DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Folkestone, July, 2020.

Page Updated:- Wednesday, 22 July, 2020.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton and Jan Pedersen

Earliest 1863

Railway Bell

Closed July 2008

209 Dover Road

Folkestone

From the Folkestone Herald, 11 February, 1978.

Railway Bell 1940

Above photo, 19 October, 1940.

From the Folkestone Gazette, 18 October, 1961.

Railway Bell 1961

The reconstructed "Railway Bell," in Dover Road, near the Junction Station, will be opened tomorrow. The premises were badly damaged during an air raid in World War 2. The new building is in the latest contemporary style.

From the Folkestone Herald, 21 October 1961.

Railway Bell 1961

The new "Railway Bell," near the Folkestone Junction Station, reconstructed from the old shell-damaged inn, was reopened on Thursday.

Railway Bell 1978

Above photograph kindly supplied by Jan Pedersen, 1978.

Railway Bell sign 1995

Above sign, March 1995.

With thanks from Brian Curtis www.innsignsociety.com.

Railway Bell 2009

Above photo 2009 by David Anstiss Creative Commons Licence.

Former Railway Bell Former Railway Bell

Above photographs of the former "Railway Bell". Taken on 6th July 2009 by Paul Skelton.

Former Railway Bell 2012

Above photo kindly sent by Phil Nicholson, 29 November, 2012.

 

Rumour has it that there was a pub on this site as early as 1843, built the same time as the railway line was being constructed and supplied beer to the workers, however, no evidence has yet been found to confirm this rumour.

What is known is that brewers Nalder and Collyer from Croyden obtained a lease of land from George Holledge at a rent of  £74 per annum for 99 years (quite a huge sum at the time) on 29th September 1862, and architect Joseph Gardner designed the premises that opened shortly after construction in February 1863. The house at the time was being advertised as containing a large bar and bar parlour, tap room, parlour and club room, six bedrooms, commodious cellars and the usual conveniences besides a walled garden.

The high rental at first discouraged anyone from taking on the pub and staff from the brewery were forced to run it till 2nd January 1865 when Joseph Moret became its first proper licensee.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 10 January, 1863. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

ROBBERY

Monday January 5th:- Before the Mayor and John Kingsnorth, Esq.

Thomas Groves and George Cockson, privates in the 96th Regiment, stationed at the Camp, were placed in the dock, and the following evidence was given:-

Thomas Brown, K.C.C., was on duty at Hougham on the 2nd of January, and at ten a.m., at the "Royal Oak" in that parish, saw the prisoners, who were drinking in the tap room, and told him that they had passes, but they had lost them. He approached them as deserters, they being in uniform, but Groves had no military cap on. He saw the chisel produced sticking out of the pocket of Groves's tunic, and charged Groves with having stolen property in his possession. While talking, the chisel fell out of the pocket, and witness picked it up. Groves said he bought the chisel at Dover. Witness then asked Groves for the hammer in his possession, which he had been offering for sale. He at first denied having a hammer, but after a few minutes he gave it up. He took them in a conveyance to Seabrook station, and on the way they found Groves's cap. The prisoners were committed from Hythe as deserters, and after they had been conveyed to Shorncliffe Camp he apprehended them on the present charge.

James Quested Petts, builder in Folkestone, was building a house near the railway station. The workmen and himself left their tools in the house at night. The chisel produced was his property, and was in the house at five o'clock on the 1st of January. At half past 7 the following morning he missed several tools, but having no occasion to use the chisel he did not miss it till the afternoon. That morning he found a ladder against the back kitchen window, the window open, and a piece of candle in the yard.

There being no evidence against Cockson the charges against him were dismissed, but Groves elected to be tried by a jury at the Quarter Sessions.

Groves and Cockson were then charged with a second offence.

John Allen, labourer at Hougham, saw the prisoners between 9 and 10 on the morning of the 2nd of January come out of a meadow near Steady Hole (sic) on the road to Dover – Groves being without his belt, and Cockson without his cap. When he first saw them they were standing in a corner of the field, and he thought they had left something there, so he went to look, and found the painter's basket, tools, and two coats, now produced, which he took home, but he did not open it until P.C. Swain came to his lodgings for it.

George Haynes, painter, was at work on the 2nd of January at Mr. Petts's house, near the railway station. The basket, and the dust brush, chisel, two punches, scraper, screwdriver, and nail claw, now produced, were his property, and were left in the building at half past four o'clock on the 1st of January. The hammer was also his property, and was left in the basket. The tools were worth about six shillings. There were two other articles in the basket.

The prisoner Cockson said he left the barracks about half past three o'clock on the 1st of January, with two men who slept in the same room. He went to the "Three Horseshoes," but did not remember leaving there. He supposed he went out about tattoo until next morning, when he found himself lying in the Dover Road. He had lost his waist belt and the number of his forage cap, and looking about to find these articles he saw Groves. They went together to a public house, where they had a pint of beer. They left that house, and went on to the "Royal Oak." The policeman came in there and took them into custody as deserters. He saw nothing but the chisel and the hammer in the house.

The prisoners were then committed for trial at the Sessions.

 

Note: The tools were stolen from the then-nearing-completion of the "Railway Bell." Jan Pedersen.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 14 March, 1863. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

ADVERTISEMENT

To Be Let, with Immediate Possession, the "RAILWAY BELL INN," near the Upper Railway Station, Folkestone. The house is just completed, and contains large Bar and Bar Parlour, Tap Room, Parlour, and Club Room, Six Bedrooms, commodious Cellars, and all the usual Conveniences, besides a large Walled Garden.

For particulars apply to G. Holledge, Esq., White Post House, or Mr. J. Gardner, Architect, Folkestone.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 4 April, 1863. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

QUARTER SESSIONS

Thursday April 2nd:- Before J.J. Lonsdale, Recorder.

A true bill having been returned against Thomas Groves and George Cockson, two soldiers of the 96th, for larceny, they were placed in the dock, and the following witnesses were examined –

George Haynes, sworn: I am a painter, residing in Folkestone. I recollect the 1st of January. I was at work at the "Railway Bell," near the upper railway station. I had a basket of tools with me. I put them in an upper front room. I left them safe at half past 4. I missed them next morning at 7. The room was not locked. The outer doors of the house were locked. I saw the men closing them. The door was open when I got there. I saw a back room window open. I don't know if it had been fastened overnight. I have not seen the prisoners before. I saw some of the tools next in the possession of P.C. Swain, and some with the county constable.

Thomas Brown, sworn – I am constable in the K.C.C. On 2nd January I found the two prisoners drinking in the "Royal Oak" public house, in the parish of Hougham, about half past 10. I asked them if they were on “pass”. They said they were. I asked for their passes, and they both said they had lost them. I said I should apprehend them as deserters. They said they were not deserters. I said they were liable, as they were more than one mile from the camp without a pass. They had been drinking. While I was speaking, the chisel produced fell from the back pocket of the tunic of the prisoner Groves. I asked him where he got it. He said he bought it at Dover. I then asked him for the hammer. He first denied having one. When I told him, from information received, I knew he had been offering them both for sale, he then took the hammer from his trousers pocket. I was half an hour trying to apprehend them, and to put the handcuffs on. The landlord and another man assisted me after a while. I took them into custody, and conveyed them to Seabrook, and gave them in charge of Superintendent English.

John Allen: I am a labourer. I recollect the 2nd January. I was going along the Dover Road between nine and ten in the morning with a load of manure. I saw the two prisoners in a meadow near Steddy's Hole. Thinking they had left something behind them I went to look. They were stooping down in a corner near the road. They then went away over the further field – away from me. Stephen Burvill was with me, but he went on with the horses. I found a basket with a quantity of tools hid under some gorse, and two painter's coats laid over them. I saw prisoners look round when I went to the spot. I live at Stephen Burvill's, at a cottage under the cliff. I took the basket and coats home with me. The basket produced was identified by witness. Burvill then went on to the "Royal Oak" to pay a bill, and found Petts and P.C. Swain enquiring about the things. I gave them up to Swain the same day. Witness continued – I had passed the house building by Petts, from whence these things were stolen, earlier in the morning. I did not see the prisoners again. I was about 30 rods off when I first saw them, but I will swear to the two prisoners being the same men – Groves, the tallest, had his belt and no cap, and Cockson had his cap and no belt.

In answer to the Recorder witness repeated this – although when before the magistrates he had sworn just the opposite, and when cross-examined by prisoner Groves, had said he was not certain.

P.C. Swain deposed: From information received, he went up the Dover Road and saw Burvill and Petts. I had heard two soldiers had been taken with some tools. Burvill told me the last witness (Allen) had found a basket of tools, and they were at his house. He went down the cliff and brought them up to me.

The learned Recorder summed up as favourably as he could for the prisoners, who were undefended; adverting to the contradictory evidence of the principal witness, Allen, and the credit due to his testimony.

The jury retired for a short time, and returned with a verdict of Not Guilty.

The learned Recorder discharged the prisoners with a caution and admonition on the narrow escape they had had.

 

Note: This was during the latter stages of the building of the "Railway Bell." Jan Pedersen.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 4 April, 1863. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

QUARTER SESSIONS

Thursday April 2nd:- Before J.J. Lonsdale, Esq.

Thomas Groves, 24, and George Cockson, 24, Privates in the 96th Regiment, were indicted for stealing one hammer, one painter's basket, one dust brush, one chisel, two punches, one scraper, one screwdriver, and one nail claw, the property of George Haynes, at Folkestone, on the 1st of January last. Both prisoners pleaded Not Guilty, and a petty jury being empanelled, Mr. Frederick George Francis being foreman, the following evidence was called.

George Haynes, painter, was employed on the 1st of January last on a house that was being built by Mr. Petts near the railway station. He last saw the tools that had been stolen in that house on the 1st of January, in an upper room, in a basket, where he put them at half past four o'clock, and he missed them the next morning at seven o'clock. The outside of the house was locked, but not the room. In the morning the back room window was open. The articles were worth about 6s.

Thomas Brown, K.C.C., on the 2nd of January, found the two prisoners at the "Royal Oak Inn," in the parish of Hougham, at half past ten in the morning. The prisoners were drinking in the tap room, and said they were on pass, but had lost their passes. He then apprehended them as deserters. While talking with them a chisel fell from the tunic pocket of Groves, who then said he had bought it at Dover. Witness asked him for the hammer, saying that he had had information of his trying to dispose of a hammer and chisel. At first he denied having a hammer, but afterwards he produced it from his trousers pocket. He then secured the prisoners, and conveyed them to Seabrook.

John Allen, labourer, saw the two prisoners in a meadow near Steddy Hole, Dover Road, between nine and ten in the morning of the 2nd of January. Suspecting something from their manner, when they went away he went to see if anything was left behind, and he found a basket with a quantity of tools and two old painters' coats. The coats were laid over the basket, and the whole was under a piece of gorse. He took the basket and coats in his hand to his lodgings at Steven Burvill's, where he put them in the front room. Before he got to the place where the soldiers were, he had passed by the house Mr. Petts was building. When the prisoners were in the field they were about thirty rods from him, or six times the length of that room, but he could swear to them. Groves had his belt, but no cap; Cockson had his cap, but no belt. Burvill went to the "Royal Oak," and between two and three in the afternoon P.C. Swain came to his (witness's) lodgings, and he delivered the things up to him.

P.C. Swain on the 2nd of January went to the "Royal Oak" in company with Mr. Petts, where he saw Mr. Burvill, who said that his lodger had got a basket of tools and two coats, and he went on to Burvill's house under the cliff. Burvill went down to the house, and returned with Allen and the basket and coats.

This was the case for the prosecution.

The prisoner Groves then said that he came into possession of the hammer and chisel by picking them up in the Dover Road. He had been drinking for two days, and when the policeman asked about the things he was not in uniform, and it was on that account he told him he had bought them.

The Recorder, in addressing the jury, threw some doubt on the testimony of the witness Allen, who gave positive evidence before the magistrates as to the identity of the prisoners; afterwards, on cross-examination, said he was not positive, and now again had become very positive, but gave a description of the dress of the men differing from that he gave before the magistrates. It was for the jury to say if this was due to the confusion of mind of an ignorant witness.

The jury retired for a short time, and on returning into court gave a verdict for both prisoners of Not Guilty.

There was a second indictment against Groves for stealing, at the same time and place, a chisel, the property of James Quested Petts; but as the case was supported only by the same evidence as that upon which he had just been acquitted, the prosecution was dropped, and both prisoners were strongly admonished by the Recorder, and discharged.

 

Note: The theft was from the nearly-completed "Railway Bell." Jan Pedersen.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 28 May, 1864. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

EXTENSIVE ROBBERY

Hugh McMarth, a young man of very intelligent and respectable appearance, who was recently in the employ of Mr. Peter Thomson, draper, was charged on Monday with stealing a quantity of cloth and a variety of articles, the property of Mr. Thomson. The prisoner had been apprehended at Folkestone, and handed over to the Dover Police by the magistrates of this borough. He was brought before C. Stein Esq. at Dover on Saturday, and was remanded to complete the evidence for the prosecution.

Prosecutor deposed the prisoner was lately in his employ as traveller. He gave him notice to quit on the 16th instant, and paid him his wages at nine o'clock in the morning. He then asked the prisoner if he had anything to be booked against him, and he replied “No”. He asked the prisoner how many pairs of boots he had had from him since he had been with him, and the reply was “Three”. He told the prisoner he had only accounted for two pairs, and deducted for another pair from his wages. He asked the prisoner if he had any goods to give up, and the answer was “No”. The prisoner then went away. Between eleven and twelve o'clock the same day he saw two of the boxes now produced taken from his house and put into an omnibus. On the following Thursday he saw the prisoner in Folkestone, carrying upon his back a packing box and leather strap which belonged to him. They were in the prisoner's charge when in his employ, but he had neither given him them or given him permission to take them away. He stopped the prisoner and asked if he was going on business for himself or if he was travelling for anyone, but he replied “No”. He then took him to the "Railway Bell" public house, and after they had had a glass of ale together he gave him into custody upon a charge of stealing the packing cloth and strap. At the police station he opened the pack, and found in it two pieces of calico, each six yards long, two five yard lengths of skirting – the former bearing his private mark and the latter matching with some in his possession. In the pack were other things which he believed were his property. On Thursday evening he went to the "White Horse" public house, St. James's Street, and found three boxes, two of which he knew belonged to the prisoner, and had been removed from his house the previous Monday. The boxes were taken to the police station, and when they were opened he found they contained a variety of things, some of which he identified as his property – viz. – three sunshades or parasols, a pair of Scotch tweed trousers, a flannel shirt, three pairs of stays, a scarf &c. Those articles which he could swear to as belonging to him he valued at £4, but he believed the whole of them were his property.

Prosecutor, in cross-examination by Mr. Fox, said the prisoner entered his service in April, 1863. The agreement between them was that the prisoner was to travel for him for three years, if he conducted himself properly, at £25 per year, and £30 if he suited him, and all travelling expenses. There was nothing said about determining the engagement by notice. He gave the prisoner a month's notice to leave because he was not satisfied with him – because he rode about on horseback and in flies, stayed out late at night, and because he suspected his dishonesty, as he had lost things from his shop and could not make out where they were gone. He did not verify his suspicions until after he had discharged the prisoner, but he travelled a fortnight endeavouring to detect his dishonesty. There were no other reasons for his discharging the prisoner. He paid the prisoner his wages at the rate of £25 a year. After deducting several items for clothes he paid him £8 19s 6d in cash as the balance due to him. The prisoner's duties were to solicit orders and take goods for sale. The goods he took out he cut from pieces in prosecutor's shop, and was supposed to enter them in a book, but some of them he could swear the prisoner had not entered. To the best of his belief the letters on the sunshades were in the prisoner's handwriting, and the figures in his wife's handwriting, but he could not swear to this. He identified the Scotch tweed trousers because he was wearing a pair of the very same material. The prisoner, when charged with stealing the packing cloth and strap, said they were his property.

P.C. Ovenden, Folkestone, deposed that he had received the prisoner into his custody at the "Railway Bell," Folkestone. Nothing was then said by the prisoner, but at the police station he said “I know the prosecutor has got an account against me for some things which I have received and not accounted for”. The prisoner also asked him what he could do in the matter, and he replied he could not tell him. The prisoner said the things in his possession were all his own property. Upon the prisoner he found a bunch of keys.

William Cheeseman, an omnibus driver, was called to prove that the boxes found at the "White Horse" were those he conveyed thither, from the house of the prosecutor to the prisoner, but all the witness would say was that he took some boxes there, but did not know how many there were, nor what they were like.

John Friend, landlord of the "White Horse," said the prisoner came in an omnibus with the three boxes produced, and two of which had been identified by Mr. Thomson, to his house about noon on the 16th inst., and left the boxes there. He afterwards showed them to the prosecutor, who removed them to the police station.

Police sergeant Bailey said he received a bunch of keys from the witness Ovenden, and with them he unlocked the boxes brought to the police station by the prosecutor, and which contained the articles enumerated.

Mr. Strood submitted that was the case for the prosecution.

Mr. Fox said the prisoner would reserve his defence.

The bench committed the prisoner to take his trial at the next quarter sessions for the borough.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 2 July, 1864. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

EXTENSIVE ROBBERY BY A PACKMAN

The Dover Quarter Sessions were held on Monday, before the Recorder. The case of chief interest was the following:-

Hugh McMath, 23, draper, was indicted for stealing a packing cloth, strap, two pieces of calico, and a quantity of other articles, the property of Peter Thomson, at Dover, on the 16th of May. Mr. Biron (instructed by Mr. Minter) was for the prosecution; Mr. Channell (instructed by Mr. Fox) conducted the prisoner's defence.

Mr. Biron, in opening the case, said the prosecutor was a draper carrying on business in Castle Street, and for rather more than a year previous to the 16th of last May the prisoner was in his employ as a packman, in which capacity he used to travel round to neighbouring towns and dispose of his master's goods. Upon making up his book, he ought to have inserted a list of articles he was going to take away, so that his master might have an opportunity of taking an account when he returned. For some reason or another, the prosecutor gave the prisoner a month's notice to leave, and on the 16th of May he left his employ. The prisoner's wages were £30 a year, and he also had the privilege of taking at cost price such articles of clothing as prosecutor kept in his shop, and from time to time, as his wages were paid him, prosecutor deducted any money which might be due on his account. On the 16th of May, as the prisoner was leaving, they went into the accounts, and prosecutor said “Have you got anything I am to charge against you?”. Prisoner said there were three pairs of boots which he had had repaired, and this was deducted from his wages with some other trifling charges, and the balance, £8 19s 6d, handed over to him as his wages. But before he left, prosecutor said “Have you taken anything else?”. Prisoner replied “I have now accounted for everything I have had”. This transaction took place about nine in the morning, and in the middle of the day the prisoner came and fetched his boxes away, which he had conveyed to the "White Horse" public house in St. James's Street. In the course of the day the prosecutor went over to Folkestone, and there he found the prisoner with a pack. The oil-skin cover and strap belonged to the prosecutor, and ought to have been given up before the prisoner left. On opening it, the prosecutor found it to contain two 6 yard pieces of calico, two 5 yard pieces of skirting, among other articles which he identified as belonging to him. The prisoner was then charged with theft, and given into the custody of the police at Folkestone. He was afterwards brought over to Dover and taken to the "White Horse," when his boxes were opened, and in them was found a large amount of property which had been taken from his employer. When apprehended at Folkestone, prisoner said in reply to the charge “I know that I have received property I have not accounted for”.

Prosecutor was then examined. He spoke to the facts as detailed by the learned counsel, and added that when he met the prisoner at Folkestone with the pack he asked him whether he was travelling for anyone or in business for himself. The prisoner replied “Neither” but added that he must get a living. He then requested the prisoner to let him see the contents of the pack, and subsequently took him into custody for stealing several articles which it contained. The calico, stays, sunshades, scarves &c., he identified by his private mark upon them, and said they had never been accounted for by the prisoner. He missed some stuff like that of which the trousers produced were made in January last, and he asked the prisoner whether he had sold or taken any of it, but he replied he had not. The whole of the stock which the boxes and pack contained he believed to be his property, although he could not swear to them from any distinct mark.

Mr. Channell cross-examined the prosecutor in reference to the several articles named in the indictment, and endeavoured to identify them with entries of goods taken and accounted for by the prisoner in the day-book, but the prosecutor distinctly swore that he had been through the books carefully from January last and found that the articles which the prisoner was charged with stealing were not entered and had not been accounted for.

William Cheeseman, an omnibus driver, stated that he removed the prisoner's boxes to the "White Horse" at his request on the 16th of May, and John Friend, the landlord of the "White Horse," spoke to receiving them in his care for the prisoner.

Charles Ovenden, of the Folkestone police, took the prisoner into custody, and at the police station prisoner said he knew the prosecutor had something against him which he had not accounted for, and asked him what he could do in the matter. He told him he did not know. The prisoner also said the things in the pack were the property of Mr. Thomson.

Police sergeant Bailey said he received the prisoner into custody from the last witness, who also handed him a bunch of keys found upon the prisoner, with which the locks of the boxes were unfastened.

Robert Smith, tailor, of Military Road, stated that he made the trousers produced from cloth brought to him by the prisoner in January last.

Mr. Channell made a forcible address to the jury on behalf of the prisoner, and said that the admission made by the prisoner to the Folkestone policeman, that he had received some goods belonging to Mr. Thomson and not accounted for them, far from operating against the prisoner, was exactly the defence he was about to offer. There was no doubt that the prisoner was in possession of these goods, but he would ask the jury to take a charitable view of the case, and suppose the prisoner had no intention to defraud the prosecutor, but that he was selling them and would have paid the money over to Mr. Thomson as soon as he had sold them. Assuming that this was the prisoner's intention, the prosecutor's remedy would be in the County Court.

The Recorder, having summed up, and pointed out the fact of the prisoner having retained the property of his master after all business connection between them was at an end would constitute the offence a larceny.

The jury consulted, and gave a verdict of Guilty, but recommended the prisoner to mercy.

The Recorder: On what grounds do you recommend him to mercy?

A Juror: Because we think the prosecutor did not take sufficient care with his books.

The Recorder (to prosecutor): Have you any doubt that all or any of the things belong to you?

Prosecutor: Not the slightest.

The Recorder: What is their value?

Prosecutor: About £42.

Mr. Biron: I am told there is also about £40 the prisoner has received in January, which he has not accounted for.

Prosecutor: There are also about 110 yards of silk missing which I can find no account of.

The Recorder, in passing judgement, said he had great doubts whether it was not necessary to send the prisoner to penal servitude. This man was receiving liberal wages, and yet carrying on a system of robbery against his employer. He must therefore be treated with severity, and stopping short of penal servitude, he must have the full extent of punishment the law would admit. The prisoner would therefore be imprisoned and kept to hard labour for 18 months.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer, 10 December, 1864.

SHOCKING ACCIDENT TO TWO FEMALES

On Sunday afternoon an accident of the most painful nature took place on the South-Eastern Railway, in the long cutting between Abbott's Cliff tunnel and the tunnel nearest to Folkestone. It appears that two young women named Warde and Williams, the daughters of coast-guardmen stationed at the Pelter station, of which is situate midway between Dover and Folkestone, at the base of the cliffs, had been on a visit to their friends and were returning to Folkestone, where they were living in service. For the purpose in saving time they selected the railway line, instead of taking their way by the cliffs. They had got near to the entrance of the Folkestone tunnel when an up-train came along, and before they could get out of the way they were struck down, the train passing over their bodies and leaving them quite lifeless, and sadly mutilated. It is believed that a third young woman, the daughter of another coastguard, would have been in their company, and in all probability shared their fate, had she not left some article of clothing behind her at the house of her parents, whither she had returned at the moment of the hapless catastrophe. The bodies of the unfortunate young woman were removed to the "Railway Bell," at Folkestone, where an inquest was held upon their remains on the following day by J. Minter Esq., the coroner of the borough of Folkestone. The jury having been sworn, were conveyed by special train in charge of the station master, Mr. Willis, to the place of the accident which was inspected and the bodies viewed. On the return to the inquest room, the inquiry was proceeded with, the evidence in respect of the death of the female Wade being first elicited.

Peter Mitchell deposed: I am a ticket-collector in the employ of the South-Eastern Railway Company at the Folkestone station. The 4.15 p.m. mail train, yesterday from Dover stopped at Folkestone Junction station a few minutes late, and the driver told me that he had knocked down two females dressed in black just beyond the first tunnel. I said I would see to it, and the train went on. Having obtained assistance, I went to the spot indicated by the train-driver, and there saw the deceased lying upon the ground. Wade lay on her back at the side of the rails - between the embankment and the outer rail of the up line - with her feet towards the metals and her head towards the embankment.

George Mercer said: I am a carpenter. In company with a young man named George Elliott. I was in the Warren yesterday afternoon at the top of the embankment at the side of the South-Eastern Railway line. On looking over into the cutting, I saw two females walking together - one of them being in the 4ft. up line and the other in the 6ft. which separates the two lines. At that moment I observed the mail train approaching about thirty yards off. I shouted out "Missus, here's the train close behind you," when they both rushed across the up line to get out of the way. Before they cleared the line, however, the buffer or some part of the engine struck them and knocked both of them down. I immediately went down upon the line, and saw the deceased. Wade lying with her clothes over her head on the up line. I lifted her up, and she appeared quite dead. Elliott at the same time went to the deceased Williams, and found she was also quite dead. Having laid the bodies upon the ground clear of the lines, I went to the coastguard station for assistance.

By the Jury: I heard the whistle of the engine just before the deceased was struck. The wind was blowing adverse to the direction in which the train was going, and therefore the sound was carried away from where the females were walking.

Dr. East deposed: Yesterday afternoon, about twenty minutes to five, a message came to me that two females had been killed by a train in the Warren, and that the station-master (Mr. Willis) was taking measures for bringing the bodies to Folkestone. I hastened to the junction station, and was taken in a trolley to the place in question, about a mile and a half from Folkestone and there saw the bodies of the deceased. That of Wade I first examined, and found that she had sustained a severe fracture of the skull, through which considerable portions of the brains had exuded. Her left leg was also torn off close to the knee, it only then hanging to the body by the skin, and the foot was almost cut off. From the injury to the skull alone, death must have been instantaneous.

William Peplar said upon oath: I am an engine driver in the service of the South-Eastern Railway Company, and live at 3, Cooper's Road, Old Kent Road, London. Yesterday I drove the engine of the 4.15 p.m. mail train from Dover. We left Dover punctually at our time. Just before reaching the Martello tunnel, I saw something dark in front of the train upon the line. I could not distinguish what it was because it was dusk. I went from the left to the right side of the engine, and then saw two females attempting to cross the line just in front of us, I blew the whistle; but the train was upon them in a moment, and they were knocked down, although I applied the break and did all I could to stop the train. I stopped the train at Folkestone and informed the ticket collector of what had occurred.

By the Jury: The train was travelling at about 40 miles an hour at the time of the accident. It is not my practise to blow the whistle if I see persons upon the line, unless, they are actually upon the line which the train is travelling upon, as it sometimes has a tendency to frighten people and place them in greater danger; but I blew the whistle in this instance because I saw the imminent peril in which the deceased were upon the line.

The Coroner observed there was other evidence forthcoming, if the jury desired it; but he thought it would be principally corroborative, and as the facts appeared conclusive that the occurrence was purely accidental, he proposed not to adduce it, unless it were the wish of the jury.

The jury expressed themselves satisfied with the facts elicited and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

The evidence was then taken in the case of the poor girl Williams. The testimony did not materially differ from the above given, and the jury, in this case also returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 10 December, 1864. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

INQUEST

An inquest was opened on Monday last at the "Railway Bell Inn" by John Minter Esq., coroner for the borough, on the bodies of Margaret Ann Wade, aged 17 years, and Mary Rebecca Williams, aged 16 years and 6 months, who unfortunately lost their lives in the cutting of the railway in the Warren on the previous day, as detailed in the evidence given below.

The jury, having been sworn, proceeded in special carriage and train, provided by the company, to the Coast Guard Station in the Warren, where the bodies of the deceased lay, and on their return viewed the spot where the accident occurred.

The first witness called was Peter Mitchell, ticket collector, South Eastern Railway Company, upper railway station, sworn: At 20 past 4 yesterday afternoon the driver of the 4-15 p.m. mail from Dover stopped the train at the Folkestone Junction, and said he had knocked two females down just beyond the tunnel; they were dressed in black. Witness immediately went down with assistance, and found the body of Margaret Ann Wade, who was lying on her back on the up side of the line, between the embankment and the outside rail,, her feet towards the metals and her head towards the bank, about two hundred yards beyond the Martello Tunnel; she was dead; identified the body as that which he found.

George Mercer, carpenter, Folkestone, sworn, deposed he was in the Warren yesterday afternoon a few minutes after 4. Witness was just on top of the batter on the up line side, walking towards the Coast Guard buildings; George Elliott was with him; witness looked over the cutting and saw two females walking, one was in the 6 foot and the other was in the 4 foot, on the up line; witness at the same moment saw the train coming on them; the train was not more than 30 yards off. Witness halloed out “Missus, there is a train close behind you”. They both then attempted to cross the line to the sea side, and witness believed they both had their feet on the off metal when the engine struck them and knocked them down. Witness then went down and found the body of Margaret Ann Wade, who lay in the 4 foot of the up line, with her head towards Folkestone and her clothes disordered. Witness then took her off the rails and laid her on the bank; she was dead. The accident happened about 200 yards beyond the Martello Tunnel. The wind was blowing towards the train, and the whistle was blowing. The train struck deceased, but witness could not hear the train coming.

Silvester Eastes, sworn, deposed he was a surgeon, practicing in Folkestone. About 20 minutes to 5 yesterday afternoon a messenger came to him from the station and told him that two women had been hurt by the mail train in the Warren, and that Mr. Willes was sending down to bring them to the station. Witness went down in the trolley to the Pelter Coast Guard Station, and there saw the body of Margaret Ann Wade. On examining it witness found she had received a most extensive fracture of the upper part of the skull, through which a considerable portion of the brain had exuded. The left leg was torn off close up to the knee, merely hanging by the skin, and about half the right foot cut off. There was also excessive haemorrhage. She was dead. He had no doubt that death was instantaneous.

William Pepler, engine driver in the employ of the S.E.R. Company, residing at No. 3, Cooper's Road, Old Kent Road, London, sworn, deposed: Yesterday, the 4th December, he was driving the 4.15 mail train from Dover; left Dover punctually; and just before going into Martello Tunnel witness's attention was attracted to the front of the train, where he saw someone in black. They were on the down line. Witness went to the off side of the engine and saw the person or persons cross over in front of the engine towards the sea side. Witness blew his whistle and put on his brake. Witness could not tell whether he had struck anything or not. The train was brought up on the station side of the Martello Tunnel. Witness started the train again into the station, where he stopped and gave information to the ticket collector. The train was going at 40 miles an hour. When witness first saw them, it was impossible to pull up the train. Witness did not whistle when he first saw them, as they were clear of him, and blowing the whistle he considered might have the effect of frightening them.

Mr. Minter then read a rule, dated 8th July, 1862, by the commander of the Coast Guards:- “Whereas the railway master, Mr. Willes, had made complaint that the women and children at the station were continually on the line it is ordered that no person shall continue such practice, and this is to be made known to the men, their wives, and children. This order is to be retained at the Pelter Station, in case of any accident occurring by the disobedience of it. T. Davies”.

The inquest on the body of Mary Rebecca Williams then took place.

