Bench agreed to the withdrawal of the application.

 

Daily Herald, Monday 13 June 1949.

Signs Please.

Last month Whitbread's the Brewers started the game of collecting the Inn signs of pubs in Kent.

They issued miniature inn sign cards which landlords were to hand out to their customers. The idea was to collect a set of 50.

A friend who was in Kent during the weekend tells me that "Sorry, no inn signs," is now the cry of the barmaids of that County. One publican who issue 10,000, awaits a new supply.

Remote little pubs that formerly housed the local darts team of an evening are now besieged by visitors in cars, hunting swaps.

But the children of Kent are happy. Somehow or other they have cornered the cards, stand outside the pub selling them to baffled collectors; if you came out of the public bar, the price of six pence - if the saloon, one shilling.

 

Dover Express, 25 November 1949.

BREWERS’ AGREEMENT WITH CANTERBURY.

A report that Canterbury City Council have reached agreement with the Kent Brewers’ Union regarding the re-allocation of licences in respect of public houses destroyed in the war says that, as a result there will be about 25 per cent, fewer licensed houses in the City.

At the Dover Licensing Sessions earlier in the year, the Chairman stated that the Magistrates did not like the position that had arisen whereby the brewers, holding the licences of war-closed houses, could decide how many licensed premises there were in the town.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 9 December, 1949.

LICENCES

Approval was given to the removal of the licence of 58 Castle Street to 58 Castle Street, which were formerly the licensed premises before war damage.

The licence of the "Savoy Cafe," Snargate Street was transferred from Mr. Stanley Arthur Masters to Kathleen Emma Victoria James, of Downton Farm, Nr. Shrewsbury, Shropshire; "railway Station Refreshment Rooms," Priory Station from Mr. Archibald MacMurchy to Mr. William Henry Johnson.

An application on behalf of 70 members of the Wingham and District L.V.A. for Christmas extensions on December 24th, 26th and 27th, to 11.15 p.m., and on New Year's Eve until 11.45 p.m., was heard. The extensions were granted until 11.p.m. in each case. A number of other licences received similar extensions.

 

 

TOP Valid CSS Valid XTHML