Peter Mitchell, being sworn, gave similar evidence to that in the previous case, but found the body lying about 30 yards from that of the other deceased, in a similar position.

George Elliott, labourer, residing at East Cliff, Folkestone, sworn, deposed he was with the witness G. Mercer in the Warren yesterday afternoon. They were standing near the fence on the top of the embankment of the S.E.R.; saw steam from an engine coming from Dover. Witness looked down on to the line and saw two females in the 4 foot of the upper line. Witness made a remark to Mercer “There are two women on the line” and Mercer called out to them. As soon as Mercer spoke deceased looked round and the buffer struck her and she was knocked clean off the rails; heard the whistle blow before the girls were struck. As soon as the train passed witness thought they were clear, but Mercer said “No, there lies one”. Witness went down and found deceased lying clear of the rail, about 18 inches from it, and dead.

Silvester Eastes repeated his evidence as in the former case, and added that Mary Rebecca Williams had a most extensive fracture of the right temporal bone, which extended to the base of the skull, causing immediate death; also a compound fracture of both bones of the right leg, with great laceration of the muscles, and a fracture of the left arm.

The Coroner remarked that from the evidence adduced the accident was purely accidental, and the jury, having shortly consulted, returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

 

From the Folkestone Observer 10 December, 1864. Transcribed by Jan Pedersen.

TWO YOUNG WOMEN KILLED ON THE RAILWAY

A very dreadful mistake was made on Sunday by two young women, daughters of coastguardsmen at the Pelter Station, and in the service of Folkestone, by which they in an instant lost their lives. One of the young women, Mary Ann Wade, would have been seventeen years of age on Christmas Day next; the other young woman, Mary Rebecca Williams, was but sixteen years and six months old, and was remarkably tall and well formed. They had been on an afternoon visit to their friends, and were returning to their places of service, having to be in by five o'clock. As the girls were hurriedly getting ready, the father of one of them advised them not to be in too much haste and get overheated. It was but a quarter past four and there was ample time for them to get leisurely into town. It was usually the case, we believe, that nearly all the young folks in the coastguard colony accompanied the young women into town on Monday afternoons, but on Sunday last Miss Williams entreated them not to go with her – she would rather that they not go that evening; and only one girl set out to accompany the two who were returning. This young woman soon afterwards remembering that her own sister, then at tea, had to go into Folkestone, and was afraid to go by herself over The Warren, left her companions and returned home. There is a footpath through The Warren (an old and extensive landslip from the contiguous cliff) and running at first by the side of the railway, where the railway is an embankment or open cutting. This path must have been in good condition on Sunday, but the deceased appear to have intended to take their way through the Martello Tunnel, for they got on to the line soon after they had left the cottages, and after their companion left them were proceeding along the down line, in quiet conversation, facing any train that might be on that line, and so likely to receive an intimation of any danger that might threaten. Very soon after they had entered on the line the afternoon mail emerged from the eastern tunnel, and came on with it's usual quiet rapidity through the gathering shades of evening. The stoker of the train, observing some persons on the line, drew the driver's attention to them and he looked out for them, keeping them constantly in his eye, but refraining from sounding his whistle lest he should alarm them, they being then safely on the down line. The wind blowing strongly down the line, the young women did not hear the approaching up train, but just as it neared them they were hailed from the top of the cutting by a person who wished to put them on their guard. That hail was unfortunate. One of the young women turned her head, and rushed instantly, as all women do, into the peril which a simple standing still would avoid. The fatal movement was seen by the engine driver, and he quickly turned to his whistle and gave the alarm – too late, alas! The shriek of the whistle was a shriek of the dead. Just at the moment the whistle gave forth it's sound the buffer struck Miss Williams on the back, sending her forward thirty yards – dead. Miss Wade received her instantaneously fatal blow at the base of the skull, then the wheels cut open the upper portion of her leg, smashed the bone and flesh of the lower portion, and tore off half a foot. The men who had hailed them from the top of the cutting rushed down to them, but found them utterly dead. The unusual yell of the engine whistle alarmed the coastguardsmen and they ran up to the rail, only to find dead beyond recall those young friends who eight minutes before were in exuberant health. The engine driver slowed his train to the Folkestone Junction station, where ordinarily he does not stop, and reported the fatal mishap; then a messenger was dispatched for surgical aid, and everything prepared for service, should human service yet be of avail. But all was useless. The bodies of the young women were borne sorrowfully to the houses of their relatives, and every kindly attention paid to the shattered remains to fit them as far as possible for the necessary inspection by the coroner and his jury.

On Monday afternoon the borough coroner (J. Minter Esq.) held his court at the "Railway Bell," and the jury having seen the bodies and the locality of their death (the railway authority placing a train at the service of the Coroner and jury), the following evidence was taken as to the death of Mary Ann Wade:-

Peter Mitchell, ticket collector to the South Eastern Railway, said: At twenty three minutes to four yesterday the driver of the 4.15 mail train called me to him, and stopped the train, which does not ordinarily stop at the Junction Station. He said he had knocked two females down just beyond the Martello tunnel, who were dressed in black. I told him I would see to it, and he proceeded with his train. I immediately got assistance, and went down, and found the body of Margaret Ann Wade was lying on her back on the up side of the line, between the embankment and the outer rail, with her feet on the rail and her head towards the embankment. The body was about 200 yards from the tunnel. Mary Ann Wade was dead. I found the body of Williams about 30 feet from the body of Wade, also between the embankment and the outer rail.

George Mercer, carpenter, Folkestone, said: I was in The Warren yesterday afternoon, a few minutes after four, and saw the mail train coming up. I was on the top of the cutting, on the sea side. I was walking towards Dover in the company of George Elliott. I saw the females before I saw the train. Elliott said to me “George, there are two females on the line”. I looked over the cutting, and saw two females walking, with the train coming. One was in the six foot and the other in the four foot, the up line. There was no-one else with them. The train was about thirty yards off when I saw them. I hallooed out “Mrs. There's a train close behind you”. I could not see whether they were young women or aged persons. Before the words were hardly out of my mouth the train struck them. They both ran together, as if they were arm in arm. They ran to get on the sea side. I believe they both had one foot on the outside metal when the train struck them. The train knocked one of them on towards Folkestone. Elliott said “I think they are clear”, and I said “No, there one lies, there”. The buffer struck them. I first went to the body of Mary Ann Wade. She lay on the metal, on the four foot, with her head towards Folkestone – on the up rail, between the two rails, with her clothes over her head. I pulled her clothes down over her legs and picked her up. I held her a second or two in my arms, and found her head drop on one side, and she had no use of her legs, and was dead, as I thought, and I took and drew her on one side of the rails, and laid her against the bank. The accident happened 200 yards the other side of the first tunnel. The wind was dead against the train; I could not hear it coming. The driver blew the engine, I suppose, as it was blowing just at the moment the engine struck them, but the wind was blowing so hard I could not hear it but then, and I could not hear the train. The young women were in the act of crossing sideways before I spoke to them. They were walking apparently close together, one with her foot against the metal on one side and one with her foot against the metal on the other side.

Silvester Eastes, surgeon, said: Yesterday afternoon about 20 minutes to 5 a messenger came to me from the railway station and said two women had been run over by the mail train down by the tunnel, and Mr. Wilkes was sending down to bring them up to the station. I had a carriage waiting for me at the door at the time to take me to a patient who had sent an urgent message some time before, and I sent word that as soon as I had seen my patient I would come. I went on to the station soon after, and was taken down on a trolley to the Pelter Station. I saw the body of Margaret Ann Wade, and found that she had received a most extensive fracture of the upper part of her skull, through which some considerable portion of the brain had exuded. The left leg was torn off close up to the knee; the bone was fractured in many places, and it only held on by a piece of the skin. About half the right foot was also torn away. She must have died instantaneously.

William Pepler, residing at No. 3, Pepler's Road, Old Kent Road, London, engine driver, in the employ of the South Eastern Railway, said: Yesterday I drove the engine of the mail train from Dover, leaving Dover at 4.15 punctually. Just before coming to the Martello Tunnel my attention was attracted to the females on the up line. I took them to be one female; my mate said there were two. It was very dark. I could hardly tell who it was, man or woman. I could only see it was someone in black. I passed over to the other side to see what it was, and no sooner did I see them than they ran across to the other side. I stand on the left of the engine, but no sooner did I go over to the right side than they ran to the other side. They were first on the down side. I could not tell whether it was one or more than one when they crossed. I blew my whistle as hard as I could, and we both tried to pull up as quick as we could. I never felt anything – whether we struck them or not. I did not see anything afterwards. We could not stop till we came to the end of the tunnel. Then we proceeded slowly to give information at the station. My mate said to me “I believe there's two”. We were going about 40 miles an hour. I could not have pulled up the train when I first saw them. They were standing clear, and I never like to blow the whistle when I see persons standing clear. It alarms them.

The Coroner then pointed out to the jury the bearing of the evidence towards an accidental death and read the following rule, that had been constantly hanging in the public room at the Pelter Coastguard Station to which all had access:- “Folkestone. 9th July 1862. Whereas the Railway Station Master has spoken to me upon the subject of women and children continually lying on the railway in the rear of the Pelter buildings, it is my direction that they be not allowed to continue such practice, and this is to be made known to the men, their wives, and children. T. Davies T.C. This order is to be retained at the Pelter Station in case of any accident occurring by the disobedience of it”.

The jury immediately returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

The inquest on the body of Mary Rebecca Williams was then proceeded with, and Peter Mitchell, ticket collector, repeated the evidence given in the former case.

George Elliott, labourer, living at East Cliff, said: I was at The Warren with Mercer yesterday afternoon, standing against the fence at the top of the cutting. I saw the steam from an engine coming from Dover. I looked down on the line and saw two females in the four foot between the rails of the up road that the train was running on. I should think the train was from 20 to 30 yards off. I did not see the engine till it struck the girls. I remarked to Mercer “There`s two females on the road”, and he said “Yes” and called out “Look out, Missus!”, and the train struck them. When he called out I think one of the two females looked round, and then ran. She appeared to me to have hold of the other one's hand, and stepped from the rail with the left foot. The buffer struck her, and knocked her out of the rails, clear of the embankment. That was Miss Williams that I went to. I heard the driver sound his whistle before the girls were struck. As soon as I saw them in the four foot I heard the whistle blow. We got over the fence and I made a remark to Mercer – “I think they are clear”. He said “No, they are not. There lies one”. That was Miss Williams. Her feet were about 15 or 18 inches from the rail. She was dead.

Mr. Eastes said: I saw the body of Mary Rebecca Williams. I found a most extensive fracture of the right temporal bone of the skull, which extended through the base of the skull, and which caused instant death; also a fracture of both bones of the right leg, great laceration of the muscles, and integuments, and fracture of the right arm.

The Coroner briefly left the case to the jury, who in this case also returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 11-3-1865

Thursday March 9th:- Before Captain Kennicott, A.M. Leith, James Tolputt and James Kelcey Esqs.

Permission was granted to Mr. Moret for a temporary authority to sell excisable liquors at the Railway Bell Inn until the next transfer day.

 
Folkestone Observer 11-5-1866

Fatal Accident In Abbot`s Cliff Tunnel

An inquest was held at the Railway Bell Tavern, near the Folkestone Junction Station on Tuesday, before J. Minter Esq., Coroner, on the body of Matthew Hammond, aged nine years, who gad met his death under the circumstances detailed in the evidence.

Matthew Hammond, second officer of the “Breeze” L.C.& D. steamboat, and residing at Dover, identified the body of deceased as being that of his son, who was nine years old last October, and was engaged by a woman named Lacy to come to Folkestone and sell shrimps. He left home on Monday morning at eight o`clock, and came to Folkestone by the eight o`clock train for the purpose of selling shrimps.

Elizabeth Lacy, living at 8, Round Tower Street, Dover, said deceased was in her employ selling shrimps. Came to Folkestone with her yesterday morning by the eight o`clock train. Parted with him at about quarter past eight at the station. He was to go down town to sell shrimps. Witness went round to sell to the shops. They were to meet somewhere in the town, and would return at two or five o`clock, according as they had sold out. Witness had his return ticket in her pocket. He came away in good spirits. He left his basket in the tea shop near the Swan, where witness usually had her tea. Did not know why he went back so soon. He had not done so before. He was a very good boy. Where he had left the basket he said witness had told him to go to the station, but she had said nothing of the kind. Had had no words with him. Did not know why he returned.

William Marsh, platelayer, in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, was yesterday at work on the line between Dover and Folkestone, about a mile and a quarter from the Folkestone station. Was sitting down taking his breakfast at the side of the line about ten minutes before nine, when this lad came along from Folkestone, walking in the six-foot between the lines, and when he came up asked him where he was going. He said he was going to Dover. Told him he must not go that way. He had better go up the cliff onto the hard road. Said his father was coming behind him. Told him he had better wait till his father came, and then he should send them both off. Then he began crying, and said he did not know the road up the cliff, and he turned back again. Told him he must not walk up the line. He had better go on to the beach, for the water was down, and he could go either to Dover or Folkestone. He had better not be seen on the line again, or witness would lock him up. He went on to the beach, and witness saw no more of him till he was picked up. He did not seem at all confused, until when he told witness his father was coming, and then he was confounded a little. He said his father was a shipwright, living at Dover.

Charles Carter, inspector, in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, stationed at Dover:- On arrival of the 9-30 mail train at Dover, a child`s hat fell from the engine previous to it`s entering the station. On examining the same, blood and brains were found inside. The engine was then examined, and blood and brains were found on the ash pan and also on the wheels. Reported this to the superintendent, and took an engine to search the road from Dover to Folkestone. Mr. Colbeck, surgeon, and others accompanied witness, and they came on the up line. About a quarter of a mile before they came out of the Abbot`s Cliff Tunnel, on the Folkestone side, found the body of a little boy, on the down-line rails, in the four-foot. The body was examined by the surgeon and brought to Folkestone. The body was quite dead. The Parliamentary train had passed over the body, but had not touched the body. The mail train arrived in Dover at 9-23 and the Parliamentary at 10-22. Witness left Dover at 10-28. Previous to leaving Dover telegraphed to Folkestone, at 10-25, to say that an accident had occurred on the down line of rails. The Parliamentary train had left Folkestone before an accident was known to have occurred. Did not know of the accident till witness came back from the pier where he had been with the mails. The signalman near the Abbot`s Cliff Tunnel had picked up the hat as soon as the train had passed, but he would not be allowed to leave his signal box until the train had returned from the pier, which would be at five minutes to ten.

Thomas William Colbeck, surgeon, practicing at Dover, was called soon after ten o`clock yesterday to go up the line in company with the last witness. About a quarter of a mile before getting out of the tunnel on this side a man, who was walking on the down line with a lantern, said “Here it is, sir”, and on getting out of the carriage they saw the greater part of the skull and one boot. About ten yards nearer Folkestone they discovered the body. Both legs had been broken and greater part of the skull carried away. Twenty yards nearer Folkestone they found several masses of brain. Death must have been instantaneous. Porters who were there took the body up, put it on a truck, and took it to Folkestone. The Belgian, who accompanied witness, said as they approached the spot “You will find it near about here”. He had felt the shock, and at the same time exclaimed “What on earth is that?”. He thought a box had fallen off.

The Coroner, on summing up, suggested that possibly the boy had got tired of his occupation and wanted to throw it up, and went home the nearest way he could to Dover.

The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Editorial

Is Crowner`s Law Law For The Crowner?

At the opening of the Coroner`s Court at the Railway Bell on Tuesday the following conversation took place.

Foreman (Mr. Hide, Dover Street): I am deputed, Mr. Coroner, to ask you a question. How much a juryman would be fined in the event of his being absent?
Coroner, scenting the game: But they are all here.
Foreman: But in the event of one being absent, what would be the fine? It is 40s, I think. Now, you have kept us waiting –
Coroner: It is the first time I have been absent at the time fixed for opening the court, and I thought this was called for six o`clock. I saw Mr. Willes, the station master, last night, as to the trains, and I found that I could be here in time for six o`clock. I am very sorry I have detained you half an hour.
Foreman: It`s an hour, Mr. Coroner. We had thought it was Mr. Morford`s, the summoning officer`s fault, and we had intended fining him, but as you have confessed we will let him off. (laughter)
Mr. Bolt: I hope Mr. Minter will charge you 6s 8d for advice. (laughter)

 
Folkestone Chronicle 12-5-1866

Inquest

An inquest was held at the Railway Bell Inn on Tuesday evening, on the body of a lad named Matthew Hammond, who was killed on Monday morning while walking through Abbot`s Cliff Tunnel on his way to Dover. Owing to a mistake between the Coroner and Morford, who “warns” the jury, the latter were kept waiting for an hour and a half before Mr. Minter arrived, when, in answer to a question from the foreman (Mr. Hale) as to how much a Coroner ought to be fined who kept a jury waiting – a juryman being liable to a fine of 40s, who kept a coroner waiting – the mistake was explained. The jury, having viewed the body, which presented a sickening spectacle, the following evidence was adduced.

Matthew Hammond, mariner, of Dover, said he identified the body as that of his son, Matthew Hammond. He was nine years of age last October. He was employed by a woman named Lacey to come with her to Folkestone to sell shrimps, and left home yesterday morning for the purpose of coming to Folkestone by the eight o`clock train.

Elizabeth Lacey said she lived at Dover. The deceased was employed by her to sell shrimps, and came to Folkestone for that purpose with her by the eight o`clock train on Monday morning. Parted with him about a quarter past eight o`clock in the Dover Road. He was to have gone round the town to sell shrimps whilst she went to serve the shops. When he had done selling he either found her in the town or waited for her at the station. She had his return ticket in her pocket. She had no words with him. He left his basket of shrimps at a coffee shop near the station. He was generally such a good boy to sell, and she did not know why he went away. Could not say whether he could find his way home to Dover by the road. He had never left her before.

William Marsh said he was a platelayer in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company. On Monday morning he was at work on the line about a mile and a quarter from Folkestone. A few minutes before nine o`clock he was sitting on the bank eating his breakfast, when he saw a lad walking towards him from Folkestone in the six foot. Asked the lad where he was going and he said “To Dover”. Told him he must not go that way, but he had better go up the cliff and along the road, when the lad began to cry, and said his father was coming behind him. Told him he had better wait till his father came, when he must turn them both off. The lad began to cry, said he did not know the road over the cliff, and started to walk back towards Folkestone. Told him he must not be on the line at all, and he could go down on the beach as the water was down, and reach either Dover or Folkestone that way, and that if he caught him on the line again he would lock him up. He went over on to the beach, and witness saw no more of him till he was picked up dead. The lad did not seem at all confused, but came along boldly as if he did not know he was doing wrong, and said his father was a shipwright living at Dover.

Charles Carter, an inspector in the employ of the South Eastern railway Company, said that previous to the 9-33 mail train entering the station yard at Dover, the signalman at the Archcliff Tunnel saw a child`s hat drop from under the engine, and on picking it up found in it a quantity of blood and brains. When the train came back from the pier, the signalman reported the circumstance to the station master, and on examining the engine blood and brains were found on the ash pan and the wheels. Witness received instructions to take an engine to search the up line between Dover and Folkestone, and a telegram was sent to Folkestone asking the station master to search the down line. Witness was accompanied by Mr. Colback, surgeon, and several others. About a quarter of a mile before they got out of Abbot`s Cliff Tunnel, on the Folkestone side, they found the body of deceased on the down line of rails, lying in the “four foot”. The body was examined by the surgeaon and brought to the Railway Bell, Folkestone, on a truck. In answer to a question by a juryman, witness said that the Parliamentary train passed over the body after the mail train: it had started from Folkestone before the accident had been reported. He was of opinion that this train did not touch the body, and that if deceased had been lying down the mail train would not have touched him. There is plenty of room at the side of the tunnel to stand as a train passes.

Thomas William Colback, a surgeon practicing at Dover, said that soon after ten o`clock on Monday morning he was sent for by Mr. Way, the superintendent at the Dover terminus, to accompany the last witness along the line in search of the deceased. About a quarter of a mile from the end of the Abbot`s Cliff Tunnel, a man who was walking along the down line with a lantern said “Here it is, sir”, and on getting out of the carriage witness fount the greater portion of the upper part of a skull, and a boot. About ten yards nearer Folkestone they found the body of deceased, which was very much lacerated, and both legs broken. He need hardly say that it was quite dead, and death must have been instantaneous. About twenty yards further on they found masses of brains. The Belgian Mail Master (who accompanied them in the search), on approaching the spot where the body was found, remarked “You will find it somewhere about here”, and said that when they passed that place in the morning he felt a shock, and made a remark about it at the time to one of his men.

After a few remarks from the Coroner the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.


 
Southeastern Gazette 28-8-1866



Local News



On Monday afternoon, a fashionably-dressed man, carrying a large black glazed leather bag, entered the Railway Bell Inn, and ordered tea and a chop, with a bed for the night. He then requested to be shown to his bedroom, to refresh himself with a wash. His desire was complied with, and he was shown upstairs to a room on the first floor. This chamber, it seems, opened into a corridor, at the end of which was a room containing a large cabinet, in which the silver plate and other valuables of the establishment were kept. In about half an hour the gentleman came down, carrying the black leather bag with him, which he had taken upstairs. As he passed the bar he mentioned that he was going out on business for half an hour. Several hours passed away without the return of the “traveller,” when it just struck the landlady to go upstairs to see whether all was safe. On going into the room where the plate had been left, she found that the chest had been broken open, and some forks and spoons, amounting in value to about £15, abstracted. It need scarcely be remarked, that the stranger did not come back for his “tea and chop.”

 
Folkestone Chronicle 11-5-1867

Coroner`s Inquest

The inquest on the body of the unfortunate man, Charles Wood, was held at the Railway Bell Hotel on Thursday, before John Minter Esq., Borough Coroner, and a jury.

William Mitchell, station master, identified the body, which presented a frightful appearance, the head being all but separated from the body, which was much mangled.

Thomas Mann, engine driver, of 9 Alfred Place, Bedford Place, Old Kent Road, London, was in charge of the engine drawing the 9-05 a.m. down train from Charing Cross, on the 8th inst., reaching Folkestone about 12-47. On nearing Folkestone Junction Station he was looking out, and saw just at the end of the platform, the deceased step from behind a truck on the siding by the goods shed, on the down line, so that he was momentarily struck down by the left hand buffer of the engine. The train was stopped at once.

Cyrus Southerden Offen, carriage inspector, in employ of South Eastern Railway Company, at Folkestone Harbour and Upper Stations, whose duty it is to attend the arrival of each train, witnessed that of the 9-05 a.m. from Charing Cross on Wednesday. He was walking in the 6 ft. between the turntable road and the down road, towards the down platform, and saw deceased just in front come from behind a truck into the way of the train: witness helloed to him twice, but he took no notice: he ran to try to save him, but was too late: he saw him knocked down by the engine, and turned away horrified: deceased was carried about 15 ft. by the train. When the train had passed, witness went to deceased, who was lying in the 4 ft: he gasped twice when he was found.

John Porter, goods porter at the South Eastern Railway Upper Station, was close to the goods shed at the Dover end, and about a rod from deceased when he was struck down by the engine as described by the last witness.

Mr. Mitchell, re-examined: Deceased was well aware of the train. Richards should be on the spot where the accident occurred, to warn persons crossing the line. There was formerly a man specially appointed to warn them, but not now. It was everyone`s business.

The Coroner told P.C. Swain that he understood the door of the room had been locked, and no-one allowed to see the poor man. It was not necessary for the police to take charge of the body in a case like this, where there was no suspicion of foul play. The body might have been taken home.

Richards, the ticket collector, and Chester, the head porter, having been examined, the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 
Folkestone Observer 11-5-1867

Inquest

An inquest was held at the Railway Bell on Thursday by Mr. Coroner Minter, on the body of Charles Wood, a goods porter, who was knocked down on Wednesday by the train leaving Charing Cross at 9-05 a.m. The deceased was about 54 years of age, unmarried, and has been heard to say that he had not communicated with his friends at Chipping Ongar for thirty years.

Thomas Mann, living in Old Kent Road, London, said he was the driver of the 9-05 a.m. mail train from Charing Cross on the South Eastern Railway, on Wednesday. Stopped at Shorncliffe, and arrived at Folkestone about 12-28. On approaching the Folkestone Station he was keeping a look out, and the line was clear until he approached the station. Saw Wood come out from behind a truck on a siding by a goods shed. He was only three or four feet from the engine when he stepped out on to the four feet of the down line, and witness shouted to him instantly. Had not time to blow the whistle. The brake had been previously applied, and the engine was slung out of gear, in accordance with the regulations for entering the station. It was impossible to stop the engine before it struck deceased, with the left hand buffer, on the side. He was evidently going to pick up the goods train from Dover, and when shouted to he still looked at the pick up. Did not think the engine was going six miles an hour.

Cyrus Offen, who is carriage inspector at both Folkestone stations, said it was his duty to attend on the arrival of each train to examine the carriages. Was present on Wednesday on the arrival of the 9-05 train from Charing Cross, and which arrived in Folkestone from about half past twelve to one. Was walking in the six foot between a siding and the down line, near the turntable on entering the station. Saw just in front of him the deceased coming from behind a truck. Called out to him by his name to warn him of the approaching down train. Was six or seven feet from him. He took no notice of witness`s calling to him. He was not deaf. Deceased`s attention was called to the pick-up coming in from Dover, and the noise of the engines would drown witness`s voice. Witness ran towards him to save him, but was too late. Thought he heard witness call, as he seemed partly to turn around after his foot was on the metal. The buffer struck him, and witness saw the engine go over one of his legs. He then turned away horrified, and did not see him again till the train had passed. He was then about fifteen feet from where he was knocked down. Witness went up to him, and he gasped twice. The engine was going about six miles an hour. Cannot say whether any officer was on either of the stations to warn people from crossing.

John Philpott, goods porter at the Upper Railway Station, was close to the goods shed, Dover side, on the arrival of the 9-05 train from Charing Cross on Wednesday. Saw deceased going from the goods shed to the goods pick-up, to which he always attended. The truck from behind which he stepped was between the turntable and the goods shed. Was about a rod from deceased, and as soon as he stepped out he was knocked down by the engine. Went up and looked at him, and he was quite dead.

Mr. Mitchell, station master, said the train had been running at this time for many years, and had not been altered more than five minutes. Deceased was quite aware of the time of arrival. They have the timetables and book of rules in the goods shed, and also the warning bell.

A juryman enquired whether Mitchell, the station master, was at his post when the train came in. Mr. Mitchell said he was at the Harbour Station at the time. His representative, Inspector Chester, was in charge at the time.

Samuel Chester was called and said: I am head porter at Folkestone Junction Station. In the station master`s absence I take his place and duties. Hills was at the signal post at the arrival of the train. The ticket collector should have been at his.

Mr. Minter said the question asked as to the duties of the various officers would have a good deal to do with the verdict, supposing the person killed was a stranger, but the deceased was an official, and knew the time at which the trains should arrive, and he (Mr. Minter) could not help thinking, and had no doubt the jury would agree with him, that habits of familiarity with danger caused the railway employees to take risks on themselves which were wholly unnecessary, and he wondered there were not more accidents. He did not know that anyone was really more to blame than the unfortunate deceased himself. If he had not been so intent on his duty, so anxious to give the way bills to the Dover “pick-up”, he would not have, probably, met with his death. A question had been asked as to the duties of the various officials, and according to the answer he thought it was almost impossible that such an accident should have happened to a stranger as there was a man stationed at the signal post one side, who would warn passengers off, and there was the ticket collector on the other. The ticket collector was not where he should have been in this instance, but the probabilities were that if he had been, in this instance, he would have taken no notice of deceased, who was well acquainted with shunting trains and knew more of the danger to be incurred than the witness.

The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.



 
Southeastern Gazette 14-5-1867



Inquest

An inquest was held on Thursday last, at the Railway Tavern (sic), before J. Minter, Esq., coroner, and a respectable jury, on the body of Charles Woods, a goods porter in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, who bad met with his death on the previous day, by being knocked down by an engine.

It appeared from the evidence that on Wednesday, shortly after noon, the pick-up goods train, from Dover, was standing on the up line of rails; and Wood (who was standing on the space between the two lines of railway) stepped back upon the down line of rails, not observing the approach of the train which is due at Dover at 12.40, which was slowly drawing into the station and then close upon him. The unfortunate man was knocked down, the guard-iron striking him so as to nearly sever his head from his body - the ash-pans completing the work of his destruction by crushing him as they passed over. The spectacle to the passengers who were waiting on the platform was of a very appalling description. Deceased had been many years in the company’s service at Folkestone, and was much and deservedly respected. He was an unmarried man. Mr. Minter, in summing up the case, said, as far as the evidence went, it did not appear that blame was attachable to anyone.

A verdict of “Accidental death” was returned.

 
Folkestone Observer 15-2-1868

Wednesday, February 12th: Before The Mayor, R.W. Boarer and W. Bateman Esqs.

John Williams applied for a transfer of the license granted to Joseph Moret to sell excisable liquors at the Railway Bell hotel, Dover Road. Application granted.


 
Southeastern Gazette 20-7-1868



Inquest



On Friday afternoon an Ashford man named Prebble dropped down dead at his work under the circumstances narrated below. The inquest was held on Saturday morning, at the Railway Bell, Dover Road, before J. Minter, Esq., borough coroner.



The body was identified by the postmaster of Ashford as that of his cousin, William Prebble, an insurance agent and messenger to the post office of Ashford. He had been sent to Folkestone to paint the huts and apparatus belonging to the post-office. Deceased was 45 years of age, and had formerly been in the 23rd Fusileers, having served through the Crimean war, where he was shot through the body at the last storming of the Redan.



Mr. Silvester Eastes, surgeon, deposed to having been sent for to attend deceased, at about a quarter to six o’clock on Friday. He found him lying on the ballast on the north side of the down line, with his face on the ground, slightly inclining to his right side, quite dead and cold. Close to where his work was left unfinished were two or three small pools of blood, as though he had been coughing, and witness believed that some large vessel of the chest had been ruptured, especially as he found an old wound about him; it was greatly accelerated by the intense heat. There were no marks of violence on the body. There was no doubt that death was occasioned by natural causes.



Other witnesses having been examined, the jury returned a verdict of “Died by the visitation of God.”

 
Folkestone Chronicle 25-7-1868

Coroner`s Inquest

An inquest was held at the Railway Bell on Saturday before J. Minter Esq., coroner, and a jury, on the body of Wm. Prebble, whose sudden death we reported in our last.

The jury having viewed the body the following evidence was taken.

John Edward Munn, postmaster, Ashford, identified the body as being that of William Prebble, an insurance agent and messenger to the Post Office, Ashford, and a cousin of his own. He was here engaged painting the huts and apparatus belonging to the Post Office, and he came down from Ashford on Thursday. His age was 45, and he had been a soldier in the 23rd Fusiliers, and went all through the Crimean War, being shot through the body at the last action at the Redan.

S. Eastes Esq., surgeon, deposed: Yesterday about a quarter to 6 o`clock I was sent for to attend deceased, who had been found laying on the railway. He was lying about 4 feet from the north side of the rail and parallel to it, on his face, quite dead, and getting cold. There was a little blood mixed with phlegm on the ballast close to where his work had been left unfinished. I believe some large vessel about the chest had been ruptured, and as he had an old wound it is very probable it was connected in some way with that. I think the death was greatly accelerated by the intense heat. There were no marks of violence, and I have no doubt death was occasioned from natural causes.

Wm. Hills, signalman, in the S.E.R. Company`s employ, saw deceased at ten minutes to five at his work, spoke to him, and received a reply that it was very warm.

Robert Leonard, engine driver, at 5-26, was driving his train and saw deceased lying with his face on the ground close to the mail apparatus, between that and the down line. He appeared to be asleep and I reported the circumstance at the station.

Eli Belcher, porter, S.E.R. said he was directed to go to the mail apparatus about half past five, and there saw deceased lying down, with his face to the ground, his head on his right arm. He appeared to be asleep, but as I could not arouse him I touched his face and found it was cold. I got assistance and helped to remove the body to this house.

Supt. Martin deposed: Last evening at a quarter to six the last witness came to him and stated a man had been found dead on the line. He searched the body and found a silver watch with steel chain, a purse containing £2 10s. in gold, 11s. in silver, 1 1/2d. in copper, and a knife.

The coroner then briefly summed up, and the jury returned a verdict of “Died by the visitation of God”.

 
Folkestone Observer 9-1-1869

Wednesday, January 4th: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

Robert Flux applied for a temporary authority to sell excisable liquors at the Railway Bell Hotel under the license granted to John Willows.

Application granted.

 
Folkestone Express 9-1-1869

Wednesday, January 6th: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

The Railway Bell, Dover Road: This was an application by Mr. Robert Flux for temporary power to sell under the license of Mr. John Willows. Application granted.

 
Folkestone Chronicle 30-1-1869

Inquest

On Monday afternoon an inquest was held at the Railway Bell before J. Minter Esq., coroner, and a jury, on the body of a man named Edward Jones, well known to all the residents and visitors of the town as a crossing-sweeper at the bottom of Mill Lane, as a shoe-black near the Pavilion Hotel, and as a vendor of nuts and oranges, who was found dead at the lime kiln, Dover Road, on Saturday morning, under the circumstances detailed below.

The court having been opened and the jury sworn, the proceeded to view the body, which was lying on some straw in the stable, and was identified by James Burvill. On their return, a juror asked if Mr. Thomas Newman, the proprietor of the kiln, should be on the jury. The Coroner replied, that having been sworn, it was not in his power to discharge him, but had he known the circumstances he should not have allowed him to be on the jury. The enquiry then proceeded.

James Burvill, lime burner in the employ of Mr. Thomas Newman, Folkestone Hill Lime Works, said: On Saturday morning last, at twenty minutes past six, I found deceased lying on his right side, arms partly folded, on the wall of the kiln, and his feet in the kiln, on the lime. The kiln was alight, but not burned through. I put a thatched wattle on Friday to keep the wind from the kiln, and deceased was in it`s shelter. He was quite dead, but not cold. I took his feet off the kiln, and laid him straight. I sent for the police. I have often seen deceased there before, and have cautioned him of danger. There is nothing to prevent anyone from falling in if the kiln is empty, but it is never left empty, and `tis not on any road. There is no right of way to it.

William Bateman, surgeon, said: On Saturday morning I was called to see deceased, who was lying at the lime kiln in the position described by last witness. He appeared to be asleep. I examined the body – there is no appearance of violence, and I have no doubt he was poisoned by the carbonic acid gas from the fumes of the lime, which first produces torpor, next insensibility, and soon death. The wind may have shifted, for there was an eddy of smoke over his face. It is a very dangerous position for him to be in. I know nothing of deceased except by hearsay.

P.C. Hills said: From information received, I went to the Folkestone Hill Lime Works on Saturday morning about eight o`clock, where I found deceased. I informed Dr. Bateman of the occurrence. I assisted to remove the body to the stable, where it now lies. I searched it, and found 2d. in coppers, two knives, one purse, a Book Of Common Prayer, his shoe brushes, a chain, and a necktie. He obtained a livelihood as a crossing-sweeper and a shoeblack.

A verdict of “Poisoned by carbonic acid gas” was returned.

It was stated that deceased had a brother, a silk mercer, in Fenchurch Street, but no-one had written to inform him of the occurrence. The parish officers would have to apply to him for the funeral expenses.

 
Folkestone Observer 30-1-1869

Inquest

An inquest was held at the Railway Bell Hotel, before the Coroner, J. Minter Esq., on Monday afternoon last, on the body of Edward Jones, about 35 years of age, a shoeblack and crossing sweeper, who usually took up his quarters near the Harbour.

After the swearing of the jury and seeing the body, a juror asked if Mr. Newman, who was proprietor of the lime kiln, should be allowed to sit on the jury.

The Coroner said it was not proper that Mr. Newman should be on the jury, but as he was sworn he could not discharge him.

The following evidence was then taken:

James Burvill said he was a lime burner and lived in Denmark Road, in the employ of Mr. Thomas Newman, proprietor of the Folkestone Hill Lime Kilns. On Saturday morning last, about 20 minutes past six, he found deceased lying by the side of the lime kiln. He identified the body as that of Edward Jones. Deceased was lying on his right side, with his arm partly folded on the wall of the kiln. His feet were lying over the wall into the top of the lime. The kiln was lit, but the flames had not reached the top. He was lying behind a wattle, which had been put there to keep the wind from the kiln. Deceased was quite dead but not cold. Took his feet from the kiln, and laid him straight. There was no-one with witness until ten minutes after, when he sent the boy for a policeman.

By the jury: There was no protection for passers by, but it was not a public thoroughfare. The Dover Road was 100 yards, and the Crete Road but 20 yards from the kiln. Never left the kiln empty at night; it was his duty to fill it.

William Bateman, surgeon, practicing at Folkestone, said he was called about eight o`clock by a policeman and proceeded to the Folkestone Hill Lime Kiln. Found the deceased in the position described by the last witness. He was lying as if asleep.

Burvill, re-called, said deceased had been there before, and witness had cautioned him as to the danger of sleeping there. Deceased said he thought there was no harm, as he only came to have a warm. Did not see him there on Saturday night. They had what they called “Fired up” when he left. The smoke from the kiln was very suffocating.

Mr. Bateman then continued his evidence. The last witness told him he had only moved his legs. Examined the deceased and found no appearance of violence. Had no doubt he had died from the carbonic gas from the kilns. When witness saw him the wind took the smoke right across his face. The lew of the wattle would make the eddy dangerous. The body did not show any outward appearance. In some cases the carbonic gas discoloured the face. If an animal had been in the same position he had no doubt it would be dead in a few minutes. Had seen deceased about the town very often, but did not know much about him. Had heard that deceased had a brother well off at Fenchurch Street, London, a silk merchant, he believed.

P.C. Hills said on Saturday morning about seven o`clock he received information that a man was lying dead at the lime kilns. He gave information to Mr. Bateman, and then proceeded to the lime kilns where he saw deceased lying as described by the first witness, Burvill. He then, with the assistance of Burvill, removed him to the stable where he now lay. On searching him, he found twopence, two pocket knives, a money purse, a common prayer book, one neck tie, and half a dozen shoe brushes, the whole of which he now produced. Deceased was a shoeblack. He earned his livelihood by sweeping crossings and by shoe cleaning.

The jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased was poisoned by inhaling carbonic acid gas.

 
Folkestone Express 30-1-1869

Inquest

An inquest was held at the Railway Bell on Monday, before the Coroner, J. Minter Esq., on the body of a man who was discovered on Saturday morning, quite dead, lying on the lime kilns, adjacent to the Dover Road. It is supposed that he went there for the purpose of sleeping, and was suffocated by the poisonous vapour arising from the lime. The deceased was identified as Edward Jones, a man who is better known as the shoe-black, generally stationed near the Pavilion Hotel, and was considered rather an eccentric individual, his following that employment being apparently voluntary, as some of his friends were in good circumstances, and from what we can hear used their endeavours to influence him to follow a more respectable vocation.

The jury was sworn, but an exception was taken to the name of Mr. Newman, but the Coroner said as he had been sworn he must remain.

The first witness examined was James Burvell, who said: I am a lime burner in the employ of Mr. Thomas Newman, who is the proprietor of the Lime Kilns, Folkestone Hill, where the body was found, and I live in Denmark Road. (The jury then proceeded to view the body, and the witness identified it). On Saturday morning last, the 23rd instant, at twenty minutes past six, I found the deceased lying on the lime kiln. He was on his right side, and his arms partly folded. His body was on the wall of the kiln, and his feet on the lime. The kiln was alight, but the fire did not rise to the top. He was lying between the thatched wattle which I had placed there the previous evening to prevent the wind getting to the lime. He was quite dead, but not cold. I took his feet off the kiln and laid him straight. There was no-one else there at the time, but ten minutes after a boy came, and I sent him for Mr. Hills. The deceased`s clothes was all in order.

By the jury: There is no protection to the kiln, but it is generally full, and always when I leave of a night. There is no pathway to the kiln, but to go there you must trespass.

By the Coroner: The kiln is about 100 yards from the road. The one in the Crete Road is only twenty yards.

Dr. Bateman, sworn, said: I am a surgeon, practicing at Folkestone. I was called at eight o`clock on Saturday by a policeman and proceeded to the lime kilns, and there found the deceased lying in the position the previous witness described, looking as if he was asleep. Burvell told me he had only moved his feet.

J. Burvell, re-called: I have seen the deceased there before several times to sleep of a night, and I have cautioned him and told him of his danger of suffocation. He said he thought it no harm; he came to get warm. I did not see him there that night; the fumes are suffocating; if there is a deal of smoke, it is very strong; the lime was fired up.

Dr. Bateman: I examined the body. There was no appearance of violence, and I have no doubt he died poisoned by carbonic acid gas, which produces sleepiness and stupor. When I saw him, the wind took the smoke and gas close to his face. I should think it a very dangerous position at any time. The lew of the wattle would make the smoke come to him. There was no outward appearance but that he died by suffocation. An animal would have died in such a position in a few minutes. In the position he lay he had the whole of the smoke. Carbonic acid is a very poisonous gas, and ten percent of it in the atmosphere would poison any person. I can`t tell if he was the worse for drink at the time. I have seen him often, and heard that he has a brother very well off; he is in business in Fenchurch Street as a silk mercer. The deceased was frequently very badly off, and when he had money he spent it in a very foolish manner.

P.C. Hills, sworn, said: On Saturday morning I saw a man lying dead at the lime kilns, and I gave information to Mr. Bateman; deceased was lying on the brickwork; we then removed him to where he now lies. I searched him and found 2d. in money, two knives, one purse, a Common Prayer Book, and a neckerchief, a half dozen shoe brushes, and a little chain. He was a shoeblack and crossing sweeper.

The jury at once returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, that the deceased died from the effects of carbonic acid gas from the lime kilns.



 
Southeastern Gazette 1-2-1869


Inquest

An inquest was held before J. Minter, Esq., at the Railway Bell Hotel, on Monday afternoon, on the body of a man found on the Lime Kiln, near the Dover Road, on Saturday morning.

James Burvill deposed that he was a lime burner, and that when proceeding to his work about six o’clock on Saturday morning last he saw the deceased lying on his side, his feet resting on the lime, and quite dead. He had seen the deceased there previously, and cautioned him of the danger of suffocation. Deceased answered “There is no harm in trying to get warm.” The fumes of the lime were very suffocating if there was much smoke. The kiln was fired up on Friday night. The kiln was away from any public thoroughfare, and about 100 yards from the road. There is no protection to it, but it was generally full.

Mr. W. Bateman, surgeon, had no doubt that death arose from his having been poisoned by the carbonic acid gas, which produces sleepiness and stupor, and was caused by the burning lime.

Deceased’s name was Edward Jones, and he followed the calling of a shoe black and crossing sweeper near the Pavilion Hotel.

The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

 
Folkestone Chronicle 27-2-1869

Wednesday, February 23rd: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and S. Eastes Esq.

License of the following house was transferred at a special sessions:- The Railway Bell to Robert Flux

 
Folkestone Observer 27-2-1869

Tuesday, February 23rd: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and S. Eastes Esq.

Robert Flux applied for a transfer of the license granted to John Willows, to sell at the Railway Bell Hotel. Granted.

 
Folkestone Express 27-2-1869

Wednesday, February 24th: Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and S. Eastes Esq.

Transfer of License

The Railway Bell – Robert Flux, transferred from John Willows. Granted.



 
Southeastern Gazette 1-3-1869

Transfer of Licence.—The following licence was applied for on Wednesday and granted :—R. Flux, from J. Willows, of the Railway Bell


 
Folkestone Chronicle 3-1-1874

Inquest

An inquest was held on Monday last before J. Minter Esq., Coroner for the Borough, at the Railway Bell Inn, Dover Road, on the body of James Borland, a fireman in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, who met with his death on Friday evening last, under the circumstances detailed below.

The jury, having been sworn, proceeded to view the body, which was lying at the father`s house. On their return the following evidence was taken –

Sylvester Eastes, surgeon, being sworn, deposed that about 5 o`clock on Friday evening he was called to the house of the father of the deceased, whence he had been removed on a stretcher. He found deceased quite stiff, and in a complete state of collapse, and insensible. After a little time he partially recovered sensitiveness, and swallowed a little brandy and water. I had him placed on a bed, and had his clothes removed. He was then breathing rapidly. Upon examination I found two or three ribs on the left side broken, and a large quantity of air had escaped under the cellular tissues over the greater part of the body, thus proving that the lungs had been injured by the fracture of a rib. There was also a dislocation of the left hip joint. After bandaging the chest, I applied warmth to the feet and gave him some stimulants. He then became quite conscious, but breathing very laboriously. I then left him, but saw him again between 7 and 8 o`clock; found him in much the same condition. Between 9 and 10 o`clock I received an urgent message to come and see him again. Upon my arrival I found he was dead. Death was caused by injury to the lungs caused by broken ribs. I have not held a post mortem examination; did not think it necessary; he only lived about 4 hours.

William Mills was next sworn, who said: I am an engine driver in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, and am stationed at Folkestone. I drive the engine (No. 152) to and from the Harbour to the Junction. I have identified the body of deceased as that of James Borland, who was my fireman. I am 63 years of age, and have been in the employ of the Company as an engine driver for 27 years. I and deceased had been at work all day on Friday, December 26th, from about a quarter before six, driving the engine to and from the station and the Harbour with passengers and goods, excepting during breakfast and dinner. We left the engine to go to tea about half past four. On my return a few minutes before five, I met deceased at the end of the platform, on th up side of the line. We walked down to the engine together, deceased being a little in front of me. The engine was standing about 20 yards from the water crane. There was a bank brake attached to our engine; there was no tender. Deceased got up and moved the engine to the water crane, and I gave him water. I then got up on the engine, deceased being on the other side. I put the engine in motion, intending to go to the Harbour. It would have been my duty to have directed the deceased to uncouple the chain from the bank brake, had I not seen him walk along the outside of the engine for that purpose. Unless a brakesman happened to be present, deceased always did it. He had done it hundreds of times before. Sometimes he would do it from the framework of the engine, and sometimes from the brake. It was very dark on the evening in question. I did not see deceased again. I listened to hear the chain thrown off, but not hearing it fall I called out to deceased “Is it all right, Jim?”. Receiving no answer, I got off the engine and called out “Where are you?”. Still receiving no answer, I walked back, and found him in the 4 ft., about 50 or 60 yards from where I left the engine. When I came up to him I found he was insensible. I went and fetched assistance and had him carried on a stretcher to his father`s house. We were both quite sober, having had no liquor to drink that day.

In answer to a juryman, the witness said: I did not feel the wheels pass over him; the ash pan and cylinders caused his death. Had he been lying flat there would hardly have been room for the engine to pass over him.

By another juror: The regulator was shut directly deceased began to walk along the engine. There being no steam on, could not consequently feel any bumping of the engine against the buffers of the brake. There is no particular regulation about detaching the engine from the brake.

Witness continued: There is a rail which passes along the smoke box, and another rail along the side of the engine, so that when travelling we can walk alongside to oil the engine, or to examine it to see that it is all right.

James Borland, sworn, said: I am a carpenter in the employ of the S.E.R. Company. Deceased was my son. He was 29 years of age. I was not at home when he came home to tea. Just before he died, he became conscious. I asked him how it had occurred. He replied “I went, as usual, to uncouple, and whilst in the act of doing so, the steam was put on. I slipped in the four foot, and the engine passed over me. I wonder I wasn`t doubled up”. I have frequently seen him uncouple the engine in different ways.

The witness Mills was then re-examined, and said: I did put steam on again, after I had said “Is it all right, Jim?”. It was from 20 to 30 yards from where I had first left the engine before I put on steam again.

William Mitchell, sworn, said: I am station master at Folkestone. I was at the Harbour at the time of the accident. About 10 minutes after, I arrived at the Junction. I saw Mills that evening; he was quite sober; he is generally a very sober man. I have often seen the uncoupling of the engine, as spoken to by the previous witnesses.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”. The Coroner remarked that it did not appear to him there was culpability attaching to anyone, as the system of uncoupling appeared to be a customary one, but it was a great pity men would run such risks, and endanger their lives.

 
Folkestone Express 3-1-1874

Inquest

We regret to have to record a fatal accident, which happened on Friday evening, 26th ult., to a respectable young man named Borland, stoker on the engine running between the Upper Station and the Harbour. From the evidence given below it will be seen that the fatality was purely accidental, and arose from a mishap in a simple mechanical operation which deceased had performed hundreds of times safely. We understand that the poor young man who has met with such an untimely end was very steady and was much respected by all those with whom he worked.

An inquest was held on Monday at the Railway Bell Inn before J. Minter Esq., Coroner, and a respectable jury. The following evidence was adduced:

Mr. S. Eastes deposed: On Friday evening last, the 26th December, about five o`clock, I was called to the Upper Station to see the deceased, James Borland. He was taken to his father`s house on a stretcher; he was then in a state of collapse, and quite insensible. A few minutes after I entered the room he partially recovered his senses, and was able to swallow a little brandy and water. I had him placed upon a bed, and his clothes taken off; this time he was breathing very rapidly, and on examination I found two of his ribs on the left side broken, and a large quantity of air had escaped under the cellular tissue over a great part of the body, thus proving that the lungs were wounded by the fractured ribs. There was also a dislocation of the left hip joint. After bandaging and supplying warmers to the feet and giving a little stimulants he became quite conscious, but the breathing was still very laborious. I saw him again between seven and eight o`clock; he was in much the same condition. Between nine and ten I received an urgent message to visit him. On arriving at the house I found he was dead. His death was caused by injury to the lungs through the broken ribs.

William Hills was then called. He said: I am an engine driver, in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, stationed at Folkestone, running between the Harbour and Upper Station. I identify the body as that of James Borland, my fireman. I have been in the service of the company for 27 years as engine driver. I left the engine near the water crane on Thursday. We came out to work about a quartr to six on Friday morning. I and deceased had been at work all day with the engine, going to and from the harbour. We had breakfast and dinner hours. I and the deceased left the engine about half past four to go home to tea. I returned about five minutes to five; I met the deceased returning on the up side platform. We then walked to our engine, deceased being a little in advance of me. The engine was standing about twenty yards from the water crane, the bank brake being attached. Deceased got up and moved the engine to the water crane, and I gave him water; I then got up on the engine, deceased was on the other side. I put the engine in motion, with the intention of going to the harbour, and should have directed the deceased to uncouple the bank brake, had I not seen him walk along the side of the engine for that purpose. He had done this before many hundred times. He would uncouple it sometimes standing on the frame of the engine, and sometimes from the brake. It was very dark on that evening, and I lost sight of the deceased when he got halfway along the engine. Not hearing the coupling chain fall, I called out “Is it all right, Jim?”. Receiving no answer, I stopped the engine and got off and called out “Where are you?”, and receiving no answer I walked back and found him lying in the fourfoot, about fifty or sixty yards from where I stopped the engine. I met a man and asked him to go for a doctor. I then went off for a stretcher, and he was carried to his father`s house. Deceased and I were quite sober. The ash pan and cylinders must have struck and passed over the deceased. There would be hardly room where the deceased was lying for the ash pan to pass over, and the ground was rather soft. The regulator was shut. There is a rail goes along and across the front of the engine to hold by whilst examining the machinery when in motion. I put my steam on after I called out.

James Borland, a carpenter in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, deposed: The deceased is my son. He was carried into my house as I returned home. He became conscious just before he died. I then asked him how it occurred. He said he went as usual to uncouple, and as he was doing so the steam was put on. He slipped and the engine passed over him. He made the remark “I wonder I was not doubled up”. The age of deceased was 29.

William Mitchell then said: I am the station master at Folkestone. I was at the Harbour when the accident took place. I arrived at the Upper Station about ten minutes after I left the Harbour, and I met the deceased being carried off on a stretcher by four men. I was aware of the manner in which the engine was uncoupled, and it was done when it was necessary for the light engine to go to the Harbour to fetch a train.

The jury returned a verdict of accidental death, caused by injuries sustained by falling from an engine whilst in motion.

 
Folkestone Express 2-5-1874

Inquest

An inquest was held on Monday evening at the Railway Bell, before John Minter Esq., Coroner, on the body of Samuel Goddard, who met with his death as detailed below.

The jury having viewed the body, Edward Hobday deposed: I am a labourer. On Friday week I went home about twelve at noon; I live two door above deceased`s house. I heard a noise and went to look; the back door was fastened. I undid the window and reached the bolt of the back door and drew it and went in. I saw deceased laying at the foot of the stairs, doubled up, with his head in a pail, which was fallen over, his legs being on the stairs. There was no-one in the house. He was insensible. I picked him up and laid him in the room, and placed something under his head. When I picked him up I noticed congealed blood hanging to his head. I left him in the care of two men, named Hall and Clay.

Jane Goddard, wife of deceased, deposed: I went out to work about 7 o`clock on Friday morning week. On Thursday evening I went to a party at my sister`s, and told deceased I should not be home that night; my husband was out then. Between 12 and one on Friday, in consequence of what I heard, I went home. On my arrival my husband was sensible. He told me he got out of bed between nine and ten on Thursday night and got dressed, and missed the stairs, and did not remember any more. He died about seven o`clock on Saturday night. He was 76 years of age. He told me he had been to bed, and I saw by the bed that he had been there.

Marta, wife of Wm. Hall, deposed: Deceased came home on Thursday evening week about seven o`clock. I did not speak to him. He was a little the worse for drink. About half past eleven next day I heard a moan proceeding from the kitchen of deceased`s house. I opened the window and saw deceased lying at the foot of the stairs. I waited until the witness Hobday came home. Mrs. Clay and Mrs. Hobday came. We called to deceased, but he did not answer. We did nothing, but waited till our husbands came home. I did not think anything at all about what was the matter with him.

By the Foreman: I did not hear anything of him the night before. The next door neighbour heard something fall between ten and eleven.

Supt. Wilshere said: I saw deceased going home on Thursday night the worse for drink. He was coming from the Black Bull towards his residence. He was in company with another man. Deceased said “I am going home to sleep it off, old fellow”. I told him that was the best thing he could do.

W. Bateman Esq., M.R.C.S., deposed: On Friday afternoon I was called in to see deceased, and found him lying on a couch in the front room, insensible. On examining his head I found on the right side a wound about two inches in length, and on further examination found the skull was fractured to the same extent just over one of the principle arteries of the brain, which runs in a groove in the bone. He afterwards became sensible, so as to answer questions indistinctly. His left side was paralysed, and it was a hopeless case from the first. He died from exhaustion caused by injuries to the brain, which was wounded. After looking at the pail, I think he fell on the ear of the pail.

By a Juror: I do not think medical assistance sooner could have saved him.

The Jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death while intoxicated”.

 
Folkestone Express 19-9-1874

Wednesday, September 16th: Before The Mayor, J. Tolputt and J. Clark Esqs.

The following received temporary authority to sell intoxicating liquors at the houses named until the transfer day:

Mr. Major, Railway Bell

Note: Major does not appear in the list in More Bastions



 
Southeastern Gazette 14-8-1876



Inquest



An inquest was held at the Railway Bell, on Monday, on the body of James Godden. On June 30th he was working with William Hogben on a scaffolding inside the Congregational Chapel, when he accidentally fell backwards. He sustained concussion of the brain and injury to the spine, but lingered fire weeks and died on Friday, the 4th inst. The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”

 
Folkestone Express 21-4-1877

Local News

On Thursday evening the body of the man Brotherwood, who was killed by a slip at Eagle`s Nest, on the Suth Easter Company`s line to Dover, was found by the men engaged in clearing away the earth. The body was in a frightful condition, being, as an eyewitness said, like a crushed sheet of newspaper. When discovered the body was bound up with telegraph wire, and three strands of the metal had to be cut before it could be released from it`s prison. The inquest will be held this (Friday) afternoon at three o`clock at the Railway Bell Inn, Dover Road.

 
Folkestone Express 28-4-1877

Inquest

On Friday Mr. Coroner Minter held an inquest at the Railway Bell Inn, Dover Road, on the body of Henry Brotherwood, who was killed by the fall of earth from Eagle`s Nest on to the South Eastern Company`s line of railway to Dover on the 15th of January.

At the opening of the enquiry the Coroner remarked that he did not know for what reason the body was brought into Folkestone Parish for the inquest to be held, but inasmuch as it had been brought, his duty was to hold the inquiry into the cause of death.

The first witness called, after the viewing of the body, which laid at the Railway Station, was Thomas Brotherwood, who identified the body as that of his brother, Henry Brotherwood, a labourer in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, who resided at Farley. He was twenty seven years of age.

John Lavender deposed that he was a navvy employed on the slip on the South Eastern Railway. Between ten minutes and a quarter past one o`clock on the previous day he was engaged in excavating on the slip when he came upon the body of the deceased, on the down line, across the rail. His head and his feet were close together. Witness called some of the Company`s men and they got the body out. It was placed in a shell and taken away.

Mr. Harvey, the Inspector of the Permanent Way, in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, deposed: Part of my district is on the main line from Ashford to Dover. The deceased was in the employ of the Company as a labourer. On the 15th of January, when the slip occurred, he was assisting on putting a temporary road on the lime kiln siding on the up side of the line. On that day about a quarter to one o`clock I was standing at the eastern mouth of the Martello Tunnel, and I saw the fall of chalk and earth from the face of the cliff into the cutting, about a hundred yards on the Dover side of the lime kiln siding, filling it up to a depth of about forty feet, and a length of about two hundred yards. At the time of the fall I did not see the deceased or any other person near the spot. Capel-le-Ferne is the parish in which the slip took place. My duty is to inspect up to the fence on both sides of the line. The fence on the inland side is about 120 yards from the foot of the cliff. The land from the top where the slip took place, down to the Company`s fence belongs, I believe, to a Miss Campbell, who lives in Bouverie Square, Folkestone; at all events, she claims it. I had not inspected the cliff at the spot where the slip took place prior to the fall, but I have done so since. The cause of the slip was that the foot of the cliff was rotten, owing to the water washing the sand and red loam down a fissure at the back, and from the continuation of the wet caused a portion of the cliff to become disconnected from the rest and fall. I have since inspected the cliff and I do not think that there is any likelihood of another similar fall. The earth which branched out has been removed to prevent this, and the face of the cliff has been levelled down. The fall was unexpected.

Albert Link, a labourer in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, residing at Ashford, stated that on the 15th of January he was assisting in making a siding near the lime kiln. Close upon one o`clock he had just finished dinner when he saw the chalk slipping down the cliff. The deceased was standing on the side of the railway nearest the cliff, holding by the iron railing and looking upwards. The chalk and the earth came down suddenly and covered the deceased.

This was all the evidence and the Coroner summed up. He said that from the testimony adduced there could be no doubt the deceased was smothered by the fall of earth upon him, but then the question rose “What was the cause of the slip?” They were told by Mr. Harvey that the cause was a crack in the back of the cliff, and sand and water washed in there, causing the face of the cliff to become loosened and fall down. It did seem to him (Mr. Minter) as a startling fact that a public line of railway should have been liable to such a calamity as to that which had occurred, and by which two men had lost their lives. When they thought of the number of trains carrying hundreds of passengers passing this spot, and that this fall might have taken place during the passing of a train, it would, he believed, strike them as being a most strange and startling thing that such an accident should be likely to occur on a railway. Then again the question rose in one`s mind whether or not there was any means of the occurrence having been prevented. From the evidence of Mr. Harvey they would see that the company had no right to go beyond their line of fence, and therefore it would appear that the duty of keeping all outside in order devolved on the owner of the property. There was not, it would appear, any supposition on the part of anyone that this fall would take place, and therefore no-one`s attention was called to it. The occurrence would consequently seem to be quite accidental, and although it made one dread to think of the danger to which passengers to Dover and vice versa had been liable to, yet now there was the satisfaction of knowing that the occurrence had called the attention of the Company, or the owner of the property, to the insecurity of the cliff and a thorough examination of it had been made and precautions had been taken to render it perfectly safe, and to prevent a similar occurrence in the future.

The jury then returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

 
Folkestone Chronicle 24-8-1878

Inquest

On Thursday afternoon an inquest was held at the Railway Bell Hotel, before J. Minter Esq., on the body of Charles Catt, a labourer, who was killed on the previous day through the falling of a large mass of chalk. Deceased and another man named Howland were employed to remove a quantity of chalk, and on Wednesday they commenced work at six o`clock in the morning. About half past two they were working at a large piece of chalk weighing about 2½ tons. Deceased and Howland were standing at the foot of the piece of chalk, endeavouring to force it out, when it broke off very suddenly. Catt was crushed entirely beneath it, and Howland fell a little on one side of it, and he was caught by the leg and shoulder. Assistance was speedily obtained, and they had to cleave the chalk to release the deceased. He was quite dead. Dr. Eastes said he had examined the body of the deceased. Three or four of the upper ribs on the left side were fractured. From the copious bleeding from the left ear, he believed the base of the skull was fractured. There was also a compound fracture of the left thumb, which was nearly torn from the hand. Death appeared to have been instantaneous. The other man named Howland had his leg broken and arm fractured. The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 
Folkestone Express 24-8-1878

Inquest

On Thursday afternoon an inquest was held at the Railway Bell Hotel before J. Minter Esq., on the body of Charles Catt, a labourer, who was killed on the previous day through the falling of a large mass of chalk. The deceased appeared to have been killed instantaneously, and a man named Howland, who was working with him, had his leg broken. The following evidence was given:

John Kitchingham, a labourer, living in the Folly Fields, said he took a contract with the Cement Company to remove a quantity of chalk marked out in the chalk quarry. Deceased and another man named Howland were employed by him to assist. On Wednesday they commenced work at six o`clock in the morning. About half past two o`clock they were working at a large piece of chalk weighing about 2½ tons, and endeavouring to burst it out from where it was wedged in by two other pieces. Witness got on the top of it and told the others he thought they would not be able to do it. Deceased and Howland were standing at the foot of the piece of chalk endeavouring to force it out with a crowbar, when it broke off very suddenly. Catt was crushed entirely beneath it and Howland fell a little on one side of it, and he was caught by the leg and shoulder. Witness ran and called Wiffin and another, and they had to cleave the chalk to release the deceased. He was quite dead.

Mr. S. Eastes, surgeon, said he was called on Thursday afternoon about three o`clock by the last witness, who said there had been an accident at the Cement Works. He said one man was killed, but he wished him to go and see the other, who was badly injured. He told him they had better bring the man into the town, and sent his youngest son back with him to assist. Soon after he went over himself to the Cement Works and found Howland had been removed to the dispensary. He had examined the body of the deceased. Three or four of the upper ribs on the left side were fractured. There was also a compound fracture of the left thumb, which was nearly torn from the hand. Death appeared to have been instantaneous.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.


 
Southeastern Gazette 24-8-1878



Inquest


An inquest was held at the Railway Bell Inn on Thursday afternoon, before the coroner (J. Minter, Esq.), respecting the death of Charles Catt, who was killed by a fall of chalk at the Cement Works on the previous afternoon.

Stephen Catt, brother of the deceased, identified the body, and said deceased was 26 years of age and was a labourer.

John Kitchingham said he was a labourer living in the Folly Fields. Witness had taken a contract with the cement company to remove some earth and chalk which was marked out in the chalk quarry. He employed deceased and another man named Howland to assist him in the work. They were working in the quarry on the previous day. They had undermined a large piece of chalk about two or three tons weight which was wedged in between two other pieces and they were endeavouring to force it out. Witness got on top and having looked said to them he did not think they would be able to do so. Deceased and Howland were standing at the foot of the chalk with a crow-bar trying to force it out. One side had been cleared. It stood about 8ft. high. While deceased and Howland were endeavouring to move the block it broke short off. Deceased fell in front of it, and the chalk fell upon him and crushed him. Howland fell a little wide and the block caught him by the leg and shoulder. Witness called to a man named Whiffen and another for assistance, and ultimately they cleared the chalk and released the body of deceased from under. Deceased did not speak at all.

Dr Eastes said he was called to see the deceased on the previous afternoon about three o’clock by the last witness, who said one man was killed by an accident and wished him to come and see the other who was badly injured. Witness said he had better bring him into the town and sent his younger son back with him to assist. Subsequently witness went over to the cement works and found that Rowland had been taken to the cemetery. He had examined the body of deceased’ and found several of his ribs fractured on his left side and from the copious bleeding from the left ear he believed the base of the skull was fractured. There was also a compound fracture of the left thumb which was nearly torn from the hand. Death appeared to have been instantaneous.

The Coroner pointed out the principal points of the case, and the jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death.

 
Folkestone Express 5-10-1878

Wednesday, October 2nd: Before John Clark and W.J. Jeffreason Esqs.

Annie Wood was charged with being drunk and disorderly and using obscene language, and Thomas Wood was also charged with being drunk and disorderly at the same time and place – the Dover Road.

Superintendent Wilshere said he was informed that there was a disturbance near the Railway Bell. He went there and saw the male prisoner lying in the road drunk. He shook him and got him up and advised him to go away, but he refused, and began to hello and shout, and he was therefore taken into custody and placed in a stable at the rear of the Railway Bell. While there, the woman came up with another man and tried to force her way into the stable. She was so violent that she had to be placed in a cart to be brought to the cells, and she made use of most disgusting language on the way.

Prisoners said they were man and wife and had just come from hop picking.

The woman was fined 5s. and 6s. costs for drunkenness, and 5s. and 3s. 6d. for using obscene language. The man was fined 9s. 6d., including costs.

 
Folkestone Express 11-1-1879

Inquest

On Monday John Minter Esq. held an inquest at the Railway Bell Inn on the body of a child named Mercy Rumbold, aged three years, daughter of Charles Rumbold, a dairyman, living at 3, Canterbury Road, whose death resulted from scalding.

Mercy Rumbold, the mother of the deceased, said that on the 18th of December she was in the back room sitting in front of the fire, and the child was near the tea table. Her neice, Sarah Rumbold, 12 years old, was pouring out the tea from a teapot, when her little boy, four years old, in passing behind her, touched her elbow accidentally, causing the teapot to cant over, and the contents went down the side of the face and neck of the deceased. Dr. Gill had attended the child from day to day until her death, which took place on the 5th inst., at one o`clock.

Dr. Gill said he was sent for to attend the deceased child on the 20th December. She was suffering from a scald, which he believed to have been caused in the manner described by the mother. He attended her constantly up till the day of her death, which resulted from the injuries she had received.

The Jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death from scalding”.

 
Folkestone Express 16-8-1879

Inquest

On Monday evening J. Minter Esq., Coroner, held an inquest at the Railway Bell Inn, on the body of a child, aged 17 months, the son of a brickmaker, named George Wire, whose death took place under the following sad circumstances:

Catherine Ann Wire said she was the wife of George Wire, living at No. 6, Beach Cottages, and the deceased, whose name was George Edward Wire, was their son. His age was a year and five months. On Sunday, the 27th of July, she was engaged in clearing away the dinner things and the deceased child was toddling about the room. She went into the scullery, leaving the knives and forks in the centre of the table, and the child was left for a moment alone. Immediately after she heard him say “Mamma”, and then heard him fall and scream out. She ran to pick him up, and then saw that he had a knife and fork in one hand, and the blade of another knife which he had been carrying was sticking in his eye. He must have dragged the table cloth and thus pulled the knives to him. She drew the knife out, and carried the child into Mrs. Hogben`s, her next door neighbour. They bathed and bandaged the eye, and deceased then began to vomit. The child`s father at once took him to Dr. Mercer.

Ellen, wife of Herbert Hogben, ticket collector at the South Eastern Railway Station, said Mrs. Wire took the deceased into her house and told her what had occurred. After bathing the eye, which was bleeding, they bandaged it up, and the child`s father at once went with him to the doctor.

Mr. Richard Mercer, surgeon, said the child was brought to him between two and three o`clock on the afternoon of the 27th July. On examining the child he found it had a puncture wound on the left eyelid, which had penetrated through the lid of the orbit into the skull. He attended the deceased, and saw him last on Saturday the 9th, and he died on Sunday at half past one, from inflammation of the brain caused by the wound.

The jury at once returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.


 
Southeastern Gazette 16-8-1879



Inquest

An inquest was held at the Railway Bell, Dover Road, on Monday, before the borough coroner, Mr. Minter, respecting the death of Charles Edward Wise, aged one year and five months, who died from the effects of an accident, as described in the following evidence:—

Catherine Ann Wise, the mother of the deceased, said her little boy was sitting at the table on the 27th July whilst she was clearing away the dinner things. She heard him say “Mamma,” and then heard him fall and scream. She went to him and found that he had fallen with a knife in his hand, the blade of which had penetrated his left eye. She bandaged up the wound and took him to Dr. Mercer.

Dr. Mercer said he attended the child and found him suffering from a punctured wound in the eye. Deceased died on Sunday from inflammation of the brain caused by the wound.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

 
Folkestone Express 27-12-1879

Wednesday, December 24th: before The Mayor, Aldermen Banks, Sherwood and Hoad, R.W. Boarer, and Colonel De Crespigny.

The landlord of the Railway Bell was granted an extension of two hours on the occasion of a supper.

 
Folkestone Express 24-1-1880

Inquest

On Sunday morning an elderly man, named Henry Kennett, who was well known about town, and especially among visitors and lodging house keepers as a luggage porter, committed suicide by cutting his throat. He at one time was a tradesman in a very good position, but having been much addicted to drink, and at times most eccentric in his conduct, he became reduced in circumstances. Some months ago he met with a severe accident, and since that occurrence he had never properly recovered his health. For the last few weeks he had been in a low and desponding state, and as stated above he ended his somewhat chequered career by committing suicide. An inquest was held on the body of the deceased before the borough coroner, J. Minter Esq., at the Railway Bell Inn, on Monday evening, when the following evidence was taken:

Bishop Kennett identified the body as that of his father, Henry Kennett, who lived at No. 1, Randall Terrace, Canterbury Road. Deceased was a fly driver, and his age was 59. For a long time he had been very eccentric in his conduct.

Emma Kennett, wife of the deceased, said for the last two months the deceased had slept by himself in a bedroom adjoining hers. He went to bed on Saturday night at half past ten. He was perfectly sober when he went to bed, but he had been in the habit of getting intoxicated, and that was the reason of his having a separate bedroom. For the last three or four weeks he had been quieter. On Sunday morning he got up begore it was light and went into witness`s room for a candle. He was in the habit of getting up at two or three o`clock in the morning and making himself some tea. He was partially dressed. He went downstairs without saying a word. Witness got up at half past eight, and on going into the kitchen she saw deceased lying on his face with his head under the grate. She called her neighbour, Mrs. Dawe, and then sent her daughter for her brothers and the doctor. Her husband had been in a very desponding and melancholy state for a long time, and had been very eccentric in his conduct for some months previously.

Harriett Dawe said on Sunday morning she was called by Mrs. Kennett and went immediately to her house. She saw deceased lying on the floor of the kitchen, with his head under the fireplace. There was a quantity of blood inside the fender. She believed the deceased was dead. Mrs. Kennett said “Don`t touch him until Dr. Mercer comes”. Witness remained until Dr. Mercer came. She had known deceased for five or six months, and had noticed that he had looked very ill for some time.

Mr. Richards A. Mercer, surgeon, said he was called about nine o`clock on Sunday, and on going to deceased`s house found him lying as described by the previous witness. He lifted him off the fender. There was a large pool of blood in the fender, and the razor produced was lying close to deceased`s right hand inside the fender, opened and covered with blood, which was quite dry. On turning the body over witness found a very large wound in the throat, dividing the large vessels, and also the windpipe. There were two or three slight cuts both above and below the large wound, and on the right and left side of it, but only just dividing the skin. The main wound would cause almost immediate death. Deceased`s vest and undervest were both unbuttoned and thrown back. In his opinion the wound was self-inflicted. From the position of the body, witness thought he must have been kneeling or leaning over the fender, all the blood being inside. There were no wounds or bruises on the body other than those described, except a bruise or two on the face which would be produced by his falling amongst the cinders. In the opinion of witness he had been dead three or four hours when he saw him. During the past summer witness had noticed that he looked more like a man demented than otherwise.

A verdict that the deceased committed suicide whilst temporarily insane was at once returned.


 
Southeastern Gazette 24-1-1880


Inquest

On Monday evening an inquest was held at the Railway Bell Inn, on the body of Henry Kennett, a fly driver.

Bishop Kennett said he identified the body as that of his father, who lived at Randall Terrace, Canterbury Road. He was 59 years of age. Latterly he had been very eccentric in his conduct.

Emma Kennett, the wife of deceased, said her husband slept in an adjoining room to hers and had occupied a separate room for two months. The reason for this was that he used to get intoxicated. On Saturday night he went to bed at half-past ten o’clock, and she retired shortly afterwards. He was in the habit of going downstairs early in the morning in order to make some tea for himself. On Sunday morning he came into her room and took the candle, and she then heard him go downstairs. At half-past eight she got up and went into the kitchen, and there saw deceased lying on his face with his head under the fire grate. She called in the assistance of a neighbour, Mrs. Dair.

Dr. Mercer said he was called to see the deceased about nine o’clock, and found him lying under the fire grate. There was a pool of blood inside the fender, and the razor produced was close by, covered with blood. There was a large wound in the throat, dividing the larger vessels and also the windpipe. He was of opinion that the wound was self-inflicted.

The jury returned a verdict of “Suicide whilst in a state of temporary insanity.”



 
Southeastern Gazette 11-9-1880


Local News

On Wednesday Benjamin Colman was summoned for assaulting Henry Charlton, on September 1st. Complainant is the landlord of the Railway Bell, and on September 1st he went to see the defendant about the rent of some stables which he owed him. Defendant, however, pushed him and struck him on the hand with his stick.

There was a cross-summons, and defendant gave his version of the affair. He said that plaintiff came up and asked what he was going to do about the rent he owed him. He told him as he had placed the matter in his solicitor’s hands he had nothing to say to him; he had better go home to his pothouse and not stay there insulting him. Witness then wanted to pass into Mr. Mortimer’s garden, but Charlton blocked the way and struck a blow at him with his stick. It was possible in parrying the blow that witness hit him on his hand, but he did not strike a deliberate blow.

The Bench dismissed both summonses with costs.

 
Folkestone Chronicle 27-11-1880

Inquest

An inquest was held at the Railway Bell Inn, Dover Road, on Thursday evening on the body of an imbecile girl named Anne Godden, between 16 and 17 years of age, who met with her death under the following sad circumstances.

She was left alone whilst her mother, who lived in Bridge Street, went out washing. Mrs. Wilkins, a neighbour, deposed that she had often seen the girl, and believed although deficient in intellect she was able to take care of herself whilst her mother was out, although she believed she ought not to be left alone.

The evidence of the girl`s brother merely stated that the girl was found in a burning state, whilst the statement of the mother proved that she was a poor widow woman compelled to get her livelihood, and in her opinion the deceased was competent to be left alone.

The Coroner, in summing up, cast some blame on the mother for leaving the girl alone, as she was not in a position to take care of herself, and if the mother was too poor to do so, she could have asked for assistance from the Parish. On the other hand they should recollect the poor position of the woman, that she was obliged to go out for her daily livelihood, and the opinion expressed by the mother and a neighbour, that in their opinion the girl, although deficient in intellect, was able to take care of herself.

The jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased had died from the injuries sustained from burning, but in what manner those injuries were recieved, there was no evidence to show.

 
Folkestone Express 27-11-1880

Inquest

On Tuesday afternoon a young woman named Jane Godden, about 17 years of age, daughter of a widow living in Bridge Street, met her death in the most horrible circumstances. It seems that the poor creature had been from her birth subject to epileptic fits, in consequence of which her intellect was greatly impaired, and in addition to these afflictions she was “flesh tongue tied”, and unable to articulate. The mother is a laundress, who on three days of the week is away from home at work, and during these days it has been her custom to leave her daughter alone in the house whilst two younger children were away at school. On the return of the little boy on Tuesday afternoon, when he opened the front door to go in, a volume of smoke came out, which a neighbour noticed, and at once went in. In the yard she saw the poor imbecile lying with her face on the ground and her clothing almost consumed. She drew the unfortunate girl away from the burning fragments and had her carried indoors. Dr. Mercer happened to be in the neighbourhood, and within a few minutes of the occurrence the sufferer received such relief as medical aid could afford, but her injuries were so severe that it was impossible for her to recover, and death put an end to her sufferings about midnight, after she had lingered for eight hours. There was no evidence to show how deceased`s clothing got alight, but the probability is that she was attending to the fire, and on seeing herself in flames, rushed out into the yard. The intensity of the fire may be imagined by the fact that the wash-house door became ignited, probably while the deceased was endeavouring to get it open, and that her body was in places completely charred. An inquest was held by the Borough Coroner at the Railway Bell on Wednesday evening, when the following evidence was taken:

James Godden, a labourer, living at 28, Bridge Street, said the deceased was his sister, Jane Godden. Her age was between 16 and 17 years. On Tuesday afternoon about four o`clock his wife told him that the house, No. 16, Bridge Street, was on fire. He ran to the house with a small quantity of water, and on going into the back room, and thence into the wash-house, he saw the back door on fire. The deceased was lying out in the yard on the bricks. Her clothing was burnt completely off with the exception of her stays. He took off the remnants of her clothes, wrapped her in his jacket, and carried her into Mrs. Southon`s. Dr. Mercer was sent for and came in about five minutes.

Mr. Richards Mercer, surgeon, said he was driving up Bridge Street about ten minutes past four on Tuesday, and saw a crowd outside No. 16. Smoke was issuing from the door. He went there and found the deceased lying in the passage just inside the front door. He caused her to be taken into a neighbour`s house as there was so much smoke in No. 16. On examining deceased he found her very much burnt. All her clothing was gone and she was wrapped in a blanket. The whole of the surface of the body was burnt, and in some places the flesh was charred. She was sensible. He dressed the burns and administered opiates, but the deceased only survived for about eight hours and died from shock to the system at twelve o`clock. She must have eventually died from the effect of the burns. He had known the deceased, and had been in the habit of attending her occasionally for six or seven years for epileptic fits. She had been an idiot, he believed, from birth, and was utterly incapable of taking care of herself. In his opinion she ought not to have been left in the house alone, but someone ought constantly to have been looking after her. He had never suggested that she should be placed in an asylum.

Mary Ann Wilkins, wife of a labourer, living at 19, Bridge Street, said she saw smoke coming from No. 16 when Mrs. Godden`s little boy opened the door to go in. He ran out again directly. Witness went to the door and called, but could not make anyone hear. She went through the passage into the wash-house. The door of the wash-house leading into the yard was in flames. It was wide open. She saw Jane Godden lying face downwards in the yard, enveloped in flames. She turned her over out of the flames on to the bricks. There was only a portion of her stays left upon her, and one shoe and half a stocking. Mrs. James Godden came, and ran and fetched her husband. Whilst she was gone, witness got some blankets to roll deceased in. When Godden came deceased was carried into No. 16, and from thence into Mrs. Southon`s. There was a fire in the back room of No. 16, in an ordinary open grate. There was no disarrangement of the fireirons, nor was there anything burning about the fireplace or the room. She had known deceased for the past nine or ten years. She was tongue-tied and could not talk, but was not deaf and understood what was said to her. She was not quite right in her mind, in consequence of having had fits. Witness believed she was capable of taking care of herself. She had frequently been left. Witness would have been afraid to leave her alone in the house with a fire, not on account of the state of her mind, but lest she should have a fit and fall into the grate. Witness knew that she had frequently attended to and kept a fire up during her mother`s absence, and tidied the room up, washing up all the dirty things and doing other domestic duties.

Emily Godden, a widow, mother of the deceased, said she left her home every week on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays to go out washing, and was absent the whole of the day. She had two other children besides the deceased, a boy aged six, and the other girl aged nine. She left home at half past seven on Tuesday morning and went to the Bouverie Laundry, where she remained all day. She lit a fire in the back room before she went, and left it alight. The deceased was upstairs dressing, and the two little ones were in the back room. Deceased had been subject to fits since her birth, but had not had any during the past 12 months. She always attended to the fire during witness`s absence. There was no cooking done except when witness was at home. Deceased was of weak intellect, but would do anything she was asked to do. Witness used sometimes to be afraid to leave her, but she did not know how to avoid it.

The Coroner having summed up, and commented on the fact of the deceased having been left entirely alone, when it was clearly shown that she was not capable of taking care of herself, the jury returned a verdict that the deceased met her death by burning, but there was no evidence to show how her clothing became ignited.



 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 3 June, 1881. 1d.

SUPPOSED MURDER NEAR DOVER

In the early part of Wednesday there was a rumour in the town that a man had been robbed and murdered near Folkestone. Inquiring as to the report we went to the half-way house, the “Royal Oak Inn,” about three o'clock in the afternoon, and there heard that an inquest was going to be held on a man found dead with his head severely injured. The inquest was held about four o'clock, before the County Coroner (Dr. Johnson), on the body, which was in the shed adjoining the Inn, and which was identified as that of Thomas Tickner, supposed to have been in the East Kent Militia at Dover.

The Rev. T. Biggs was chosen foreman of the Jury, and the body being viewed, the following evidence was taken:-

Henry Charlton, landlord of the “Railway Bell,” Folkestone Junction, said: On Saturday morning at about quarter to eight, the deceased with several other men came into my house all a little the worse for drink. There were about six or seven in all, and they used the most filthy language I have ever heard. Four or five left my house a little before nine to catch the 8.40 train to Dover. The deceased and another man remained a short time afterwards. The other man a few minutes after picked up his things which were in an handkerchief, went out of the door, and got halfway down the road towards the station, when the deceased called after him and asked him to look after his kit. The man came back to the house, undid his bundle, and asked the deceased if there were anything there that belonged to him. He (the deceased) answered that the pair of boots in the bundle were his property, but were not marked, and as they were marked the other man put them back into his bundle and again went towards the station, but returned in a few minutes, very angry, as he had lost the train, and there were words but no fight between the two men. I then got deceased to leave the house quietly, but he returned in a minute or two, and then took up the other man's beer and drank it. I persuaded him to go once more, but he again returned, picked up another customer's beer and drank the contents off, and also knocked over a pint of stout. I threatened to give him in charge, so he left and was away about a quarter of an hour, when he came in the private bar door on the other side of the house, and asked for some drink, which I refused to serve him with, and at once commenced to put him out, and the deceased held the sides of the doorway to prevent me from putting him out, but just then a man named Clarke pulled his hands away, and the deceased shot forward out into the street, turned a somersault, and fell foremost on his head. The deceased's face rubbed along the ground. About a quarter of an hour after I saw the deceased going to the railway station. The other man went to the back of the house, and washed his face before he went away.

David Whitehead, a smith, residing in Folkestone, said: At about 8 o'clock on Saturday morning I was in the “Railway Bell Inn,” with an old mate, who stood treat to a pint of beer, which the deceased shortly after came and snatched off the counter and drank without asking for permission. The deceased used very bad language so I remonstrated with him. The deceased being the worse for liquor, the landlord refused to draw beer for him. He abused the last witness who turned him out twice more and then the deceased came into the private bar, and was ejected and fell as described by last witness. We afterwards took him to the back of the house, and washed his face, and I said to him, “You scratched your nose, old fellow, when you fell,” but he did not complain of anyone ill-using him. I didn't know the deceased was dead till yesterday. His eyes at the time were blackened through his face going on the ground.

Thomas Butcher, a dairyman, living at Capel, said: On Saturday last between nine and ten in the morning, I was passing the “Railway Bell,” returning from Folkestone, when I saw the deceased lying in the road just below the lamp about ten or twelve yards from the house. I stood and looked at him for a minute, the deceased seeming to be senseless, and then a man came out and turned him over, and went back into the house, and returned with two others named Clarke and Whitehead, and they took him inside. The other one, whom I don't know, defied anyone to touch the deceased till he fetched a doctor, and then went away. Clarke and Whitehead then dragged him to the back of the house, as he could not walk alone. I passed on up the hill, and that was the last I saw of him. The deceased appeared to be one mass of blood, and there was a quantity of blood in the road. I never saw any signs of consciousness although I was there quite five minutes. On Monday morning about 20 minutes past 6, I was with my master driving our milk cart through Downfield Lane, leading to Capel, when I saw the deceased staggering along as if he were drunk, first on one side and then on the other. I said to my employer, Mr. Marsh, “that's the man whom I saw at the “Railway Bell.”

By the Jury: The deceased was alone lying in the road on the Saturday when I first saw him. I went into the public-house afterwards, and the man I don't know by name, but who was marked with the smallpox spoke as to the ejecting of the deceased.

The Coroner: Where it that man?

The constable in charge: He has gone away by train.

Mr. Marsh corroborated the evidence of the witness Butcherm, and further said when he saw him staggering along the road the deceased had a black eye. That place would be about five minutes walk from the “Railway Bell.”

Alfred James Clarke, labourer working in the Channel Tunnel, and living at Pudding Hole, said: On Saturday evening, between nine and ten, I was in the “Railway Bell” with others, when the deceased came in and drank some of my beer. The landlord spoke to him about it and the deceased abused him. Another man asked for a pint, and he also drank that without permission, and he was then put out of the house, but returned, and the landlord pushed him towards the door, which the deceased caught hold of, so I unloosened his hands and the deceased fell over my foot violently on to his face, about 12 feet from the door. There are two steps to the door and the road is down hill. We picked him up and took him to the back of the house and washed him. I did not hit him, nor did the others, but the deceased was so drunk that he could not keep himself from falling. At first he was unconscious, but when washed he became all right and walked away. I didn't see him again alive. He didn't' complain of any undue violence. The landlord was very civil to him, but he would not go out alone so he had to be put out.

By the Foreman: I asked him where he was going, and he answered that he didn't know.

William Aird, landlord of the “Valliant Sailor” at the top of Folkestone Hill, said: The deceased came to my house on Sunday morning, a little before eleven o'clock, and asked for a ginger beer and brandy, which was served him. I asked him how he came by the bruises and two black eyes he had, and he answered that they were more than blows, they were kicks, but he didn't say where they were done. He had no hat, so my wife fetched him one of my old ones. The deceased left soon after, going in the direction of Capel. He didn't seem to know much about how he come by the bruises, as he was so muddled. My house is about one mile from the “Railway Bell.”
James Hogbin, plumber and painter, living at Folkestone, said: On Monday morning last about half past eight I was going along Capel Lane, with my son, and on arriving at the opening he drew my attention to the deceased, who was lying on a land roller. I immediately went up to him and found he was quite dead, being black in the face and round the neck. I went and got the assistance of Mr. Marsh, waggoner and another man took the deceased to the nearest shed, and then went for a constable at Hougham. There appeared to be no marks of struggling at the spot. The deceased looked as if he had sat on the roller and had fallen back on his head. His head was lower down than his body.

Instructing-constable Ross said he examined the body and found two documents, one from an aunt of the deceased, and another from the War Office, there were some pawn tickets for goods pledged in Dover. There was a hole in the bottom of the trousers pocket.

Dr. A. Long said: I have examined the body in the shed, and find no marks of violence except on the face and forehead. There was no fracture of the skull or effusion of blood. I am of opinion that death was caused through dislocation of the neck. The deceased would die immediately after his neck was broken. It might have been done by falling heavily back from the roller.

The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was found dead with his neck accidentally broken.

 

Folkestone Express 4-6-1881

Inquest

On Wednesday afternoon an inquest was held at the Royal Oak Inn on the Dover Road on the body of a man who was found dead in a field at Capel-le-Ferne. From a paper found on the body it was ascertained that his name was Thomas Tickner, and that he was formerly a gunner in the Royal Artillery. He had been previously seen in the Railway Bell Inn, and subsequently at the Valiant Sailor Inn, where he appears to have created a disturbance. The body was found lying over a land roller. There were several bruises about the face, both eyes were blackened, and the head, face, and neck were very greatly discoloured in such a manner as to lead to the suspicion that the man had met with foul play. The presumption was further strengthened by the fact that on searching the body the police only found a sixpence and some coppers, while it was stated that the morning previous he was at a public house in the neighbourhood, when he had, besides other money, a half sovereign in his possession. It appeared, however, from the medical evidence, that the man`s neck was dislocated. There was no extravasation of blood in the brains, and as there appeared to be no doubt that the man had been addicted to drinking, it was thought he probably sat on the roller and fell over, and a verdict was returned of death from dislocation of the neck, there being no evidence to show how it occurred.

 
Folkestone Chronicle 19-6-1886

Wednesday, June 16th: Before The Mayor, Maj. Gen. Armstrong C.B., and H.W. Poole Esq.

George Collins applied for a transfer of the license of the Railway Bell, Dover Road, late in the occupation of Mr. R. Pilcher. Granted.

 
Folkestone Chronicle 16-4-1887

Inquest

An inquest was held at the Railway Bell Inn on Wednesday afternoon before the Borough Coroner, Mr. Minter, respecting the death of a man unknown, whose body was found in the Dover Road that morning.

George Jenner said: I am a gardener, living at 42, Sydney Street. This morning as I was going to work about twenty minutes to six I saw the deceased lying partly in the road, just above the Railway Bell, in front of Kensington Lodge. I went up to him and spoke to him, but got no reply. His eyes were partly shut. I lifted his head up and then laid him down. There was not the least appearance of a struggle; a little blood was issuing from his mouth. I sat him up and waited for one of my fellow workmen, named Fraser, to come up, and together we brought the body down to the shed here.

George Collins, landlord of the Railway Bell, said: Deceased came to my house last night with two volunteers, who gave him a glass of ale and then left him. Deceased stayed in the front bar until a quarter to eleven o`clock. I believe he had several drinks with other people, until I thought he had had quite enough, and I told him he had better go and see to his lodgings if he wanted any in the town. He said he had secured his lodgings, and was going to see a Mr. Berry, and went out, I believe, with that intention. The next thing I heard was when a policeman asked if I knew I had a dead man lying in the yard. I said “No”, because I thought he was joking.

Dr. Maynard said he was called to examine the body of the deceased that morning, and he did so about quarter past eight. The body was still warm. There were no external marks of violence, and from the evidence of the last two witnesses he should say that death was caused by haemorrhage on the brain or apoplexy. He should judge his age was about sixty.

The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

 
Folkestone Express 16-4-1887

Inquest

An inquest was held at the Railway Bell Inn on Wednesday afternoon, respecting the death of a man, whose name was unknown, and who was found dead in Dover Road that morning.

George Jenner, a gardener, living at 42, Sidney Street, said: This morning I was going to work at about twenty minutes to six and saw deceased lying partly in the road, just above the Railway Bell. I went to him and spoke to him, but got no reply. His eyes were partly closed. I lifted him up and hen laid him down again. He gave a moan and then died. There was no appearance of a struggle, and a little blood was oozing from his mouth. I lifted him up and waited for one of my fellow workmen, named Frazer, and together he and I brought the body down to the Railway Bell.

George Collins, living at the Railway Bell, said: Deceased came to my house with two volunteers, who gave him a glass of ale and then left. Deceased stayed in the front bar until about ten minutes to eleven. I believe he had several glasses with other people, until I thought he had quite enough, and told him he had better go out and get lodgings. He went out with that intention. The next thing I heard was that his body was in my back yard.

Mr. E.C. Maynard, surgeon, said he had examined the body, and believed the cause of death was haemorrhage on the brain, or apoplexy.

The jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Superintendent Taylor took possession of a few scraps of paper deceased had in his possession, and has instituted inquiries with the view of getting the poor fellow identified. The general appearance of the deceased would lead to the belief that he was a stable helper.

 
Folkestone Express 27-7-1889

Saturday, July 20th: Before Alderman Banks, Surgeon General Gilbourne, F. Boykett, H.W. Poole, J. Pledge and J. Brooke Esqs.

Mary Sellis was charged with assaulting Jane Prior on the 6th July. She pleaded Guilty.

Complainant said she was housekeeper to John Allen, of 29, Bridge Street. She went outside her house on the 6th, and Mrs. Sellis wanted to know what she had said about her bastard child, and at once knocked her down.

Defendant said she smacked complainant`s face, and she fell down because she was drunk.

John Allen was then charged with assaulting Mary Sellis on the same day.

Complainant said she was the wife of Wm. Sellis, of 3, Arthur Street. She went outside of the Railway Bell about half past nine. Defendant was there and wanted her to fight, and the men there prevented him striking her a second time.

Sarah Allen said she was with Mrs. Sellis outside the Railway Bell, and she saw Allen strike Mrs. Sellis on the side of the head. She did not stay to see the end of the row. She was wife of the defendant, and he had turned her out of doors.

On it`s transpiring that the witness was defendant`s wife, her evidence was struck out.

Defendant said that Mrs. Sellis attacked him, and his head was bandaged up in consequence of the injuries she inflicted.

Robert Allen, son of the defendant, said he was going to the fair on Saturday evening, and he saw Mrs. Sellis strike his father three times. Mrs. Sellis struck Mrs. Prior. A policeman separated them.

The Bench dismissed both summonses, Sellis having to pay 3s., and Sellis 4s.
 
Folkestone Chronicle 10-1-1891

Saturday, January 3rd: Before The Mayor, Major Penfold, Ald. Pledge, J. Holden and J. Fitness Esqs.

An extension of licence was granted to Mr. Collins, of the Railway Tavern (sic), for the following Wednesday, the occasion of the annual dinner of the railway employees.

 
Folkestone Express 10-1-1891

Saturday, January 3rd: Before The Mayor, Alderman Pledge, J. Holden, J. Fitness and S. Penfold Esqs.

Mr. Collins, landlord of the Railway Bell, was granted an extension of an hour, on the occasion of a dinner given to the railway employees.



 
Holbein`s Visitors` List 20-5-1891

Local News

On the arrival of the ten o`clock express from Dover at the Junction Station on Tuesday morning, the driver of the train reported that they had run over a man in the Warren. On proceeding to the spot the mangled remains of Amos Job Cooper, journalist, were found on the line about a hundred yards east of the Martello tunnel opposite the path that leads from the Warren into the deep cutting of the railway. The remains were conveyed to the Railway Bell and await an inquest to be held today.
Folkestone Visitors` List 27-5-1891

Inquest

Local pressmen conversed in subdued tones as they gathered round their allotted table in the stuffy little den yclept, Police Court on Wednesday afternoon last. Painful memories were present to the minds of one and all. One of themselves, a “forlorn and shipwrecked brother”, had gone to his last account – died, to all intents and purposes, by his own hand, and now they were met – as they had often met with him away then – to record the finish, the tragic finish, to one of the most painful life histories it has been within the writer`s experience to encounter. A simple record of how, on the morning of Whit-Tuesday, the Brussels mail ran over a man – or what was left of his original shape – was identified as Amos J. Cooper, a well known local journalist, appeared in the List last week.

It was left to the Borough Coroner, J. Minter Esq., and a jury, with Mr. J. Tunbridge as foreman, to unravel, to the best of their ability, the mystery of this awful ending to a chequered career; and, with what results may best be gathered from the evidence which follows:-

The first witness called was Mrs. Waddell, who said she identified the body as that of Mr. Cooper, but she had only got this far when the Coroner asked Dr. Yunge Bateman whether he knew deceased. The doctor replied in the affirmative, and his evidence in this point was taken in preference to Mrs. Waddell`s.

At this stage, however, the jury retired to view the body, which was lying in an outhouse at the Bell Hotel. On their return, after an interval of 15 minutes or so, Dr. Yunge Bateman was again called.

He identified the body, he said, as that of Amos J. Cooper, whose age, he should say, was about 38. He had examined the body and found injuries to the skull, one of the feet cut off, and the other one smashed. The injuries to the skull were the cause of death, and such as would be produced by being run over by a train.

The next witness called was Robert Flaherty, who said he was an engine driver in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company. On the previous day he had charge of the 9.32 a.m. Brussels mail from over to Cannon Street. He left Dover at 9.32. All went well until passing the Warren Station – that would be about 9.40 – when he became aware that the engine had struck something on the near side, but what it was it was impossible to say, as they were running at a great speed. He was standing on the off side of the engine at the time, and the stones and ballast which flew up on the near side prevented his seeing anything. Fearing that something had gone wrong with the engine, he at once shut off steam and applied the automatic brake, and brought the train to a standstill from within 3 to 400 yards distant. When he had considerably reduced the speed he was enabled to look over the side of the engine, when he saw the body of a man being dragged along by the brake gear of the engine. One of his feet was gone, his leg being entangled in the brake gear of the wheel. With the assistance of the fireman, witness succeeded in disentangling the body. He then summoned a platelayer who was working in the vicinity to his assistance, and leaving him in charge of the body, took another platelayer with him on the engine, and after reporting the matter at Folkestone Junction, proceeded on his journey. In witness`s opinion death must have been instantaneous, as the deceased`s brains were scattered all over the buffer, the side of the engine, and the tender.

In reply to the Coroner, witness said the buffer would be, as near as he could say, three or four feet from the rails. There was an iron bridge for foot passengers to cross the line at the Warren Station. The Station was closed for traffic at present. The line at the point where the engine struck deceased was perfectly straight for some distance, and he could see the Warren Station quite a quarter of a mile before reaching it. Though keeping a careful watch out ahead he saw nobody on the line, or within sight, and it was a beautifully, sunshiny morning. He could not account for deceased`s presence there, and thought he must have been secreted thereabouts. (By a juryman: Deceased must have been standing up at the time he was struck.) When the train stopped, the deceased was quite nude, the engine having torn away every bit of clothing from his body.

Jesse Coleman, a platelayer, said he was at work on the morning in question, on the down line, by the Martello Tower. He saw the train turn the corner and subsequently come to a standstill, upon which he went to see what was the matter. When he got to the train he saw the deceased`s body. He then called his mate, and with his assistance brought the body to Folkestone. He saw no-one jump off the platform at the Warren Station.

Mrs. Waddell said she was the wife of Henry Waddell, a painter, living at 27, Warren Road. She knew the deceased; he lodged with her fifteen months, and last slept at her house on the Saturday before Easter. She last saw him on Sunday week at her house when he came to fetch a book he had left there. She handed him a letter addressed there from his wife, who was living at Bristol, to the effect that an order had been made for him to pay 10/- a week for the maintenance of herself and family. Deceased said he supposed they would lock him up, in which case he would get board and lodging. Months before that he had said to her husband that he would commit suicide by throwing himself in front of a train. He had been a man who drunk very heavily.

Henry Waddell said some days ago deceased had a conversation with him about committing suicide. At that time he was unemployed and destitute. Witness met him in the street, and he said “I`m down at the heel, I haven`t a friend in the world, and I intend to throw myself in front of a train unless I get someone to assist me”. This took place at the Harvey Hotel. He addressed letters to this effect to Mr. Reeves, a reporter on the Folkestone News, and to Mr. J.T. Brown, the editor of The Visitors` List. Witness talked with him and took him home to his own house. About three weeks ago deceased had said to him “Life is not worth living; I shall make off with myself”. He had been drinking very excessively for some months past.

Charles James Croucher said he was an Inspector at the Junction Station. Early on Tuesday morning it was reported to him by the Company`s watchman on the Warren that he had seen deceased on the line between the Warren Station and the Martello Tunnel about 5.20 a.m. The watchman asked deceased what he was doing along there and he replied that he was simply out for a stroll. He informed him that he was not allowed to walk on the line and told him to go away. Deceased then went away in the direction of the sea. The watchman did not see him again until he had been run over.

Mr. Minter having briefly summed up the evidence, the jury returned a verdict that “the deceased committed suicide whilst of unsound mind”.

Folkestone Chronicle 30-1-1892

Saturday, January 23rd: Before The Mayor, Aldermen Pledge and Sherwood, E.T. Ward, and George Spurgen Esqs.

Mr. Collins asked for an extension of one hour at the Railway Bell on the 27th inst., the occasion of the Railway employees` annual dinner.

The application was granted.


 
Folkestone Chronicle 26-4-1895



Local News



On Wednesday at the Borough Police Court a case of alleged selling during prohibited hours should have been heard in which Mr. Collins, of the Railway Bell, was the defendant, but, upon the application through the Magistrates` Clerk, of Mr. Hall (solicitor), who was engaged to defend, and could not possibly be present, the hearing of the case was adjourned for one week.



 
Folkestone Chronicle 3-5-1895



Local News



At the Borough Police Court on Wednesday the hearing came up of the charge against George Collins, tenant of the Railway Bell Inn – one of Nalder and Collyer`s houses – Dover Road, for offering or exposing for sale drink on his premises during prohibited hours, on Sunday forenoon, April 14th, at 10.35 a.m. Mr. Hall (solicitor) appeared for the defence, and pleaded Not Guilty. The case had been adjourned for a week at Mr. Hall`s request. The police who prosecuted were not assisted by legal representation.



P.S. Lilley was the first witness, and said that on the date named he, in company with P.S. Swift and P.C. Johnston, watched the Railway Bell Inn, of which defendant was the landlord, from seven o`clock in the morning. At a quarter past eight he saw a postman enter in the course of his delivery, and immediately afterwards two men went in, who were well-known residents. At twenty five minutes to nine two more men entered by the yard gate, and at nine o`clock other men entered.



Mr. Hall, interposing, objected to the statement of evidence of this character, as the charge defendant had to meet – and the only charge – was that of exposing for sale or of selling certain intoxicating liquors at 10.35 a.m. on the date in question. He emphatically objected to evidence as given by the witness, and stated that in common fairness his client should have been informed that other allegations were to be brought forward against him.



Mr. Herbert (who presided, the other Magistrate on the Bench being Ald. Pledge) decided, on the other hand, that it would be better to accept the evidence generally.



Witness (continuing) said that from the commencement of his watching the house until 10.35 a.m., when he entered the premises, as many as twenty one persons had gone into the house. At that time two men entered the house by the yard entrance, they being known residents named Suckling and Tunbridge. Witness got over the gate, which was fastened by a chain on the inside, and on going into the house he saw two men in a room at the rear of the house – a compartment which he believed was used as w washhouse. Defendant came from the direction of the bar carrying a small tray, on which there were two glasses of whisky, and a jug containing water. When Collins saw the witness he placed the tray on a dresser behind the door, and on being asked what the men were doing there, he made no reply. Witness asked him who the whisky was for, when defendant made no answer until he had been asked three times, when he said it was for himself. Defendant then turned to the two men and asked what they were doing there, or what they wanted there. They made no reply. Witness took their names and addresses and left the house.



Mr. Hall asked if his cross-examination of the witness would necessarily have to be confined to the charge, or if he could deal with the whole of the evidence as it arose.


Mr. Herbert said the cross-examination would be left entirely in the hands of Mr. Hall to do as he thought best.

Witness (cross-examined) said he would rather not state where he was from 8.15 to 10.25 on the morning named.

Mr. Hall pressed for an answer, and the Bench upheld his inquiry.

Witness then said he was in a house higher up Dover Road, opposite the Inn, and almost one hundred yards away. He was not in a house in Alexandra Street. He did not live at 1, Alexandra Street. From the position he occupied he could see people going into the Inn, both at the side passage and at the front door. He could not see inside the building. The people who went in did not climb over the gate. Some of the 21 persons who entered the house during the time were bona fide travellers. He laid the information against defendant. The house was largely frequented by travellers, because there were no refreshment rooms at the Junction railway station adjoining. The men whose names he took had not been summoned.

P.S. Swift gave corroborative evidence. When he entered the house he saw Mrs. Collins and her daughter in the front of the bar, apparently making for the front door, and heard Mrs. Collins say something about the police. A man named Onslow was in the bar, and on the counter near where he was standing was a pint glass containing a little freshly-drawn ale. Witness asked Onslow what he was doing there, and he made no reply. Two other pint glasses with froth round them also stood on the counter. Onslow went out of the house, and came back directly afterwards with a portmanteau, saying that was what he had come for.

Mr. Hall`s brief cross-examination of this witness failed to elicit any further material evidence. Mr. Hall then said he would call his witnesses, and reserve his remarks until the close of the case.

George Collins, the defendant, said: I have held a publican`s licence for twenty years – eleven years at Ashford and nine years here. I pay £100 a year rent here, and it cost me £650 to take the house. I let off the yard and stables at the back. I take precautions to see that no Folkestone people are served during prohibited hours, and when there is a rush of trippers and visitors engage a man specially for that purpose. It was false – a tissue of lies – to say that 21 people entered the house before 10.35 on the day named. Twenty one persons were not served up to that time. I and my family did not come downstairs until ten minutes to nine that morning, and then we went into the bar to wait for the 9.10 train. Two or three travellers came in then, and they were served. When the boat train came three or four people also called, including a lady and gentleman who were served with breakfast. At 10.30 this couple said they wanted a man to carry their portmanteau down to the Harbour, and I went to the station and asked Mr. Croucher if he had a man who could go with it. He said “Yes, there`s Jimmy”, meaning Onslow, who came into the house, where I gave him a shilling which the people had left with me to give to him for taking the portmanteau along to the Harbour. I showed him the people for whom he had to take it. Then two or three people came in from the Canterbury train. Kate Long, my domestic servant, then told me there were two travellers from Dover who wanted two threes of whisky. Long does not serve at the bar, and I have always told her to keep the back door shut. I said I would go and see who the men were. I took the glasses in my hand thinking the men were outside, and that if they were travellers it would save me from having the journey back again. I came across the policemen, who said “What are these men doing here?” I asked “What men?” because I had not seen any men. I then stepped into the scullery and saw Tunbridge and Suckling and asked them what their business was, because I knew them, but had not seen them before on that day. I should not have served them if the police had not been there, but I should have turned them out. None of the men were served, and Onslow was not served with anything.

In answer to the Deputy Clerk: P.S. Lilley did not ask me a question three times – that is quite false. He asked me whose that whisky was, and I said “Mine”.

Kate Long, who was the next witness, said: I am a domestic servant employed by Mr. Collins, and have been engaged by him for nearly two years. On the morning in question I was downstairs in the scullery, and heard a knock at the door, which was bolted at the top. I unbolted it and saw two men outside, one of whom said they were travellers and had come from Dover. They asked for two threes of whisky. I closed the door, telling them to wait, and told Mr. Collins there were two travellers outside, when he said he would come and see them himself. I never serve in the bar, and do not know these two men at all. Mr. Collins has always told me to keep the back door bolted. One of the men was dusty and looked like a traveller. I did not admit any men at all that day.

The Bench here stopped the proceedings, saying there was a doubt in the case, and that they would give defendant the benefit of it, to which he was entitled. The case had not been distinctly proved against him. Collins was wrong in letting off a portion of the premises which were licensed, and in that way was opening the door to deceit and fraud. The Bench had no doubt that if the police had not arrived on the scene the two men would have been served with drink by Collins, whom they warned to be exceedingly careful as to his future conduct, With that caution, the case would be dismissed.

Collins thanked the Bench, and the brewers` agent promised the sub-letting should not be continued.


 
Folkestone Express 4-5-1895

Wednesday, May 1st: Before W.G. Herbert and Alderman Pledge.

George Collins, landlord of the Railway Bell, was summoned for selling intoxicating liquors during prohibited hours on the 14th of April. He pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. Hall appeared for defendant.

Sergeant Lilley said on Sunday morning, April 14th, in company with Sergeant Swift and P.C. Johnson, he watched the Railway Bell, Dover Road, the house kept by defendant, from 7 a.m. till 10.35, and saw the postman go in and deliver letters. He came out and two men went in and stayed two or three minutes. At 8.35 two men went in by the yard gate at the side of the house. At 9 o`clock another man went in.

Here Mr. Hall raised an objection to all the evidence given, as the defendant was summoned for an offence alleged to have been committed at 10.35, but the Bench overruled the objection.

Examination continued: During the time he was watching, from seven o`clock till 10.35, twenty one men entered the house, some by the front door, and some by the yard gate. The whole of them were residents in the town – thirteen he knew by name, and the others by sight. At 10.35 three men went in, and he entered the house. The men were Tunbridge, Suckling, and Anslow. The two first went in by the yard gate, and the other by the front door. Witness got over the yard gate, and upon entering the house he saw the three men named in a room at the rear of the house. He judged it was a wash-house, opening into a kitchen or living room, through which they had to go to get to the bar. He asked what they were doing there, and neither answered. He then saw defendant in the living room, coming from the bar. He had a small tray, on which there were two glasses containing whisky, and a jug containing water. When he saw witness, he stood the tray on a dresser behind the door which separated the two rooms. He asked the landlord twice what the men were doing there, and he made no reply. He then said “Who is this whisky for?”, and defendant replied “For myself”, and then turned to the men and asked them what they were doing there. They made no reply, and after taking their names and addresses they left the house. Witness then went into the bar and saw the man Anslow, who is a railway porter, and he pointed to a bag on a chair and said ”I came in to fetch that”. On the counter there was a pint glass and two half pint glasses. The pint glass contained a small quantity of freshly-drawn ale. Defendant said “You will see that this man goes across with the bag, as I had sent for him to fetch it”.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hall: He was in a house about 100 yds. up Dover Road. Neither of them were in 1, Alexandra Street that morning watching. From the position he was in, he could see people going in by the front door. He could not see into the house at all. The other people who went in opened the gate, and did not have to climb over it. Five went in through the front door and 16 went through the gate in the ordinary way. He gave the names of all the men. The most in the house at one time was three. When he went into the scullery the men were there. The defendant did not say “What men?” when he asked him what they were doing there. During the time he was watching, he saw about sixteen travellers going in. There was no refreshment bar at the station, and persons coming in by train were in the habit of frequenting defendant`s house. No summons had been taken out against the three men.

Sergeant Swift said he was in company with the last witness up to the time he entered the house. He corroborated Lilley`s evidence entirely up to that time. Lilley unfastened the yard gate and he passed through and entered the house by a different door to Lilley, and went straight into the bar. He saw Mrs. Collins, and, he believed, Miss Collins, in front of the bar, apparently making for the front door. He heard Mrs. Collins say “Police” and go to unbolt the front door, and she said “Come along” to Anslow, who left the house. He said “What are you doing here, Anslow?”, and he made no reply. He did not see a portmanteau at all. There was none in front of the bar. When Alsow left he was not carrying anything. He then went to the back, where Lilley was in the scullery, and his attention was called to the glasses containing whisky. They then went back to the bar, and there saw Anslow, who had returned, and he said to witness “That is what I came in for”, and pointed to a portmanteau which he was holding. Defendant said “Yes, I asked him to fetch it for me. See he goes across the yard with it”. He knew that Anslow was a railway porter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hall: He did not think it surprising that Mrs. Collins should say “Here are the police”. None of the men got over the gate, but went through.

Re-examined: About five minutes before they entered the house, they had seen travellers leave by the front door.

Mr. Hall then called the defendant, who said he had held a publican`s licence for twenty years – eleven years at Ashford, and nine at the Railway Bell. It cost him £650 to go into the house. He was bound to admit travellers. It was not true that twenty people had entered from 8.15 to 10.25. They were not down until ten minutes to nine, and then they went into the bar to attend for the nine `oclock down train. Several people came in from the 9.38, and a lady and gentleman had breakfast, and made a request that he would find a man to take a portmanteau to the harbour. He saw Mr. Croucher and asked him if he had anyone to take a portmanteau. He said there was Anslow, and beckoned to him and he came and took the portmanteau. Four or five people came from the Canterbury train – one had a pint of ale, and three had glasses of bitter. His servant came to him and said there were two travellers from Dover at the back door, who wanted two threes of whisky, and he said he would go and see himself. The instruction to the girl was always to keep the door shut and not to admit anyone. When he went out with the whisky, Lilley was there and said “Collins, what are these men doing here?”. He replied “What men?”, and stepping forward saw them and asked them what they wanted. He could not have served the men. He would have turned them out. He let the stables to a man named Ward, who employed three or four men. Neither Anslow, Tunbridge or Suckling were served, Lilley only asked once who the whisky was for, and he replied it was his. The people off the Canterbury train had left only a few minutes when the police arrived, and the glasses on the counter were those in which they had their drink.

Kate Long, who had been a domestic servant in the employ of defendant for the past two years, said on Sunday, April 14th, she was in the scullery and heard a knock at the scullery door. The door was bolted at the top; she unbolted it and opened it and she saw two men who said they were travellers, and that they had come from Dover and wanted two threes of whisky. She told them to wait and closed the door and went and told Mr. Collins there were two travellers outside, and he said he would go and see them himself. She did not serve in the bar, and did not know who the men were. Her instructions were always to keep the back door bolted on Sunday. One of the men was rather dusty. She did not admit anyone into the house at all. There was only one door at the back. She was down soon after seven o`clock and was about the house all the time, and only the two men came to the door.

The Bench gave the defendant the benefit of the doubt, as in their own minds they thought he would have served the two men if the police had not been there, and they therefore dismissed the charge.

 
Folkestone Herald 4-5-1895

Police Court Record

Mr. George Collins, landlord of the Railway Bell Inn, Dover Road, was charged before the Borough Magistrates on Wednesday with having violated the Licensing Acts by selling intoxicating liquors at prohibited hours on Sunday, the 14th of April. The charge was brought by the police, and Mr. Superintendent Taylor conducted the prosecution. Mr. Hall, solicitor, defended the accused. The case seemed to have excited considerable interest, the public part of the court being filled to inconvenience.

P.S. Lilley deposed that on the day named he, in company with P.S. Swift, watched the defendant`s premises. At 8.15 a.m. he saw two other men enter the house. At 8.36 he saw two men go in at the yard gate. At nine o`clock another man entered at the gate. (Mr. Hall protested against the introduction of this evidence, as the charge had reference to an alleged offence at 10.30, but the objection was overruled.) Witness, continuing, said that he watched the house until 10.38, and during the time he was there he noticed that 21 men altogether had entered the premises, some by the front door, and some by the yard gate. Thirteen of these men were known by name, and others by sight. About 10.35, after three men had gone in, the witness and P.S. Swift entered the house, the latter by the front door and witness by the gate. On entering a room at the back of the house, witness saw two men standing there, and from the room there is a passage leading to the bar. He asked them what they were doing there, but received no reply. On turning round, the witness saw the landlord coming into the room from the direction of the bar. On a small tray, which the defendant carried, there was a glass containing whisky and a jug of water. Witness knew it was whisky because he took the precaution of tasting it. The defendant, on seeing the witness, placed the tray on the dresser, and witness asked him what the men were doing there. Defendant made no reply, and witness then said “Who was this whisky for, Mr. Collins?” The question was repeated twice, and thereupon the defendant replied “It is for myself”. Defendant then asked the two men what they wanted, and they made no answer. At that moment P.S. Swift came in, and both constables proceeded to the bar. The witness stated that he then saw a man leave the house. On the counter he found a pint glass and two half pint glasses, which seemed to have contained liquor recently.

In cross-examination by Mr. Hall, the witness said that he and Swift watched the premises from a house on the other side of the road. To the best of his knowledge, sixteen of the men who entered defendants house were travellers. The parties stayed in the house from three to five minutes,, and three was the greatest number who entered the premises together. He added that as the house is situated nearest to the railway station it is much frequented by travellers.

P.S. Swift corroborated the evidence of the previous witness. When he entered the house at the front door he went straight into the bar, where he saw Mrs. and Miss Collins, and a railway porter named Anslow. Mrs. Collins went out at the front door, and witness asked the porter what he was doing there. He made no reply, and then left the house, having nothing in his hand at the time. On the counter near where he had been standing the witness found a pint glass and two half pint glasses. Witness then went to the back of the house and joined P.S. Lilley, who called his attention to the whisky. Both went to the bar afterwards, and witness saw Anslow there again, who said “This is what I came in for”, pointing to a portmanteau which he had in his hand. Defendant then remarked “Yes, that is what he came for”. In about five minutes after entering the house, the witness saw persons leave, whom he took for travellers.

This was the evidence for the prosecution.

Mr. Collins, the defendant, was then called, and examined by Mr. Hall. In reply to questions, he said that he had held a public house licence for 20 years, here and elsewhere, and that he paid £100 a year as rent. His valuation on entering this house was £650. He was in the habit of opening his house to travellers coming in by train on Sundays, but he took the precaution to have a man stationed at the door to see that no-one was admitted except persons coming by train. On this particular morning there was no-one serving in the bar except his wife and daughter. He characterised as a tissue of falsehood the statement that 21 persons had entered the house on the occasion referred to. He had gone to the bar himself at ten minutes to nine to await the arrival of a train, and two or three men came to his house. A gentleman staying at the hotel asked for a man to carry his portmanteau to the railway station, and Anslow was sent for the purpose from the station. Three or four people came in from the 10.20 train and had some whisky and ale, after which they left at once, and the glasses stood on the bar ready to be washed up. The general servant then came to him and stated that there were two travellers from Dover who wanted to be served with whisky. He replied that he would come and see who they were. He drew the whisky and took it towards the back door, but was met by P.S. Lilley, who asked him what the men were doing there. Witness, on seeing the men, asked them what their business was, and recognised one of them as a customer. Witness would not have served these men, and would have turned them out independently of the police officer being present.

Kate Lang, a servant at the hotel, deposed that she was in the scullery on the day in question; she heard a knock at the back door. On opening it she saw two men, one of whom said they were travellers from Dover, and asked for whisky. She told them to wait, and then she closed the door and went to tell Mr. Collins.

Eventually, there being a doubt in the minds of the Court, the case was dismissed.


 
Folkestone Visitors` List 8-5-1895



Police Court Jottings



A case, in which local teetotallers took a good deal of interest, was heard before Mr. Alderman Pledge and Mr. W.G. Herbert at the Police Court on Wednesday.



George Collins, landlord of the Railway Bell public house, was summoned for having committed a breach of the Licensing Act, in so far as that on the 14th of April he sold and exposed for sale certain intoxicating liquors at a time when his licensed premises should have been closed. The defendant was represented by Mr. F. Hall, solicitor, Folkestone, and pleaded Not Guilty.



The evidence of Police Sergeant Lilley was to the effect that on the date referred to in the summons he, in company with another sergeant and police constable, watched the Railway Bell public house from seven o`clock in the morning. At a quarter past eight he saw a “postman enter in the course of his delivery”, and immediately afterwards two men went in, who were “well-known residents”. At twenty five minutes to nine two more men entered the premises by the yard gate, and at nine o`clock other men entered.



Mr. Hall, interposing, objected to evidence of this character, as the charge defendant had to meet – and the only charge – was that of exposing for sale, or of selling certain intoxicating liquors at 10.35 a.m. on the date in question. He emphatically objected to the evidence as given by the witness, and stated that, in common fairness, his client should have been informed that other allegations were to be brought forward against him.



The Chairman decided that it would be better to accept the evidence generally.



Witness (continuing) said that from the commencement of his watching the house until 10.35 a.m., when he entered the premises, as many as twenty one persons had gone on the premises. At that time two men entered the house by the yard entrance, they being known residents, named Suckling and Tunbridge. Witness got over the gate, which was fastened by a chain on the inside, and on going into the house he saw two men in a room at the rear of the premises – “a compartment which he believed was used as a washhouse”. Defendant came from the direction of the bar carrying a small tray, on which there were two glasses of whisky and a jug containing water. He knew the glasses “contained whisky because he tasted the contents”. (Laughter) When Collins saw the witness he placed the tray on a dresser behind the door, and on being asked what the men were doing there, he made no reply. Witness asked him who the whisky was for, when defendant made no answer until he had been asked several times; then he said “it was for himself”. Defendant then turned to the two men and asked them what they wanted there. They made no reply and he (witness) took their names and addresses.



Mr. Hall asked if his cross-examination of the witness would necessarily have to be confined to the charge, or if he could deal with the whole of the evidence as it arose.


Mr. Herbert said the cross-examination would be left entirely in the hands of Mr. Hall to do as he thought best.

Witness (cross-examined) said he would rather not state where he was from 8.15 to 10.25 on the morning named.

Mr. Hall pressed for an answer, and the Bench upheld his inquiry.

Witness then said he was “in a house higher up Dover Road, opposite the Inn, almost one hundred yards away”. He was not in a house in Alexandra Street. From the position he occupied he could see people going into the house, both by the side passage and at the front door. Some of the 21 persons who entered the house during that time were bona fide travellers. The house was largely frequented by travellers, for it was a matter of notoriety that there were no refreshment rooms at the Junction railway station. The men whose names he took had not been summoned.

P.S. Swift gave corroborative evidence. When he entered the house he saw Mrs. Collins and her daughter in front of the bar, apparently making for the front door, and he heard Mrs. Collins say something about the police. A man named Onslow was in the bar, and on the counter near where he was standing was a glass containing a little “freshly drawn ale”. (Laughter) It had the “bloom” on. Witness asked Onslow what he was doing there, and he made no reply. The other pint glasses with “froth” round them also stood on the counter. Onslow went out of the house, and came back directly afterwards with a portmanteau, saying that was what he had come for.

Mr. Hall`s brief cross-examination of this witness failed to elicit any further material evidence.

Mr. Hall then said he would call his witnesses, and reserve his remarks until the close of the case.

The defendant stated that he had held a licensed victuallers` licence for twenty years, having lived in the present house for nine years. He heard the statement of the police as to the number of persons who entered the house on the morning of the 14th of April. The statement was false – a tissue of lies. He nor the members of his family had not come downstairs until nine o`clock that morning, and he then went into the bar to wait for travellers of the 9.10 a.m. train. Two or three travellers entered the house from off this train, and three or four people called from off the boat train, including a lady and gentleman who had ordered breakfast. At 10.30 this party required a porter to take their luggage to the Harbour Station, and one of the servants intimated to him that there were two travellers at the door from Dover. When he came to the bar-room he found the men referred to by the police sergeant, and knowing that they were not travellers they were not served. They were admitted by the servant, who did not serve in the bar.

Kate Long, the servant referred to, stated that she undid the back door, and admitted the two men whom she thought were travellers. She then informed her master. The defendant always told her to have the back door locked.

The defendant, re-called, stated that he had sub-let the stables and yard attached to his house. Several men frequently went in there to attend to horses and carriages.

The Bench stopped the proceedings, the Chairman intimating that there was a doubt that presented itself to them, and they would give the defendant the benefit of it. The case for one thing had not been distinctly proved against him, but the defendant was wrong in letting off a portion of the premises which was licensed. Under the circumstances they would dismiss the summons, but the defendant would have to be very cautious for the future. Summons dismissed.


 
Folkestone Chronicle 17-5-1895



Local News



On Wednesday morning at the Borough Police Court, before Messrs. Fitness and Pursey, two men named Suckling and Tunbridge were charged with being on licensed premises, at the Railway Bell Inn, during prohibited hours. The offence was committed on Sunday, April 14th. Defendants pleaded Guilty.



Mr. Hall, solicitor, watched the proceedings on behalf of Messrs. Nalder and Collyer, brewers and owners of the premises.



P.S. Lilley gave evidence in support of the charge, and the Bench resolved to take into consideration the fact that defendants had admitted their guilt, and merely imposed a nominal penalty of 2s. 6d., with costs 10s. 9d. each.




 
Folkestone Herald 18-5-1895

Police Court Record

Thomas Suckling and Thomas Tunbridge were charged on Wednesday, before Mr. J. Banks and Mr. C.J. Pursey, with being found on the licensed premises of Mr. G. Collins, Dover Road, at prohibited hours on Sunday, 14th of April.

P.S. Lilley deposed that on the day in question he watched the Railway Bell Inn, and at 10.35 saw the defendants enter. He followed them, and found the men in the scullery. One of them lived in Dover Road; the other near the hotel. He asked them what they were doing there, and they did not reply.

The defendants pleaded Guilty.

The Bench fined them 13s. 3d. each, including costs, or in default 7 days` imprisonment.


 
Folkestone Visitors` List 22-5-1895

Police Court Jottings

One way publicans often get into trouble is by persons representing themselves to be what they are not. The other week the landlord of the Railway Bell public house had to answer a summons for having allowed two men on his premises during prohibited hours, but the summons was dismissed because it was clearly proved that the men had not been served, and that they gained admission by representing themselves as travellers from Dover.

Thomas Suckling and Thomas Tunbridge, the two men then referred to, were summoned on Wednesday for having been “unlawfully” on the licensed premises of the Railway Bell on Sunday the 14th of April. Mr. F. Hall, solicitor, Folkestone, who represented the landlord when his case was heard, watched the case in the interests of the house.

The defendants pleaded Guilty, and Sergt. Lilley briefly stated the facts.

On the forenoon of Sunday, the 14th April, he saw a number of persons, who were bona fide travellers, entering the Railway Bell. He saw the defendants, who were known to him, enter too, and he followed them. He found them in the scullery, and when he asked them what they wanted, they made no reply.

The defendants now pleaded Guilty, and one of them alleged that he was a teetotaller, and had been so for eighteen months.

The Justices, Mr. Alderman Fitness and Mr. Pursey, did not altogether believe this, for a teetotaller who gained admission to licensed premises during prohibited hours savoured at though he had gone there to “get a drink”. But apart from this the Bench took into consideration the fact that the defendants pleaded Guilty. Fined 2. 6d., with 10s. 9d. costs in each instance.

“Costs!” echoed one of the defendants. “What is the costs for?” (Laughter) “For what you did not have” blandly replied one of the court officials, and then it was explained that the 10s. 9d. was for “court” costs, “for the privilege of appearing before the Justices”.


 
Folkestone Chronicle 29-8-1896



Annual Licensing Sessions



The Sessions were held on Wednesday, the Magistrates sitting being Messrs. W. Wightwick, J. Pledge, and W.G. Herbert.



The whole of the old licences were renewed.



The Bench suggested that in the case of the Railway Bell the yard be shut off from the house. Mr. Crouch (on behalf of the owners, Messrs. Nalder and Collyer) promised to see to it.



 
Folkestone Express 29-8-1896



Annual Licensing Day



The annual licensing meeting was held on Wednesday. The Magistrates present were W. Wightwick, James Pledge, and W.G. Herbert Esqs. The old licences were all renewed. A very large number of the publicans did not attend to receive their certificates.



In the case of the Railway Bell, the Magistrates suggested an alteration so as to shut off the yard, and prevent people getting access to the house in that way. Mr. Crouch, on behalf of the owners, promised to have the suggestion attended to.



 
Folkestone Chronicle 26-6-1897

Saturday, June 19th: Before Messrs. Holden, Vaughan, Fitness, and Pledge.

George Smiles, landlord of the Railway Bell Inn, near the Junction Station, applied for an hour`s extension of time on the night of the Jubilee commemoration, owing to the number of people who had been travelling by rail.

The Superintendent opposed the request, as the people at the top of the hill would thus be able to drink until twelve o`clock. There would be no trains after 11 p.m.

The application was refused.



 
Folkestone Express 26-6-1897

Saturday, June 19th: Before J. Holden, J. Fitness, T.J. Vaughan, and J. Pledge Esqs.

Mr. Smiles, of the Railway Bell Inn, applied for an hour`s extension on Jubilee Day – until midnight. The applicant said it was a universal thing. The Bench declined to grant the application.



 
Folkestone Herald 26-6-1897

Folkestone Police Court

On Saturday last – Mr. Holden presiding – the landlord of the Railway Bell, the nearest house to the Junction Station, made an application for an extension of licence on Jubilee Day from eleven until twelve.

It was remarked that there was no train after 11.

The Chairman said the Bench were all against it.


 
Folkestone Chronicle 4-9-1897

Wednesday, September 1st: Before Messrs. J. Holden, J. Fitness, G. Spurgen, and J. Pledge.

Albert Boxer was charged with embezzling £1, the money of his employer, Daniel Phineas Walter Jones.

The prosecutor said defendant was his carman and traveller, and had been in his employ for two years. He absented himself from his work a fortnight ago. He took out mineral waters, tobacco and cigars for delivery, received the cash, and made a daily return to witness`s clerk.

Joseph George Smiles, the landlord of the Railway Bell in Dover Road, said he was a customer of Mr. Jones. He knew the defendant, and remembered him calling on the 17th July, when witness purchased four boxes of cigarettes. Witness had already had two boxes, so he paid £1 – the cigarettes being 3s. 4d. per box. He produced the receipt. It was marked “Paid. A. Boxer”.

James Nightingale, clerk to Mr. Jones, produced the defendant`s statement for July 17th, and the cheque book. The counterpart of the receipt did not show that the cash was paid. Defendant said it was not paid. He had never accounted for the money.

Prisoner pleaded Guilty, and elected to be dealt with summarily. He had nothing to say, and no witnesses to call.

The Chairman said the Bench had tried to inflict a fine, but the case being so serious they felt they could not. He would, therefore, be imprisoned for one month with hard labour.



 
Folkestone Herald 4-9-1897

Police Court Report

Alfred Boxer was charged with embezzling £1, the property of his master, Mr. Daniel Phineas Walter Jones.

Mr. Jones gave evidence that the defendant was in his employ as carman and traveller. He entered his service about two years ago, and he absented himself on the 21st August. His duties were to take out mineral waters, cigars, and tobacco, and to receive orders. It was his duty to make a daily return to witness`s clerk of his daily work. He never received the money from defendant.

Mr. Joseph George Smiles, landlord of the Railway Bell, Dover Road, gave evidence that he was a customer of Mr. Jones. He remembered defendant calling on him on the 17th July last, and he purchased four boxes of Woodbine cigarettes. He paid him a sovereign, 13s. 4d. for the four boxes, and 6s. 8d. for two boxes he had previously bought. He produced the receipt, signed by defendant.

Mr. James Nightingale, clerk in Mr. Jones` employ, gave evidence that he received the orders taken during the day, and as to receiving defendant`s accounts on the 17th and entering them in the day book. He produced the day book and defendant`s check book and counterfoil. He made the entry “No cash” in the day book against Mr. Smiles for the Woodbines, and the defendant told him it was not paid. The defendant had never paid or accounted for the £1 received from Mr. Smiles on the 17th or any subsequent day.

The defendant pleaded Guilty to the charge.

Mr. P.W. Jones, as to the defendant`s character, said he would rather not say anything.

The Chairman said the Bench had been trying whether they could make a money fine, but as this was such a serious offence between servant and employer they felt it could not be done.

Defendant was sentenced to one month`s hard labour.

 
Folkestone Up To Date 4-9-1897

Hall Of Justice

Wednesday, September 1st: Before Justices Holden, Vaughan, Fitness, Spurgen, Pledge, Salter, &c.

Alfred Boxer was sentenced to a month`s hard labour for embezzlement and stealing £1 from his employer, D.P.W. Jones.



 
Folkestone Visitors` List 27-4-1898

Inquest

A very shocking occurrence took place on Saturday morning last, on the railway between the Folkestone Harbour and the Junction stations. A man named William Alfred Epps, a well-known local sign and fascia writer, of 9, Walton Road, was observed to be dangerously near the line by the engine driver of a luggage train which was running down from the Junction at about 10.30 a.m. to the Harbour Station. The driver immediately blew his whistle, but it appears that the man must have stepped on to the line just in front of the engine. The train was stopped as quickly as possible, and his decapitated body was found entangled between the wheels of the carriages.

The deceased`s head was found some 20 yards from the body, it being a somewhat curious fact that although cut clean off there was not a scratch or mark upon the head or face. One foot was also cut off, just above the top of the boot. The deceased, who was about 50 years of age, leaves a wife and grown-up family. He was a clever and experienced worker at his trade, and was always able to get full employment.

At the inquest, held on Monday evening at the Town Hall by the Borough Coroner (J. Minter Esq.), the evidence given went to prove that the deceased had been for days previous in a very despondent frame of mind. The driver of the engine deposed that, seeing a man standing close by the side of the line, he blew his whistle twice. He turned to look at his gauge, and did not see the man again until after he had found he had run over something.

Mr. James Friend deposed that he had been in the company of Epps at the Railway Bell the night before, and in the course of conversation the deceased said that he was in great trouble owing to his inability to get on with his work during the windy weather, and that he said “I have a good mind to go over the road and throw myself in front of a train”.

The Coroner, in his summing up, carefully commented on the evidence which had been given, and concluded by saying that what the jury had to duly consider was the question as to whether the unhappy occurrence was the result of an accident or if the evidence pointed to a case of suicide.

After a brief consultation the jury returned a verdict of “Suicide whilst temporarily insane”.


 
Folkestone Chronicle 30-4-1898



Inquest



An inquest was held on Monday evening at the Town Hall by Mr. John Minter, Borough Coroner, touching the death of William Alfred Epps.


James Friend, Coke Cottage, Tram Road, said the deceased was a sign writer, aged about 50. Witness saw him last Friday night in the Railway Bell, when he appeared upset about his work, and said he had a good mind to go across and throw himself under a train. Witness advised him not to worry, as all had trouble. He was sober. He was a quiet, inoffensive man and witness had never seen him the worse for liquor.

James Warner, Clarendon Place, Dover, engine driver on the South Eastern Railway, stated that at 10.20 on Saturday morning he was driving the engine 122 from the Junction to the Harbour. There were 16 goods trucks attached. At the crossing over the line from the Tram Road to the Folly Fields, when the train was going between six and seven miles an hour, witness saw the deceased beside the down line, some 30 yards away. Witness blew his whistle twice, and then lost sight of the man. The tender was leading and the witness could not have pulled up under 30 or 40 yards. There was nothing in deceased`s action to lead him to think he contemplated suicide. Witness felt the engine go over something and pulled up. He pulled up and got down from the engine. He then saw that the train had been pulling the body of deceased along. It was jammed between the wheel and the rail of the carriage next to the brake. The body was decapitated, and one of the men picked up the head with a fire shovel.

George Brewer, of Cowgate Hill, Dover, fireman on the South Eastern Railway, who was on the engine with the last witness, said he did not see the deceased on the line, but when the train stopped he saw the body on the rails. The head was found at the rear of the train, on the rails, by Alfred Newman. One of the feet was lying near the body in the six feet way.

The Coroner said the question for the jury was whether deceased committed suicide or if the death was accidental.

The jury returned a verdict of Suicide While Temporarily Insane.


 
Folkestone Up To Date 30-4-1898

Inquest

On Monday an inquest was held before the Borough Coroner (Mr. Minter), at the Town Hall, on the body of William Epps, aged 51, sign writer, Walton Road, Folkestone, who was killed on the railway line between the Junction and Harbour, near Swain`s Crossing, on the previous Saturday morning. The Junction Station Master (Mr. Croucher) appeared on behalf of the South Eastern Railway Company.

James Friend said: I have no occupation. I live at Crow Cottage, Tram Road, Folkestone. I identify the body as that of William Epps, a sign writer at Folkestone. He was about 50 years of age, and was married, I believe. I had known him for about six or seven years, and met him in the street occasionally. The last time I saw him he was worried. I last saw him on Friday night, when he said he had a good mind to go and throw himself before the train. The only reason I knew for it was that he was in trouble. He said he could not get to work. I told him that life was full of trouble for us all. I never saw him the worse for drink. He was a very quiet, inoffensive man.

James Bourner said: I am an engine driver, living in Clarendon Place. On Saturday, the 23rd inst., I was driving the engine 122 from the Junction to the Harbour. There were 50 goods wagons attached, most of which were empty. The accident happened at a private crossing.

Mr. Croucher said the crossing was what was called an occupation crossing.

The Coroner remarked that it was a crossing with a footpath over it.

Witness (continuing): We were going between six and seven miles an hour. I saw the deceased standing close to the outside rail of the down line, not on the six foot way. If he had kept that position, the engine would have passed him clear. I blew my whistle two successive times, and then turned round to see if the steam gauge was working all right. When I turned again I lost sight of him. The tender was running before the goods engine, and I was standing on the side of the engine nearest the fields – the same side of the line as deceased was. The gate crossing is about 14 yards from the footpath crossing; not more. The deceased did not move when I blew the whistle. He still kept standing there. We could have pulled up about a distance of 30 or 40 yards away. There was not time to stop, even if we had known that he intended to throw himself before the engine. There was nothing in his action which led me to suppose that he intended to throw himself down. I felt the engine go over him, at least I knew the engine had gone over something. I was drawing the trucks down. The guard`s brake was next to the engine. I pulled up about 30 or 40 yards off. The guard put the brake on when I pulled up. I found the deceased`s body jammed in the first wheel of the carriage next the brake van. The head had been cut off the body. I had never seen the deceased before. That is all I know.

George Brewer said: I live at No. 1, Cowgate Hill, Dover. I am a fireman, and was on the engine with the last witness on Saturday, driving from the Junction to the Harbour. I heard the driver sound two whistles, one for each of two crossings. I did not see the deceased on the line. When passing one of the crossings, I felt the engine go over something, and I put the hand brake on. The train stopped as soon as it could, about 30 or 40 yards away, and I then saw the deceased`s body in the wheel of the engine. The body was headless. The head was found at the rear of the train. It was fetched by a fireman. One foot was lying near the body, in the six foot way. I did not know the deceased.

The Coroner said a man named Hopkins was said to have seen the poor fellow hanging about during the morning. He did not know whether the jury would consider it necessary to have Hopkins called. The question for the jury was to decide whether the deceased committed suicide, or his death was accidental. There might be a question whether he was deaf, and did not hear the train coming.

Mr. Friend, re-called, said he had heard since the accident that the deceased was slightly deaf, but witness did not know of it. In conversation the deceased could always hear hat was said to him.

The Coroner, proceeding with his remarks, said there did not appear to be much in the idea that the deceased was deaf, and did not hear the train coming. It was evident the accident was not the fault of the engine driver.

The jury returned a verdict to the effect that “the deceased committed suicide whilst temporarily insane”.



 
Folkestone Herald 30-4-1898

Inquest

On Monday evening an inquest was held by the Borough Coroner (Mr. John Minter) touching the death of William Epps. Deceased was killed by a train on Saturday morning on the railway adjoining the Tram Road. The following evidence was taken.

James Friend, of no occupation, deposed that he lived at Coke Cottage, the Tram Road, Folkestone. (The jury here adjourned to view the body. On their return the witness continued his evidence.) The deceased was a sign painter, or something of that kind. Witness considered him to be about 50 years of age. Witness was in the habit of meeting him in the streets. The last time he saw him, deceased seemed to be very much upset. He was married. He could not get to work. Witness saw him in the Railway Bell Hotel on the previous Friday night. When witness left he said he had a good mind to go across the road and throw himself under a train. He was upset and worried. Witness told him they all had troubles to put up with. He did not remember deceased making any reply. All the time witness had known him he had never seen deceased worse for drink. He was a very quiet, inoffensive man. As far as he remembered, he never heard a wrong word from him.

James Bourner, an engine driver in the employ of the South Eastern Railway Company, deposed that this occurred at 10.20 on the 23rd. He was driving a train from the Junction to the Harbour. Sixteen goods wagons were attached. He was going between six and seven miles an hour. He saw the deceased about thirty yards before he got to the gate crossing. He was up alongside the down line, standing sideways. His right side was towards witness. If he had kept that position, the engine would have passed him clear. Witness blew his whistle two successive times. After he had blown the whistle he turned to see something. He was standing on the same side as deceased. When he turned his head they were just about going over the gate crossing. When he blew his whistle the deceased still kept standing. There was nothing in deceased`s action that led him to suppose he was going to throw himself down. Witness`s head was turned about two seconds. He felt the engine go over the deceased. He pulled up as quickly as he could. The engine was going backwards, and the wagons were in front of the engine. The guard`s brake was next to the engine. The deceased`s body was jammed in the first wheel of the carriage next to the brake, between the wheel and the rail. He had never seen the deceased before.

George Brewer, a fireman, of 1 Calgate Hill, Dover, deposed that he was on the engine with the last witness on Saturday. He heard the driver sound the whistles twice. There were two crossings, and he sounded for each crossing. He did not see the deceased on the line. He felt the engine go on something. The hand brake was put on, and the train stopped as soon as possible, in about between 30 and 40 yards. Wiitness got down. He saw the deceased lying under the wheel of the second vehicle from the engine. The body was headless. He did not know deceased.

The jury found that deceased committed suicide while temporarily insane.


 
Folkestone Express 21-1-1899

Saturday, January 14th: Before The Mayor, W.Wightwick, C.J. Pursey and J. Fitness Esqs.

Mr. Smiles, of the Railway Bell Hotel, was granted an extension of an hour on the occasion of a dinner of the staff at the Junction Station.



 
Folkestone Up To Date 21-1-1899

Saturday, January 14th: Before The Mayor, J. Fitness, W. Wightwick, and C.J. Pursey Esqs.

Mr. Smiles, of the Railway Bell, Dover Road, applied for an extension on the occasion of the approaching railway employee dinner, on Wednesday, January 18th.

The Magistrates` Clerk said it was an annual application.

Mr. J. Fitness did not think it was an annual one.

The application, however, was granted.


 
Folkestone Express 18-3-1899

Monday, March 13th: Before The Mayor, Colonel Westropp, J. Hoad, E.T. Ward, J. Pledge, T.J. Vaughan, and J. Stainer Esqs.

John Adams was charged with stealing a pair of boots, the property of Jessie Finn.

Jessie Finn, a labourer, said on Tuesday afternoon he went to the Railway Bell Hotel, and left a pair of new boots on a seat. He had bought them at Mr. Vickery`s. Having occasion to go out he left the parcel, and when he returned it was gone. Witness informed the police, and afterwards met the prisoner in Tontine Street with the boots in his possession. He was taken into custody.

In reply to prisoner, witness denied that he gave him the boots to carry in Dover Street.

George Fagg, a labourer, said he was in the bar at the Railway Bell Hotel on Tuesday afternoon while the two men were there. After Finn had left the bar, prisoner took a parcel and went down the street,

P.C. Prebble said he went with prosecutor to the various common lodging houses to find prisoner. They met him in Tontine Street with the boots in a paper bag under his arm. Finn gave him into custody. He was formally charged at the police station, and he replied “I did not steal them. He gave them to me to look after for him”. Prosecutor was sober. Prisoner was carrying the boots quite openly, and it was about six o`clock.

Prosecutor said he knew the prisoner, and had been working with him. In Dover Street he had given him the boots to carry while he lit his pipe.

The Bench dismissed the case.



 
Folkestone Herald 18-3-1899

Folkestone Police Court

On Wednesday, John Adams was charged with stealing a pair of boots, value 4s. 11d., the property of Jessie Finn.

Prosecutor deposed that he was a labourer, living at the Warren. He went to the Railway Bell the previous afternoon in the bar. He had a parcel containing a pair of boots, which cost 4s. 11d. He gave it in charge of the defendant for a few minutes, and when he returned both defendant and the parcel were gone. He afterwards left the house and gave information to the police. Subsequently, in company with a constable, he met the defendant with the boots.

George Pay deposed that he saw the defendant take up the parcel and walk away.

P.C. William Prebble deposed that at 5.20 p.m. the previous afternoon, he met the defendant in Tontine Street with the boots under his arm. Prosecutor said “That is the man”. When charged at the police station with stealing the boots, he said “I did not steal them. He gave them to me to look after for him, all right”.

Finn said he had been working with defendant.

Defendant said prosecutor gave him the boots, and he took care of them. He brought the boots down the street. He thought he would perhaps see prosecutor.

The Bench discharged him, giving him the benefit of the doubt.


 
Folkestone Up To Date 18-3-1899

Wednesday, March 15th: Before The Mayor, J. Hoad, J. Pledge, G. Spurgen, E.T. Ward, J. Stainer, W. Medhurst and T.J. Vaughan Esqs., and Col. Westropp.

John Adams, a labourer, was charged with stealing a pair of boots, value 4s. 11d., the property of Jesse Finn, a labourer.

The complainant said: I went to the Railway Bell yesterday afternoon about 3.30 with a parcel containing a pair of boots which I had bought from Mr. Vickery, Tontine Street. I asked the prisoner to look after the parcel for five or ten minutes while I went away, and on returning to the bar I found that the prisoner had gone.

After corroborative evidence as to the theft, P.C. William Prebble said: About 5.20 p.m. yesterday, the witness came to me in High Street. From information received, I went with him through the common lodging houses, and then back into Tontine Street, where I saw the prisoner with the boots, in a paper bag, under his arm. The witness said “This is the man. I give him into custody”. I took the prisoner into custody about 6 p.m. He was carrying the boots openly at the time.

The prisoner elected to be tried before the Magistrates, but pleaded Not Guilty, remarking that he had been asked by the witness to carry the boots for him. There had been no intention of theft.

The Court gave the prisoner the benefit of the doubt, and dismissed him.


 
Folkestone Express 2-3-1901



Monday, February 25th: Before J. Hoad, E.T. Ward, Geo. Peden, J. Pledge, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs., and Lieut. Col. Westropp.



Mr. Smiles was granted an extension of time on the occasion of the railway servants` dinner at the Railway Bell.


 
Folkestone Herald 2-3-1901



Monday, February 25th: Before Mr. J. Hoad, Lieut. Colonel Westropp, Alderman Pledge, and Messrs. Ward, Vaughan, and Peden.



An extension of an hour on Wednesday night on the occasion of the Railway Servants` dinner was granted to Mr. Smiles, landlord of the Railway Bell.


 
Folkestone Express 9-3-1901



Wednesday, March 6th: Before W. Wightwick, W. Salter, G.I. Swoffer, C.J. Pursey, and J. Pledge Esqs.



Mr. Smiles, of the Railway Bell, was granted an extension of time of one hour on the occasion of a dinner of the Junction Station railway staff.



 
Folkestone Express 17-3-1900



Wednesday, March 14th: Before J. Fitness and W. Wightwick Esqs.



Mr. Smiles applied for an extension on the occasion of a dinner, to be held at the Railway Bell, of the railway employees on Wednesday. The Bench granted it.


 
Folkestone Express 25-9-1901



Tuesday, September 24th: Before W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and G.I Swoffer Esqs.



John Henry Barton and Rhoda Herring were placed in the dock, the former on a charge of being drunk and disorderly, and the other with assaulting the police.



P.C. Thomas Allen said about 8.05 p.m. on Monday evening he was in Dover Street, where he saw Barton, with several others, drunk and in a fighting attitude. He requested him to go away, and the prisoner pulled his jacket off and threatened to fight witness. P.C. Bourne came along, and the two prisoners left and went towards Canterbury Road. Witness followed, and the prisoners went into a fried fish shop. P.C. Smith went into the shop and asked Barton for his name and address as the prisoner had assaulted the landlord of the Railway Bell. The prisoner left the shop and offered to fight witness and three other constables. Witness took him into custody, when prisoner became violent, and witness required the assistance of P.C. Bourne, P.C. Smith, and P.C. Johnson. The latter attempted to handcuff the male prisoner, when the prisoner Herring, who had been very disorderly, snatched them from him and struck him in the mouth.



P.C. Leonard Johnson said at the time in question he was in Canterbury Road in plain clothes. The prisoner Barton was in custody, but as he became violent witness went to the constables` assistance. As he was attempting to put the handcuffs on his hands the female prisoner snatched them and struck him in the mouth with her right fist. He told he he was a police constable, and she struck him two more blows and said “Are you another Burniston?”



P.C. Smith corroborated, and added the female prisoner behaved like a mad woman.



The Chief Constable said the prisoners had just returned from hop picking.



The Bench fined Barton 10s. and 5s. 6d. cots, or 14 days`, and Herring was fined £1 and 5s. 6d. costs, or 14 days` for the assault. They told the latter she should think herself lucky, as they had the power to send her to prison without the option of a fine. The money was paid.

 
Folkestone Chronicle 26-10-1901



Wednesday, October 23rd: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and G.I. Swoffer, and Lieut. Col. Hamilton.



The licence of the Railway Bell Hotel was transferred to Mr. Tunbridge, of the Guildhall Vaults.


 
Folkestone Express 26-10-1901



Wednesday, October 23rd: Before W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, and G.I. Swoffer Esqs., and Col. Hamilton.



A full transfer of the licence of the Railway Bell was granted to Mr. Tunbridge, late of the Guildhall Vaults.


 
Folkestone Herald 26-10-1901



Wednesday, October 23rd: Before Messrs. W. Wightwick, W.G. Herbert, G.I. Swofer, and Lieut. Colonel Hamilton.



Mr. Tunbridge, of the Guildhall Vaults, was granted the transfer of the Railway Bell.

 
Folkestone Express 7-12-1901

Wednesday, December 4th: Before J. Stainer, G. Peden, and T.J. Vaughan Esqs., and Col. W.K. Westropp.

A special licensing sessions was held, when Mr. Tunbridge, of the Guildhall Vaults, was granted transfer of the licence of the Railway Bell


 
Folkestone Express 15-3-1902



Wednesday, March 12th: Before W. Wightwick and W.G. Herbert Esqs.



Mr. J. Tunbridge, of the Railway Bell Hotel, applied for an extension of one hour on Wednesday evening on the occasion of the annual dinner of the S.E. Railway employees at the Junction Station.



 
Folkestone Chronicle 28-2-1903

Saturday, February 21st: Before Lieut. Col. Penfold, Lieut. Col. Westopp, and Messrs. W.C. Carpenter, E.T. Ward, J. Stainer, and G. Peden.

Mr. Tunbridge, of the Railway Bell Hotel, applied for an extension on Tuesday evening, the occasion being the annual dinner of the Junction and Harbour staff.

The Chief Constable raised no objection, and the application was granted.


 
Hythe Reporter 30-7-1904



Tuesday, July 26th: Before The Mayor, J. Scott Esq., and A.M. Curties Esq.



Mr. James Tunbridge, of the Railway Bell, Folkestone, applied for the transfer of the licence of the Fountain Hotel, Seabrook. Granted.



 
Folkestone Daily News 11-3-1905



Saturday, March 11th: Before The Mayor, J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, and Alderman Herbert Esqs.



A temporary transfer of the licence of the Railway Bell from Mr. T. Tunbridge to Mr. J.S. Saunders was granted.

 
Folkestone Herald 18-3-1905



Saturday, March 11th: Before The Mayor, Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. J. Stainer, and Mr. G.I. Swoffer.



The licence of the Railway Bell was temporarily transferred from Mr. J. Tunbridge to Mr. S. Saunders.


 
Folkestone Daily News 12-4-1905

Wednesday, April 12th: Before Messrs. Spurgen, Carpenter and Fynmore.

The Railway Bell was transferred from Mr. J. Tunbridge to Mr. S. Saunders

 
Folkestone Express 15-4-1905

Wednesday, April 12th: Before Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and W.C. Carpenter Esq.

The Bench considered several applications for the transfer of licences, and granted the following: The Railway Bell from Mr. J. Tunbridge to Mr. J.B. Saunders


 
Folkestone Herald 15-4-1905



Wednesday, April 11th: Before Mr. W.C. Carpenter and Councillor R.J. Fynmore.


A special licensing session was held, when the licence of the Railway Bell was transferred from Mr. Jas. Tunbridge to Mr. J.S. Saunders

 
Folkestone Daily News 31-5-1905



Wednesday, May 31st: Before Alderman Herbert, J. Stainer and C.J. Pursey.

Proposed alterations at the Clarence Hotel (late New Inn), and at the Railway Bell were approved.


 
Folkestone Chronicle 3-6-1905

Wednesday, May 31st: Before Alderman W.G. Herbert, Mr. J. Stainer, and Mr. C.J. Pursey.

The Magistrates confirmed plans which were submitted for alterations to the Railway Bell.


 
Folkestone Daily News 7-5-1906

Monday, May 7th: Before Messrs. G. Spurgen, T.J. Vaughan, T. Ames, and Lieut. Colonel R.J. Fynmore.

John William Minter, Invicta Road, pleaded Not Guilty to being drunk and disorderly in Dover Road on the previous night. He said he had only spent 4d., so couldn`t be drunk.

P.C. Bourne said he was called at nine o`clock the previous evening by the landlord of the Railway Bell. He went to the public bar and there saw the prisoner, whom the landlord said he had refused to serve because he was intoxicated. He was removed, and when outside refused to go away. He became very violent and used obscene language. It required four constable to get him to the police station, notwithstanding that he was handcuffed and his feet tied together.

He was fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days` hard labour.

His application for time to pay was refused, and he was conveyed to the cells.


 
Folkestone Express 12-5-1906


Monday, May 7th: Before Alderman Spurgen, Alderman Vaughan, Lieut. Colonel Fynmore, and T. Ames Esq.

John William Minter, of Invicta Road, was charged with being drunk and disorderly the previous night in Dover Road.

Prisoner, when asked to plead, said he had only spent 4s., so he did not believe he was drunk.

P.C. Bourne said about nine o`clock the previous night he was called to the Railway Bell Hotel to eject the prisoner from the bar. He had gone into the house intoxicated, but refused to go out when requested. When witness got him outside, he refused to go away and commenced to shout and use most filthy language. Witness therefore took him into custody, when he became very violent, and he had to obtain the assistance of P.C.s Prebble, Ashby, and Smith to get him to the police station. Minter continued to struggle and kicked all the way there, notwithstanding that he was handcuffed and had his legs tied together.

Minter, who had nothing to say, had six convictions against him, the last being twelve months ago. He was fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, but in default of payment he was sent to prison for seven days with hard labour.


 
Folkestone Herald 12-5-1906

Monday, May 7th: Before Alderman G. Spurgen, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Councillor R.J. Fynmore, and Mr. T. Ames.

John Wm. Minter, living in Invicta Road, was charged with being drunk and disorderly the previous evening. He pleaded Not Guilty, saying he had only spent fourpence on drink.

P.C. Bourne deposed that at nine o`clock the previous evening he saw the landlord of the Railway Bell Inn, Dover Road, eject prisoner. He had refused to serve him, as he was drunk. Minter came outside, and would not go away, and used very foul language, so, with assistance witness took prisoner to the police station and charged him with being drunk and disorderly. On the way thither he struggled very violently, although he was handcuffed, and his legs were tied together.

There were six previous convictions against the prisoner, who was fined 5s. and 4s. 6d. costs, or seven days`.

Minter asked for time to pay, but this was refused, and he went below.


 
Folkestone Daily News 26-9-1911

Tuesday, September 26th: Before Messrs. Ward, Fynmore and Vaughan.

The licence of the Railway Bell was transferred from Sidney Saunders to George Hoare.


 
Folkestone Express 30-9-1911

Tuesday, September 26th: Before E.T. Ward Esq., Alderman Vaughan, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

The licence of the Railway Bell was temporarily transferred to Mr. George Hoare, who said he had previously kept a public house at Sandgate.


 
Folkestone Herald 30-9-1911

Tuesday, September 26th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Alderman T.J. Vaughan, and Lieut. Col. Fynmore.

Application was made for the temporary transfer of the licence of the Railway Bell Inn from Mr. J.S. Saunders to Mr. George Hoare. Granted.


 
Folkestone Daily News 30-11-1911



Wednesday, November 29th: Before Messrs. Stainer, Linton and Leggett.



The licence of the Railway Bell was transferred.





 
Folkestone Express 2-12-1911



Wednesday, November 29th: Before J. Stainer and R.J. Linton Esqs., and Major Leggett.


The following licence was transferred: Railway Bell, from Mr. S. Saunders to Mr. G. Hoare.

Temporary authority had been granted.
Folkestone Herald 2-12-1911

Wednesday, November 29th: Before Mr. J. Stainer, Major Leggett, and Mr. R.J. Linton.

The licence of the Railway Bell was transferred from Mr. S. Saunders to Mr. H. Hoare.


 
Folkestone Express 20-1-1912



Local News



The Transfer Sessions were held at the Police Court on Wednesday morning, when the licence of the Rendezvous Hotel again came before the Bench. The Magistrates were E.T. Ward Esq., Lieut. Col. Fynmore, Major Leggett, Alderman Jenner, and W.G. Herbert Esq.


Plans for the alteration of the Railway Bell, opposite the Junction Station, were approved.


 
Folkestone Herald 20-1-1912


Wednesday, January 17th: Before Mr. E.T. Ward, Lieut. Col. R.J. Fynmore, Major Leggett, Alderman C. Jenner, and Mr. W.G. Herbert.

Plans were produced and passed for alterations of premises at the Railway Bell.


 
Folkestone Express 15-6-1912



Thursday, June 13th: Before J. Stainer, G.I. Swoffer, W.J. Harrison, A. Stace, and G. Boyd Esqs.


Margaret Driscoll, who is a stranger and a cripple, was charged with breaking a plate glass window, value £3 10s., at the Railway bell Hotel on the previous day. She said it was an accident.

John Watson said he saw “the lady” come up Dover Road at about a quarter to twelve. She went into the Railway Bell, where she was refused drink. She took up her crutch and struck the window – a large plate glass one – three times with the foot of the crutch, but it did not break. She then reversed the crutch and struck the window with the head, breaking the glass at the third blow.

In reply to the defendant, witness said he did not see her thrown out of the house.

George Hall (sic), landlord of the Railway Bell, said he saw the prisoner between ten and eleven o`clock on Wednesday morning, when she went into the public bar and asked for a glass of beer. With which she was served. She commenced to dance, and he requested her to leave, which she did. At a quarter to twelve she returned, and was refused any drinks, and the barmaid turned her out. Prisoner sat down on the pavement. Witness went back into the house, and shortly after he heard the glass break. He went outside and saw prisoner standing up, shouting “Rule Britannia”. He sent for a constable and gave her into custody. The value of the window was £3 10s.

P.C. Styles, who took the prisoner into custody, said he saw her sitting in the Junction Station yard. When told the charge, she replied “I don`t care”. She had had a drink or two, but was not drunk.

Prisoner said she was a stranger to the town. She went in a temper to strike a person, and had no intention of breaking the window. She was heartily sorry, and if she could pay for the window she would willingly do it. She was invited to the house by “two other ladies”.

The first witness said he saw two other women go into the bar before the prisoner went in.

Prisoner said the “two ladies” took her in.

The Bench imposed a fine of 5s., damage £3 10s., and costs 6s. 6d., or 21 days` imprisonment with hard labour.


 
Folkestone Herald 15-6-1912


Thursday, May 13th: Before Mr. J. Stainer, Mr. G.I. Swoffer, Mr. G. Boyd, Councillor W.J. Harrison and Councillor A. Stace.

Margaret Driscoll was charged with wilfully breaking a plate glass window, value £3 10s., at the Railway Bell Hotel. Prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.

It was stated that the woman broke the window after being turned out of the house.

Accused, who was a stranger to the town, was fined 5s. and 6s. 6d. costs, and the value of the window, £3 10s.; in default, 21 days` hard labour.


 
Folkestone Daily News 15-6-1912


Thursday, June 13th: Before Justices Stainer, Swoffer, Boyd, Harrison, and Stace.

Margaret Driscoll, a middle-aged wreck of a woman with a wooden leg, but whose diction was of a superior class, was charged with breaking a plate glass window, value £3 10s., at the Railway Bell Hotel. In the absence of the Chief Constable, Inspector Swift conducted the prosecution.

John Frederick Morrison, of 50, Bridge Street, said he saw the defendant outside the Railway Bell about 11.45 a.m. on Wednesday. She entered the hotel and then came out again, as the barmaid had refused to serve her. She deliberately took up her crutch and jabbed at the plate glass window three times, but the window did not break; she there reversed her crutch, using the mallet end, and striking at the window again, broke it.

The accused: It was under great provocation. Did you not see me thrown into the road?

Witness: I did not.

Accused: Was I not talking to two ladies?

Witness: There were two ladies in the “balloon” bar.

George Ward, landlord of the Railway Bell, deposed that he saw the prisoner between 10 and 11 a.m. on Wednesday. She came into the bar and asked for a glass of beer, with which she was served. After that she commenced to sing, and danced round upon her crutch. Witness then told her to drink up and go out, which she did, but she came back again about 11.45, and the barmaid, by his instructions, refused to serve her, and turned the woman out, but she again attempted to re-enter. He (witness), who was standing in the doorway, prevented re-entry, and led the woman across the pavement, when she either “slid” or sat down in the roadway. After he had returned indoors he heard a crash of glass, and on going out again he saw prisoner near the broken window, with her crutch raised, and she was singing “Rule Britannia”.

Prisoner (surprised): How could I sing “Rule Britannia” when you had thrown me down and I had a lot of blood on me?

Witness (continuing) said the window was valued at £3 10s.

Prisoner: There were two women I know from London in the bar. I should not have come back into the bar unless they had asked me.

Witness admitted there were two women in the bar, but prisoner abused them.

P.C. Stiles said about 12 a.m. on Wednesday he went to the Railway Bell, and from the information received he went to the Station yard, where he saw prisoner sitting down. He charged her, and she replied “I don`t care”.

The Deputy Clerk (Mr. Roots): What was her condition?

Witness: Her condition was normal; she was not intoxicated.

The prisoner, addressing the Bench, said she was extremely sorry, and if she had the money she would most willingly pay for the damage. She had let her temper get the better of her, and she could only express her great regret and contrition, and say how heartily sorry she was for what had occurred. The whole thing had been caused (she alleged) by the publican throwing her out and hurting her.

Inspector Swift said the accused was quite a stranger, and nothing was known about her.

The Chairman said the attempts to break the window were repeated and persistent. It was not the impulsive action following provocation, but a very determined intention to break the glass. Prisoner would be fined 5s., costs 6s. 6d., damages £3 10s. (£4 1s. 6d. in all), or 14 days` hard labour. Prisoner, who had no money, was removed to the cells.


 
Folkestone Herald 10-1-1920



Local News



We regret to announce the death of Mr. Sidney (Sid) Saunders, of the Fountain Hotel, Seabrook. Deceased, who was widely known, went out on Tuesday night on business and did not return. The next morning the deceased was found in a small greenhouse, having passed away suddenly in the night. His death was due to natural causes. Much sympathy is expressed with the family. The late Mr. Saunders came to Folkestone many years ago as a carpenter, and was formerly proprietor of the East Cliff Tavern. He subsequently became proprietor of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, the Railway Bell Hotel, Folkestone, and the Fountain, Seabrook.


 
Folkestone Express 15-1-1921



Local News



Mr. J.G. Smiles, of Cheriton, the Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians and a member of the Cheriton Urban Council, about ten days ago left for Switzerland for the winter sports. Early this week notification was received from Switzerland that he had met with an accident, as a result of which pleurisy had ensued. Mr. Roy Smiles, his son, who was in Scotland at the time of the receipt of the news, returned to Cheriton, and has left for Switzerland in order to be near his father.



It will be the sincere wish of Mr. Smiles` numerous friends in Folkestone, Cheriton, Hythe, and the surrounding district that he will have a speedy recovery.

Yesterday (Thursday) intimation was received that Mr. Smiles broke his collar bone. His condition was more reassuring.

Local News

In another column reference is made to an accident to, and the illness of, Mr. J.G. Smiles. Last (Thursday) evening information was received from Switzerland that he was suffering from double pneumonia.

 
Folkestone Herald 15-1-1921



Local News



Many people will regret to hear that Mr. J.G. Smiles (Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians and a member of the Cheriton Council) has met with an accident whilst on holiday with Mr. T. Fentiman, at Grindelwald, Switzerland. Whilst enjoying the sport of tobogganing he fractured his collar bone, and since then had developed double pneumonia. The latest cable (received on Thursday) states that he is no worse and the fever is abating.



Mrs. J.G. Smiles and Mr. Roy Smiles (son) left this week for Switzerland, where it was expected they would arrive yesterday (Friday) afternoon. The many friends of Mr. Smiles will hope for his complete and speedy recovery.

 
Folkestone Express 22-1-1921



Obituary



Last week we reported that Mr. J.G. Smiles, who resided at Brier Lea, Ashley Avenue, Cheriton, was seriously ill in Switzerland with double pneumonia, following an accident, which had resulted in a broken collar bone and two broken ribs. We now regret to have to record his death, which took place on Saturday morning, and the news of which was received later in the day at Cheriton. His demise, we are sure, be received with the greatest regret of a large circle of friends and acquaintances, not only in Folkestone, but in the surrounding towns and district, for wherever Mr. Smiles went he was exceedingly popular. He was always full of geniality, and wherever he went he speedily won the affections of those who came in contact with him. His sympathy, particularly for those who were in straightened circumstances, was very great, and he was ever ready to help in alleviating the wants and sufferings of those who, unfortunately, had to seek help. As Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians, he was particularly solicitous of those who had to seek assistance of that body, but he always placed such people who had to come before the Board at their ease in a quiet manner. He did great good by stealth, and many people will be the poorer in friendship and in various other ways by his death.



Mr. Smiles went with Mr. Fentiman, of Folkestone, to Switzerland to take part in the winter sports there shortly after Christmas, proceeding to Grindelwald. On January 6th he was tobogganing when he crashed into a fence, and the force of the collision was such that he sustained the injuries previously mentioned. On Monday, January 10th, pneumonia developed, and it was then that Mr, Fentiman wired to Mr. Smiles` family at Cheirton stating that Mr. Smiles had met with an accident, and that pneumonia had set in, and suggesting that members of the family should go out to Switzerland. Mr. Roy Smiles, his son, had been to Scotland, and was at Leeds on Tuesday. Mrs. Smiles and Roy Smiles decided to go out to Switzerland late on Tuesday night, and they sought the aid of Mr. G. Harvey in obtaining passports for them. Mr. Harvey proceeded to London by the eleven o`clock train on Wednesday morning, and by one o`clock had obtained the necessary passports from the Passports Office. He visited the French and Swiss Offices in order to get them visaed, and the passports were in the possession of Mrs. Smiles and her son shortly after six o`clock. They, however, decided not to proceed on their journey to Switzerland until Thursday morning, when they travelled via Dover to Calais. Unfortunately they arrived too late to see Mr. Smiles alive.


Mr. Smiles was 62 years of age. He leaves a widow and three sons, Mr. Roy Smiles, the licensee of the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton; Mr. Horace Smiles, who is in Australia, and who served in the Australian Forces during the war; and Lieut. Eng. Percy Smiles, R.N. His eldest son, Mr. Joe Smiles, died two or three years before the war from pneumonia, when about to take over the Shakespeare Hotel, in Folkestone. Mr. Smiles` father is still alive, and is 88 years of age. With Mrs. Smiles and the members of the family the greatest sympathy of the whole community in the district will be extended.

Mr. Smiles had many activities, and was very keen on all kinds of sport. He was an enthusiastic supporter of football, cricket, and hockey, and one of his chief delights was to have a good walk.

Mr. Smiles associated himself a great deal with the public life of the district. At the time of his death he was Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians, a position he had filled with conspicuous ability for eight years. He was also Chairman of the Assessment Committee, the Finance Committee, and the House Committee. He had been a member of the Board for 21 years, during which time he had shown the greatest sympathy with those who had to seek assistance from the Guardians. He had represented the Board frequently at the meetings of the Poor Law Unions Association.

In politics Mr. Smiles was a Unionist, and an ardent supporter of Sir Philip Sassoon and the late Sir Edward Sassoon.

As a member of the Cheriton Urban Council he had always been characterised as one of the ablest representatives of the ratepayers, for whose interests he had the greatest consideration. He had served on that body for over eighteen years, and in this direction his loss will be deeply felt. He associated himself with everything for the good of the community of Cheriton and any good cause had his ready assistance. He was a vice president and the Treasurer of the Cheriton Gardeners` Society. It can be truly said of Councillor Smiles that he was a man who was fearless in his public duty and imbued with the spirit to do the best he could for his fellow men.

Previous to going to Cheriton to take over the White Lion Hotel in 1903, Mr. Smiles resided at the Railway Bell Hotel, Folkestone, and at various times was connected with other Folkestone hotels.

Councillor Smiles was a sidesman at All Souls Church, Cheriton, and was one of the managers of the schools.

At the meeting of the Elham Board of Guardians yesterday (Thursday) a vote of sympathy was passed with the widow and family.



 

Folkestone Herald 22 January 1921.

Obituary.

There was a genuine ring in the feeling of regret expressed by the local community as the news of the death of Mr. J. G. Smiles spread through the town and district. He was a man honoured by his fellows above most men. As Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians, and as a member of the Cheriton Urban District Council he had rendered valuable services to the public, and his death is a distinct loss to both those authorities, who thoroughly appreciated his sound advice and his native common sense. His unfailing urbanity, his ready tact, his unvarying kindliness of heart, his complete lack of ostentation – these were some of the characteristics which combined to make him a loveable man who made friends wherever he went, and among all classes of the community. There is no exaggeration to say that his death is a real loss to his fellow citizens.

Joseph Smiles 1921

Local News.

News was received on Saturday last that Mr. Joseph George Smiles, of Brier Lea, Ashley Avenue, Cheriton, the Chairman of the Elham Board of Guardians, had died at Grindelwald, Switzerland. The intimation was received with deep regret on all hands. He was sixty three years of age.

As was stated in our last issue, Mr. Smiles met with a serious accident while tobogganing at Grindelwald, whither he had gone on a brief visit with his close personal friend, Mr. A. (Tommy) Fentiman, and subsequently he had developed double pneumonia. He passed away at 3.15 on Friday afternoon last week. His wife and eldest son (Mr. Roy Smiles) did not arrive till ten a.m. on the following morning, their journey having been delayed owing to the necessity of obtaining passports. Mr. George Harvey (who was on intimate terms with the late Mr. Smiles) made a special journey to London in order to secure the passports, which were promptly forthcoming. But the mere fact of the necessity of obtaining the passports prevented Mrs. Smiles and her son from starting as soon as they wished.

There were several formalities to be gone through at Grindelwald, and the widow, Mr. Roy Smiles, and Mr. Fentiman did not arrive home till Thursday night. The body was to follow by a later train and boat.

Mr. Roy Smiles kindly granted an interview to a Herald representative, and in the course of his statement said: My dear father, in company with Mr. Fentiman, left England for the winter sports at Grindelwald (Switzerland) on the 4th instant, the accident occurring on the following Sunday (January 8th). Snow was already on the ground, but it rained and subsequently froze hard. Thus the surface of the hillsides and roads was similar to a sheet of ice. It was under these conditions that father tobogganed (face downwards) on the side of a slope (calculated at about two hundred yards) which I can only describe for steepness as resembling Sugar Loaf Hill or the sides of Caesar`s Camp. It is calculated by eye-witnesses that when the accident happened my father was travelling at the rate of thirty miles an hour. It was whilst gliding at this rate that the toboggan crashed into a projecting fence, with the result that my father sustained not only a fractured collar bone, but a broken rib. Assistance was at once forthcoming. A sledge was secured, and he was driven to the Belvedere Hotel, Grindelwald, about three quarters of a mile distant. Dr. P. Strasser was at once sent for and promptly arrived. Immediate attention was given to the injuries, but double pneumonia supervened. Two nurses for two days and nights, together with the doctor, were in constant attendance at the bedside, but in spite of all their efforts, my father passed away on Friday afternoon.

The greatest sympathy was extended to us by the visitors at the hotel, and the villagers generally. The principal official or representative of Grindelwald (Mr. A. Borhren) called at the hotel to express the sympathy of the inhabitants, and also asked the acceptance of a laurel wreath and flowers. Wreaths and expressions of condolence were also tendered by the guests of the hotel, where a short and impressive service was held by the resident chaplain before we left for England. It was a source of much consolation to my mother that Mrs. Carpenter (late of Folkestone and Lyminge) was staying at the hotel. She was devoted in her attentions, which proved a great comfort to us both, and especially to my mother”.

The late Mr. Smiles came to Folkestone between thirty and forty years ago, when he became proprietor of the Railway Bell Hotel (opposite the Junction). He next took over the White Lion Hotel, Cheriton, subsequently retiring and taking up his residence at Brier Lea, Ashley Avenue. He was for a considerable period Chairman of the local Licensed Victuallers` Association, and his wise and imparted conduct in the chair was fully recognised by his fellow members. He took a deep interest in Poor Law administration, becoming a member of the Board of Guardians in 1900, and subsequently representing Cheriton. He showed such marked ability and aptitude for his duties that he was chosen Chairman in 1913, a post he held up to the time of his death. In this capacity he won both the warm esteem of his colleagues and also of the various officials. Never did a sour word escape his lips whilst he was in the chair, and if ever a “breeze” arose he was ever ready with his tact to smooth over any difference. He was also a member of the Assessment Committee and here again his advice was invaluable.

His interest in the inmates of Hill House was not perfunctory. If ever a man had the true human touch in his character, it was Mr. Smiles. It was his real delight to pay not only official, but private visits to Hill House and Cottage Homes. His constant care was for the comfort of the inmates especially those in the sick wards. Such words as “workhouse” and “pauper” were scrapped for “Institution”, “inmates”, and so on. At the Cottage Homes, amongst the children, his presence was always welcome. During the war, when the inmates were boarded out at Tenterden, Eastry, Brighton, etc., his visits were many, and he always remembered his duties to those belonging to the Union who were also inmates of the Chartham Asylum.

As a member of the Urban District Council, Mr. Smiles was constant, regular, and punctual in his duties, ever taking a keen interest in all that appertained to the welfare of Cheriton. His aim was to secure efficiency and to keep the rates within bearable limits. In this, with the assistance of his colleagues, he succeeded. He was a regular worshipper at All Souls Church, of which he was a sidesman.

Deceased was a member of the Masonic Order, and was widely esteemed by his brethren.

He sustained a great loss in 1913, when he lost his eldest son, Mr. Joseph Smiles, a bright young fellow who will be remembered, not only as a lover of manly pastimes, but as a trooper in the Royal East Kent Yeomanry.

Councillor Smiles leaves a widow and three sons, Mr. Roy Stuart Smiles, Mr. Horace Smiles, and Mr. Percy Smiles. One of these is in Australia, and a few years back deceased went out on a visit to him. It was his purpose, we understand, to have paid a return visit during the present year. Mr. J. G. Smiles is survived by his father, who is in his eighty ninth year and in good health. He lives with Mr. Roy Smiles.

Touching his private life it could be said of the late Mr. Smiles it could be said that he was geniality personified. He abhorred the petty, and was ever ready to discern the best and not the reverse in any man. There was much good that he did openly, but there was a great deal more (known only to his intimates) that he did by stealth. A useful citizen, a manly man, a kind friend, the whole community is the poorer for his death. To his widow and family we tender our heartfelt sympathy.

We are unable to state the date of the funeral owing to the uncertainty of the arrival of the body, which is being conveyed by a later and slower train. In all probability, however, the funeral will take place at St. Martin`s Churchyard in the early part of next week.

 

Folkestone Express 4-3-1922



Local News



At the Police Court on Wednesday the following licence was transferred: The Railway Bell, from Mr. G. Hoare to Mr. G.A. Clarke, Croydon.


 

Folkestone Express 11-3-1922



Adjourned Licensing Sessions



Wednesday, March 8th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and Colonel P. Broome-Giles.

The licence of the Railway Bell was transferred from Mr. George Hoare to Mr. Arthur John Clark.

 
Folkestone Herald 11-3-1922



Adjourned Licensing Sessions



Wednesday, March 8th: Before Mr. G.I. Swoffer and Colonel Broome-Giles, C.B.



The licence of the Railway Bell was transferred from Mr. George Hoare to Mr. Arthur John Clarke.


 
Folkestone Herald 22-4-1922



Felix


Mr. J.A. Clarke, a one-time member of the Croydon Borough Council and other public bodies in the well-known Surrey town, has, on his own assertion, taken up his residence in Folkestone “all through drink”. This gentleman, to put it briefly, has come to preside over the destinies of the Railway Bell Hotel – his first venture in the licensing trade. A brief reference has already been made in the Herald to our new citizen. Now through the kindness of one who knows Croydon pretty well, I have been favoured with a few details of Mr. Clarke`s public career, in recognition of which various tokens of respect and tributes were offered to him on leaving the town in which he had for so long pursued a life of usefulness. Councillor Clarke and his wife were entertained at a banquet which was graced with the presence of the Mayor and Mayoress of Croydon, aldermen, councillors, ratepayers, and Masonic and other friends. Any speeches were made in praise of the departing guests, Councillor Clarke being presented with an illuminated address and his wife with a gold brooch.

Amongst other public presentations made to Councillor Clarke was a case of pipes and a tobacco pouch by the inmates of Croydon Union in token of his services on the Board of Guardians, on which he had served as a member for several years. The gifts were handed to the recipient by a septuagenarian inmate on the occasion of an entertainment in the Workhouse. It was quite natural that Mr. Clarke, in acknowledgement, said he would ever treasure the gifts, the funds for which included many pennies. The staff at the Workhouse also presented Mr. Clarke with a pair of entree dishes (in duplicate). The late Councillor is an out-and-out constitutionalist, and at a farewell concert he was also presented with a solid silver cigarette case suitably inscribed. Mr. Clarke, in acknowledgement, said he had been associated with the Constitutional cause for a quarter of a century. He thought he was born a Constitutionalist. His father was a soldier, his son was a soldier, and he was a soldier. In this last connection ex-Councillor Clarke held the position of staff farrier sergeant during the war, and his service on the Franco-Belgian Front brought him into contact with soldiers under all circumstances. He shared their hardships and dangers, and in subsequent years has urged the claims of ex-servicemen to liberal treatment at the hands of the community.

As Chairman of the Smallholders` Association Mr. Clarke appears to have done good service, and this was recognised by the members, who presented him with an illuminated address. Folkestone welcomes a gentleman of this calibre. I have heard in some quarters that this ex-Councillor from Croydon is looked upon as somewhat in the nature of a “dark horse” for the “North Ward Stakes” in the event of a contest at the next election, but from all I can gather Mr. Clarke has had his fill of public life, and desires to “stand at ease” in this respect.


 
Folkestone Express 14-4-1923

Local News

At the transfer sessions held at the Police Court on Wednesday the following licence was transferred: The Railway Bell, Dover Road, to Mr. F. Bean, of the Duchess of Kent, Dover, from Mr. Clark.


 
Folkestone Herald 14-4-1923

Local News

On Wednesday last the Folkestone Magistrates granted application for the transfer of the licence of the Railway Bell, Dover Road, from Mr. J.A. Clarke to Mr. F. Bean, of the Duchess of Kent, Dover.


 
Folkestone Express 22-11-1924

Local News

At the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday, before The Mayor and other Magistrates, the licence of the Railway Bell was transferred from Mr. Bean to Mr. Joseph George Brown (late of the King`s Head, Cheapside, London.



 
Folkestone Herald 23-1-1926



Obituary



We regret the death, at the Swan Inn, Dover Road, of Mrs. Annie Buller Saunders, at the age of sixty years. Deceased was the widow of the late Mr. “Sid” Saunders, who was successively landlord of the Railway Bell Hotel, Folkestone; the White Lion, Cheriton; East Cliff Tavern, and the Fountain Hotel, Seabrook. Her happy and cheerful disposition endeared her to all. To do a good and deserving turn to others afforded her real joy. To her only child, Mrs. Herbert, the wife of Mr. S. Herbert, of the Swan Inn, sincere sympathy is extended.



The funeral took place at the Cemetery.


 
Folkestone Express 13-3-1926



Obituary

We regret to have to announce the death of Mr. James Tunbridge, of Laudec Villa, 74, Radnor Park Road, and which took place in the Royal Victoria Hospital on Monday morning. He was 76 years of age, and had enjoyed good health until about a month ago. The deepest sympathy, we are sure, will be extended to the members of the family, who are left to mourn a very great loss. He leaves a widow, three sons and a. daughter, nine grandchildren and three great-grand­children.

Ever a fine personality, the late Mr. Tun­bridge was characterised by his extreme geniality and goodwill. He was a typical old English gentleman, who had won the highest esteem of those whom he came in contact. He was ever ready to help those in distress, and some of his staunch advice proved invaluable. His kindly nature had won the admiration of his fellow men. He celebrated his golden wedding on Christmas Day, 1921, the marriage taking place at the Holy Trinity Church, Dover, on Christ­mas morning, 1871. He was born at Alkham, the village midwav between Folkestone and Dover, and was a son of the late Mr. Thomas Tunbridge. He was a brother of the late Mr. Tilden Tunbridge. He was a carpenter, and was employed on the South Eastern Railway for twelve years. He was one of the first to commence the work on the projected Channel Tunnel. He assisted in the building of Shorncliffe Station and was foreman-in-charge of Cheriton Arch Station, which, at the present time is known as the Central Station. He became the proprietor of the Castle Inn, Foord, and subsequently resided at the Guildhall Vaults, the Railway Bell, and the Fountain Hotel, Seabrook. He retired from business in 1917. He was the chairman of the Licensed Victuallers Society on three occasions, and was the chairman of the Licensed Victuallers’ Mineral Water Co. for six years. He was exceedingly fond of bowls, and was a member of the Hythe Bow­ling Club. He was quite content and happy when “trundling the woods’.” He was, in his time, an excellent shot, and was probably one of the best shots in the neighbourhood. He was greatly devoted to shooting, and with! his canine friend and a gun and cartridges, would make his way to the woods, where he spent many happy hours. He loved a game of billiards, and was known to be a very good welder of the cue, and was a rather formidable exponent of the game. He came to Folkestone 47 years ago. He was a member of the Brotherhood of the Cheerful Sparrows, and also of the Folkestone Club.

The funeral took place yesterday (Thurs­day), at the Folkestone Cemetery, when the Vicar of St. John’s Church (the Rev. J. B. Cowell) officiated at the Church and at the graveside in the Folkestone Cemetery.


 
Folkestone Herald 13-3-1926



Obituary

We regret to announce the death on Sunday of Mr. James Tunbridge, of 74, Radnor Park Road. The deceased, who was seventy four years of age was widely known in the town and district.

In his early days he followed the occupation of a carpenter and was employed on the South Eastern Railway for twelve years. He was one of the first to start on the work of the Channel tunnel, the site of which was afterwards utilised for a coal boring. He helped to build Shorncliffe Station, and was foreman-in-charge of the erection of Cheriton Arch Station, subsequently known as Radnor Park and now as the Central Station. As a licensed victualler he was in turn licensee of the Castle Inn, Foord, Guildhall Vaults, Railway Bell, and the Fountain Hotel, Seabrook. In his particular calling deceased was regarded as a model, inasmuch as he always acted strictly in accordance with the licensing laws. He was for some time Chairman of the local Licensed Victuallers` Association, and also acted in a similar capacity for the Folkestone and District Licensed Victuallers` Mineral Water and General Supply Coy., Ltd. In both these positions he enjoyed the full confidence of the members. He retired from business about nine years ago.

Decease was a great devotee of the outdoor life. He loved a game of bowls, and nothing gave him greater pleasure than to handle the “woods” on the greens of the Hythe Bowling Club, of which he was a member up to the time of his death. He found great pleasure, too, with his gun and dog amid the “wheaten stubble” on autumn and winter days. He was widely regarded as a “dead shot”. A respected member of the Folkestone Club, he also enjoyed a game of billiards, and could give a good account of himself with the cue and ivories.

The late Mr. Tunbridge was born at Alkham, but had resided in Folkestone practically all his life. He celebrated his Golden Wedding on Christmas Day, 1921, and on that occasion, with his devoted partner, was the recipient of presents from many friends. Deceased was a typical Englishman. He was outspoken to a degree, “straight as a die”, and a real manly man. As such he was regarded by all who had the privilege of his acquaintance. He was a friend to many, and did a lot of good by stealth.

To his widow and surviving family (three sons and one daughter) much sympathy is extended.

The funeral took place at the Cemetery on Thursday afternoon.


 
Folkestone Express 21-1-1928

Local News

The licence of the Railway Bell Hotel, Dover Road, was on Tuesday, at the Police Court, transferred from Mr. Joseph Brown to Mr. Albert Leigh, of the Royal Oak, Dormans Sand, Surrey.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions.


 
Folkestone Express 26-1-1929

Friday, January 18th: Before Alderman G. Spurgen and other Magistrates.

Richard Ryan was charged with stealing on the 5th January, he being the bailee, a bicycle, the property of Mr. Attwood, by converting it for his own use. Defendant pleaded not guilty.

Mr. J. Attwood, a cycle engineer and dealer of 40, Coolinge Road, said he identified the prisoner. He first called at his shop on the 1st January, with the view of purchasing a bicycle, and took the machine on the 2nd January. He had wanted to know the terms for buying a machine on the instalment system. He entered into an agreement to have the bicycle on the hire-purchase system. On the 2nd January he read the agreement completely through, some of it aloud. He said he would pay 7s. 6d. He took the machine away. He paid nothing further, beyond the first 7s. 6d. Witness sent to his house twice and he had had a letter from him. He had given the defendant no authority to deal with the bicycle.

Prisoner: Did you say “This is the first bike I have sold this year?”

Mr. Attwood: I did.

The Clerk: When you went through this transaction were there any transfers on the machine? - Two, one on the front, and one on the rear.

Are they there now? - No, they have been rubbed off.

Prisoner: My boy rubbed it off.

Frederick Harold Croucher, 19, Canterbury Road, employed as a barman at the Railway Bell, said defendant was a customer there. He saw him there about a fortnight ago, and he was trying to find someone to buy a bicycle. Prisoner asked him, and he had the bicycle outside the bar. Three or four days later he went in the bar, and asked again if he wanted to buy it. Prisoner said he was hard up, and he purchased it for £2, under the belief that the bicycle belonged to him. He never noticed any transfers, whether they were on or off. He had had the bicycle ever since.

In reply to prisoner, witness said he wanted him not to sell it, as he wanted it. He told him he did not want a receipt, as he knew him.

David Edward Brown, employed by Mr. Attwood, said he was there when Ryan went to buy the bicycle. A few days later Mr. Attwood sent him to see prisoner about the payments, and he said he would go round on the Saturday, but he did not go. He went on the Monday, and prisoner said he would give him a note for Mr. Attwood.

Det.Sergeant Rowe said that about noon on the 16th he went to 117, Canterbury Road, where he saw the bicycle. He saw it was a new machine, and the transfers had been scratched off and painted over. He saw the prisoner in Folly Road. At first prisoner said he would not toll him where he got it, and afterwards he said “I got it from Mr. Att­wood at Coolinge Road”. On Thursday he took a statement from Mr. Attwood, and in consequence ho charged the prisoner, and he replied “I bought that bicycle, I did not steal the bicycle.”

Brown, recalled, said he handed a copy of the agreement (produced) to Mr. Ryan.

Walter John Masters said he saw prisoner sign the agreement.

Prisoner, giving evidence on oath, said that when he went to Mr. Attwood he thought he had purchased the machine, and he told his wife it would do to ride up and down if the work opened up on Dover Road, and he got a job as night man. He honestly be­lieved it was his bicycle. If he did a thing like that with a wife and three children, with the pension of £1 a week, he would deserve horse whipping. He did not think he had purchased it for 7s. 6d., but he knew he had to pay for it. He sold it because his wanted him to get rid of it.

The Magistrates found defendant guilty. Inspector Pittock said there was one pre­vious conviction, for stealing ten fowls with another man. He had been wounded in the arm, which was practically useless. In 1927 he was thrown off a cart, and fractured his skull.

Prisoner was sentenced to one month’s hard labour.

Prisoner: I thank you.


 
Folkestone Herald 16-2-1929

Local News

A very enjoyable evening was spent by a good company at the Railway Bell Hotel on Monday, on the occasion of a farewell supper and concert to Mr. and Mrs. Leigh, the genial landlord and his wife, who are shortly leaving the town.

The chair was taken by Mr. E. Turner, supported by Messrs. Binfield, S. Smith, Langford, and other friends. After an enjoyable repast, the Chairman presented Mr. Leigh with a case of pipes, and a small present to Mrs. Leigh as a small token of respect and goodwill from a few friends. He said he was very sorry that Mr. Leigh was leaving them, but hoped that good luck would go with him and his wherever they went.

Mr. Leigh suitably replied, saying that he much regretted leaving Folkestone and his good friends.

After supper there was a musical evening, and Mr. H. Brooker ably accompanied at the piano.


 
Folkestone Herald 27-1-1934

Obituary

We regret to announce the death recently, at New Malden, Surrey, of Mrs. Harriett S. Tunbridge, the widow of the late Mr. James Tunbridge, who was in turn licensee of the Railway Bell Hotel, Guildhall Hotel, Fountain Hotel (Seabrook), and the Castle Inn, Foord. Mrs. Tunbridge was respected by all who knew her. The funeral took place on Wednesday at Folkestone cemetery.



 
Folkestone Express 24-8-1935

Local News

The licence of the Railway Bell, Dover Road, was transferred from Mr. Peter C. Richardson to Mr. George Gumbrill at the Folkestone transfer sessions at the Town Hall on Wednesday. Mr. Gumbrill, who has managed several other licensed houses, comes from Fairlight Cove, Hastings.


 
Folkestone Herald 24-8-1935

Local News

The licence of the Railway Bell, Dover Road, Folkestone, was transferred from Mr. Peter Coughlan Richardson to Mr. George Gumbrell by the Folkestone Magistrates on Wednesday. It was stated that Mr. Gumbrell had held licences at Hastings, Woolwich and other places.


 
Folkestone Herald 16-9-1939


Local News

Another batch of summonses for breaches of the Lighting Order was heard by the Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday. Fines were imposed in each ease. Mr. A.E. Pepper presided with Mr. L.G.A. Collins and Alderman J.W. Stainer.

George Gumbrell, of the Railway Bell, Dover Road, was summoned for an offence.

Special Constable Coveney said that at 10.25 on the night of September 6th he was on duty in Dover Road when he noticed that light was emitted from the Railway Bell public house whenever the door was opened. He waited five minutes until closing time, when the doors were all opened and streaks went across the pavement.

Defendant told the Magistrates he had lowered the wattage of his lamps and had shaded all his lights. It could only have been a very small light that was emitted. He had since covered the doors with blankets taken off the beds.

Defendant was fined 10s.

 
Folkestone Herald 16-9-1939


Local News

Another batch of summonses for breaches of the Lighting Order was heard by the Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday. Fines were imposed in each ease. Mr. A.E. Pepper presided with Mr. L.G.A. Collins and Alderman J.W. Stainer.

George Gumbrell, of the Railway Bell, Dover Road, was summoned for an offence.

Special Constable Coveney said that at 10.25 on the night of September 6th he was on duty in Dover Road when he noticed that light was emitted from the Railway Bell public house whenever the door was opened. He waited five minutes until closing time, when the doors were all opened and streaks went across the pavement.

Defendant told the Magistrates he had lowered the wattage of his lamps and had shaded all his lights. It could only have been a very small light that was emitted. He had since covered the doors with blankets taken off the beds.

Defendant was fined 10s.

 
Folkestone Herald 7-9-1940



Local News



At the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday the Magistrates granted a protection order to Mr. P.E. Wootton, of the Guildhall Hotel, Folkestone, in respect of the Martello Hotel, Dover Road. It was stated that Mr. R.L. Chapman, the licensee of the Martello, would shortly be going into the Army.


 
Folkestone Herald 24-4-1943



Local News



At Folkestone Police Court on Wednesday, the Magistrates agreed to the transfer of the licence of the Guildhall Hotel, Guildhall Street, from Mr. P.E. Wooton to Mr. R.P. Rawlings, of Messrs. Mackeson's, Ltd.


Note: This does not appear in More Bastions.

Alderman R.G. Wood pre­sided with Alderman J.W. Stainer, Mr. P. Fuller and Mr. P.V. Gurr.


 
Folkestone Herald 31-7-1943



Local News



For a breach of the Lighting Restriction Order, Mrs. Amy Wootton, of the Guildhall Hotel, was fined £1 by the Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday.


 
Folkestone Herald 6-1-1945

Local News

Four members of the R.A.F. Regiment who stole a firkin of beer from a Folkestone hotel were fined at Folkestone Magistrates’ Court last Friday. Alfred Jennings, Samuel Campbell, Stanley Jones and Stanley Kempson Boyle pleaded guilty to the theft of the barrel of beer, valued £2 12/6, the property of Mr. Ev P. Woottcn, licensee of the Guildhall Hotel. Jennings, who was further charged with stealing a glass tankard, valued at 2/3, denied the theft.

P.C. Farrier said at 10 p.m. on December 23rd he was in Rendezvous Street when he heard a disturbance coming from the passage by Messrs. Lewis Hyland's premises. By the light of his torch he saw two airmen, one carrying a firkin of beer on his back. He challenged them and the one who was carrying the beer dropped it and ran into Rendez­vous Street. He caught the other man (Jennings) and asked him where they had obtained the beer, and he replied “I will show you”. At the Police Station he searched Jennings and in his right hand overcoat pocket he found a mug which was later identified by Mr. Wootton as his property. Later he charged Jennings with stealing the mug and he replied "All I can say is this; in the pub I took off my over­coat and before leaving put it on again. I did not know the glass was in my pocket”.

Percy E. Wootton, licensee of the Guildhall Hotel, said shortly after 10 o’clock on December 23rd he found the firkin of beer was missing from the saloon on the public side of the bar. There was an exit from the saloon bar to the back of the Town Hall.

D. Sergt. Bates said on Decem­ber 24th he saw Jennings and told him that he was making enquiries about the theft of the brer. Defendant replied ‘’Yes. I was helping Campbell to take it away when the policeman came along”. Later he interviewed Camp­bell, and he said "During the evening I went down to the lavatory in the pub and helped some other men to take the beer outside. I don’t know who the other men were. I later told Jennings about it and we were taking it away when the policeman stopped us”. Witness next saw Jones, who said “I was in the pub with Campbell and Boyle and took the barrel from the bar and took it outside”. Later he saw Boyle, who said “Yes. I was with them. We took the barrel from the bar”.

Campbell said they had had some drinks that evening and what they did was more of a seasonable prank than anything else.

An officer said all the men had good characters.

The Chairman (Alderman N.O. Baker): You regard it more or less as a seasonable occurrence than anything else?

The officer: Yes, a seasonable prank.

The Chairman told the defendants they had done a very silly thing. Everybody knew it was Christmastime, but they belonged to the Air Force and should have thought before doing such a thing. They had given a lot of trouble, and had deprived the licensee of the beer at a time when it was in short supply.

Each would be fined £1, and Jennings a further 5/- for the theft of the mug.

Alderman Baker sat with Dr. Esme Stuart.


 
Folkestone Herald 24-3-1945



Local News

Two R.N. Commandos, Frederick James Edwards and Thomas Lee, appeared before the Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday charged with robbing with violence from L.A.C. Alfred Williams, and stealing his wallet containing £1, correspondence and a cigarette case, altogether valued at £2.

Defendants appeared before Alderman W. Hollands (presiding), Alderman N.O. Baker and Dr. Esme Stuart.

After evidence had been given by a detective officer, accused were remanded in custody until next Tuesday.

D. Const. Peck said on Saturday last at 11 p.m. he went to a billet in company with an officer, who checked the roll. On a landing he saw Edwards, dressed in underclothing, come out of his room and go to the lavatory. Shortly after Edwards returned to his room. A quarter of an hour later, accompanied by a duty officer and L.A.C. Williams, the complainant, witness again visited the billet, and in the seventh room they entered Williams pointed to three men, two of them being Edwards and Lee. Williams said “These are three of the men who were in the public house”, and indicating Edwards and Lee, he said “These are the two men who assaulted me”. Witness told defendants that the airman who had just been in the room had been assaulted and robbed of his wallet and cigarette case and that he had pointed them out as the persons responsible. Edwards immediately said “I don`t know anything about it”. Lee said “Nor me”. Witness then went to the lavatory to which he had seen Edwards go, and on the top of the cistern he recovered an empty wallet and a handkerchief. He showed the wallet to Williams and then went back into the room to show it to Edwards, telling him where he had found it, and that he had seen him (Edwards) go to the lavatory. Edwards said “I didn`t put it there”. The following day he charged defendants, and Edwards said “I had nothing to do with it because I was with Lee all the time, and we came back together. I never saw the airman after we left the Guildhall”. Lee said “I know nothing about it. I left the pub at closing time and we went back aboard with Edwards and the other two of our boys. I never saw the airman when I left the pub”.

As stated, defendants were remanded for a week.

 
Folkestone Herald 31-3-1945

Local News

Two R.N. Commandos were committed for trial at the next Kent Assizes when they appeared before Folkestone Magistrates` Court again on Tuesday, charged with robbing with violence Leading Aircraftsman Williams, R.A.F. Accused were Frederick James Edwards and Thomas Lee.

Mr. T.T. Cropper, who prosecuted, said it was alleged that defendants robbed Williams of a wallet containing £1 and a cigarette case. At the first hearing, added Mr. Cropper, D. Const. Peck gave evidence that he went to defendants` billet the same night, and there L.A.C. Williams identified defendants as the two men who had assaulted him. The Magistrates would also remember that while the detective was standing on a landing Williams, it was alleged, came out of his room and went across to a lavatory. Later in the lavatory an empty wallet was found.

L.A.C. Alfred Williams, R.A.F., said on March 17th at 9.10 p.m. he went to the Guildhall Hotel, Folkestone. Among those in the public bar were four R.N. Commandos, Edwards and Lee being among them. Witness was accompanied by L.A.C. Hignell. He left the hotel at 10 o`clock, hignell being in front, and Edwards was behind following Lee. He (Williams) was going to the Central Station to get a taxi. Edwards, who was standing outside with witness, called Lee, and the three of them walked along Guildhall Street. He was in the centre, and Edwards and Lee had an arm linked with his on either side. After they passed Moncrieff`s shop Edwards pushed him into a doorway. Holding witness, Edwards told Lee “to give it to him”. Edwards held him and Lee started hitting him about the face and head with his fist. Edwards`s arms were round him. Witness`s eye was blackened, and he was marked on the nose and the other eye by Lee`s blows. Edwards then said to Lee “Have you got the lot?”, referring to his wallet and cigarette case. Lee replied “Yes”. The case and wallet were taken from his tunic pockets. The wallet contained a £1 note. Edwards and Lee afterwards made off. As witness came out of the doorway he contacted a soldier, and about four minutes later he saw P.C. Harman to whom he reported what had happened. At the police station he received attention for his injuries. At about 11.30 that night he went with a detective to a building in which he visited several rooms. In one of them he identified Edwards, Lee and another Commando as having been in the Guildhall Hotel earlier. He also picked out Edwards and Lee as the men who had attacked him; neither defendant said anything. Afterwards he was shown his empty wallet by the detective.

By Edwards: From the time they left the public house to the end of the attack about 15 minutes had elapsed.

L.A.C. John Q. Hignell, R.A.F., said on the following day he attended an identification parade at the Town Hall. There were about eight R.N. Commandos lined up and he picked out two who were in the Guildhall Hotel the previous night. Edwards was one of those, but he could not be quite definite. Witness said he left the room and returned again later. On that occasion he picked out Edwards, Lee and another as having been in the public house the night before.

Able Seaman J. Kelly, R.N. Commando, said on the night of March 17th he was in the Guildhall Hotel. Defendants were also there. He left at 10 p.m., and as he was coming out of the bar a soldier pushed him. There was an argument for a time, and then witness started making his way back. He had walked about 30 yards from the public house when defendants came up behind him. On arriving at their billet they all turned in. Later a police officer visited the room. Before that witness had left the room, but he could not be sure whether anyone else had done so.

Replying to Edwards, witness said it was a fairly dark night.

P.C. Harman said at 10.10 p.m. on March 17th he was on duty in Sandgate Road when he was approached by Williams, who was bleeding from a cut on the bridge of his nose, and from another cut under the right eye.

Both defendants said they did not wish to make any statement at that stage.

The Magistrates committed defendants for trial at Kent Assizes, granting legal aid.

Alderman W. Hollands presided, with Alderman N.O. Baker and Dr. Esme Stuart.


 
Folkestone Herald 13-10-1945


Local News

The following licence was transferred at a sitting of the Folkestone Magistrates on Wed­nesday last week: Railway Bell, from Mr. Leonard Barker to Mr. Horace Justin Cornelius Reader.
Folkestone Gazette 25-4-1956
Local News

A heavy fireproof steel safe containing nearly £100 in cash, stolen from the Railway Bell public house, Folkestone, as dawn broke on Monday, was apparently smashed open with axes and a pick in an adjoining yard.

Residents in the neighbour­hood of the lock-up premises told the Gazette they were awakened by the noise of blows out did not pay much heed to them as they are accustomed to similar noises from the nearby Junction Station shunting yards. Other neighbours said the noise appeared to come from two or three men seen in the vicinity of the yard at the time who were seemingly chopping wood.

Police are anxious to receive information (other than that already obtained) from anybody who saw or heard anything be­tween 5 and 6 a.m. on Monday.

Discovery of the theft was made by a man who went to the yard around 6.30 a.m. for his car which he parked there overnight. The safe, the front of which then resembled a mass of twisted metal, was lying empty in the yard, and silver and copper coins were scattered around it.

The landlord, Mr. H. Reader, who lives nearby but does not reside on the premises, was in­formed and the police were im­mediately called.

The thieves apparently gained entry through a door of a room, at the rear of the bar, where the safe was kept in a comer. A wooden step at the back door was found to be broken, presumably by the weight of the safe, in the course of its removal to the yard. The room had been thoroughly ransacked and a Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund collect­ing box in the saloon bar had also been emptied.

Mr. Reader informed the Gazette that the safe con­tained nearly £100 in takings, thrift club money and old age pension token forms. Some wine appeared also to have been stolen or consumed from the bar, he said. “Several attempts to break in have been made in past years”, added Mr. Reader, but this is the biggest loss I have suffered”.

 

 

17th October 1940 saw a bomb hit the pub, shattering the upper story, which was subsequently removed and service continued within a few weeks, such being the resilience of people in such troubled times.

The 1950s saw a large family of more than 20 people called Durban frequent the pub and the pub obtained the unofficial local nickname of the "Durban Arms."

The 99 year lease having run out in 1961, Ind Coope decided to flatted the original building and a new one was built within the ground just behind the original and built from natural hardwoods and Kentish Ragstone was opened on 19th October 1961.

 

Folkestone Gazette 4-5-1960

Local News



Development consent has been granted for the erection of a new building to replace the war-damaged Railway Bell public house in Dover Road for Ind Coope (London) Ltd.



 
Folkestone Herald 28-5-1960



Local News



The Railway Bell public house, near Folkestone Junction Station, which is to be rebuilt and furnished at a total cost of £27,000, will be opened within the next year or 18 months.



This was stated at a licensing transfer sessions at Folkestone Town Hall on Wednesday, when the Justices approved plans for the building.



The Chairman, Mrs. D.M.T. Buttery, commented "We think it will be a great asset to that part of Folkestone”.



Submitting the plans, Mr. Gerald Block said the public house had been very badly damaged in the war, but there had been just enough of the old building left to enable the trade to be carried on in two bars under somewhat difficult condi­tions. The new building would be set back from the road to allow parking space for 15 cars. It would have two bars of approxi­mately equal size, with a small off-licence department.


Advert from Folkestone Herald 14-10-1961

Photo from Folkestone Gazette 18-10-1961


 
Folkestone Herald 21-10-1961



Local News



Twenty one years ago this week two German Messerschmitt 109s dive-bombed front line Folkestone. A public house and 19 houses were damaged in the raid on the afternoon of October 17th, in the second year of World War II.


The public house was the Railway Bell, in Dover Road. It was partially demolished by bombs which fell at the junction of Alexandra Street. Fortunately, the licensee, his wife and daughter were at a cinema. But the Railway Bell was only closed for a few weeks for first-aid repairs and then business was resumed as usual, although only the lower half of the building could be used. And thus it remained for 21 years. But on Thursday Group-Captain Bernard Carfoot, an executive director of Ind Coope, declared open a new Railway Bell – a contemporary public house with a light and colourful exterior.

There are two spacious bars and every effort has been made to retain the link with “railway”. Generations of railwaymen working at the Junction Station have used the “Bell”, and the association has not only been perpetuated but stressed in the decor of the new house. A feature is an enlarged line drawing in the saloon bar of one of Harry Wainwright`s old South Eastern and Chatham Railway “D” Class locomotives, which were current from 1900 – 1912. The handsome lines of the 2-4-0 locomotive were a familiar sight on the railway to Folkestone. And now No. 273, drawn to scale by the late Mr. J.N. Maskelyne, is in the British Transport Museum at Clapham.

Saloon and public bars, and a home sales shop, occupy the ground floor of the pleasant building, incorporating in its construction natural hardwoods and Kentish ragstone. On the first floor is a spacious three-bedroom flat for the tenants, Mr. And Mrs. Harry Reader, who since 1945 have commuted between the Railway Bell and a private house.

The remains of the old building will disappear within the next fortnight to provide a car park for 15 vehicles.

Photo from Folkestone Herald 21-10-1961

Photo from Folkestone Gazette 25-10-1961

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

From the Folkestone Gazette, 25 October, 1961.

Licensees Harry and Elsie Reader 1961

When the reconstructed "Railway Bell," Dover Road, was opened on Thursday, Mr. Harry Reader, the licensee, pulled the first pint for a director of Ind Coope Ltd., the landlords, in the centre is mrs. Elsie Reader. The Railway Bell was badly damaged by a hit and run raider's bomb on October 17th, 1940. The new house is attractive contemporary style.

 

Folkestone Gazette 17-5-1967

Local News

Mr. Leonard Barker, of 14, Segrave Road, Folke­stone, retired licensed victualler, who died in March, left £12,491 gross, £12,416 net. Duty paid was £745. Probate has been granted to his niece, Miss Winifred M. Barker, of 10 Hurst Avenue, Horsham, and nephew Walter E.J. Barker, of 148, Comptons Lane, Horsham. He left £500 and certain effects to Mrs. Dorothy M. de Vere, if still in his employ at his death and not under notice; £50 to Dr. Fritz Ewer, of Greenoaks, Military Road, Sandgate, “for his kindness and attention to my late wife during her long and painful illness”; and £25 to the Rev. Gethin-Jones, late of The Vicarage, Sandgate.

 
Folkestone Gazette 19-2-1975



Obituary



Mrs. Elsie Reader, landlady of the Railway Bell public house in Dover Road, Folkestone, for almost 30 years, has died, aged 81. Mrs. Reader was born in Elham, and her husband took over the public house in 1945. A funeral service at Hawkinge was conducted by the Reverend W. Foster.







Photo from Folkestone Herald 11-2-1978 Shows Railway Bell 19-10-1940


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

From the Folkestone Gazette, 25 March, 1975.

Local News.

Harry Reader 1975

Landlord Harry Reader believes he is the longest serving publican in Folke­stone. He retires soon after having been mine host of the Railway Bell, Folke­stone, for 30 years. Mr. Reader, aged 67, has been given a good send-off by his Ind-Coope col­leagues. Eight Folkestone publicans got together and presented Harry with an inscribed clock at a surprise meeting in the saloon bar of the Railway Bell on Wednesday. When he moves to a new home at East Cliff, Folke­stone, he plans to spend his time gardening and taking photographs.

 

South Kent Gazette 22-11-1978



Local News



Empty tankards brought few cheers at four Folkestone pubs when beer kegs and bottles ran dry. Regulars had to make do with fruit juice and spirits as a result of a brewery workers` strike at Ind Coope. The brewery supplies local pubs including the Black Bull, Nailbox, Morehall and Railway Bell from its Aylesham depot. After missing three deliveries, pub supplies dwindled last week to nothing.



One landlord said his trade had been cut by 50 per cent, and another claimed his darts league and pool players had turned to lemonade and Coke.



Now customers will be finding what their right arms are for again. The 14 workers at Aylesham agreed to return to work yesterday. A spokesman for the brewery said the strike by a total of 1,750 production and distribution employees was over a pay claim. Most of the other workers agreed to return to work on Monday.


South Kent Gazette 25-11-1981



Local News



Cheers ten times over was the cry when a group of sponsored walkers set out on a pub crawl to help the Kent Association for the Blind. Ten pubs were visited, and on Thursday walk organiser, postman Dave Garrod, handed over a bumper cheque for £1,210 to association deputy secretary Les Ellis.



Mrs. Olive Hallett, landlady of the Railway Bell, in Dover Road, Folkestone, received an award for the most cash raised. Her customers collected over £350. It was a double night of success for the pub, with regular Mike Kingston winning an award as the highest individual money-raiser by raking in £222.



 
South Kent Gazette 27-4-1983

Gravesend Crown Court

After being struck in the face with a broken bottle by a man in a pub, Michael Reece needed 25 stitches in his wounds, a court heard.

Sean Coyne, 23, and Mr. Reece were playing pool in the Railway Bell in Dover Road, Folkestone. Trouble broke out as they chalked up their names, Gravesend Crown Court was told on Tuesday. Before it finished Coyne had broken an empty bottle and hit Mr. Reece in the face.

Mr. Simon Buckhaven, prosecuting, said that according to Coyne the incident started when Mr. Reece nudged him. Coyne started a short fight and another and another brief fight outside the toilets was stopped by one of the pub`s customers. Later Coyne picked up an empty bottle from a crate, and broke it against a toilet wall. He rushed past the publican into the bar and struck Mr. Reece in the face with it. Before the two men were eventually separated there was more fighting. Mr. Reece was taken to hospital with wounds on his face and neck. Seen by police, Coyne, who bore some bruises, admitted being involved in fighting, but at first denied using a bottle. Next day he admitted what had happened, and said “He was antagonising me. He really got on my back. I have never been so mad in my life, and I just did it”.

Coyne, of Tyson Road, Folkestone, admitted wounding Mr. Reece on February 4 last year. His Not Guilty plea to a charge of intending to cause grievous bodily harm was accepted.

Sentence was postponed for a psychiatric report and Coyne was bound over until then.

For Coyne, Mr. Elikkos Georghiades said he had been epileptic since boyhood and showed signs of possible brain damage. Further reports were necessary before sentence was passed, both in the public interest and Coyne`s own, he submitted.


 
Folkestone Herald 9-12-1983

Local News

A cheque for more than £1,000 was handed over to the Kent Association for the Blind on Thursday, thanks to the efforts of local postman David Garrod and a band of thirsty walkers. The money was raised during a charity pub crawl organised by Mr. Garrod in August, when 84 people went on a 10 mile trek from Folkestone to Hythe and back, boozing all the way. They visited ten pubs en-route with varying amounts of sponsor money riding on them.

After handing the cheque to K.A.B. representative Mr. John Crook at the Railway Bell in Dover Road, Folkestone, Mr. Garrod said he was delighted with the result. It was the third year running that the sponsored crawl, which has now become an annual event, has raised more than £1,000. He said he had first held the walk in 1978 when just himself, his wife and a couple of friends took part. They raised £70, but it started the postman thinking about the fundraising potential of such an event. Now he is determined to continue the yearly crawl, but says next year it will be held in July rather than August to avoid clashing with a number of other sponsored events which are held in the town.



 
Folkestone Herald 23-8-1985

Local News

Angry about missing a ferry, Adrian Hall hurled a stool through the window of a pub, a court heard last Wednesday.

Thirty-year-old Hall was preparing to leave the Railway Bell pub in Dover Road, Folkestone, after having a couple of drinks in the saloon bar. He picked up his haversack, shouted some­thing, then picked up a stool and threw it through a side window. Landlord Edward Hallett and some customers chased Hall, said Jackie Morey, prosecuting at Folkestone Magistrates’ Court. Mrs. Morey said she understood Hall got into the back of a lorry and stayed there until the police arrived. After seeing Hall hiding in the parked lorry, they took him to the police station and questioned him. Asked why he threw the stool he said it was bad temper caused by the frustrations of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. He was then asked if he had missed a ferry or something. He replied “Yes” and said that he should have been in Germany. Told he could have hit two elderly women sitting near the window, Hall said he did not mean to hit anyone, he aimed at the window Mrs. Morey said Hall had already given Mr Hallett £20 towards the £56.75 cost of repairing the window.

Hall, who comes from Devon, admitted des­troying the window. He was given a one-year conditional discharge and ordered to pay £36.75 compensation.


 
Folkestone Herald 5-6-1987



Local News



Regulars of the Railway Bell Pub in Dover Road, Folkestone, recently completed a marathon darts game where the final score totalled 323,000,064. A team of 10 people including licensees Mike and Wendy Roberts spent an exhausting 12 hours playing, starting at 11 a.m. in the morning and continuing until 11 p.m. closing time. Around £500 was raised from the game, and this will be donated to the Les Adams appeal, an International Charity - which will finance a holiday for handicapped children.



 
Folkestone Herald 28-8-1987

Local News

The British Heart Foundation was £200 richer this week thanks to the efforts of regulars at a Folkestone pub who played pool for 12 hours. Six regulars at the Railway Bell, Canterbury Road, were sponsored by family and friends. The marathon match started at 11 a.m. and ended with the last orders bell at 11 p.m. that night. Mike Roberts, landlord of the pub said “It was a good turn out especially as there was lots going on in Folkestone that same day”. Mike chose the British Heart Foundation as the charity as his father-in-law suffers from a heart condition. Mike and his wife Wendy are moving to Scotland at the end of the week so they can be nearer to him.


 
Folkestone Herald 11-3-1988



Local News


Red-faced pool player Keith George is still squirming about the day he stopped the yellow ball from jamming the table. For he got his hand trapped in the pocket of the pool machine and became the centre of a full-scale rescue operation while his mates just carried on playing. Pub regular, Keith, of Westbourne Gardens was trying to stop a yellow ball that kept getting stuck in the machine, from falling into one of the holes. But when he put his hand down it got painfully lodged and wouldn’t come out. Watching the spectacle was a full house at the Railway Bell pub in Dover Road on Saturday. People had packed in to see the local band Tom and Jerry. Relief manager Sylvia Colboume tried washing-up liquid but with no suc­cess, so the fire brigade was called. Eventually Keith was cut free and was taken to William Harvey Hospital for treatment to his hand.





 
 
 
 

From the Folkestone Herald 24 June 1988.

Local News.

Darts 1988

Still smiling after 24 hours of continuous darts, the ladies of the Railway Bell on Dover Road were on double top form last Saturday. Landlady Susan Bridle and her team of hardy players started their marathon at 8 p.m. on Friday night. They raised £90 in a raffle, and hope for another £500 from sponsorship. The hard-earned money is to go to the William Harvey Hospital baby care unit and to the National Schizophrenia Fellowship Folkestone Group.

Susan Bridle said “We stayed out of the Telethon fever because we felt that our efforts would be swallowed up in the masses and would not have a noticeable local effect. We are hoping to present the money personally when we have collected it. We were all very pleased with the way the event went, although we’re a bit stiff now”.

 

Folkestone Herald 19-5-1989



Local News



Our super readers lost their hair and their dignity to help raise over £2,000 for the Herald`s William Harvey Appeal. The fun began when students from South Kent College took to the streets in weird and wonderful outfits for a sponsored walk from Folkestone to Hythe, Over 130 joined in and those who didn`t handed over £3 “fines”.



Meanwhile at the Railway Bell in Folkestone, landlord George Bridle organised a fund fun night, with regulars lining up to have their heads shaved, wrestle with an Alsatian or play one-armed pool. He said “The ladies with the razors were a bit nervous, and quite a few plasters were used –but it was all good clean fun”. George himself was one of the sponsored baldies, and he added “It`s a bit cold now, but the best thing is you can wash your face all over. The only trouble is, I don`t know where to start when I have a shave in the mornings”.



The pub was packed right through to closing time, and new sponsors were continually found and promises of money soared to more than £1,000. Organisers also ran a raffle with prizes ranging from French lagers to Hagar the Horrible T-shirts. George added “The whole evening was one big party, and the pub was just teeming with people enjoying themselves. But the most important thing is the amount of money raised. Everyone was great and we are all over the moon with the cash we collected. Thanks everyone”.


 
Folkestone Herald 20-7-1990


Local News

Shepherd Neame has bought four pubs in Shepway from Ind Coope. It was part of a £5.85 million deal for 33 public houses in Kent, London and the south east. The pubs taken over in Shepway are: Britannia Inn, Shorncliffe; Harvey Hotel (sic), Folkestone; the Nailbox, Shorncliffe; and the Princess Royal, Folkestone.

Note: It was Railway Bell and not Harvey Hotel.


 
Folkestone Herald 30-10-1992

Local News

The manager of a pub has been left baffled by the theft of his sign.

Michael Lowe, who runs the Railway Bell in Dover Road, Folkestone, locked up as usual on Saturday night and put his clocks back. An hour later his wife thought something outside was missing, and when Mr. Lowe checked the sign had gone. “God knows where it`s gone”, said 46-year-old Mr. Lowe. “It was 15 feet off the ground and it took two men to get it up there. It must have been well planned. Whoever took it had to get a ladder, unbolt it and lower it down. If it had just blown down in the high wind and someone had picked it up it would have hit one of the cars parked nearby first. But nothing was heard or seen by anyone. It`s a complete mystery why anyone would want it, unless they`re a connoisseur or railway freak”.

The 4ft x 3ft. Sign, which Mr. Lowe said was worth £250, was hand-painted by an artist and had only been up for two months. It depicts a steam engine, the Railway Bell, on a red background.



 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Shepherd Neame took charge of the house on 11th July 2002, but decided to close the place some time around 2008. It is now boarded up if not demolished. Local knowledge would be appreciated here, for me to be able to update the page.

 

Latest news I have been informed about is the premises is now (November 2012) operating as a Tesco Express.

 

LICENSEE LIST

HAYTOR C, WORMSTER G, & DRUMMOND J 1863-65 Bastions

MORET Joseph 2/Jan/1865-68 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

WILLOWS John 1868-69 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

FLUX Robert 1874 Post Office Directory 1874

HEAVENS Frederick 1874 Bastions

ANGELL James 1874-75 Bastions

NAVE Theodore 1875-79 Bastions

PHILLIPS George 1879-80 Bastions

CHARLTON Henry 1880-83 (age 57 in 1881Census) Dover ExpressPost Office Directory 1882

PILCHER Richard 1883-86 Bastions

COLLINS George 1886-95 Next pub licensee had Post Office Directory 1891More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney To Rendezvous

SMILES Joseph George 1895-1901+ Next pub licensee had (age 42 in 1901Census) Kelly's 1899Later Shakespeare Hotel

TUNBRIDGE James 1901-05 Post Office Directory 1903From Guildhall Tavern

SAUNDERS Joseph Sidney 1905-11 Census

HOARE George 1911-22 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyPost Office Directory 1913Post Office Directory 1922Ex Oddfellows Arms

CLARKE John 1922-23 Bastions

BEANE Francis 1923-24 Bastions

BROWN Joseph 1924-27 Bastions

LEIGH Albert 1927-29 Bastions

RICHARDSON Peter C 1929-35+ More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyKelly's 1934

GUMBRELL George 1935-42 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyPost Office Directory 1938

GUMBRILL Maude 1942 Bastions

Last pub licensee had BARKER Leonard 1944-45 Next pub licensee had More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

READER Horace "Harry" 1945-75 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

HALLETT Edward 1975-86 More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

GILL Patrick 1986 Bastions

PARISH Paul & BEEDON Arthur 1986-87 Bastions Arthur Beedon Also Black Bull 1985-87

ROBERTS Michael & BEEDON Arthur 1987 Bastions

BRINDLE George & CLARK Edward 1987-1990 Bastions Also Black Bull 1987-90

BRINDLE George & BLYTH Simon 1990-91 Bastions Simon Blyth Also Black Bull 1990-94

PEEKS Allen & LOWE Michael 1991-93 Bastions Allen Peeks Also Master Brewer

RUDYARD John & Malcolm 1993 Bastions John Rudyard To Master Brewer

COLE Rodney & Lynn 1993-96 Bastions

LYNES Derek & Angela 1996-97 Bastions

BETTS Steve 1997 Bastions

TUNNEY Francis & Bridget 1997-2002 Bastions

HAWARD Steven & Christine 2002-03 Bastions

GALLAGHER Anthony & HAYWARD Stacey 2003-04+ Bastions

http://www.closedpubs.co.uk/railwaybell.html

 

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1891From the Post Office Directory 1891

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Post Office Directory 1903From the Post Office Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Post Office Directory 1922From the Post Office Directory 1922

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

More Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and RooneyMore Tales from the Tap Room by Easdown and Rooney

Dover ExpressFrom the Dover Express

BastionsFrom More Bastions of the Bar by Easdown and Rooney

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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LINK to Even More Tales From The Tap Room